Hawaiian Songwriting Retreat August 2-4, 2013

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is offering a three-day Hawaiian music songwriting retreat for just $25, from Friday, Aug. 2 through Sunday, Aug. 4 with Hawaiian music, language and haku mele (Hawaiian song) experts Kenneth Makuakāne and Kaliko Trapp-Beamer.

Kenneth Makuakane

Kenneth Makuakane

The Friday, Aug. 2 workshop runs from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Sat., Aug. 3 and Sun., Aug. 4 both begin at 8 a.m. and finish at 4 p.m.

Advance registration required. To register, contact Elizabeth Bell at (808) 985-6019 or email Elizabeth_bell@nps.gov no later than July 25.

The retreat will be held in the park at the summit of Kīlauea. Budding songwriters will find inspiration in this wahi kapu (sacred place), among the towering koa and ‘ōhi‘a lehua trees, over fields of ropy pāhoehoe lava, and in the awe-inspiring eruptive glow from Halema‘uma‘u Crater.

Also inspirational are the retreat’s accomplished teachers. Kenneth Makuakāne is a multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano award winner, along with his group, The Pandanus Club. He’s a prolific songwriter (1,500-plus songs), producer of more than 100 albums, and collaborator who has worked with virtually all of the stars of Hawaiian music over the years.

Kaliko was raised as the hānai son of Hawaiian cultural expert Aunty Nona Beamer (1923-2008), learning Hawaiian chant, storytelling, traditional protocol, family songs, and stories. He currently teaches Hawaiian language courses at the University of Hawai‘i in Hilo, and helps coordinate the Beamer Family Aloha Music Camp. He is the President of the Mohala Hou Foundation dedicated to “preserve and perpetuate Hawaiian culture through education and the arts.”

The three-day Hawaiian songwriting retreat is sponsored by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association.

 

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park July 2013 – Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Programs

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in July. All programs are free, but park entrance fees may apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Hawaiian Hula Presented by Haunani’s Aloha Expressions. This entertaining hula group is comprised of native Hawaiian kāne and wāhine kūpuna, or elders, ranging from 70 to over 90 years old. For years, they have shared the aloha spirit by welcoming malihini (visitors) on cruise ships arriving at the Port of Hilo, and at Hilo International Airport.

The kūpuna also entertain on a regular basis for the patients at the Life Care Center of Hilo, Hale ‘Anuenue, Extended Care, Hawai‘i Island Adult Day Care, Aunty Sally Kaleohano Lū‘au House Senior Program and more. They won overall at the Kūpuna Hula Festival with the song, Tutu E. They also won the Moku o Keawe competition on numerous occasions. They make all of their own colorful costumes and lei, singing and dancing hapa-haole hula and have performed at the park’s annual cultural festival on numerous occasions. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.

When: Wed., July 17 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

A train with the Hawai‘i Consolidated Railway plies the rails between Hilo and the Hamākua Coast. Photo courtesy of the Laupāhoehoe Train Museum.

A train with the Hawai‘i Consolidated Railway plies the rails between Hilo and the Hamākua Coast. Photo courtesy of the Laupāhoehoe Train Museum.

All Aboard! The Laupāhoehoe Train Museum (www.thetrainmuseum.com) mission is to emphasize the history of railroads in Hawai‘i and to preserve, promote, and protect the community interests of the Hilo-Hamākua Coast.  Many visitors – and residents – are surprised to learn that there were trains in Hawai‘i.  Learn the history of the Hawai‘i Consolidated Railway (the only standard gauge train in the islands), the impact of the 1946 tsunami, and the development of the train museum which started in 1995.  Museum treasurer Doug Connors will discuss the history of the railroad on the island of Hawai‘i, the sugar plantations, and the development of the Hamākua Coast. Free.

When: Tues., July 30 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

 

November After Dark in the Park Programs at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors throughout November.  These programs are free, but park entrance fees may apply. Mark the  calendar for these upcoming events:

The Statues Walked: Revealing the Real Story of Easter Island. Rapa Nui, or Easter Island, is widely known as a case study of human-induced environmental catastrophe resulting in cultural collapse. However, a closer look at the archeological and historical record for the island reveals that while an environmental disaster unfolded, the ancient Polynesians persisted.

