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Kahalu’u Educational Complex Community Meetings to be Hosted by Kamehameha Schools

Kamehameha Schools has scheduled two public meetings for community members to discuss plans for the development of the Kahalu’u Educational Complex on lands of former hotel sites in Kahalu’u.
The former Keauhou Beach Resort
The community meetings are scheduled for Thursday evening, October 17 from 6:00 to 7:30 pm, and Friday morning, October 18 from 8:30 to 9:30 am at the Sheraton Kona Resort & Spa Convention Center Keauhou Ballroom 1.

Community participants will receive an update on the Kahalu’u ma kai project, review project timelines, learn more about the vision for the educational project and share mana’o (feedback).

“We encourage everyone who is interested to attend and learn more about our vision for Kahaluu ma kai, and especially our evolving Kahalu’u Manowai education plans.  Come talk-story with our team about how we are protecting the cultural, historical and environmental assets during demolition,” stated Kamehameha Schools Director of Strategic Initiatives for West Hawai’i Ka’eo
Duarte. “We’re looking forward to advancing the educational legacy of Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop in West Hawai’i by restoring and re-energizing this very special place.”

As stated by Kamehameha Schools, the vision for the Kahalu’u educational complex is to restore the cultural landscape of Kahalu’u ma kai to an intrinsically Hawaiian place in which opportunities for applied learning, teaching, and knowledge creation are rooted in tradition while advancing learners and lahui (assemble) toward innovation, leadership and a sustainable future.

Those wishing to attend are encouraged to RSVP by emailing Denise Kauhi at dekauhi@ksbe.edu or calling 808-322-5301.

 

Hulihe‘e Palace Event Remembers the King

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabsh Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, May 19 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember the late King Kamehameha IV. Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs and performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i.

Daughters of Hawaii

Daughters of Hawaii

Afternoon at Hulihe‘e is part of the palace’s series of free monthly concerts that honor Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

King Kamehameha IV (Alexander Liholiho) was 21 when he inherited the throne in 1855. He agonized over the dwindling native population that was reduced from 300,000 in 1778 to 70,000 in 1855. “Hawaiians had no resistance to the diseases of foreigners and over 6,000 caught smallpox brought to the islands in 1853,” says Casey Ballao, docent coordinator. “The king and his Queen Emma pushed for the building of a hospital so Hawaiians could get adequate medical care.”

Brought up by a physician, Emma shared her husband’s values on health. Liholiho married Emma Naea Rooke in 1856. She was the granddaughter of John Young, Kamehameha’s British advisor. As was the custom for children in Hawai‘i to be given to relatives for upbringing, Emma was the hanai (adopted) daughter of Dr. T. C. Rooke, an English physician practicing in Honolulu, and Emma’s aunt.

“Besides providing funds, the royal couple earnestly solicited donations from others,” explains Ballao. “In 1860, Kamehameha IV laid the cornerstone for the Queen’s Hospital, which he named to honor his wife.” Today, it is the prestigious Queen’s Medical Center in downtown Honolulu.

The king died when he was 29, a short time after his four-year-old Prince Albert became fatally ill. “Queen Emma became a candidate to the throne but lost a heavily contested election to Prince David Kalakaua,” says Ballao “Queen Emma died at the age of 49.”

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays; with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2013 Afternoon at Hulihe‘e schedule: 4-5 p.m. on the palace grounds

All Afternoons at Hulihe’e present hula by Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i Hula Halau and vocals by the Merrie Monarchs. Some events also include the Hulihe’e Palace Band and are noted below. On band dates, only kahiko hula is showcased. Other events offer a full hula show.

May 19: Event remembering King Kamehameha IV “Alexander Liholiho”

Jun 9: Band appearance remembering King Kamehameha I “Paiea”

Jul 21: Event remembering John Adams Kuakini

Aug 18: Event remembering King Kamehameha III “Kauikeaouli”

Sep 15: Band appearance remembering Queen Lili‘uokalani

Oct 20: Event remembering Princess Ka‘iulani

Nov 17: Band appearance remembering King Kalakaua, Palace Curator Aunty Lei Collins and Bandmaster Charles “Bud” Dant

Dec 15: Event remembering Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop

Hulihe’e Palace Dates Set for 2013

Enjoy a free Afternoon at Hulihe’e Palace 4-5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16 to remember the late Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop. Presenting hula and serenade by the Merrie Monarchs, the event is part of a year-long series that honors Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Princess Bernice Pauahi is most well known as the benefactress of Kamehameha Schools. A great-granddaughter of Kamehameha I, she came of age during the Victorian Era. She was well liked and very private. When her cousin, Kamehameha V, chose her as his successor in 1872, she declined. Her refusal ended the Kamehameha Dynasty.

