• what-to-do-media
  • puako-general-store
  • Cheneviere Couture
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    December 2018
    S M T W T F S
    « May    
     1
    2345678
    9101112131415
    16171819202122
    23242526272829
    3031  

After Dark Goes OUT of the Park in 2016

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s popular After Dark program will travel to Hilo and Kailua-Kona this year to celebrate the park’s centennial anniversary in those communities. This year is also the 100-year anniversary of the National Park Service.

A view of Ka Lae (South Point) from Kahuku. NPS Photo/David Boyle

A view of Ka Lae (South Point) from Kahuku. NPS Photo/David Boyle

NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Mokupāpapa Discovery Center in downtown Hilo will host four one-hour After Dark Out of the Park programs on Feb. 24, June 29, Aug. 17, and Oct. 26. Each program is free and starts at 7 p.m. Free parking is available.

In Kailua-Kona, the Kona Historical Society will host an After Dark Out of the Park program on July 27 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the West Hawai‘i Civic Center. Free parking is available. See the schedule below for Kona and Hilo presentations:

A two-tone ‘ōhi‘a lehua at Kahuku. NPS Photo/David Boyle

A two-tone ‘ōhi‘a lehua at Kahuku. NPS Photo/David Boyle

After Dark Out of the Park: The Natural Resources of Kahuku. Park Botanist Sierra McDaniel and Wildlife Biologist Jon Faford discuss the natural treasures of the Kahuku Unit, former ranch lands acquired by the National Park Service in 2003, and the challenges of conserving the native species like nēnē, hāhā and Mauna Loa silverswords that cling to life here. Sponsored by Mokupāpapa Discovery Center.

  • When: Wed., Feb. 24, 2016 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Mokupāpapa Discovery Center in downtown Hilo, 76 Kamehameha Avenue

After Dark Out of the Park: The Evolution of Landscape Restoration at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Since its establishment in 1916, various attempts to conserve and protect the park’s rich biological resources have been made by the Territory of Hawai‘i, the National Park Service, and citizen scientists – with varying degrees of success. Beginning in 1970, park staff adopted a systematic park-wide approach to managing species and habitats which continues today. Join Chief of Natural Resource Management Dr. Rhonda Loh to learn more about these Special Ecological Areas, or SEAs, and decades of successful restoration in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Sponsored by Mokupāpapa Discovery Center.

  • When: Wed., June 29, 2016 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Mokupāpapa Discovery Center in downtown Hilo, 76 Kamehameha Avenue

After Dark Out of the Park: The Establishment of Hawaii National Park. Park Archeologist Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura shares the story of the development of Hawaii National Park, and presents a fascinating look at the extraordinary individuals of the late 19th and early 20th centuries who were key in creating the national park that then included the summits of Kīlauea and Haleakalā on Maui. Sponsored by the Kona Historical Society as part of its Hanohano ‘O Kona Lecture Series.

  • When: Wed., July 27 at 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
  • Where: West Hawai‘i Civic Center, 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Highway

After Dark Out of the Park: The Establishment of Hawaii National Park. Park Archeologist Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura shares the story of the development of Hawaii National Park, and presents a fascinating look at the extraordinary individuals of the late 19th and early 20th centuries who were key in creating the national park that then included the summits of Kīlauea and Haleakalā on Maui. Sponsored by Mokupāpapa Discovery Center.

  • When: Wed., Aug. 17 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Mokupāpapa Discovery Center in downtown Hilo, 76 Kamehameha Avenue

After Dark Out of the Park: LiDAR Sheds New Light on Hidden Gems. LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) technology is used to digitize archeological resources including ancient footprints, petroglyph fields and agricultural systems. Join Park Archeologist Dusten Robbins to learn how the park uses LiDAR in managing cultural resources, and future uses of this exciting technology. Sponsored by Mokupāpapa Discovery Center.

