Big Island Police Investigate 23 Counterfeit Money Cases in May

Hawaiʻi Island police are warning the public about a spike in counterfeit cases in the Hilo and Puna districts.

In May, police investigated 23 counterfeit cases in those districts compared with seven cases in April and two cases in January through March. Stores and restaurants have received counterfeit bills in $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100 denominations.

Anyone who receives a counterfeit bill is urged to call the police to file a report.
Counterfit Money
Police ask anyone with information about who is producing or passing these bills to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

State and County Officials Seek Help in Big Island Wildfires – Arson is Possibility

A series of wildfires in the Puuanahulu area of Hawaii Island over the past week have prompted fire and police officials to ask people using the region to report any suspicious activity.

Photo snipped from Big Island Video News coverage

Photo snipped from Big Island Video News coverage

The latest fire sparked a little after midnight today, south of the Kona hunter check station in the Puuanahulu Game Management Unit.  Fire crews were able to extinguish the small brush fire quickly.  A county fire department investigator was called to the scene to look at the possibility this fire and three others over the past week were set intentionally.

More than 775 acres of mostly brush and grass burned, starting last Thursday in the same area.  The DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) reports these fires are contained, though there may be occasional smoke from the interior.

DOFAW, the DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) and the Hawaii County Fire and Police Departments encourage anyone with information on these fires, or anyone who spots unusual activity in the Puuanahulu area to call 9-1-1 or 643-DLNR.

Big Island Video News posted the following video:

Updated Map Pinpoints Dengue Fever Cases on Big Island of Hawaii

Below is a map that depicts case locations as of 1/6/2016.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

This map will be updated Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with location data provided by the State Department of Health. Locations may represent multiple cases. For the most up to date case counts and other information from the Department of Health, visit their website at health.hawaii.gov.

Surveying and spraying is being conducted at the residences of all suspect and confirmed cases, in addition to proactive spraying at nearby public facilities.

This map should not be used to exclude any areas of the island from proactive mosquito control measures. All residents islandwide are encouraged to Fight The Bite by reducing mosquito breeding grounds and protecting themselves from mosquito bites.

Updated Map Shows New Risk Areas for Potential Dengue Infection on the Big Island of Hawaii

An updated map of potential areas of infection by mosquito for confirmed dengue fever cases has been released:

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

This map should not be used to exclude any areas of the island from proactive mosquito control measures. All residents islandwide are encouraged to Fight The Bite by reducing mosquito breeding grounds and protecting themselves from mosquito bites.

Updated Map Pinpoints Dengue Fever Cases on Big Island of Hawaii

Below is a map that depicts case locations as of 1/4/2016.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

This map will be updated Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with location data provided by the State Department of Health. Locations may represent multiple cases. For the most up to date case counts and other information from the Department of Health, visit their website at health.hawaii.gov.

Surveying and spraying is being conducted at the residences of all suspect and confirmed cases, in addition to proactive spraying at nearby public facilities.

This map should not be used to exclude any areas of the island from proactive mosquito control measures. All residents islandwide are encouraged to Fight The Bite by reducing mosquito breeding grounds and protecting themselves from mosquito bites.

Confirmed Dengue Fever Cases on the Big Island of Hawaii Remains at 202

The Dengue Fever outbreak on the Big Island continues and the total amount of confirmed cases remains at 202.
Mosquito BiteAs of January 4, 2016*:

Since the last update, HDOH has identified 0 new cases of dengue fever.  Currently, as many as 5 of the confirmed cases to date are potentially infectious to mosquitoes. All others are no longer infectious.

Potentially infectious individuals
5 Illness onset  12/25/15 to 12/27/15
Cases no longer infectious
197 Illness onset 9/11/15 to 12/24/15
Past and present confirmed cases (Cumulative TOTAL)
202

Of the confirmed cases, 182 are Hawaii Island residents and 20 are visitors.
164 cases have been adults; 38 have been children (<18 years of age). Onset of illness has ranged between 9/11/15 – 12/27/15.

As of today, a total of 772 reported potential cases have been excluded based on test results and/or not meeting case criteria.

