Coast Guard, HFD Rescue 20 Fishermen From Aground Vessel Off Honolulu

Twenty fishermen were transported to shore from an aground vessel less than a half mile off Honolulu early Wednesday morning.

 

Honolulu Fire Department Jet Ski crews transported fishermen from the vessel to a Coast Guard 45-foot Response Boat-Medium for further transport to awaiting emergency responders at Ala Wai Harbor. A Coast Guard MH-65 helicopter crew hoisted two of the fishermen and the master of the vessel and transported them to Honolulu airport.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Honolulu received three reports of the 79-foot commercial fishing vessel Pacific Paradise grounded off Diamond Head near the Outrigger Canoe Club Channel Tuesday night. They responded by directing the launch of response assets.

The RB-M crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu arrived on scene at 11:48 p.m. Tuesday followed by an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point at midnight. HFD Jet Ski, boat and shore crews also arrived on scene.The Pacific Paradise is homeported in Honolulu and the vessel’s last port of call was American Samoa. No injuries were reported.

The vessel is carrying a maximum of 13,000 gallons of diesel as well as assorted lube and hydraulic oils. No pollution has been reported. Further evaluation will be done after first light.

The Coast Guard is investigating the cause of the grounding. Responders will work with the owner to assess damage and develop a salvage plan.

Weather at the time of the incident was reportedly winds at 11 mph, seas 1-foot or less with partly cloudy skies.

Three Men Rescued From Sinking Vessel Off The Big Island

Three men were rescued from a sinking vessel 6 miles off the Big Island this morning:

Situation Found at Scene: 3 adult males in their 60’s clinging to a partially sunken 22 ft. fishing vessel 6-miles offshore. The victims were able to contact the Coast Guard and Hawaii Fire Department who collaborated to execute the rescue of the three men utilizing Rescue Boat 7 out of the Kailua-Kona Fire Station. The three men were evaluated by Medic 12 out of the Keauhou Fire Station and released.

Remarks: The three men were able to utilize their cell phones to call for help and visually make their position known to Rescue Boat 7. Rescue Boat 7 personnel made contact with the victims who were able to signal and respond to rescue personnel directives to help identify each other in the early morning darkness. All three men had lifejackets and were with the vessel on arrival of the Rescue team. According to the victims, they were in the water for approximately an hour and a half. None of them were injured. Rescue Personnel left lights attached to the vessel to alert other boats of the Navigational hazard.

Coast Guard Saves 6 People Off Maui

The Coast Guard rescued six people from a 27-foot vessel taking on water off Maui, Saturday.
Coast Guard Station Maui launched a 45-foot Response Boat-Medium and arrived on scene at 3:10 p.m. took the Makali’i in a stern tow and the crew aboard. They were safely towed to Kihei boat ramp where a post search and rescue boarding revealed no violations.

The Coast Guard rescued six people from taking on water in their 27-foot pleasure craft off Maui, September 9, 2017. Coast Guard Station Maui launched a 45-foot Response Boat-Medium safely towing the vessel to Kihei boat ramp where a post search and rescue boarding revealed no violations. (U.S. Coast Guard Photo/Released)

“This crew did everything right to be prepared and assist responders.” said, Petty Officer 1st Class William Cusic, search and rescue coordinator at Coast Guard Sector Honolulu. “They called in as soon as they began taking on water, donned their lifejackets and deployed their anchor. We also recommend anytime you are on the water you take provisions and you leave word with family or friends about your voyage.”

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector Honolulu command center received a report via VHF radio channel 16 from the master of the vessel around 1:30 p.m. The master reported they were taking on water at an unknown rate and the Makali’i’s crew was bailing water by hand in addition to the on board dewatering pumps. The water level was neither increasing nor decreasing.

Sector Honolulu issued an urgent marine information broadcast notice to mariners and directed the launch of the Station Maui RB-M.

On scene weather was reported as east winds approximately 11 mph with waves less than one-foot .

UPDATE: Coast Guard Rescues All Who Abandoned Ship South of Hawaii

The Coast Guard successfully coordinated the rescue of 42 people who abandoned ship when their fishing vessel American Eagle caught fire approximately 1,800 miles south of the Hawaiian Islands, Wednesday.American Eagle Fishing LLC

An HC-130 Hercules airplane crew from Air Station Barbers Point arrived on scene at 5:10 p.m. (HST), established communications with the fishing vessel’s crew and dropped a dewatering pump, flash lights and flares.