During her lifetime, the princess witnessed the physical and social decline of Hawaiians. Some foreigners brought disease—the native population dwindled from 400,000 in 1778 to fewer than 45,000 a century later—and controlled most commerce. Missionaries introduced a new value system.

“Distressed by the plight of her people, Princess Pauahi created a will in 1883 as an instrument of change,” says Casey Ballao, Hulihe‘e Palace docent coordinator. “She believed education could be the answer to help her people.”

The document established a charitable land trust overseen by trustees to improve the well being of Hawaiians. It operates as Kamehameha Schools today, one of the largest, private trusts in the nation.

“The will was the princess’s way to malama ka ‘aina—practice the ethical, prudent and culturally appropriate stewardship of land and resources,” adds Ballao.

Hulihe’e Palace

Pauahi married Charles Reed Bishop in 1850. She and Bishop shared a love for traveling, teaching and entertaining and the couple became astute property managers. When her favorite cousin, Princess Ruth Ke‘elikolani died, Pauahi received her entire estate (including Hulihe‘e Palace) and this inheritance comprised the major portion of Pauahi’s landholdings. The princess died a year later in 1884. To honor his wife, Charles founded the Bishop Museum in 1889 to house the royal family heirlooms and her extensive collection of Hawaiian artifacts.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturdays. Palace admission, which includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are available starting 10 a.m. to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2013 Afternoon at Hulihe‘e schedule: 4-5 p.m. on the palace grounds

All Afternoons at Hulihe’e present hula by Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i Hula Halau and vocals by the Merrie Monarchs. Some events also include the Hulihe’e Palace Band and are noted below. On band dates, only kahiko hula is showcased. Other events offer a full hula show.

  • Jan 13: Band appearance remembering King Charles “Lunalilo” and Aunty I‘olani Luahine
  • Feb 17: Event remembering Princess Ruth Ke‘elikolani
  • Mar 17: Band appearance remembering Queen Ka‘ahumanu and Prince Kuhio
  • Apr 21: Event remembering Prince Edward Albert
  • May 19: Event remembering King Kamehameha IV “Alexander Liholiho”
  • Jun 9: Band appearance remembering King Kamehameha I “Paiea”
  • Jul 21: Event remembering John Adams Kuakini
  • Aug 18: Event remembering King Kamehameha III “Kauikeaouli”
  • Sep 15: Band appearance remembering Queen Lili‘uokalani
  • Oct 20: Event remembering Princess Ka‘iulani
  • Nov 17: Band appearance remembering King Kalakaua, Palace Curator Aunty Lei Collins and Bandmaster Charles “Bud Dant
  • Dec 15: Event remembering Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop

 

Kamehameha Schools Names Robert Nobriga as New Trustee

Kamehameha Schools is pleased to extend warmest aloha to Robert Kaleookalani Nobriga, who was selected today as Kamehameha Schools’ newest trustee by the state Probate Court. He will replace Trustee Douglas Ing and begin his term on Jan. 1, 2013.

Robert Kaleookalani Nobriga

Along with his experience in governance with local charitable organizations, Nobriga brings to Kamehameha Schools demonstrated experience in the design and execution of complex financial and business strategies, and the ability to strategically direct all levels of financial affairs in a large organization. He possesses strong qualifications in all areas of financial management and planning and is considered an expert in analyzing operations to maximize performance.

On his selection as trustee, Nobriga said “I am humbled and feel very fortunate to be selected as Trustee Ing’s successor. I also have the passion and feel it is my deep sense of responsibility, my kuleana, to give back to this school which has changed my life and the lives of many family and friends. I cannot think of a higher honor than to serve Princess Pauahi in helping Kamehameha Schools achieve greatness. I look forward to contributing to the trustee team and I believe with my experience I can hit the ground running.”

Nobriga is currently the executive vice president and chief financial officer of Hawaii National Bank (HNB), where he has overall responsibility for the management of HNB’s balance sheet including investments, loans, and deposits. He joined the bank in 2006 to refocus the bank’s strategy and performance.

He co-authored the bank’s strategic plan and designed, implemented and oversees an integrated corporate performance management system which aligns strategy with budget, departmental planning, resource allocation, and employee goals and rewards.