Dr. Terry Hunt (NPS Photo)

Join Dr. Terry Hunt as he discusses The Statues That Walked: Unraveling the Mystery of Easter Island, a book he co-authored with fellow archeologist Carl Lipo. In this presentation, Dr. Hunt outlines the evidence for the island’s astonishing prehistoric success, and explores how and why this most isolated and remarkable culture avoided collapse. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Nov. 13 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kalapana ‘Awa Band in Concert.  Enjoy a memorable evening listening to the gentle voices of Sam Keli‘iho‘omalu, Ipo Quihano, and Ikaika Marzon, group members who are all ‘ohana from Kalapana and have been playing together for more than 10 years. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Weds., Nov. 21 at 6:30 p.m. (doors open at 6:15 p.m.)
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Whose Footprints Are These Really? Research suggests the story behind the fossilized human footprints in the Ka‘ū Desert may be more complex than originally thought.

Whose footprints are these? (NPS Photo)

Footprints found in desert ash layers were believed to have been created in 1790 by the army of the Hawaiian Chief Keōua on their way back from battle. While in the area, Kīlauea is said to have erupted, sending suffocating ash down on one group. Others made it out alive, leaving their footprints in the then-wet ash. The ash dried, forever memorializing this event…or did it? Join Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura as she examines fascinating geologic evidence that may indicate much more prehistoric activity in the area. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Nov. 27 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

7th Annual Moku O Keawe International Hula Festival Flourishes

The 7th Annual Moku O Keawe International Hula Festival, November 1-3, 2012 at Waikoloa Beach Resort, offers something special for everyone who loves Hawaiian culture.  Along with the Festival’s three nights of exciting international hula competition at Waikoloa Bowl at Queens’ Gardens, is an extensive Made-in-Hawai‘i Marketplace at Waikoloa Beach Marriott Resort & Spa.

Beamer-Solomon Halau O Po’ohala at the MOKIF 2011 competition (Photo Aaron Yoshino)

Moku O Keawe also promotes cultural education through a series of hands-on workshops in hula kahiko and ‘auwana, chant, cordage, ipu-making and more. One of Hawaii’s most distinctive hula events, Moku O Keawe is an educational, entertaining and engaging experience for visitors and residents to enjoy on many levels.

International competition, Waikoloa Bowl at Queens’ Gardens.   Moku O Keawe brings together hālau from Hawai‘i, Japan, Mexico, the U.S. Mainland and elsewhere with top caliber hula competition in Hula Kahiko, Hula ‘Auwana, and Kupuna divisions, group and solo.  Competition nights feature live music onstage and Mistress of Ceremonies, KAPA radio personality Ka‘ea Alapa‘i.  Affordable for everyone, Moku O Keawe tickets are only $5 Lawn seating, $15.00 Reserved. (Ticketmaster fees additional.  Beach chairs and mats welcomed!)

Cultural Workshops.  The hula competition judges—Nalani Kanaka‘ole, Ed Collier, Iwalani Kalima, Nalei Napaepae-Kunewa–are asked to share their knowledge through workshops.  As masters, their insights and experiences are offered on a personal basis, allowing participants an opportunity to learn about hula kahiko and hula ‘auwana, as the various lineages of the kumu hula are unique forms in style, repertoire, and interpretation.  Registration is limited and students are urged to register early by visiting www.MOKIF.com.

Hawai‘i Marketplace, Waikoloa Beach Marriott Resort & Spa.  The Made-In-Hawai‘i Marketplace features a wide variety of some of the best products from 35 Island of Hawai‘i vendors, including Hula implements, fresh lei, silk-screened clothing, woven lauhala hats and purses and jewelry.

“A plethora of knowledge of Hula – both ‘auwana and kahiko – has been shared via Moku O Keawe International Festival,” said designer Kuha‘o Zane.  “Implements, costuming, chants, a sense of place, and most importantly, we share our unique perspective of Hawaiian thought.  We remember all who have brought us to this point and have firmly planted the pillars of knowledge for the next generation to build upon.”