  • When: Wed., Oct. 26 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Mokupāpapa Discovery Center in downtown Hilo, 76 Kamehameha Avenue

The After Dark Out of the Park series will be offered on a Wednesday, and each presentation will be followed by a complementary hike or excursion in the park the following Saturday to encourage people to “Find Your Park.” Visit the park website for the Centennial Hike Series schedule, and After Dark In the Park programs.

In 2016, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park will celebrate 100 years  of connecting people to, and caring for, the extraordinary landscape, native plants and animals and Hawaiian culture linked with Kīlauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes.

The Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Centennial After Dark in the Park, After Dark Out of the Park, and Hike Series is free, and no advance registration is required. The series is co-sponsored by the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and donations are greatly appreciated.

After Dark in the Park – May Events

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in May. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

NEW! Artist-in-Residence Program. In conjunction with the non-profit National Parks Arts Foundation, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park will launch its first Artist-in-Residence program, continuing the legacy of the famous volcano-inspired artists. The debut artist will be Master of Hawaiian featherwork, Rick Makanaaloha Kia‘imeaokekanaka San Nicolas. Rick will provide a public exhibit and lecture about his artwork, his inspiration from Hawai‘i’s sacred volcanoes, and the history and culture of Hawai‘i. His work is currently on exhibit at the Volcano House, and will soon be in Honolulu at the Bishop Museum. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, and your $2 donation helps support After Dark programs.
When: Tues., May 6, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

The 1924

The 1924 eruption of Kilauea. NPS Photo

The 1924 Explosive Eruption of Kīlauea. The May 1924 eruption from Halema‘uma‘u Crater caused community turmoil and one death. Yet of all the known explosive eruptions of Kīlauea before 1924, it was the smallest—the runt of the litter. This small eruption and its magnified impact illustrate the interplay between hazard (what the volcano provides) and risk (the impact of the hazard on us).  On the 90th anniversary of the eruption, HVO geologist Don Swanson and volunteer Ben Gaddis address what happened in 1924, what caused the explosive eruption, and how it stacks up against the much larger eruptions of the past and, probably, the future. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, and your $2 donation helps support After Dark programs.
When: Tues., May 13, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Tī Leaf Kūpe‘e Demonstration. Teana Kahoohanohano shares her knowledge and love of hula adornments. Learn how tī leaves are used to create stunning wristlets and anklets worn for certain hula dances. Watch as a simple leave is transformed into a work of art before your eyes. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., May 14 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

After Dark in the Park Goes to the Movies. Sam Low presents his classic seafaring film, The Navigators: Pathfinders of the Pacific. Anthropologist and filmmaker Sam Low tells the real story of how a thousand years before Europeans knew the Pacific existed, Polynesian seafarers explored and settled this vast ocean using only natural signs to guide them. It’s one of the most amazing stories of human exploration and settlement, and it’s never been properly told. Shot on location in Huahine, Fiji, Satawai and other locations, the 1983 documentary features traditional Satawalese nagivator Mau Piailug, the sailing vessel Hokule‘a, and her crew. Low will be in attendance to answer questions and sign his new book, Hawaiki Rising – Hokule‘a, Nainoa Thompson and the Hawaiian Renaissance. Both the book and the DVD will be available for sale through the Hawaii Pacific Parks Association bookstore the evening of the program. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, and your $2 donation helps support After Dark programs.
When: Tues., May 20 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Mark Yamanaka

Mark Yamanaka

Mark Yamanaka in Concert. Come enjoy free island music with Hilo’s own Mark Yamanaka, a four-time Nā Hōkū Hanohano award-winning singer and songwriter. Mark will share original songs from his debut CD, Lei Pua Kenikeni. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., May 21 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Ka‘ū ‘Ohana Day. Calling keiki of all ages to join park rangers and take a closer look at the park’s Kahuku Unit for a day of activities. Connect the culture, people and the ‘āina (land) through mo‘olelo (stories), GPS, and compass. A free lunch will be provided when you sign up by calling (808) 985-6019. Deadline to register is May 16. Sponsored by the park, Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and the Queen Liliuokalani Children’s Center. Free.
When: Sat., May 24 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where: Kahuku Unit, at mile marker 70.5 in Ka‘ū on the mauka side of Highway 11