Prior to joining HNB, Nobriga was the chief financial officer and operations officer for the University of Hawai‘i’s John A. Burns School of Medicine, where he was a member of the executive team which led the turn-around effort that saved the school’s accreditation, solidified its financial base, and developed the state-of-the-art medical education and biomedical research facilities in Kaka‘ako.

Nobriga currently serves as a trustee for The Queen’s Health Systems and The Queen’s Medical Center where he is the finance committee chair and a member of the endowment and investment committee. Since 2009, he has served as an audit committee member for the Kamehameha Schools Board of Trustees.

A certified public accountant, Nobriga is a 1991 graduate of Kamehameha Schools Kapālama and the University of Notre Dame, where he majored in accounting. He is also a 2008 graduate of the Pacific Coast Banking School at the University of Washington.

Nobriga and his wife, Joyce, have two daughters, Amber Kawena and Lauren Kau‘ikealani.

Kamehameha Schools welcomes Trustee Nobriga and extends deepest mahalo to Trustee Ing, who has honorably served with great leadership and intelligence as a Kamehameha Schools trustee for the past decade. Trustee Ing’s aloha for Kamehameha Schools and his dedication to the legacy of Ke Ali‘i Bernice Pauahi Bishop will be forever cherished.

For more on the trustee selection process, please visit www.ksbe.edu/about/officers.

Hulihe’e Palace Honors Princess Kaiulani

Enjoy a free Afternoon at Hulihe’e Palace 4-5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 21 to remember the late Princess Kaiulani. Presenting hula and serenade by the Merrie Monarchs, the event is part of a year-long series that honors Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Princess Victoria Kawekiu Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Kaiulani

Princess Victoria Kawekiu Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Kaiulani was the last heir to the Hawaiian throne. Born in 1875 to Princess Miriam Likelike, she was the niece of King Kalakaua.

“Her father was an Edinburgh Scot named Archibald Cleghorn, who was a governor of O‘ahu,” says Casey Ballao, docent coordinator. “The young princess, who was especially fond of peacocks, lived in Waikiki at the garden estate of Ainahau. Today, it is the present location of the Sheraton Princess Kaiulani Hotel.”

A fellow Scot, Robert Lewis Stevenson, became friends with Princess Kaiulani and he wrote numerous poems about his “fair maiden.” Known for her grace and hospitality, Kaiulani traveled abroad and studied in London as a teenager. Though a long way from Hawai‘i, she soon found herself in the fight to save the monarchy from American annexationists.

Hulihe’e Palace

“Kaiulani went to Washington and visited President Grover Cleveland and his wife to plead her cause,” adds Ballao. “Enchanted by the young, beautiful and fashionable Kaiulani, President Cleveland sent a personal representative to Hawai‘i to report on the political situation.”

Kaiulani’s aunt, Queen Lili‘uokalani, and others suggested the princess choose a husband to help Hawai‘i’s political situation: the nephew of the Emperor of Japan or her Hawaiian cousin, Prince David Kawananakoa. Bitter and disillusioned, Kaiulani realized her chance at the throne was gone forever when Hawai‘i officially became part of the U.S. in August 1898.

A few months later, after attending a wedding at Parker Ranch, Kaiulani got caught in a cold and cutting “Waimea rain” and the princess became seriously ill. “Her father came to the Big Island with the family doctor and Kaiulani improved at Mana enough to be carried by litter to a ship bound for Honolulu,” explains Ballao. “Back at Ainahau, her illness persisted, worsened and she died in two months; Kaiulani was 23 years old.”

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturdays. Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2012 Afternoon at Hulihe‘e schedule: 4-5 p.m. on the palace grounds

All Afternoons at Hulihe’e present hula by Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i Hula Halau and vocals by the Merrie Monarchs. Some events also include the Hulihe’e Palace Band and are noted below. On band dates, only kahiko hula is showcased. Other events offer a full hula show.

  • Oct 21: Event remembering Princess Ka‘iulani
  • Nov 18: Band appearance remembering King Kalakaua, Palace Curator Aunty Lei Collins and Bandmaster Charles “Bud Dant
  • Dec 16: Event remembering Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop

 

 

Kamehameha Schools 125 Years – On Oceanic Cable, The Web and Instagram

Kamehameha Schools is 125 years old, and for the past few months, we’ve been sharing stories about KS people, programs, services, collaborators, and stewardship of the lands of our founder, Bernice Pauahi Bishop.

