Free Educational App – “Talking Trees”

The Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu project has developed and released a free educational app for the iPhone and Android called Talking Trees.

The Talking Trees app features suggested stops on Hawai‘i Island that offer the opportunity to learn about the culture and history of the island through stories of the ‘ulu (breadfruit). Information is conveyed through photos, articles and video interviews with local cultural practitioners. For people who want to learn how to cook with ‘ulu, the app also features award-wining breadfruit recipes. Other links include information about how to cultivate and use breadfruit and Hawaiian mythology.

Ag app

“The goal for us in creating the app is to engage people in the culture, history and current uses of breadfruit,” says Craig Elevitch, Co-Director of the Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu project. “In addition to being a great food, there are so many fascinating Hawaiian stories about life as it relates to the ‘ulu. So much of Hawaiian mythology is relevant to life today.”

The Talking Trees app was developed with support from the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority’s Kūkulu Ola—Living Hawaiian Culture Program administered by the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement. A corresponding enhanced Google map was developed with support from the Atherton Family Foundation. Ho’oulu ka ‘Ulu is a project of the Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network and the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden.

Learn more and download the app at breadfruit.info, or from the iTunes stores.

 

Puna Ulu (Breadfruit) Festival Goes Nuts – Ulu a Niu

The Second Annual Puna ‘Ulu Festival—‘Ulu a Niu will be held on Saturday, March 2, 2013 from 9 am – 3 pm at Ho‘oulu Lāhui, the site of Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School at Pū‘āla‘a, adjacent to the ‘Āhalanui County Park warm ponds in Puna. The event is free and open to the public. The Puna ‘Ulu Festival—‘Ulu a Niu will celebrate ‘ulu (breadfruit) and niu (coconut) with a cooking contest, breadfruit trees and coconut palm trees for sale, presentations, keiki activities, cultural demonstrations, music all day with Diane Aki, Bruddah Cuz and Ili Wai, and local food featuring breadfruit and coconut.

The day will begin at 9 am with an opening pule by Kumu Hula Auli‘i Mitchell followed by a message from Governor Neil Abercrombie delivered by his representative Wendy Botelho-Cortez.

The buffet lunch will feature gourmet dishes by Casey Halpren of Café Pesto, Kanoa Miura of Aloha Mondays, and Mark Noguchi of Pili Hawaii and Taste. The tentative menu includes Fried ‘Ulu Croquettes, Braised Big Island Beef, Vegetable Curry, Heart of Palm Slaw with Coconut Mayo and ‘Ulu Chocolate Cookies.

Auntie Shirley Kauhaihao of Ke‘ei, South Kona, will be demonstrating how to select and prepare ‘ulu fruit. (Photo by Craig Elevitch)

Auntie Shirley Kauhaihao of Ke‘ei, South Kona, will be demonstrating how to select and prepare ‘ulu fruit. (Photo by Craig Elevitch)

Cultural activities include ‘ulu and kalo poi pounding with Uncle Jerry Konanui and ‘Anakala Isaiah Kealoha, kapa making with ‘ulu bark by experts Wesley and Lehua Sen, crafting of pahu drums from coconut with Keone Turalde, coconut weaving, and making cordage from coconut fiber with Larry Kuamo‘o. Keiki activities include games, face painting and block printing. Micronesians United will present traditional Micronesian preparations of ‘ulu with coconut milk. Demonstrations of how to make coconut milk will be held throughout the day. Local coconut water, fresh out of the coconut, will be for sale.

This year the festival is called ‘Ulu a Niu and will feature fresh coconut water for sale and cultural and horticultural activities related to niu (coconut) such as making of coconut milk, coconut palms for sale, crafting of pahu drums from coconut with Keone Turalde, coconut weaving, and making cordage from coconut fiber with Larry Kuamo‘o. (Photo by Craig Elevitch)

This year the festival is called ‘Ulu a Niu and will feature fresh coconut water for sale and cultural and horticultural activities related to niu (coconut) such as making of coconut milk, coconut palms for sale, crafting of pahu drums from coconut with Keone Turalde, coconut weaving, and making cordage from coconut fiber with Larry Kuamo‘o. (Photo by Craig Elevitch)

Learning how to cook ‘ulu and niu in new and traditional ways is one of the highlights of the festival. Cooking demonstrations will be given by local favorite Chef Mark Noguchi aka “Chef Gooch”; Shirley Kauhaihao will show how to select and prepare ‘ulu fruit; Dr. Nat Bletter, Chocolate Flavormeister of Madre Chocolate will be demonstrating how to make exquisite deserts from ‘ulu and niu; the Kua O Ka Lā students culinary arts class will present their award-winning spicy ‘ulu poke and raw foods experts Laura Dawn and Noah Dan will demonstrate how to make ‘ulu tortillas with a variety of sauces.

The public is invited to compete in the ‘Ulu a Niu Cooking Contest in which the public can enter recipes in the categories of Appetizer, Main Dish/Entrée and Dessert. Entries must include both ‘ulu (breadfruit) and niu (coconut), but the main ingredient must be ‘ulu. Prizes will be awarded for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place in each of these categories and for Healthiest Choice and Best in Show. Breadfruit Cooking Contest rules and entry forms can be found at www.breadfruit.info.