Ohe Kapela

‘Ohe Kapela

‘Ohe Kapala Demonstration. ‘Ohe kapala, or bamboo stamps, were utilized to present many unique designs for traditional Hawaiian kapa.  Today, these exceptional designs are being used as patterns on all types of fabric. Join Park Ranger Koa Johnasen as he demonstrates how ‘ohe (bamboo) are carved into beautiful designs and how they are used. There will be samples and a hands-on opportunity to learn about this distinctive art form. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., May 28 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

After Dark in the Park April Events at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in April. To celebrate the Merrie Monarch Festival’s 51st anniversary, special cultural presentations are offered April 23, 24, and 25. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

A demonstration of ‘ohe kapala, or bamboo stamping, at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park  NPS photo/Jay Robinson.

A demonstration of ‘ohe kapala, or bamboo stamping, at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park NPS photo/Jay Robinson.

Adventures in the Philippines. Experience the Philippines through the eyes of Ranger Adrian Boone, who visited last November as Typhoon Haiyan bore down on the island nation. His travels included several UNESCO World Heritage Sites, including the 2,000-year-old Banaue Rice Terraces and Puerta Princesa Subterranean River National Park. He explored the hanging coffins of Sagada, the limestone caves of Sumaguing, northern Luzon, Manila, the ancient Spanish city Vigan in Ilocos Sur, and much more! Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, and your $2 donation helps support After Dark programs.
When: Tues., April 8, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Earthquake Storms: The Past & Present of the San Andreas Fault. Dr. John Dvorak explains the San Andreas Fault: what it is, where it is, and how it works. His new book, Earthquake Storms: The Fascinating History and Volatile Future of the San Andreas Fault will be available for sale, and it explains how the recent seismic lull in could result in an “earthquake storm” of large earthquakes. Dr. Dvorak studied volcanoes and earthquakes for the U.S. Geological Survey, taught at the University of Hawai‘i, and has written numerous cover articles for scientific publications. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, and your $2 donation helps support After Dark programs.
When: Tues., April 22, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Events Honoring the Merrie Monarch Festival. The park will offer nearly a dozen cultural programs to celebrate the 51st anniversary of the Merrie Monarch Festival, from April 23-25. All of these programs are part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Check the park website to print posters of these and other events at http://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/events.htm.

Wednesday, April 23

Kalo Demonstration.
Join Edna and Sam Baldado as they share the cultural uses of kalo, or taro plant. See how each plant is identified by its leaf, steam, corm, color, and shape. Discover the hundreds of varieties of kalo in Hawaii, and how kalo was used for food, medicine, glue, dyes, and much more.
When: Wed., April 23 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai:

Feather Kāhili Workshop. Helene Hayselden will demonstrate the art of making a feather kāhili, a symbol of royalty. Watch or join in and make your kāhili to take home.
When: Wed., April 23 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai:

Music by Rupert Tripp, Jr. Enjoy the beautiful music and voice of singer, songwriter, and multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award nominee, Rupert Tripp, Jr.
When: Wed., April 23 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai:

La‘au Lapau. Ka‘ohu Monfort shares her knowledge and love of the island’s native plants. Learn how her passion for plants and the Hawaiian culture are used to heal and nourish. See and touch a variety of medicinal plants, including kuku‘i, ‘ōlena, ha‘uowī, noni, kī, and guava.
When: Wed., April 23 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai:

Thursday, April 24

Feather Work. Watch Vi Makuakāne demonstrate the intricate art of feather work. Thousands of feathers are sorted, graded, trimmed, and sewn to a base. The result is a beautiful lei hulu, or feather lei.
When: Thurs., April 24 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Kenneth Makuakāne. This multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano award-winning singer, songwriter, and producer will play original songs from his solo albums and compositions.
When: Thurs., April 24 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