“Much like the light rain that falls on to the ʻōhiʻa, gathering within the tips of the lehua blossoms, and dripping down to nourish the tap root—this year’s design embodies the process of our lehua, gathering the moisture that will promote proper growth by nourishing the taproot.  We flourish,” he said.

The Moku O Keawe International Festival is sponsored by the Moku O Keawe Foundation, a private nonprofit organization dedicated to enhancing, enriching and educating the practice and development of hula and its associated arts. For information and tickets to events, visit www.MOKIF.com

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park – May Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Program

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors throughout May.  Most programs are free (except where noted), and park entrance fees apply. Mark your calendars for these upcoming events:

Kapoho: Memoir of a Modern Pompeii. Award-winning author Frances H. Kakugawa shares the stories of her life in the town of Kapoho, which was engulfed by lava during the 1960 eruption. Born and raised in Kapoho, Kakugawa’s precise recall in Kapoho: Memoir of a Modern Pompeii (Watermark Publishing, 2011) helps remind us of the beautiful innocence of youth and the realities of growing up poor in Hawai‘i. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free. When: Tues., May 1, 7 p.m. Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

The Kāpili Choir

Kāpili Choir: Concert on Kīlauea. Kāpili Choir, the premier vocal ensemble of the University of Hawai‘i-Hilo under the direction of Dr. Matthew Howell, will perform an evening concert described as an eclectic blend of gospel, early American and contemporary Hawaiian choral arrangements. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free. When: Tues., May 8, at 7 p.m. Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

 

Oral Abihai

Hawaiian ‘Ukulele Demonstration. Join Oral Abihai as he shares his passion for making ‘ukulele from discarded or naturally fallen pieces of wood. Learning only several years ago in Lahaina from Kenny Potts, he has since made more than 50 ‘ukulele. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free. When: Wed., May 9 from 10 a.m. to noon Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Hālau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu ma Kīlauea

An Evening of Hula and Hawaiian Music. Come witness some of the traditions of Hālau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu ma Kīlauea, under the direction of kumu hula Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia. The evening begins with a humble vocal supplication for inspiration and grace. Observe the method of adorning oneself for dance as the novice ‘ōlapa (dancer) prepares for the hula. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free. When: Wed., May 16, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.  Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

i‘e kuku

Kapa Workshop. Join Park Ranger Joni Mae Makuakāne-Jarrell and create your own one-foot piece of kapa (bark cloth). The class is free, and materials are $20. Kona-born practitioner and artist Kauhane Heloca will assist you as you design and create your own kapa implements. The class is free, but implement materials are $300. This includes four implements: kua (wooden anvil), i‘e kuku (square beater), hohoa (round beater) and niho ‘oki (shark tooth knife). Space is limited to 30 students. To reserve your space, contact Joni Mae at joni_mae_makuakane-jarrell@nps.gov, or call 985-6020 by May 7. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops When: Sat., May 26 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Where: Park’s Education Center

The Historic Hawaiʻi Foundation Honored Herb Kawainui Kāne as its 2011 Kamaʻāina of the Year

The Historic Hawaiʻi Foundation honored Herb Kawainui Kāne as its 2011 Kamaʻāina of the Year for his contributions in reviving Hawaiian culture as an artist, historian, and author. As one of the founders of the Polynesian Voyaging Society, Kāne was instrumental in the revival of non-instrument navigation, which had been lost in Hawaiʻi for centuries.

Following traditional designs, the deep-sea canoe Hōkūleʻa first travelled to Tahiti in 1976. In the subsequent years, the vessel linked the islands of the Pacific and will soon circumnavigate the globe.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/W_8UnYE-JN0]

This revival of ancient wayfinding inspired a cultural reawakening among Native Hawaiians as interest in hula, language, education, arts, and self-determination flourished. Although he is most well known for fantastic paintings depicting ancient Hawaiʻi, Kāne’s greatest legacy is his influence on the generations of Hawaiians who continue to practice their culture.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s 31st Annual Cultural Festival Coming Up

Media Release:

The 31st annual Cultural Festival will happen Sat., July 9 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s Kahuku Unit, in the Ka‘ū District. The event is free and is a wonderful way to celebrate Hawaiian culture with top Hawaiian entertainment, hands-on cultural demonstrations, local food, crafts and much more.

