Census Bureau Releases More Data – Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Population Grew by 2.9 Percent

The U.S. Census Bureau today released a set of estimates showing that 50.4 percent of our nation’s population younger than age 1 were minorities as of July 1, 2011. This is up from 49.5 percent from the 2010 Census taken April 1, 2010. A minority is anyone who is not single-race white and not Hispanic.

The population younger than age 5 was 49.7 percent minority in 2011, up from 49.0 percent in 2010. A population greater than 50 percent minority is considered “majority-minority.”

These are the first set of population estimates by race, Hispanic origin, age and sex since the 2010 Census. They examine population change for these groups nationally, as well as within all states and counties, between Census Day (April 1, 2010) and July 1, 2011. Also released were population estimates for Puerto Rico and its municipios by age and sex.

There were 114 million minorities in 2011, or 36.6 percent of the U.S. population. In 2010, it stood at 36.1 percent.

There were five majority-minority states or equivalents in 2011: Hawaii (77.1 percent minority), the District of Columbia (64.7 percent), California (60.3 percent), New Mexico (59.8 percent) and Texas (55.2 percent). No other state had a minority population greater than 46.4 percent of the total.

More than 11 percent (348) of the nation’s 3,143 counties were majority-minority as of July 1, 2011, with nine of these counties achieving this status since April 1, 2010. Maverick, Texas, had the largest share (96.8 percent) of its population in minority groups, followed by Webb, Texas (96.4 percent) and Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska (96.2 percent).

Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders (NHPI)

  • The nation’s Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population was 1.4 million in 2011 and grew by 2.9 percent since 2010.
  • Hawaii had the largest population of Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders of any state (359,000) in 2011. California had the largest numeric increase since 2010 (9,000). Hawaii had the highest percentage of NHPI (26.1 percent).
  • Honolulu had the largest population of NHPI of any county (235,000) in 2011. Los Angeles County had the largest numeric increase since 2010 (2,700). Hawaii County had the highest percentage of NHPI (34.0 percent).

Full article here: Most children under the age of 1 are minorities, Census reports

Census Bureau Releasing More Data for Arkansas, Hawaii, Iowa and Maryland

The U.S. Department of Commerce, U.S. Census Bureau IS CURRENTLY CONDUCTING SURVEYS IN HAWAII.  The American Community Survey is just one of the studies that the Census does on an on going basis.

Next week the Census Bureau will be releasing more information for Arkansas, Hawaii, Iowa and Maryland.

What:
Next week, the U.S. Census Bureau will release the 2010 Census Summary File 2 for Arkansas, Hawaii, Iowa and Maryland. During December through April, the Census Bureau will provide statistics for states on a flow basis. These Summary File 2 tables will add a new layer of detail to the population and housing topics released last year from the 2010 Census. Information, such as relationship and homeownership, previously available only for an area’s entire population will now be available for specific race and ethnic groups in that community.

Summary File 2 will be available for up to 331 population groups and each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. The information will be available for a variety of geographic areas, down to the census tract level.

When:
The Summary File 2 for these states will be available on an embargoed basis for accredited media who are registered for access Tuesday, Feb. 28 at 10 a.m. The embargo will be lifted and the information released publicly Thursday, March 1 at 12:01 a.m.

To apply for embargo access, go to our Newsroom at http://www.census.gov/newsroom and click on “Embargoed Releases.” Please review the Embargo Policy carefully before submitting the embargo registration form.

Online Press Kit:
For more information about the release of Summary File 2, please visit http://2010.census.gov/news/press-kits/sf2/summary-file-2.html.

Average Age of Hawaii Resident 38.6 Years Old

Logo for the 2010 United States Census.

Image via Wikipedia

Media Release:

The U.S. Census Bureau today released the Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Alabama, Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. The demographic profiles provide 2010 Census data on age and sex distributions, race, Hispanic or Latino origin, household relationship and type, the group quarters population, and housing occupancy and tenure (whether the housing occupant owns or rents). Throughout May, these profiles are being released on a rolling basis for all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.

The profile includes more than 150 data items in all, plus percentage distributions. Highlights from the state data released today include:

Hawaii

  • The median age was 38.6.
  • The average household size was 2.89 people per household.
  • Among the state’s occupied housing units, 57.7 percent were owned, compared with 42.3 percent that were rented.

*UPDATE* Census Data Being Released TODAY

Media Release:

Today, the Census Bureau shipped local 2010 Census data to the governor and leadership of the state legislature in Hawaii. After confirmation of receipt, usually within 24 hours of shipment, the Census Bureau will issue a news release with five custom tables of data for the state. Because of time zone differences and the increased time required to ship to Hawaii, the data will be released to the public Thursday, around 3 p.m. EST. At that time, the full set of data will be available via FTP download at http://www2.census.gov/census_2010/01-Redistricting_File–PL_94-171/. Within 24 hours after release, the data will be posted on the Census Bureau’s new American FactFinder site http://factfinder2.census.gov.