‘Ohe Kapala. ‘Ohe kapala, or bamboo stamps, are used to create distinct designs for traditional Hawaiian kapa. Join Keiko Mercado as she demonstrates how ‘ohe (bamboo) are carved into beautiful designs and how they are used. There will be samples and a hands-on opportunity to learn this Hawaiian art form.
When: Thurs., April 24 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Lei Making. Patricia Ka‘ula will demonstrate different styles of lei making: hilo, haku, hili and Ku‘i. Lei is used for everything from blessing crops, adornments for hula dancers, healing and sacred rituals, to show royal status or rank, honor guests, as peace offerings, to celebrating a birth.
When: Thurs., April 24 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Robert Cazimero Book Signing. Robert Cazimero, a highly regarded and respected kumu hula, will sign the latest edition of Men of Hula, which will be available for sale. This 2011 edition by award-winning author Benton Sen chronicles how the hula teacher and Nā Hālau Kamalei shattered the stereotypical image of hula (girls in grass skirts and coconut bras) by revitalizing the masculine aspects of the ancient dance.
When: Thurs., April 24 from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center

Friday, April 25

Kapa Demonstration. Kapa maker Ku‘uleimomi Makuakāne-Salāve‘a shares the art of kapa making. See how the inner bark of the paper mulberry tree is beaten into cloth.
When: Fri., April 25 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Ulana Lauhala. Members of ‘Aha Pūhala o Puna perpetuate the ancient art of lauhala weaving. Observe this art form and learn to weave your own lauhala star from the leaves of the hala, or pandanus tree.
When: Fri., April 25 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Music by Lito Arkangel. Listen to music by Lito Arkangel, one of Hawai‘i Island’s most popular entertainers, as he plays his original compositions and Hawaiian favorites.
When: Fri., April 25 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Volcanoes National Park “After Dark in the Park” for January

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in January – which is also Volcano Awareness Month, established by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Kīlauea Volcano’s East Rift Zone: 31 Years and Still Erupting. Jan. 3, 2014, marks the 31st anniversary of Kīlauea Volcano’s ongoing East Rift Zone eruption. During its first three years, spectacular lava fountains spewed episodically from the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent. Since then, nearly continuous lava effusion has built a vast plain of pāhoehoe lava that stretches from the volcano’s rift zone to the sea.