Ohe Hano Ihu demo

The Kahuku unit is located south of the main entrance to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on the mauka side of Hwy. 11, between mile markers 70 and 71. There is no admission fee at Kahuku or the main park on July 9, in honor of this popular annual festival.

“Join us at Kahuku, a dynamic, young volcanic landscape, steeped in history and a rainbow of land and life. This festival is our gift to the local communities that support Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and its programs, and to our visitors, so we can share the culture and aloha of our island and this special place,” said Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando.

The festival’s theme, He ali‘i ka ‘āina. He kauwā ke kanaka (The land is the chief. Man is its servant) is visualized in artist Dietrich Varez’s rendering of the ‘ua‘u, the endemic Hawaiian petrel.

This year’s theme, He ali‘i ka ‘āina. He kauwā ke kanaka (The land is the chief. Man is its servant) is visualized in artist Dietrich Varez’s rendering of the ‘ua‘u, the endemic Hawaiian petrel. This endangered Hawaiian seabird nests in the subalpine region of Mauna Loa, where Park resource managers monitor their habitat in hopes of increasing the small population within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s Kahuku Unit.

Varez’s artwork on festival T-shirts this year depicts the ‘ua‘u and its compelling lifecycle, including a lone chick in a pāhoehoe pit nest awaiting its parents’ arrival, a pair of soaring ‘ua‘u, the marine life they feed upon, the pūkiawe shrub (which grows in the area), and an active volcano. T-shirts will be available for sale at the festival.

Kenneth Makuakane demonstrates ukulele basics

Hawaiian entertainment will include hula performances by Hālau Ulumamo o Hilo Palikū and Haunani’s Hula Expressions, and notable Hawaiian musicians Joseph Nahale, Kenneth Makuakāne, falsetto singer Kai Ho‘opi‘i, and Aunty Diana Aki and friends.

Learning to make lauhala bracelets

Learn how Hawaiians lived, played and created, and use those skills today, through numerous cultural demonstrations by skilled Hawaiian practitioners. Lei making (feather and plant), Hawaiian canoe building, ‘ukulele lessons, ulana lauhala (pandanus weaving), nā pā‘ani (Hawaiian games), nā mea mala (native plant gardening), and lā‘au lapa‘au (how to identify and use local medicinal plants), are just a few of the interactive demonstrations participants can learn about.

Wear sunscreen and a hat. Bring water, rain jacket, and ground mat or chair. No pets.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park was established on Aug. 1, 1916 as a public park for the enjoyment of the people. An important purpose of the 333,086-acre park is to perpetuate Hawaiian culture. Since 1980, the park’s annual cultural festival has provided an ideal occasion for young and old, for kama‘āina (native born) and malihini (newcomers), to come together for a fun and exciting day of sharing of traditional customs and values.

Co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority, Hawai‘i Natural History Association, Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Kīlauea Military Camp.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Celebrates Merrie Monarch Festival with FREE Hawaiian Programs April 27 – 29

Media Release:

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park will celebrate the 48th annual Merrie Monarch Festival by offering Park visitors free ‘Ike Hana No‘eau (Experience the Skillful Work) Hawaiian cultural programs and live Hawaiian music Wednesday through Friday, April 27 – 29.

Keiki Hāliko and Hi‘ilei Hauanio wearing lei.

Keiki Hāliko and Hi‘ilei Hauanio wearing lei.

All programs are offered free of charge at the Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai
from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. (Park admission fees apply.)