The data will include summaries of population totals, as well as data on race, Hispanic origin and voting age for multiple geographies within the state, such as census blocks, tracts, voting districts, cities, counties and school districts.

According to Public Law 94-171, the Census Bureau must provide redistricting data to the 50 states no later than April 1 of the year following the census. As a result, the Census Bureau is delivering the data state-by-state on a flow basis in February and March. All states will receive their data by April 1, 2011.

For More Information:

For more information on the Census Bureau’s Redistricting Data Program, visit http://www.census.gov/rdo and http://2010.census.gov/news/press-kits/redistricting.html.

Census Bureau to Release Local Hawaii 2010 Data Next Week

Media Release:

What: Next week, the U.S. Census Bureau anticipates releasing local-level 2010 Census population counts for Alabama, Colorado, Hawaii, Missouri, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington. For each state, the Census Bureau will provide summaries of population totals, as well as data on race, Hispanic origin and voting age for multiple geographies within the state, such as census blocks, tracts, voting districts, cities, counties and school districts.

According to Public Law 94-171, the Census Bureau must provide redistricting data to the 50 states no later than April 1 of the year following the census. As a result, the Census Bureau is delivering the data state-by-state on a flow basis in February and March. All states will receive their data by April 1, 2011.

When: Each state’s geographic products and redistricting data are first delivered to the state’s leadership, such as the governor and majority and minority leaders in the state legislative body. Upon confirmation of delivery to the state leadership, we will release a news release with five custom tables of data. Within 24 hours, the full set of five detailed tables will be available to the public online at http://factfinder2.census.gov.

For more information on the Census Bureau’s Redistricting Data Program, visit  http://www.census.gov/rdo.

Hawaii Population Up 12.3% According to US Census Bureau

The US Census Bureau released the population counts today and Hawaii is up 12.3% According to the US Census Bureau’s Website.

Unfortunately, this was not enough to gain a seat in reapportionment.

Media Release:

The U.S. Census Bureau announced today that the 2010 Census showed the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2010, was 308,745,538.

The resident population represented an increase of 9.7 percent over the 2000 U.S. resident population of 281,421,906. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke, Acting Commerce Deputy Secretary Rebecca Blank and Census Bureau Director Robert Groves unveiled the official counts at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.

“A big thanks to the American public for its overwhelming response to the 2010 Census,” U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke said. “The result was a successful count that came in on time and well under budget, with a final 2010 Census savings of $1.87 billion.”

Rebecca Blank, now Acting Deputy Secretary of Commerce who has overseen the 2010 Census as Under Secretary for Economic Affairs, echoed Locke. “The 2010 Census was a massive undertaking, and in reporting these first results, we renew our commitment to our great American democracy peacefully, fairly and openly for the 23rd time in our nation’s history.”

The U.S. resident population represents the total number of people in the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

The most populous state was California (37,253,956); the least populous, Wyoming (563,626). The state that gained the most numerically since the 2000 Census was Texas (up 4,293,741 to 25,145,561) and the state that gained the most as a percentage of its 2000 Census count was Nevada (up 35.1% to 2,700,551).

Regionally, the South and the West picked up the bulk of the population increase, 14,318,924 and 8,747,621, respectively. But the Northeast and the Midwest also grew: 1,722,862 and 2,534,225.

Additionally, Puerto Rico’s resident population was 3,725,789, a 2.2 percent decrease over the number counted a decade earlier.

Just before today’s announcement, Locke delivered the apportionment counts to President Obama, 10 days before the statutory deadline of Dec. 31. The apportionment totals were calculated by a congressionally defined formula, in accordance with Title 2 of the U.S. Code, to divide among the states the 435 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. The apportionment population consists of the resident population of the 50 states, plus the overseas military and federal civilian employees and their dependents living with them who could be allocated to a state. Each member of the House represents, on average, about 710,767 people. The populations of the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico are excluded from the apportionment population, as they do not have voting seats in Congress.

“The decennial count has been the basis for our representative form of government since 1790,” Groves said. “At that time, each member of the House represented about 34,000 residents. Since then, the House has more than quadrupled in size, with each member now representing about 21 times as many constituents.”

President Obama will transmit the apportionment counts to the 112th Congress during the first week of its first regular session in January. The reapportioned Congress will be the 113th, which convenes in January 2013.

Beginning in February and wrapping up by March 31, 2011, the Census Bureau will release demographic data to the states on a rolling basis so state governments can start the redistricting process.

Article I, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution calls for a census of the nation’s population every 10 years to apportion the House seats among the states. The 2010 Census is the 23rd census in our nation’s history.