For a map of potential areas of infection by mosquito for confirmed dengue fever cases, click HERE**. (Updated December 30, 2015)

For Hawaii Island Dengue Fever Unified Command Updates, click HERE. (Updated December 2, 2015)

Confirmed Dengue Fever Cases on the Big Island of Hawaii Rises to 202

The Dengue Fever outbreak on the Big Island continues and the total confirmed amount of cases rose by 7 more case since the last update bringing the total amount of confirmed cases to 202.

Mosquito BiteAs of January 1, 2016*:

Since the last update, HDOH has identified 7 new cases of dengue fever.  Currently, as many as 13 of the confirmed cases to date are potentially infectious to mosquitoes. All others are no longer infectious.

Potentially infectious individuals
13 Illness onset  12/22/15 to 12/27/15
Cases no longer infectious
189 Illness onset 9/11/15 to 12/21/15
Past and present confirmed cases (Cumulative TOTAL)
202

Of the confirmed cases, 182 are Hawaii Island residents and 20 are visitors.
164 cases have been adults; 38 have been children (<18 years of age). Onset of illness has ranged between 9/11/15 – 12/27/15.

As of today, a total of 765 reported potential cases have been excluded based on test results and/or not meeting case criteria.

For a map of potential areas of infection by mosquito for confirmed dengue fever cases, click HERE**. (Updated December 30, 2015)

For Hawaii Island Dengue Fever Unified Command Updates, click HERE. (Updated December 2, 2015)

CDC Interim Assessment of the Response by the Hawaii State Department of Health to the Dengue Outbreak on the Island of Hawaii

HDOH continues to routinely monitor for cases of imported dengue infection on ALL islands and will continue to have Vector Control perform mosquito site assessments and abatement as needed. Since the beginning of our current investigation on Hawaii island, two imported dengue fever cases have been confirmed (one on Oahu and one on Hawaii), and one imported chikungunya case (on Hawaii) has been confirmed. These cases are not associated with the Hawaii island investigation.

Dengue Fever and Mosquitoes — Information and Resources

Dengue Fever Brochures

Call Aloha United Way 2-1-1 for general information about dengue fever and the current Big Island dengue investigation.  (Out of state callers may call 877-275-6569, toll free)

To report a suspect case, contact:

  • On the Big Island: 808-974-6001 (East Hawaii) or 808-322-488 (West Hawaii)
  • On other islands: DOH Disease Outbreak Control Division at 808-586-4586.

To report mosquito concerns, contact:

  • On the Big Island: 808-974-6001 (East Hawaii) or 808-322-4880 (West Hawaii)
  • On Oahu: 808-586-8021, on Maui: 808-873-3560, on Kauai: 808-241-3306

If you are ill and are worried that you might have dengue fever, contact your healthcare provider.

CLINICIANS: for updates go to http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/updates-and-resources-for-clinicians/

*Updates to case counts, when available, will be posted Monday-Friday by 1:00 p.m. HST

**Updates to the map, when available, will be posted Wednesday by 1:00 p.m. HST

Updated Map Pinpoints Dengue Fever Cases on Big Island of Hawaii

Below is a updated map that depicts case locations as of 12/30/2015.

Surveying and spraying is being conducted at the residences of all suspect and confirmed cases, in addition to proactive spraying at nearby public facilities.

This map should not be used to exclude any areas of the island from proactive mosquito control measures. All residents islandwide are encouraged to Fight The Bite by reducing mosquito breeding grounds and protecting themselves from mosquito bites.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Updated Map Shows New Risk Areas for Potential Dengue Infection on the Big Island of Hawaii

An updated map of potential areas of infection by mosquito for confirmed dengue fever cases has been released:

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Confirmed Dengue Fever Cases on the Big Island of Hawaii Rises to 190

The Dengue Fever outbreak on the Big Island continues and the total confirmed amount of cases rose by 8 more case since the last update bringing the total amount of confirmed cases to 190.