NPS Photo

NPS Photo

Although the eruption has produced dramatic lava flows in past years, it has been relatively subdued in recent years, with mostly steady, but unusually weak, activity. Tim Orr, a geologist with the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, will review highlights from the past 31 years and talk about recent developments on the volcano’s East Rift Zone. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 7 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Traditional Lei Making. Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia is a kumu hula, or teacher of hula. He has taught his students at Hālau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu since 1996, where lei making is a vital and important part of their tradition. Join Ab and his wife Puamae‘ole  O’Mahoney as they continue to teach traditional lei making. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 8, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Happenings in Halema‘uma‘u: An Update on Kīlauea Volcano’s Summit Eruption. In March 2008, a new volcanic vent opened within Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the summit of Kīlauea. Since then, the eruption has consisted of continuous degassing, occasional explosive events, and fluctuating lava lake activity in an open crater that is now 520’ x 690’ in size. While thousands of visitors flock to see the nighttime glow emitted by the lava lake, the volcano’s summit eruption also provides an abundance of data and insights for scientists. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Matt Patrick will present an update on Kīlauea Volcano’s summit eruption, including an overview of the volcanic processes occurring within the vent. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 14, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kai Ho‘opi‘i in Concert. Come enjoy an evening of Hawaiian music, through the sweet voice of Kai Ho‘opi‘i, sharing the music of his ‘ohana from Kahakuloa, Maui. Kai is a winner of the Aloha Festivals Hawaiian falsetto signing contest. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 15 from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Earthquakes and Explosions: Shocking events at Kāpoho and Halema‘uma‘u in 1924. In April 1924, Kāpoho residents were evacuated as hundreds of earthquakes shook their village.  In the weeks that followed, huge explosions wracked the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. Using USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory logs, geologic field notes, National Park Service reports, newspaper accounts, photographs, and other records from 1924, Ben Gaddis, a long-time HVO volunteer, will tell the story of Kīlauea Volcano’s most violent eruption of the 20th century from the perspective of the people who lived through it. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 21 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kapa Kuiki: Traditional Hawaiian Quilting. Cyndy Leinani Martinez has been practicing the art of kapa kuiki since she was old enough to hold a needle, learning from her mother and grandmother about the family craft. Always passionate, Cyndy has kept the family traditions alive for more than 60 years, and is now president of the quilting club in Waimea. Join this experienced, third generation quilter as she shares the traditional art of Hawaiian quilting.  Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 22, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Decades of Degassing at Kīlauea: Wake Up and Smell the Coughing! As magma rises from the Earth’s mantle to the surface, the expansion of volcanic gases drives the spectacular lava fountains and flows erupted by Hawaiian volcanoes.  While Kīlauea still produces picturesque lava flows from its East Rift Zone, and its summit crater hosts a dynamic lava pond, it also releases huge amounts of volcanic gases which have negatively impacted downwind communities, agriculture, and infrastructure for years. Jeff Sutton and Tamar Elias, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geochemists, will offer an update about these gases, especially those related to the 2008‐2013 activity at Halema‘uma‘u Crater, and will talk about volcanic pollution (vog)—how it forms and what we’ve learned about its effects on our island environment. An optional “gas- tasting” party will follow the talk. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 28 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

 

September Schedule – After Dark in the Park at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in September. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and your $2 donation helps support park programs.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Haku Mele: A Beginner’s Hawaiian Songwriter’s Retreat. Join Hawaiian music, language and haku mele experts, Kenneth Makuakāne and Kaliko Beamer-Trapp, to create original Hawaiian compositions through interactive presentations and small group sessions in haku mele and leo. Class is free and limited to 20 participants. To reserve a space, contact Elizabeth Bell at 985-6019, or email Elizabeth_bell@nps.gov no later than Aug. 30. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Sat. and Sun., Sept. 7 & 8, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days
Where: Environmental Educational Center

Escalante

Grand Staircase-Escalante photo by Jay Robinson

Grand Adventures in the Southwest Desert. Some of the world’s most sublime landscapes await exploration in southern Utah and northern Arizona – where deep canyons, painted mesas, hoodoos and arches are sculpted from layers of rock deposited over eons. Join Park Ranger Jay Robinson on a raft journey into the heart of the Grand Canyon National Park, which like Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Encounter bighorn sheep, condors and lizards, and sleep beneath the stars with hairy scorpions, tarantulas and rattlesnakes! Explore narrow slot canyons and the slick rock deserts of Bryce Canyon and Zion National Parks and the newly created Vermillion Cliffs and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Sept. 10 from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

An Evening of Music with Hilo One. Come enjoy Hawaiian music by entertainers Hilo One, featuring Likeke Teanio (lead ‘ukulele, slack key guitar), Aaron Agres (electric upright bass), and Russell Mauga (12-string guitar), as they enliven the evening with their wonderful instrumentation and vocals. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., Sept. 18, from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Ulana Lauhala. Learn the art of weaving with leaves of the pandanus tree, or hala, from gathering the material, preparation, to the final product. Join practitioners Amy Kaawaloa and Malia Macabio as they continue to perpetuate this beautiful Hawaiian craft and share the intricacies of weaving lauhala. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Sept. 25 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Kahuku Junior Ranger Day. Keiki of all ages are invited to join park rangers and explore the park’s southernmost section of Kahuku, in Ka‘ū. Connect the culture, people, and ‘āina through ‘oli, GPS, and compass on a short and easy walk. See, smell and touch a variety of kalo as Sam and Edna Baldado share their love for the many varieties and uses of this native staple food. Bring a refillable water bottle, sunscreen, hat, long pants, jacket and closed-toe shoes. At least one adult must accompany the children. The event and lunch are free, but registration is required. Call (808) 985-6019 by Sept. 24. Co-sponsored by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, and the Queen Lili‘uokalani Children’s Center.
When: Sat., Sept. 28 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where: The Kahuku Unit is located on the mauka (uphill) side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5. Meet near the parking area.