Immerse yourself in Hawaiian culture through these fun programs:

Nose Flute Workshop. Join Park Ranger Adrian Boone and volunteer Ed
Shiinoki and create your own ‘ohe hano ihu, or bamboo nose flute.
Singer/songwriter Rupert Tripp, Jr. will also perform.  When: Wed., Apr.
27; 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Lei Making. Patricia Kaula and her daughter Lehua Hauanio will share the
art of lei making. Hawaiians use lei for blessing crops, adornment for hula
dancers, in healing and sacred rituals, and much more. Lei can be made from many items, including leaves, flowers, shells and seeds. When: Thurs., Apr. 28 and Fri., Apr. 29, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Feather Kahili Making. Join the Makuakāne ‘ohana as they share the arts of
Hawaiian culture.  Violet May and daughter Helene will demonstrate the art
of making a feather kahili, a symbol of royalty. Join them and make your
own kahili to take home. Singer/songwriter Kenneth Makuakāne will play
original songs from his solo albums, The Dash and Makuakāne. When: Thurs.
Apr. 28 and Fri. Apr. 29, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Create Ahu Lā‘ī.  Ahu Lā‘ī, or ti leaf capes, were fashioned by attaching
individual stems of the ti leaf to a net mesh. It was worn over the
shoulders to protect the wearer from driving winds and rains. Join Park
Ranger Jason Zimmer as he shares his knowledge and skills in making a cape, or better yet, try your hand and add a few leaves to the cape. When: Thurs. Apr. 28 and Fri. Apr. 29, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Hawaiian Economic Sovereignty by Office of Hawaiian Affairs Trustee Peter Apo

OHA Trustee Peter Apo talks about the economic power the ali’i trusts, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, and the Department of Hawaiian Homelands have now — and how they can use it for the benefit of ALL the people of Hawai’i.

[youtube=youtube.com/watch?v=vHVlUNdiEfs]

Hawaiian Cultural Experts Offer Insights To Hospitality Industry Managers and Employees

Presented April 6-7 by the Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association (NaHHA).

Media Release:

Hawaiian cultural experts Peter Apo, Margo Harumi Mau Bunnell, Kumu Keala Ching, and Donna Wheeler, will present valuable insights into Hawaiian culture for hospitality industry managers and employees at the Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association (NaHHA) Ola Hawai’i workshops April 6-7.

The speakers will share knowledge on a range of topics including “Understanding Hawaiian Values” and “Where to Find Real Hawaiian Culture.”

  • Peter Apo is a songwriter-musician, President of Mamo Records and a Trustee of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. He was a founding member of NaHHA and was Special Assistant on Hawaiian Affairs to former Governor Ben Cayetano.
  • Margo Mau Bunnell is the Sales and Operations Manager for Queens MarketPlace at Waikoloa Beach Resort and CEO of the Moku O Keawe Foundation.
  • Kumu Keala Ching is a Hawaiian cultural educator, composer and spiritual advisor to Hawaiian organizations. He is fluent in the Hawaiian language and is Kumu Hula for Ka Pa Hula Na Wai Iwi Ola.
  • Donna Wheeler has over thirty years of experience in the Hawaii hotel industry having served in operations, sales and marketing capacities, representing over 60 hotels and resorts on the Hawaiian islands of O’ahu, Maui, Kaua’i, Hawai’i Island and Moloka’i; as well as New Zealand, Guam, Saipan, and Thailand.

The two-day learning experience will explore the value of hosting, managing visitor information and sales and marketing strategies with a special focus on Hawaiian traditions and culture.

Also speaking at the workshop will be:

  • Veronica Puanani Claveran – Director of Rooms, Keauhou Beach Resort
  • Owana Wilcox-Likiaksa – Human Resources Coordinator, Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Joann Nanea Perreira-Machiguchi – Catering Sales Manager, Hawai`i Prince Hotel
  • April Ke`ala Kadooka – Learning Manager, Four Seasons Hualalai

The Ola Hawai’i workshop will be held on April 6-7 from 9am – 5pm at the Keauhou Beach Resort, Keauhou , Hawai’i Island.

Enrollment is limited and participants need to register by March 28. The cost, which includes lunch on both days, is $60.

For more information, visit nahha.com

For registration or questions, contact Pamela Davis-Lee at 808-628-6375 or pam@nahha.com

The Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association (NaHHA) is dedicated to the promotion and perpetuation of Hawaiian culture and traditions. Its mission is to promote Hawaiian culture, values and traditions in the workplace through consultation and education, and to provide opportunities for the Native Hawaiian community to shape the future of tourism.

