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Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry Completes Fisheries Enforcement Patrol Off Hawaii

The crew of Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry (WPC 1124), a 154-foot Fast Response Cutter homeported in Honolulu, recently completed a 10-day patrol of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone in the Hawaiian Islands region. They conducted six boardings on Hawaii-based, U.S.-flagged long-line fishing vessels and issued eight safety and fisheries regulations violations.

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry (WPC 1124) crew conducts a boarding from their 26-foot over-the-horizon small boat in the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone off Hawaii, Dec. 19, 2017. The crew was on their first Living Marine Resources patrol since commissioning the vessel Oct. 31. (U.S. Coast Guard photo/Released)

“Oliver Berry is ideally suited for challenging offshore conditions in the Main Hawaiian Islands. The crew performed admirably in the heavy seas we encountered and when launching and recovering our standardized small boats from the stern to conduct boardings. We are specifically designed for several missions including search and rescue and fisheries enforcement. We greatly improve the Coast Guard’s on water presence with more range and operational hours over our predecessor, the 110-foot patrol boats,” said Lt. Kenneth Franklin, commanding officer, Oliver Berry.

Oliver Berry’s crew enforced fishery regulations in the region, to ensure the estimated $7 billion industry, which provides more than half of the global tuna commercial catch, remains sustainable. Boarding teams also ensured crews are in compliance with federal and state regulations regarding all required lifesaving equipment. Citations were issued when applicable, requiring master’s to correct discrepancies. This is a critical role in the Coast Guard’s mission to preserve a natural resource, highly migratory fish stocks, essential to the fishermen and economy of not only the United States, but many Pacific nations.

On Dec. 19, while conducting a boarding of a U.S.-flagged longline fishing vessel, the boarding team suspected a foreign national was acting as the vessel captain and operating the vessel. The operation of a U.S.-flagged commercial fishing vessel by a foreign national is illegal. After an investigation, the vessel was cited for the alleged manning violation also known as a paper captain and the evidence was forwarded to the Coast Guard Hearing Office for further review and possible legal action. The penalty for operating with a paper captain once their documentation has been voided is a civil fine of up to $15,000 per day.

The Oliver Berry crew also hosted several members of the Hawaii County government and the Hilo-based Navy League during a port visit in Hilo. The crew showcased the capabilities of the cutter’s 26-foot over-the-horizon small boat and advanced command and control electronics to demonstrate how the newest Fast Response Cutter will benefit Hawaii County, while based in Honolulu.

“We all enjoyed engaging with our local government partners in Hilo and explaining how our cutter can assist in future search and rescue or law enforcement cases near the Big Island. Our goal is always to build stronger relationships between all our partners throughout the state,” said Lt. j.g. Peter Driscoll, executive officer, Cutter Oliver Berry.

Oliver Berry is designed for multiple missions, including law enforcement and search and rescue. Oliver Berry has advanced seakeeping abilities and can achieve speeds in excess of 28 knots, with an endurance of five days.

For more information about Oliver Berry, please contact District 14 Public Affairs at 808-535-3230 or Oliver Berry’s public affairs officer at Peter.M.Driscoll@uscg.mil.

Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry Commissioned

The Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry (WPC 1124), Hawaii’s first Sentinel-class cutter, was commissioned into service at Coast Guard Base Honolulu, Tuesday.

Vice Adm. Fred M. Midgette, commander, Coast Guard Pacific Area, presided over the ceremony accepting the first of three 154-foot fast response cutters to be stationed in Hawaii.

Crewmembers man the rails aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry (WPC 1124) as aircrews from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point conduct a fly-over in two MH-65 Dolphin helicopters during a commissioning ceremony at Coast Guard Base Honolulu, Oct. 31, 2017. The Oliver Berry is the first of the three Honolulu-based Fast Response Cutters that will primarily serve the main Hawaiian Islands. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Tara Molle/Released)

The cutter’s sponsor Susan Hansen, who is a distant cousin of Oliver Berry was also in attendance for the ceremony.

Susan Berry Hansen, ship sponsor for the Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry (WPC 1124) as well as a cousin of Chief Petty Officer Oliver Fuller Berry, presents a gift to Lt. Kenneth Franklin, commanding officer of Oliver Berry, during a commissioning ceremony for the cutter at Coast Guard Base Honolulu, Oct. 31, 2017. The Oliver Berry is the first of three 154-foot fast response cutters stationed in Hawaii. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Tara Molle/Released)

“It’s a great opportunity to honor Chief Petty Officer Oliver Berry’s legacy by commissioning this new cutter and engaging in the wide variety of Coast Guard missions of search and rescue, fisheries law enforcement, marine safety and security, among many others conducted in and around the Hawaiian Islands,” said Lt. Ken Franklin, commanding officer of Oliver Berry. “I am constantly impressed as I learn more about Oliver Berry through this commissioning process such as his resourcefulness and leadership in developing the specialty of aviation maintenance. The cutter helps cement the strong bond between our aviation and afloat communities and it’s a privilege to be a part of her plankowner crew and carry Oliver Berry’s legacy forward into the 21st century.”

The Oliver Berry is the first of three Honolulu-based FRCs that will primarily serve the main Hawaiian Islands.

The cutter is named after Chief Petty Officer Oliver Fuller Berry, a South Carolina native and graduate of the Citadel. He was a highly skilled helicopter mechanic working on early Coast Guard aircraft. Berry was also one of the world’s first experts on the maintenance of helicopters and served as lead instructor at the first military helicopter training unit, the Rotary Wing Development Unit which was established at Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City, North Carolina, in 1946. He also helped develop the helicopter rescue hoist.

Leighton Tseu, Kane O Ke Kai, gives a Hawaiian blessing during the arrival of the Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry (WPC 1124) at Coast Guard Base Honolulu, Sept. 22, 2017. The Oliver Berry is the first of three 154-foot fast response cutters stationed in Hawaii. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Tara Molle/Released)

Berry had an extensive career spanning much of the globe. He was involved in a helicopter rescue out of Newfoundland that earned him a commendation and the Belgian Silver Medal of the Order of Leopold II. In this case, Berry was able to quickly disassemble a helicopter in Brooklyn, New York, which was then flown to Gander, Newfoundland, in a cargo plane where he then reassembled it in time for the rescue crew to find and save 18 survivors of a crash aboard a Belgian Sabena DC-4 commercial airliner.

The Coast Guard is acquiring 58 FRCs to replace the 110-foot Island-class patrol boats. The FRCs are designed for missions including search and rescue; fisheries enforcement; drug and migrant interdiction; ports, waterways and coastal security; and national defense. The Coast Guard took delivery of Oliver Berry June 27 in Key West. The crew then transited more than 8,400 miles (7,300 nautical miles) to Hawaii.

A crewmember aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry (WPC 1124) raises the cutter’s commissioning pennant during a commissioning ceremony at Coast Guard Base Honolulu, Oct. 31, 2017. The Oliver Berry is the first of the three Honolulu-based Fast Response Cutters that will primarily serve the main Hawaiian Islands. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Tara Molle/Released)

The cutters are designed to patrol coastal regions and feature advanced command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance equipment, including the ability to launch and recover standardized small boats from the stern.

There will be three fast response cutters stationed here at Base Honolulu by the spring of 2019. These cutters with their improved effectiveness in search and rescue will make the waters around the main Hawaiian Islands a much safer place for recreational boaters and users of the waterway. They greatly improve our on water presence with each providing over 7,500 operational hours, a 40 percent increase over the 110-foot patrol boats.