After Dark in the Park December Programs at the Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors throughout December.  These programs are free, but park entrance fees may apply. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Free Hawaiian Music Concert.  Enjoy an evening of music by talented songwriters. In August 2012, the park sponsored a three-day “Hawaiian Music Songwriters Retreat” that attracted participants from Hawai‘i Island and as far away as California. These talented songwriters gather again to show off their newly honed skills. The featured artists include Kauhane Heloca, Ida Hanohano, Desiree Cruz, Doodie Downs, Ku‘u Makuakāne, Ali‘i Keana‘aina, Pililani Pua-Kaipo and Olanui Robbins. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., Dec. 19 at 6:30 p.m. (doors open at 6:15 p.m.)
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

John and Hope Keawe

John and Hope Keawe

 John Keawe “Cool December Night” Concert.  Award-winning kiho‘alu (slack key) guitarist, composer and recording artist, John Keawe warms the Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium with his music. His wife Hope provides moving interpretations of his music with her graceful hula. Winner of the 2009 Nā Hōkū Hanohano Slack Key Album of the Year award for his CD “Hawai‘i Island is My Home”, John and Hope will ring in the holidays with their music, hula and aloha spirit. This program is expected to be well-attended so come early for seating. John’s CDs and DVDs will be available for purchase the evening of the performance. This program featuring John and Hope Keawe’s lovely music and hula was produced by the University of Hawai‘i-Mānoa Outreach College’s Statewide Cultural Extension Program. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18. at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.)
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park January 2012 Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Programs

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors throughout January – which is also Volcano Awareness Month. These programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Mark your calendars for these upcoming events:

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Courtesy USGS)

Kīlauea Volcano’s East Rift Eruption: 29 Years and Counting. Jan. 3, 2012 marks the 29th anniversary of Kīlauea’s ongoing east rift zone eruption. During its first three years, spectacular lava fountains spewed episodically from the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent. Since then, nearly continuous lava effusion has built a vast plain that stretches from the east rift to the sea. This past year has seen many changes, including fissure eruptions and the collapse and refilling of the vent’s lava lake. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Geologist Tim Orr will review highlights from the past 29 years and discuss recent developments on Kīlauea’s east rift zone. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

When: Tues., Jan. 3 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Courtesy USGS)

What’s Happening in Halema‘uma‘u Crater? In March 2008, a new volcanic vent opened in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea. Since then, the eruption has consisted of continuous degassing, occasional explosive events, ongoing ash emissions, and fluctuating lava pond activity in an open vent that has grown to more than 430 feet wide. While the eruption enthralls visitors, it also provides an abundance of data and insights for scientists. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Matt Patrick will present an overview of Kīlauea’s summit eruption. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

When: Tues., Jan. 10 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Courtesy USGS)

Story of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory’s First 100 Years. In 2012, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reaches its centennial milestone – 100 years of continuous volcano monitoring in Hawai‘i. Join HVO Scientist-in-Charge Jim Kauahikaua as he talks about Thomas Jaggar’s vision for the observatory, how Frank Perret began the work of monitoring Kīlauea Volcano, and HVO’s accomplishments during the past century. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

When: Tues., Jan. 17 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Continue reading