We’d love to have you join in the celebration by literally putting yourself in the picture … via your photos! Using the smartphone app Instagram, snap and upload a picture that you feel captures Kamehameha’s mission in action or depicts events taking place during the anniversary.

And be sure to include the #ks125 hashtag in your caption so your photo will be added to the 125th anniversary collection. And go to www.facebook.com/KamehamehaSchools for a link to the #ks125 Instagram photo gallery.

For example, you could include photos of you and your friends participating in King Kamehameha Day festivities, Alumni Week, or any of the various and many wonderful Kamehameha Schools activities happening now and through Founder’s Day, December 19. Happy photo sharing!

Be sure to check out our 125th anniversary story, told through television and radio commercials, print ads and videos! It’s all posted on Oceanic Time Warner Cable digital channel 918 and at www.ksbe.edu/125, a special-edition anniversary website.

Me ka mahalo nui, and enjoy the celebration!

 

2012 Hulihe’e Palace Schedule of Events

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabash Cousins present their first free monthly Afternoon at Hulihe’e for 2012 on Sunday, Jan. 15. The 4 p.m. event on the grounds of Hulihe‘e Palace remembers the late King Lunalilo and past palace curator, I‘olani Luahine.

The event presents the Hulihe’e Palace Band, the Merrie Monarchs and Hawaiian performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

King Charles Lunalilo (1835-1874) was known as the “people’s king” as he was popular with all his subjects. During his abbreviated, 390-day reign, Lunalilo advocated the legislature to remove property qualifications for the right to vote and asked for the separation of the legislature into two houses.  He also thought the kingdom should give Pearl Harbor to the U.S. in exchange for duty-free Hawaiian sugar into California.

“During Lunalilo’s short reign, he tried to make the kingdom’s government more democratic,” notes Casey Ballao, palace docent coordinator. “His efforts were cut short by tuberculosis.”

I‘olani Luahine (1915-1978) served as curator of Hulihe‘e Palace from 1973 to 1978.  She was born Harriet Lanihau Makekau in Napo‘opo‘o, but was renamed I‘olani, after the Hawaiian hawk. Luahine was a master of hula and named a “Living Treasure” in 1972; she was invited three times to perform at the National Folk Festival in Washington D.C.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for self-guided tours. Museum and gift shop hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Hulihe‘e Palace admission, which at this time includes a self-guided tour brochure, remains $6 for adults, $4 for seniors and $1 for keiki under 18. Volunteer docents are sometimes available to give guided tours. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i. The organization was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2012 Afternoon at Hulihe‘e schedule: 4-5 p.m. on the palace grounds

All Afternoons at Hulihe’e present hula by Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i Hula Halau and vocals by the Merrie Monarchs. Some events also include the Hulihe’e Palace Band and are noted below. On band dates, only kahiko hula is showcased. Other events offer a full hula show.

Jan 15: Band appearance remembering King Charles “Lunalilo” and Aunty I‘olani Luahine

Feb 19: Event remembering Princess Ruth Ke‘elikolani

Mar 18: Band appearance remembering Queen Ka‘ahumanu and Prince Kuhio

Apr 15: Event remembering Prince Edward Albert

May 20: Event remembering King Kamehameha IV “Alexander Liholiho”

Jun 10: Band appearance remembering King Kamehameha I “Paiea”

Jul 15: Event remembering John Adams Kuakini

Aug 26: Event remembering King Kamehameha III “Kauikeaouli”

Sep 16: Band appearance remembering Queen Lili‘uokalani

Oct 21: Event remembering Princess Ka‘iulani

Nov 18: Band appearance remembering King Kalakaua, Palace Curator Aunty Lei Collins and Bandmaster Charles “Bud Dant

Dec 16: Event remembering Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop

Kamehameha Schools Hawai‘i Announces New Head of School

Dr. Holoua Stender has been selected as the new Head of School for Kamehameha Schools’ Hawai‘i campus (KSH).

Dr. Holoua Stender

Dr. Stender has contributed to Kamehameha Schools over the past 32 years in his current role as Kapālama’s Elementary School Principal as well as prior department leadership and teaching roles at Kapālama’s High School, and as an administrator in its summer programs. He is also a member of Kamehameha’s tri-campus leadership team, tasked with advancing all three of Kamehameha’s campuses in 21st century educational excellence.

“Holoua has shown his passion for student learning and has contributed tremendously both at the division and campus levels of leadership. He is well respected for his educational knowledge and his deep understanding and expression of Hawaiian culture, language and life. He practices what he believes in and inspires others to do so as well,” commented Dr. Rod Chamberlain, VP of Campus Strategic and Academic Affairs at Kamehameha Schools.