Mosquito Bite

As of December 30, 2015*:

Since the last update, HDOH has identified 8 new cases of dengue fever.  Currently, as many as 4 of the confirmed cases to date are potentially infectious to mosquitoes. All others are no longer infectious.

Potentially infectious individuals
4 Illness onset  12/21/15 to 12/26/15
Cases no longer infectious
186 Illness onset 9/11/15 to 12/20/15
Past and present confirmed cases (Cumulative TOTAL)
190

Of the confirmed cases, 172 are Hawaii Island residents and 18 are visitors.
153 cases have been adults; 37 have been children (<18 years of age). Onset of illness has ranged between 9/11/15 – 12/26/15.

As of today, a total of 736 reported potential cases have been excluded based on test results and/or not meeting case criteria.

For a map of potential areas of infection by mosquito for confirmed dengue fever cases, click HERE**. (Updated December 23, 2015)

For Hawaii Island Dengue Fever Unified Command Updates, click HERE. (Updated December 2, 2015)

CDC Interim Assessment of the Response by the Hawaii State Department of Health to the Dengue Outbreak on the Island of Hawaii

HDOH continues to routinely monitor for cases of imported dengue infection on ALL islands and will continue to have Vector Control perform mosquito site assessments and abatement as needed. Since the beginning of our current investigation on Hawaii island, two imported dengue fever cases have been confirmed (one on Oahu and one on Hawaii), and one imported chikungunya case (on Hawaii) has been confirmed. These cases are not associated with the Hawaii island investigation.

Updated Dengue Fever Map Pinpoints More Cases

This is a Dengue Fever information update for Monday December 28th at 4:00PM.

As of 1:00 PM today the Department of Health reported the total number of confirmed cases since the beginning of the outbreak to 181. These cases include 163 residents and 18 visitors.

Dengue is a virus that is transmitted from an infected person to a mosquito, which can then infect another person. Dengue fever cannot be spread directly from person to person. Of the 181 confirmed cases, 2 are recent and could be in the stage of their illness in which they can infect mosquitoes.

Symptoms of dengue include a high fever, intense headache and joint pain, and rash on the arms. If you suspect you may have dengue, contact your health care provider and remain indoors to prevent the possibility of being bitten and infecting mosquitoes.

The Department of Health is spraying and treating areas connected to confirmed cases to reduce mosquito populations. In addition, Civil Defense teams are inspecting areas of high mosquito presence reported by the community. If teams visit your home while you are away, they will leave a note – please follow the instructions on the note to contact the appropriate agency.

While these efforts lower risk by reducing mosquito populations, the most effective method to reduce the spread of dengue is for everyone to avoid and prevent mosquito bites. Fight The Bite by wearing clothing that minimizes exposed skin, using mosquito repellent, and avoiding activities in areas of high mosquito concentration during the early morning and late afternoon periods when mosquito activity is greatest.

For additional information on dengue and preventing the spread, go to health.hawaii.gov or call the Department of Health at 974-6001. Everyone’s help and assistance with this outbreak is much needed and appreciated.

Below is a map that depicts case locations as of 12/28/2015.

  • This map will be updated Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with location data provided by the State Department of Health. Locations may represent multiple cases.
  • For the most up to date case counts and other information from the Department of Health, visit their website at health.hawaii.gov.
  • Surveying and spraying is being conducted at the residences of all suspect and confirmed cases, in addition to proactive spraying at nearby public facilities.
  • This map should not be used to exclude any areas of the island from proactive mosquito control measures. All residents islandwide are encouraged to Fight The Bite by reducing mosquito breeding grounds and protecting themselves from mosquito bites.
Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Dengue Fever Risk Forces Hawaii State Land Closure For Public Safety – Milolii Village and Honomalino Bay Areas Covered

For the safety of everyone, due to the dengue fever outbreak at Milolii, the Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) has closed to the public all State unencumbered lands in the immediate vicinity of Milolii village and Honomalino Bay.  These include the parcels designated by Tax Map Key numbers: (3) 8-9-003:001 and (3) 8-9-004:007.

