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May Day Distress Call Prompts Coast Guard to Rescue Five From Capsized Vessel Off Sand Island

The Coast Guard rescued five mariners from a capsized vessel approximately one mile from Kalihi Channel, Oahu, Sunday.

At 3:39 p.m., watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Honolulu received a mayday call over VHF channel 16 from the owner of a 21-foot recreational vessel that overturned off Sand Island.

CLICK TO HEAR MAYDAY DISTRESS CALL

A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew from Station Honolulu arrived on scene at 3:52 p.m., rescued the five people and transferred them to Ke’ehi Lagoon.

Coast Guard 45-foot Response Boat

Coast Guard 45-foot Response Boat

“This case had a happy ending because they had a working VHF radio on board their vessel,” said Lt. Patton Epperson, command duty officer at Sector Honolulu. “As soon as this vessel used their radio to call mayday, followed by their position and a description of the boat, we were able to send a rescue boat directly to their location.”

The Coast Guard advises all mariners to carry appropriate safety equipment to include a VHF radio, lifejackets and flares. Maritime accidents can occur quickly and without warning and mariners should take appropriate steps to be prepared. For more information on boating safety, mariners can visit www.uscgboating.org.

A commercial salvage company removed the vessel from the water.

For more information, contact the 14th Coast Guard District Public Affairs office at (808) 535-3230.

 

Coast Guard Rescues Three More off Oahu After Boat Capsizes

Three men were rescued from their 28-foot capsized vessel approximately six and a half miles southwest of Kaena Point, Oahu, Sunday.
A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

Rescued were Jason Barlow, 34-years-old, Todd Larsen, 42-years-old, Stephen Humphreys, 28-years-old.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Honolulu received a distress call at 6:30 p.m., Saturday, from the girlfriend of the the master of a 28-foot recreational vessel stating he and his friends were overdue from an ahi fishing trip.

At approximately 10 p.m., Saturday, Sector Honolulu launched an HC-130 Hercules airplane crew and two MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crews from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point, a 45-foot Response Boat – Medium crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu, the Coast Guard Cutter Morgenthau and the Coast Guard Cutter Galveston Island to search their last known location. The Honolulu Fire Department also assisted in the search by providing a fire boat crew and helicopter crew.

At approximately 8:30 a.m., Sunday, the Dolphin crew located two of the men sitting on top of the hull of their overturned vessel while the other man clung to the hull in the water. A Coast Guard aviation survival technician was lowered and all three men were safely hoisted into the helicopter and transported to back to the air station where emergency medical services were standing by to assist.

All three men were wearing their life jackets and only minor injuries were reported.

“We have had several recreational vessels capsize lately due to various causes,” said Jennifer Conklin, a search and rescue specialist at the Joint Rescue Coordination Center Honolulu. “We conducted a search and rescue case just yesterday with a capsized vessel. They activated their emergency positioning indicating radio beacon and our rescue helicopter was able to fly directly to them without searching. Both crews survived but one group spent over 20 hours overnight in the water. Mariners that provide detailed float plans with friends and family, have registered EPIRB’s and are prepared for the worst can really take the search out of search and rescue.”

The Coast Guard recommends all mariners ensure they are prepared before heading out on the water. This includes having appropriate safety and communications equipment, checking local weather conditions and ensuring the vessel is seaworthy. For more information on boating safety visit www.uscgboating.org.

Three Men Rescued After Boat Capsizes Off Oahu

Three men were rescued from their capsized vessel approximately 14 miles off Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Friday.

US Coast Guard HH65 Dauphine

US Coast Guard HH65 Dauphine

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Honolulu received a distress call at 7:20 p.m., from a man who received a text message from his three friends who said their 23-foot boat had capsized and they needed to be rescued.

Sector Honolulu launched an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point and diverted the Coast Guard Cutter Kiska to respond. At the same time, Joint Rescue Coordination Center Honolulu also received a distress signal from the capsized vessel’s emergency position indicating radio beacon that gave an exact position of the capsized vessel.

Using the information from the text message and the EPIRB, the Dolphin crew arrived and found one man sitting on the hull of the capsized vessel and the two other men floating in the water. A Coast Guard aviation survival technician was lowered to the vessel and all three men were safely hoisted into the helicopter and transported to back to the air station where emergency medical services were standing by to assist.

All three men were uninjured.

“It cannot be overstated how important working safety gear is when heading out onto the ocean,” said Lt. Kevin Cooper, Sector Honolulu’s public affairs officer. “The position received from this vessel’s emergency position indicating radio beacon was a key factor in getting rescuers to the exact location of these men who were in distress. The EPIRB took the search out of this search and rescue case”.

The capsized boat remains adrift and the Coast Guard issued a safety broadcast to alert mariners of the hazard to navigation.

The Coast Guard recommends all mariners ensure they are prepared before heading out on the water. This includes having appropriate safety and communications equipment, checking local weather conditions and ensuring the vessel is seaworthy. For more information on boating safety visit www.uscgboating.org.

There are no photos or video available of this rescue.

 

Hawaii Fishing Vessel Catches Fire – Coast Guard Rescues Three After Abandoning Ship

The Coast Guard rescued three men who were forced to abandon ship after their vessel caught fire Friday.

Agency spokesman Shawn Eggert says the crew of the 35-foot Honolulu-based vessel Havana called for help early Friday, saying they were abandoning the ship. The unidentified men donned their survival suits and the helicopter found them in a life raft near the burning vessel.

The fishing vessel Havana burns approximately 17 miles west of Cannon Beach, Ore.,

Coast Guard Sector Columbia River in Warrenton, Ore., received a Mayday call from the crew of the fishing vessel Havana at approximately 6 a.m.  The crew reported the vessel was burning 17 miles west of Cannon Beach, Ore., with three people on board.

An HH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Air Facility Newport, Ore., was dispatched to the scene along with a 47-foot motor lifeboat crew from Station Tillamook Bay.  The three men were found in a life raft near the vessel and hoisted into the helicopter, which took them to Sector Columbia River.  All three men were uninjured.

The 47-foot motor lifeboat crew remained on scene to monitor the burning vessel, and search for signs of pollution.  The vessel was reported to have 900 gallons of diesel fuel and 50 gallons of hydraulic oil on board.

“The Havana’s captain attended a safety drill conductor course in Newport last year,” said Mr. Dan Hardin, 13th Coast Guard District Fishing Vessel Safety Coordinator.  “What he learned during that course may very well have saved his crew’s lives today.”