The public is invited to compete in the ‘Ulu a Niu Cooking Contest and can enter recipes in the categories of Appetizer, Main Dish/Entrée and Dessert.  Pictured is the 2012 Best of Show winner, Pūnana Cookies, by Raven Hannah and Jeremy Lutes. (Photo by Craig Elevitch)

The public is invited to compete in the ‘Ulu a Niu Cooking Contest and can enter recipes in the categories of Appetizer, Main Dish/Entrée and Dessert. Pictured is the 2012 Best of Show winner, Pūnana Cookies, by Raven Hannah and Jeremy Lutes. (Photo by Craig Elevitch)

Educational presentations about the cultural and horticultural aspects of breadfruit and coconut round out the event. Kua O Ka Lā students will present a need assessment of the importance of ‘ulu and niu in the community. Kumu Ryan McCormack will give two cultural presentations: ‘Ulu: A Hawaiian Perspective and Niuolahiki—The Life Giving Coconut. Noa Kekuewa Lincoln of Stanford University will present his original research on Kaluulu—the Ancient Kona Breadfruit Grove. Agroforestry expert Craig Elevitch of Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network will speak about Home Gardens—Pasifika Style. Dr. Diane Ragone and Ian Cole of the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden will be on hand to answer questions and will give presentations on Breadfruit and Sustainability and ‘Ulu from Root to Fruit: Tree Planting, Care and Maintenance. A tree planting with Leila Kealoha will commemorate the event.

Keiki activities at the Second Annual Puna ‘Ulu Festival—‘Ulu a Niu include games, face painting and block printing. (Photo by Craig Elevitch)

Keiki activities at the Second Annual Puna ‘Ulu Festival—‘Ulu a Niu include games, face painting and block printing. (Photo by Craig Elevitch)

The Puna ‘Ulu Festival is presented by Ho‘oulu Lāhui, Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School, Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network, the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden. The festival is sponsored by the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority’s Kūkulu Ola—Living Hawaiian Culture Program administered by the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement, Doc Buyers Fund at Hawaii Community Foundation, Kamehameha Schools, Suisan, Aloha Mondays, Madre Chocolate and Café Pesto. The Second Annual Puna ‘Ulu Festival—‘Ulu a Niu is a part of a larger statewide effort to revitalize breadfruit for food security called Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu. Learn more about the Puna ‘Ulu Festival by visiting www.breadfruit.info or call 965-5098.

Governor Abercrombie Appoints Annelle Amaral to Hawaii Paroling Authority

Gov. Neil Abercrombie today announced the appointment of Annelle C. Amaral to the Hawaii Paroling Authority, effective immediately.

Annelle Amaral

Annelle Amaral

The interim appointment fills a new seat in compliance with Act 139 of the 2012 Legislature, which increased Hawaii Paroling Authority members from three to five. Subject to state Senate confirmation, Amaral’s term will expire June 30, 2015.

“Annelle’s breadth of experience is as impressive as it is diverse, ranging from state Legislator to Native Hawaiian cultural liaison to motorpatrol officer, all of which will provide valuable insight and the necessary perspective critical to her duties on the Hawaii Paroling Authority,”said Gov. Abercrombie.

From 1988 to 1996, Amaral served in the state House of Representatives, where she served as Majority Floor Leader, vice chair of the Judiciary and Housing Committees, and chair of the Women’s Legislative Caucus.

For more than a decade, Amaral has provided community facilitation, strategic planning and community coordination for a wide range of government agencies, businesses and organizations. From 2008 until recently, she worked as a Native Hawaiian liaison to the Garrison Commander, U.S. Army Hawaii, providing information, coordination and direction on matters relating to Army and Native Hawaiian concerns.

Previously, Amaral was director of public affairs for Planned Parenthood of Hawaii from 2002 to 2008, as well as special projects coordinator on projects relating to domestic violence for Legal Aid Society of Hawaii from 1999 to 2001.

During the Ariyoshi Administration, Amaral coordinated the Governor’s Executive Order for the Affirmative Action program on a statewide basis, provided technical assistance to departments in the executive branch and served as a liaison with federal compliance agencies. She also worked as a coordinator for the Coalition Against Sexual Assault, a program administrator for YWCA Hawaii, an assistant administrator for the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, a motorpatrol officer for the Honolulu Police Department, and a private investigator.

Amaral is a former state Senate President-appointed member of the Hawaii State Judicial Selection Commission; first vice president of the Association of Hawaiian Civic Clubs, Oahu Council; and board member of the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement. She is a past president and founder of Ahahui Siwila Hawaii O Kapolei; past chair of the Oahu County Committee of the Democratic Party of Hawaii; former chair and member of the Hawaii Coalition Against Sexual Assault; and past chair of the Women’s Legislative Coalition.

Her extensive accolades include being the Women’s History Month Honoree of the State Commission on the Status of Women (2011), as well as the recipient of the Patsy T. Mink Award of Excellence (2009), Lei Hulu Mamo Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native Hawaiian Business Association (1999), Legislator of the Year from the Hawaii Psychological Association (1991), and Officer of the Year from the International Association of Women Police Officers (1981).

Amaral, who resides in Honolulu, earned her bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Dayton, Ohio.

 

Certified Volunteers Help “Low to Moderate” Income Taxpayers Prepare and File Their Taxes for Free at the Hawaii State Capitol

Media Release:

In collaboration with the Hawai’i Alliance for Community-Based Economic Development (HACBED) and its affiliates, state lawmakers hosted one of many free tax preparation clinics this tax season, on Saturday, January 29, 2011, for low- to moderate-income taxpayers to have their state and federal taxes prepared and filed for free with the help of IRS-certified volunteers. For those receiving a refund, they expect to have their funds soon after February 18, 2011.

Lawmakers with HACBED volunteers at the Capitol tax preparation clinic

The event was part of HACBED’s Family and Individual Self-Sufficiency Program that offers free tax preparation sites statewide. To locate other free tax assistance sites, taxpayers can call Aloha United Way’s Helpline at 2-1-1. For a complete list of tax sites on Oahu, Big Island, Maui, and Kauai, and more information about HACBED’s Family and Individual Self-Sufficiency Program, taxpayers should visit the Program’s website at www.hawaiitaxhelp.org.

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