(3) 8-9-003:001

(3) 8-9-003:001

We’re recommending the closure of this area to all but essential personnel and residents of the areas.  This closure follows Hawaii County’s closure of Milolii Beach Park until further notice so crews led by Hawaii County Civil Defense can conduct mosquito control and pesticide treatments. State and county experts are now calling Milolii a hot spot in the dengue fever outbreak on the Big Island.

(3) 8-9-004:007

(3) 8-9-004:007

The latest number of confirmed dengue fever cases on the Big Island has risen to 181 as of Friday afternoon, including 163 Big Island residents and 18 visitors.

Entry into closed lands is a violation of Hawaii Administrative Rule Sec. 13-221-4 and Hawaii Revised Statute 171-6, and is subject to a penalty of up to $5,000 for the first offense. 

Signs will be posted at various access points warning people of the hazardous conditions.

3 More Confirmed Cases of Dengue Fever on the Big Island of Hawaii

The Dengue Fever outbreak on the Big Island continues and the total confirmed amount of cases has risen by 3 more cases since the last update bringing the total amount of confirmed cases to 163.

Mosquito Bite

As of December 18, 2015*:

Since the last update, HDOH has identified 3 new cases of dengue fever.  Currently, as many as 4 of the confirmed cases to date are potentially infectious to mosquitoes. All others are no longer infectious.

Potentially infectious individuals
4 Illness onset 12/8/15 to 12/13/15
Cases no longer infectious
159 Illness onset 9/11/15 to 12/13/15
Past and present confirmed cases (Cumulative TOTAL)
163

Of the confirmed cases, 145 are Hawaii Island residents and 18 are visitors.
129 cases have been adults; 34 have been children (<18 years of age). Onset of illness has ranged between 9/11/15 – 12/13/15.

As of today, a total of 644 reported potential cases have been excluded based on test results and/or not meeting case criteria.

For a map of potential areas of infection by mosquito for confirmed dengue fever cases, click HERE**. (Updated December 16, 2015)

For Hawaii Island Dengue Fever Unified Command Updates, click HERE. (Updated December 2, 2015)

Interim Assessment of the Response by the Hawaii State Department of Health to the Dengue Outbreak on the Island of Hawaii

HDOH continues to routinely monitor for cases of imported dengue infection on ALL islands and will continue to have Vector Control perform mosquito site assessments and abatement as needed. Since the beginning of our current investigation on Hawaii island, two imported dengue fever cases have been confirmed (one on Oahu and one on Hawaii), and one imported chikungunya case (on Hawaii) has been confirmed. These cases are not associated with the Hawaii island investigation.

Updated Map Pinpoints Further Big Island of Hawaii Dengue Cases

This is a Dengue Fever information update for Monday, December 14th at 2:45 PM.

The State Department of Health continues to work with other state and county agencies on the issue of the Dengue Fever outbreak. As of 1:00 PM today the Department of Health had reported three additional confirmed cases since Friday, December 11th and bringing the total number of confirmed cases to date to 149. These cases include 132 residents and 17 visitors.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

23 Cases of Dengue Fever – Hawaii State Senator Urges Awareness and Action

The growing number of confirmed cases of Dengue fever (23 as of today) has State Senator Josh Green (Dist. 3 – Kona, Ka‘u) calling on constituents within his district and across the entire Big Island to take extra precautions to stem the spread of the virus.  

mosquitoes

“As a State Senator and a Big Island physician, I’m concerned not only about the immediate well-being and safety of our residents and visitors, but also the real long term health and economic impacts an outbreak like this can have on the state,” said Sen. Green.  “Unless people become aware of the seriousness of this virus and take action, I’m worried the infection will spread and impact will grow,” said Sen. Green. “There may likely be more confirmed, as well as real but unconfirmed, clinical cases in the coming weeks. However, Dengue can be stopped if we all do our part to reverse the outbreak.”

The Senator has personally seen and treated patients in recent weeks he is concerned may have Dengue fever and is working with hospitals and schools on Hawai‘i Island to ensure there is proper communication to report suspected cases of Dengue. He notes that any constituents who have concerns that they might have acquired the virus should contact their local healthcare provider and the DOH infectious disease branch (808-586-4586). In addition, any calls or email to Senator Green (sengreen@capitol.hawaii.gov) will be placed in the hands of top DOH officials for immediate action.

