• what-to-do-media
  • puako-general-store
  • Cheneviere Couture
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    November 2018
    S M T W T F S
    « May    
     123
    45678910
    11121314151617
    18192021222324
    252627282930  

Ulu Questions Answered at Breadfruit Festival

Breadfruti Institute

Your questions about growing ‘Ulu (breadfruit) answered by Ian Cole, Collection Manager and Curator for the Breadfruit Institute:

  • What growing conditions are necessary to grow breadfruit? (Soil, light, space in the landscape, elevation)
  • What are the cultural needs of breadfruit? (pruning, fertilization, harvesting)
  • What are the main pests of breadfruit and their impact on the crop?

This workshop is part of an educational program about breadfruit leading up to the Breadfruit Festival 2011 on September 24.

Presentation by:  Ian Cole, Collection Manager and Curator for the Breadfruit Institute at Kahanu Garden in Hana, Maui, who will present an introduction to growing breadfruit in the home garden.

Cost: FREE

Sponsored by: West Hawaii Master Gardeners Assoc., UH Extension Agency, Hawai’ian Homegrown Food Network, & the Breadfruit Institute

Breadfruit Festival and Art Contest Coming Up

Media Release:

Hawaii Homegrown Food Network, the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden and Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden, are presenting the Breadfruit Festival—Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu at the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in South Kona on Saturday, September 24, 2011 from 9:00 am – 3:00 pm. The Garden will also be holding a dedication for its new visitor center at 12:00 noon on the Festival day. The Festival and dedication are free and open to the public.

The Breadfruit Festival celebrates the rich culture of breadfruit (‘ulu) in Hawai‘i and the Pacific, raises awareness about the importance of breadfruit for food security and teaches about the many delicious ways to prepare breadfruit.

A highlight of the day will be cooking demonstrations by local celebrity chefs, food booths featuring breadfruit and other local favorites prepared by Hawai‘i Island’s finest chefs, and the “I Love Breadfruit” Cook-Off Contest where anyone may enter their favorite breadfruit dish to compete for prizes.

The Breadfruit Festival will also feature Hawaiian and Pacific Islander cultural activities including ‘Ulumaika (breadfruit bowling), talks on the culture and history of breadfruit, ‘Ōlelo No‘eau, woodworking, quilting demonstrations, tapa making, ‘ulu poi making and more.

Workshops on breadfruit propagation, tree care and maintenance, economic opportunities, the Hunger Initiative and other topics will be given by experts Dr. Diane Ragone and Ian Cole of the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden.

An art exhibit will feature the finalists in a fine art contest which focuses on the beauty of breadfruit, and a youth poster contest. Breadfruit trees will be available for sale on festival day, but supplies are limited and advance purchase for pick up at the festival is encouraged by contacting hooulu@hawaiihomegrown.net.

In addition to the September 24th Breadfruit Festival in South Kona, an East Side festival spearheaded by project partners Ho‘oulu Lahui and Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School will be held March 2-3, 2012.

Learn more about the Breadfruit Festival by visiting www.breadfruit.info.

ART CONTEST CELEBRATES THE CULTURE AND BEAUTY OF BREADFRUIT

The Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu – Revitalizing Breadfruit in Hawai‘i Art Contest. The art contest is part of the educational outreach associated with the Breadfruit Festival—Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu which will be held at the Amy B.H. Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in South Kona on Saturday, September 24, 2011. The contests celebrates the beauty of the breadfruit tree and fruit as well as the rich cultural heritage and future role of ‘ulu in Hawai‘i.

In a mauka region of Kona there was once a band of ‘ulu trees ½ mile wide and 18 miles long called kalū ‘ulu that produced as much as 36,000 tons of ‘ulu fruit per year. Today, few of these trees remain. Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu is a project to revitalize ‘ulu (breadfruit) as an attractive, delicious, nutritious, abundant, affordable, and culturally appropriate food which addresses Hawai‘i’s food security issues. The art contest will help raise awareness about the importance of ‘ulu in Hawai‘i.

All Hawai‘i Island artists are invited to submit original 2D media artwork to the art contest. Electronic submissions are due on July 25th for initial judging and semi-finalists will be asked to bring original work to the Donkey Mill Art Center on Thursday, August 11th for an artist’s reception and final judging. The artwork of finalists will be displayed at the Breadfruit Festival. One winning piece will be selected to be reproduced into a collectable poster commemorating the Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu project, which will be sold at the Breadfruit Festival and beyond as a fundraiser for the festival and project. Prizes will be awarded for best artwork.

Additional information and submission forms can be found at www.breadfruit.info.