Fong Seong 888, a Tuvalu-flagged oil tanker, arrived on scene at 5:30 p.m. (HST) to offer additional assistance.

The captain of the American Eagle reported smoke had lessened from the disabled fishing vessel and boarded the vessel with eight crew members to suppress the fire. The captain reported the fire extinguished and the vessel to be in stable condition. The team of nine were able to restart the generator, reestablish electricity and maintain communication. The remaining 33 crew members were successfully recovered from their life rafts, work boats and skiff by the Fong Seong 888.

American Eagle’s sister ship, American Victory, is en route and expected to arrive in three days to relieve the Fong Seong 888.

The crewmembers aboard 258-foot U.S.-flagged fishing vessel abandoned ship at 10 a.m. (HST) into two life rafts, three work boats and one skiff. An emergency position-indicating radio beacon was activated and continues to transmit information.

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Joint Rescue Coordination Center in Honolulu received notification from the vessel’s company American Eagle Fishing LLC at 8:38 a.m. (HST) of a fire aboard the vessel.

No injuries have been reported.

Coast Guard Responds to Report of Flares Off Maui – Rescues Mariner

The Coast Guard rescued a mariner aboard a disabled 18-foot recreational vessel following a report of four red flares off Maui Thursday night.

Cadets and crew aboard Coast Guard Cutter Eagle fire pencil flares off the fantail of the ship as part of a pyrotechnics training session Saturday, July 4, 2009. In recognition of the national holiday, everyone aboard also participated in the Square-Rigger Olympics, pyrotechnics training, and karaoke on the ship's waist later that night. (U.S. Coast Guard photo/Petty Officer 2nd Class Etta Smith)

Cadets and crew aboard Coast Guard Cutter Eagle fire pencil flares off the fantail of the ship as part of a pyrotechnics training session Saturday, July 4, 2009. In recognition of the national holiday, everyone aboard also participated in the Square-Rigger Olympics, pyrotechnics training, and karaoke on the ship’s waist later that night. (U.S. Coast Guard photo/Petty Officer 2nd Class Etta Smith)

A Station Maui 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew located the mariner during a search 5 miles west of Kihei and towed the vessel back to Maui.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Honolulu received a report of three red flares off Kihei around 9:23 p.m. A fourth flare was sighted by Maui Fire Department personnel from the shoreline shortly after.

The watchstanders launched an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Air Station Barbers Point and the RBM crew from Maui to respond. The RBM crew sighted the mariner and confirmed he launched the flares before towing him back to Kihei.

“This mariner did everything right with his flares and the case illustrates the importance of having proper emergency gear aboard your vessel,” said Charles Turner, of Coast Guard Sector Honolulu. “In addition to required flares and flotation we recommend mariners have multiple forms of communication with them including a handheld VHF-FM radio, charged cellular devices and a properly registered personal locator beacon if possible. It’s State law to have a VHF radio on your boat if you’re more than a mile offshore. Communications can be a challenge around the islands and not all devices may have consistent coverage. It’s also a good idea to leave word with friends or family about your voyage and when you intend to return so they can alert responders if you are overdue.”

Flares should never be used as fireworks as they may prompt a Coast Guard search. If you are conducting flare training please contact the Coast Guard to advise them of the location and time of the training to deconflict any search and rescue calls. Flares are especially useful at night and burn red or white. Mariners who choose to further mark their location and signal with chemical lights are asked to use red colored lights as the typical yellow and green and very hard for rescue crews to detect with night vision goggles.

VOG Causes Kayaker to Get Lost Crossing From Maui to Big Island

The Coast Guard is responding to a kayaker in distress off Big Island, Tuesday.

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector Honolulu Command Center received notification at 6:29 p.m. via cell phone from a kayaker approximately 19 miles northeast of Kohala, Big Island. The 38-year-old man was en route Big Island from Maui when he reportedly lost sight of the island due to volcanic smog and drifted off course.

Watchstanders were able to triangulate his signal with the aid of Hawaii County Police Dispatch to determine his location.

An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew and HC-130 Hercules airplane crew from Air Station Barbers Point diverted from training flights to the kayaker’s location. The Coast Guard Cutter Kiska, homeported in Hilo, is en route to assist.

The HC-130 Hercules crew arrived on scene at 7:15 p.m. and dropped a radio and lifejacket to the kayaker. The kayaker has no other life saving equipment aboard.

Due to depleted cell phone battery, the Hercules crew dropped a radio to establish communication with the kayaker.