The Senator is reminding residents and visitors to take measures to avoid the spread of Dengue Fever on Hawai‘i Island including: 

  • Applying mosquito repellents on exposed skin and clothing
  • Wear long sleeves and pants, and lighter colored clothing, to limit exposure to mosquitoes
  • Eliminate standing water around the place of residence to reduce mosquito breeding 
  • Repair screens and jalousie windows

Some key symptoms of Dengue include sudden onset of high fever (in some case over 103 degrees Fahrenheit) severe headaches especially behind the eyes, joint and muscle pain, and rash. It is rare, but bleeding can also occur with severe forms of Dengue fever and is a medical emergency.  “Anyone who believes they may have contracted Dengue should see a doctor immediately,” said Sen. Green. “People should take Tylenol for high fevers that may stem from Dengue fever and NOT aspirin or ibuprofen, that can add to complications of this disease.”

“Preventing Dengue Fever from becoming endemic in Hawai‘i will require a prolonged response from DOH, the county and state but most importantly, take good care now and call a healthcare provider if you feel sick,” Green concluded.

The latest information on the state’s efforts to control the spread of Dengue fever can be found on the DOH website www.health.hawaii.gov.

Two Cases of Dengue Fever Confirmed on Big Island of Hawaii – Investigating Others

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) is investigating two confirmed and four probable cases of dengue fever in Hawaii residents and visitors that was locally-acquired on the Big Island of Hawaii.

Mosquito Bite

Further testing and confirmation at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is pending. The department sent out a medical advisory to Hawaii County clinicians earlier today to alert them and urge them to report suspect dengue fever cases.

“Although dengue is not endemic to Hawaii, we do have the mosquito species capable of transmitting the disease,” stated State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park. “It’s likely an infected traveler infected the local mosquito population, which led to this cluster, so we want the public to be aware of this mosquito-borne disease and the steps they can take to prevent infection.”

“Our local environmental health assessments have not found significant mosquito activity in the affected area,” added Hawaii District Health Officer Aaron Ueno. “As a precautionary measure the department is conducting mosquito prevention activities such as spraying with consent from property owners.”

Symptoms of dengue fever typically begin within a week after a bite by an infected mosquito and can include fever, joint or muscle pains, headache or pain behind the eyes, and rash. Persons who have the above symptoms should contact their healthcare provider and avoid further exposure to mosquitoes, which is also the best means of prevention.

Dengue virus is most often transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito. Travelers to areas with infected mosquitoes where dengue fever is endemic are at the highest risk of acquiring the disease. Mosquitoes breed in areas of standing water (such as planters, old tires and pet water bowls). Use mosquito repellents containing 20–30 percent DEET and wear long sleeves and pants in areas where mosquito-borne disease is a concern. For tips on mosquito control, go to http://health.hawaii.gov/san/files/2013/06/Vector-mosquitohandout.pdf.

For more information on dengue fever, visit the DOH website at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/dib/disease/dengue/.

Hilda to Swing South of the Big Island of Hawaii

Hurricane Hilda was downgraded to a Tropical Storm and now appears that it will go south of the Big Island of Hawaii missing the entire Hawaii chain of islands.
Hilda7

Big Island Earthquake Upgraded to 5.2 Magnitude

The earthquake that happened yesterday evening has been upgraded to a 5.2 magnitude earthquake.

This follows a previous update of 5.0 and 4.9 as previously reported.
52 big island

Power Continues to Get Restored to Storm Hit Big Island

Hawaii Electric Light crews continue to make progress on restoring electric service to customers affected by recent severe weather conditions. Crews worked through the night to restore service to approximately 3,300 customers island-wide. All transmission lines were repaired and are back in service.

Shaka For HELCOAbout 1,700 customers are currently without service. Today crews will be working in the following areas: Kaloko, Captain Cook, Holualoa, Kamuela, Hawi, Ahualoa, Honokaa, Kalopa, Paauilo, Nanawale, Hawaiian Paradise Park, Volcano, Upper Puna, Hawaiian Ocean View Estates, and Kau.