This expertise was recognized by members of the KS Hawai‘i leadership team as they reflected after the interview process, “Dr. Stender is a proven educational leader within the KS system — he is a scholar that has connected Hawaiian pedagogies to impact student achievement.”

Dr. Stender grew up on Kewalo Hawaiian Homestead and learned Hawaiian culture and ‘ōlelo at an early age. In 1979 he achieved the level of Kumu Hula and still advises and supports various hālau and Hawaiian performing arts groups here and on the continent. He also teaches chant and mele composition and translates Hawaiian documents, songs and poetry for groups and individuals. He has been actively involved in his community and volunteers his time at church activities and in community fundraisers.

Dr. Stender received his doctorate in Education from the University of Southern California where he currently serves as an adjunct assistant professor. He also holds a master’s degree in Education from the University of Colorado at Boulder and currently serves on the core planning team of Kamehameha Schools’ Standards-Based Kula Hawai‘i curriculum project.

Upon learning of his appointment, Dr. Stender responded, “E ō e Moku o Keawe — Hawai‘i island — has always held a special place in my heart. This ‘āina is the ancestral homeland of my kūpuna. I am thankful and humbled to know that I‘ll be returning there to work with so many dedicated individuals, who are also inspired by the vision of Princess Pauahi to promote well-being and provide the very best in educational opportunities for our children and community on the Big Island of Hawai‘i.”

“Kamehameha Schools’ Hawai‘i campus has achieved many milestones in educational excellence. The school is a piko, gathering place for students, families, staff and the community. There is great synergy here where people come together to do noble work. I am excited and look forward to continuing the excellent traditions and work of leadership, faculty and staff of Kamehameha Schools Hawai‘i.”

Opened in 1996, Kamehameha Schools Hawai‘i is located on 312 acres in Kea‘au and serves 1,120 students in grades Kindergarten through 12th grade. The campus is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) and a member of the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS).

Kamehameha Schools is a private, educational, charitable trust founded and endowed by the legacy of Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop. The year 2012 marks the 125th anniversary of the opening of Kamehameha Schools, which today operates a statewide educational system enrolling over 6,900 students of Hawaiian ancestry at K-12 campuses on O‘ahu, Maui and Hawai‘i and 31 preschool sites statewide. Over 40,000 additional Hawaiian learners and caregivers are served each year through a range of other Kamehameha Schools’ outreach programs, community collaborations and financial aid opportunities in Hawai‘i and across the continental United States.

Kamehameha Schools Resolves Lawsuit Against Jane and John Doe and Eric Grant

Aloha mai kākou. As many of you may recall, Kamehameha Schools filed a lawsuit against Jane and John Doe and their former attorney, Eric Grant, in 2008, arising from their breach of our 2007 settlement agreement that ended the Does’ 2003 challenge of Kamehameha’s Hawaiian-preference admissions policy. This message is to let you know that Kamehameha Schools has resolved these claims with a stipulated judgment against the Does and a settlement agreement with their former attorney, Eric Grant. This case is over.

A stipulated judgment against the Does for $1 million plus $400,000 in legal fees and costs has been entered in favor of Kamehameha Schools.

In conjunction with the entry of judgment, the Does apologized to Kamehameha Schools for Mr. Goemans’ disclosure of the settlement terms. The Does, through their attorneys, said: “We deeply regret having become involved in the current litigation with Kamehameha Schools, we are very sorry for the harm caused to the schools, which led to this lawsuit. We are sorry for Mr. Goemans’ actions.”

In conjunction with the settlement, Eric Grant said, “I deeply regret that Kamehameha Schools was deprived of confidentiality, which was an important benefit of the 2007 Settlement Agreement. I likewise regret that my efforts, including procuring a court order barring Mr. Goemans from disclosing the settlement terms, were not enough to prevent him from doing so.”

While we have agreed not to disclose other specific terms of the settlement beyond the points above, we want you to know that we are pleased with this outcome. The settlement provides just compensation to Kamehameha Schools for the wrongful behavior of a member of the Does’ former legal team and for the Does’ and Grant’s expressions of regret. Kamehameha will receive payment from both the Does and Grant for the harm done, and we have avoided the expense and distraction of another time-consuming court case. This settlement ends Kamehameha Schools v. John and Jane Doe and Eric Grant.