Mariners should always carry essential safety equipment when heading out on the water to include a VHF marine radio, lifejacket and flares. VHF radios have the advantage of reaching all vessels within the broadcast range simultaneously. Cell phones only provide one-to-one communication and are an unreliable emergency communication method when offshore. Mariners are also advised to use and register an emergency position-indicating radio beacon or personal locator beacon. For more information on EPIRBs, visit www.epirb.com.

Ten Rescued After 60-Foot Voyaging Canoe Sinks Near Palau

The Coast Guard, in coordination with the Republic of Palau Division of Maritime Law Enforcement and the Royal Australian Navy Maritime Surveillance Advisor, partnered to provide assistance to the Republic of Palau in the rescue of 10 mariners from the Philippine Sea, approximately 103 miles northeast of Palau, Monday.

Coast Guardsmen aboard a small boat from the 110-foot Coast Guard Cutter Washington assist in transferring 10 canoeists, who were saved by the cargo vessel Hyundai Unity, March 4, 2013, approximately 103 miles off the coast of Palau. The Coast Guard, in coordination with the Republic of Palau Division of Maritime Law Enforcement and the Royal Australian Navy Maritime Surveillance Adviser, partnered to provide assistance to the Republic of Palau in the rescue of the 10 mariners from the Philippine Sea. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Coast Guardsmen aboard a small boat from the 110-foot Coast Guard Cutter Washington assist in transferring 10 canoeists, who were saved by the cargo vessel Hyundai Unity, March 4, 2013, approximately 103 miles off the coast of Palau. The Coast Guard, in coordination with the Republic of Palau Division of Maritime Law Enforcement and the Royal Australian Navy Maritime Surveillance Adviser, partnered to provide assistance to the Republic of Palau in the rescue of the 10 mariners from the Philippine Sea. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Using a satellite telephone, a crewmember aboard a 60-foot voyaging canoe contacted officials at the Palau Community College and indicated the vessel was breaking apart and sinking, at 6:30 a.m. Chamorro Standard Time, Monday.

After receiving the call, the college officials contacted the appropriate Palauan Agencies in accordance with their National Search and Rescue Plan, who requested assistance from the U.S. Coast Guard in accordance with a long-standing Memorandum of Understanding under the Compact of Free Association.

The mariners in distress began their trip aboard the 60-foot traditional sailing canoe, traveling from Palau to the outer islands of Yap State, in the Federated States of Micronesia. The vessel had 10 crewmembers aboard, including students from the Palau Community College. Aboard the canoe were two Americans, seven Palauans and one Japanese citizen.

Coast Guardsmen aboard a small boat from the 110-foot Coast Guard Cutter Washington assist in transferring 10 canoeists, who were saved by the cargo vessel Hyundai Unity, March 4, 2013, off the coast of Palau. The Coast Guard, in coordination with the Republic of Palau Division of Maritime Law Enforcement and the Royal Australian Navy Maritime Surveillance Adviser, partnered to provide assistance to the Republic of Palau in the rescue of the 10 mariners from the Philippine Sea. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Coast Guardsmen aboard a small boat from the 110-foot Coast Guard Cutter Washington assist in transferring 10 canoeists, who were saved by the cargo vessel Hyundai Unity, March 4, 2013, off the coast of Palau. The Coast Guard, in coordination with the Republic of Palau Division of Maritime Law Enforcement and the Royal Australian Navy Maritime Surveillance Adviser, partnered to provide assistance to the Republic of Palau in the rescue of the 10 mariners from the Philippine Sea. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

The Coast Guard launched the 110-foot Cuter Washington to assist in the rescue and requested long range aircraft support from the U.S. Navy’s Combined Task Force 72, located in Kadena, Japan. The Coast Guard also contacted the crew aboard the Panamanian-flagged vessel Hyundai Unity, who was in the vicinity of the distress location. The vessel crew diverted from their course toward the distress position.

The crew of the Hyundai Unity spotted the individuals at 11:32 a.m. and began the process of rescuing the crew members. The Washington’s crew met up with the Hyundai Unity crew to safely transfer the 10 canoeists and take them to Palau.

This successful response was greatly assisted by the foresight and planning of the vessel crew, who filed a detailed float plan prior to departing, and maintained a full suite of lifesaving equipment, including a satellite telephone and personal flotation devices for each person aboard.

For more information contact Lt. Justin Valentino, at Coast Guard Sector Guam, at 671-355-4824.