Moku O Keawe Foundation Announces 6th Annual International Hula Festival

Media Release:

The sixth annual Moku O Keawe International Hula Festival will take place November 3-5, 2011 at Waikoloa Beach Resort on the Big Island’s Kohala Coast.  The Festival, presented by Moku O Keawe Foundation, features topnotch women’s hālau from Hawai‘i, the Mainland USA, and Japan, competing in kahiko, ‘auana and kupuna divisions, solo and group.

Members of halau Kekaiaulu Hula Studio perform during the 2010 Moku O Keawe Hula Competition at the Queen Gardens Waikoloa Bowl at the Waikoloa Beach Resort

In keeping with the Foundation’s educational mission, intensive, hands-on workshops in hula and related arts, and excursions to cultural sites, offer a deeper experience.  Taught by noted cultural practitioners, the classes include dance, chant, crafting of musical instruments and more.

In addition, Moku O Keawe’s extensive Hawai‘i Marketplace gives participants many opportunities to see, touch, smell and taste made-in-Hawai‘i products from island vendors.  Lei of various styles, hula implements, aloha wear and jewelry, fine arts, woodworks, woven items and others will be available for sale.

The Moku O Keawe International Festival is sponsored by the Moku O Keawe Foundation, a private nonprofit organization.  Dedicated to enhancing, enriching and educating the practice and development of hula and its associated arts, the purpose is to build, strengthen and inspire the living cultural traditions of Hawai‘i.  Major supporters include Hawaii Tourism Authority/Hawaii County CPEP, Waikoloa Beach Resort, Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Native Arts and Cultures Foundation, Louis Vuitton, Big Island Candies, Queens’ MarketPlace, Kintetsu International Hawaii, Waimea Music Center.

For information and tickets to events, visit www.MOKIF.com.

Moku O Keawe Foundation Receives Grant From Office of Hawaiian Affairs

Media Release:

The Moku O Keawe Foundation has been awarded a $10,000 Community Event Grant from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA).  Funding will be used to continue their mission of Hawaiian cultural education, and present the 5th Annual Moku O Keawe Festival.

“We are extremely grateful to OHA for their support and the confidence they show in Moku O Keawe Foundation,” said President Sherron Rosenberger.  “It is exciting and inspiring to see the living Hawaiian culture grow and expand around the world through hula and the arts of hula.  And as that happens, it is even more important for organizations to work together—not only to reach a broader audience, but to share our messaging in the most respectful, authentic and meaningful way.”

The 5th Annual Moku O Keawe Festival concluded November 7 at Waikoloa Beach Resort, with 15 participating hālau from Hawaii and Japan competing in wahine hālau and pakahi (solo) hula kahiko, ‘auana and kupuna divisions.  The hula competition was coordinated by Kumu Hula Nani Lim Yap.  Other events included a made-in-Hawaii marketplace and closing night Hō‘ike starring workshop students and special appearance by Kumu Hula O’Brian Eselu and the men of Ke Kai O Kahiki, Merrie Monarch Winners.  An intensive workshop series, organized by Hawaii designer Sig Zane, featured classes in Ipu Heke (double gourd drum), Lauhala Weaving,‘Il‘ili and an excursion to the historic site at Mahukona for a workshop with Nā Kumu Hula Howard and Olana A‘i.  Workshops in hula were taught by Nā Kumu Hula Nalani Kanaka‘ole, Kaleo Trinidad and Uluwehi Guerrero

Other Moku O Keawe sponsors include Waikoloa Beach Resort, Louis Vuitton, Native Arts & Cultures Foundation, Creative Arts, Hawaii Tourism Authority, Waimea Music Company, Big Island Candies, Sushi Shiono, County of Hawaii, KAPA, Vitamin Water and Kintetsu International Hawaii.

The Moku O Keawe International Festival is an annual celebration of the rich Hawaiian culture, produced by the Moku O Keawe Foundation, a private nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to enhancing, enriching and educating the practice and development of hula and its associated arts to build, strengthen and inspire the living cultural traditions of Hawai‘i.  For more information, visit www.MOKIF.com