The areas from Lindsey Road to Ahualoa suffered substantial damage. Customers in these areas are advised to prepare for an extended outage through Tuesday.

Hawaii Electric Light asks customers who have not yet reported their power outage to call its trouble line at 969-6666. Due to the high call volume, customers may experience a longer wait time before speaking with a representative. The company sincerely apologizes for this inconvenience and thanks customers for their patience and understanding.

The company urges the community to be safe and treat downed power lines as energized and dangerous. Do not handle or move any fallen or damaged utility equipment. If someone is injured by a downed power line, do not approach them. Call 9-1-1 for assistance.

“American Jungle” – New Eight-Part TV Series Follows Hunting Clans on The Big Island

On the island paradise of Hawaii, thousands of acres of untamed jungle are home to wild beasts and the men who live off the land in the ancient ways of their ancestors. Generations of families have claimed, maintained and fought over their own sacred hunting trails. When the dry season comes, wild boar, goats, feral bulls and small game crisscross the island in search for water. These clans must do whatever it takes to protect their turf.

Click to read about the cast

Click to read about the cast

But in a land where traditions run deep and ancient spirits rule the mountains, hunting is about more than putting food on the table. It’s about respecting the family and revering the ancestors. AMERICAN JUNGLE, a new series on HISTORY, follows several tight-knit clans as they hunt the old way – with knives and spears – and battle for control of their territory. The eight-part series premieres Sunday, November 10 at 10 pm ET on HISTORY.

About the clans:

The powerful Spear Clan, descended from Hawaiian royalty, has hunted and preserved their trails for more than 150 years. The trails fell into decline and other clans saw opportunity. Their leader Scotty is determined to return the clan to its former power. Scotty turned his back on his family and traditions seven years ago and left for the mainland. Now he is back and seeking redemption.

The Rosa Clan survives entirely off of the land. Clan leader Tony was estranged for the past ten years, and has reconnected with his son Isaac, 19, to teach him the ways of his family. The clan is small, and if Isaac doesn’t learn, the family’s knowledge of the jungle will end with Tony. The Rosa’s chief rivals are the Correas. The clans began feuding nearly 40 years ago.

Pa, 67, is the leader of the Correa Clan. He descends from the legendary “Barefoot Hunter” from the island of Oahu. When Oahu became developed as a tourist destination, Pa moved the family to the Big Island and carved out his own trails. Game became the main source of food for his rapidly growing family. So keen were his hunting abilities that he brought home enough food to feed some 20 immediate family members. Now in his sunset years, he needs to make a hard decision – which of his sons will take his place.

Johnny Blaze is leader of the Blood Clan. The former college football star and his friends Eric and Kalei teamed up to learn the ways of the jungle. They are a band of outlaws who hunt all the trails in the belief that the jungle belongs to no one clan. Seldom seen by other clans, it is believed that the Bloods are mystically in touch with the spirits of the jungle and engage in strange rituals, such as drinking the blood of their kill.

The Cowboy Clan is led by Curly, a highly skilled horseman who possesses deadly precision with a lasso. He and his trusted partner Lionel are descendents of a long line of Californian-Mexican vaqueros (cowboys). They hunt the plains on horseback and like the Bloods, they don’t respect the idea of trails being owned.

Chewy and Prophet of the Ocean Clan are born and bred locals who don’t take kindly to intruders. Their behavior and alliances are completely unpredictable, changing their tactics to suit whatever the situation calls for. Most clans would rather keep the peace than to cross them.

Because they don’t own trails and are not respected on the island, the Outsiders are not a clan, but they aspire to be one. Big Joe, born in Oklahoma, learned the ways of the jungle from the local elders. He discovered early on that hunting means asking permission of the clans who claim ancestral heritage of the trails. Mark, born on the military base outside Hilo, learned the ways of the jungle from his father before they had a falling out. The pair realized that, as outsiders, they will always be at the mercy of the powerful clans unless they make a name for themselves.