We are happy to put this episode behind us, free of any residual drag on our ability and resources to focus on fulfilling the vision of our Founder. We want to express our sincere gratitude to our beneficiaries and community who have stood by Kamehameha Schools throughout.

Most importantly, we mahalo Ke Akua for providing continuing guidance, inspiration and strength at every step along this journey. We are truly thankful and blessed.

Me ka ha‘aha‘a,

J. Douglas Ing, Chair
Micah Kane
Janeen Olds
Corbett Kalama
Diane Plotts
Dee Jay Mailer, CEO

Kamehameha Schools Bishop Estate – Hawaii Campus 2011 Summer School Open House – Hayden Shines!

Today was Kamehameha Schools Bishop Estate Hawaii Campus 2011 summer school open house.

My son showed me some of the stuff that he was learning in the classroom before the day actually began.

Once all the kids arrived, it was time to head out to meet the other 2nd grade classes for the morning “oli” or Hawaiian for prayer.

My son told me he had a surprise for me… and it turned out that he was selected to lead the morning “Oli”.

Here is a short video of him leading the classes:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=evosCA2P2nU]

After the morning Oli was done, the parents watched a slide show of pictures from the events that the kids had been doing.

The parents then were treated to four performances in the schools cafeteria.

And here is the clip of the second grade performance:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCipHJRl2vM]

For those that don’t know… my son was fortunate enough to be one of forty kindergartners to get selected go to this school a couple years ago after almost a year of testing and application procedures.  Normally the summer school programs are set aside for students that aren’t accepted into KSBE on a regular basis so I feel very fortunate that he’s getting summer school provided for him as well!

Kamehameha Schools on Values-Based Land Ownership

A gift of land was the seed that blossomed into Kamehameha Schools. That gift continues to fund the education of thousands of Hawaiian learners each year. To maintain this resource into perpetuity, Kamehameha relies on five values to guide land decisions.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rj-P5DADVuA]

Hawaii County Fair Opens in Hilo this Weekend – Check Out the Kamehameha Schools Booth

Media Release:

As the 60th annual Hawai`i County Fair opens in Hilo this weekend, island residents are encouraged to visit the Kamehameha Schools booth located in the Afook-Chinen Civic Auditorium. On every day of the four-day fair, a variety of farmers and ranchers who lease agricultural lands from Kamehameha Schools will take center stage providing tasty Hawai`i-grown samplings and products for sale.

Featured participants include Hawaii Beef Producers from Pa`auilo. Best known for their grass-fed cattle grown antibiotic and hormone free, Hawaii Beef Producers will be serving samples of savory beef stew and fair goers will have the opportunity to buy fresh meat rancher direct.

Hawaiian Pineapple Company, one of Hawai`i’s few remaining pineapple producers, is best known for their premium field ripened pineapple and sweet apple banana.  Most recently, however, they have been experimenting with cacao.  Come indulge in their newest chocolate creations which will be featured at the Kamehameha Schools booth, along with their apple banana, on Friday evening.

Stop by the KS booth on Saturday to taste delicious treats from Kona Dragon Fruit Inc., farming dragon fruit and mango on 19 acres of KS lands in South Kona, and Hawaii Island Gourmet Products, known to many for their signature Atebara potato chips. This Hilo-based company is much loved for their taro, sweet potato and shrimp chips and their mouthwatering cookies.

“We like supporting Hawai`i Island diversified agriculture,” said Clyde Oshiro who, with son-in-law Nimr Tamimi, formed Hawaii Island Gourmet Products in 2002 after purchasing Atebara. “We’re growing taro and sweet potato of our own on a few acres leased from Kamehameha Schools on the Hilo coast.”

On Sunday, enjoy samples courtesy of The Kona Coffee and Tea Company, winner of the Kona Coffee Cultural Festival’s 2009 Gevalia Cupping Contest.  This family owned and operated company will impress you with their specialty 100% Kona coffee.  The Private Reserve and Malia Ohana roasts will also be available for sample and purchase.

Island-wide there are roughly 800 Kamehameha Schools agricultural tenants farming a variety of crops that help sustain local agriculture and support the educational mission.

As part of the land legacy endowed by Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop, Kamehameha Schools stewards about 180,000 acres of agricultural lands statewide. On Hawai`i Island alone, more than 72,000 acres of high-value agricultural lands support a reliable food source, local jobs and a sustainable future for all of Hawai`i, and serves the educational mission established through the legacy of Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop.

For more information on how to support local farmers or to view a list of Kamehameha Schools agricultural tenants with commercial businesses, visit www.ksbe.edu/land.