Kahilu Theatre Presents West African Dance Yankady and Bluesman Keb Mo

“YANKADY, Here is Good?” is a new original work choreographed by Master Dancer and Musician Fara Tolno of Guinea, West Africa, and written and directed by Fara Tolno and Michal Anna Carrillo.

Fara Tolno

Fara Tolno

Kahilu Theatre will host two performances, on Saturday October 19 at 7pm and Sunday October 20 at 2pm.  Tickets are $20, $25, $35 and $45, with discounts for Kahilu Theatre members.

The YANKADY performance will be a feast for the senses that is sure to provoke thought and wonder. Steeped in West African Dance and Music, it is a fusion work that explores first and third world concepts through the vehicle of dance. The show will be performed by The Lavaroots Dance Company & Fara Tolno, with special guest artists Naby Bangoura, Sekou Camara, Shizuno Nasu and David Chapman.  Kahilu is delighted to feature this incredible multi-media dance production in its Season, and is also happy to offer two schools shows of YANKADY on Monday October 21st.

AND… On Thursday October 17th at 8pm, Kahilu Theatre presents Keb’ Mo’

Keb’ Mo’ is a multiple Grammy Award-winning blues musician – he is a singer, guitarist, and songwriter, originally from Chicago and currently living in Nashville, Tennessee.

Keb Mo

Keb Mo

He has been described as “a living link to the seminal Delta blues that travelled up the Mississippi River and across the expanse of America.” His post-modern blues style is influenced by many eras and genres, including folk, rock, jazz and pop. The moniker “Keb Mo” was coined by his original drummer, Quentin Dennard, and picked up by his record label as a “street talk” abbreviation of his given name.

Tickets for Keb Mo are priced $20, $34, $44 and $64, with discounts for Kahilu Theatre members.

Tickets for all Kahilu Theatre shows are available online 24/7 at www.kahilutheatre.org, or call 885-6868, or walk in to the Theatre, 9am to 12noon, Monday to Friday.

 

Car Stolen From House Next to UH Hilo

Stolen car! Please call police if you have seen it:

Aloha Friends,
I just had the misfortune of having my 2000 Tan Honda Civic stolen from in front of my house in Hilo next to UH Hilo. It would have happened after 7pm last night and 11am today. 

Stolen Car

Please keep an eye out for it.

License Plate # HCS 839

VIN # 1HGEJ6671YL004760

It has small body damage around the passenger side headlight- pic attached.

Mahalo,

Justin Avery

Another Puna Papaya Farm Attacked by Machetes

Another Puna Papaya farm has been attacked by one or more folks wielding machetes last night.  It’s at “Bernardos Farm” according to @Farmers4Choice.

Here is a picture of some of the damage:

Papaya Trees cut down at  Bernardos Farm.

Papaya Trees cut down at Bernardos Farm.

Farmers 4 Choice writes:

Really how dare you attack another small papaya grower? Who bought the machetes who destroyed over 100 trees this morning?

While the Hawaii Papaya Industry Association was gathering for their annual meeting and Mayor Billy Kenoi was speaking one farmer was absent; he was at his field with police overlooking destruction of his trees. A sad discovery awaited his trees had been chopped down!This is not okay, activism has gone to far now you have turned into eco terrorists! This is wrong!

We’re farmers not sex offenders, We will not register like a criminal…..
The criminals are the activists who have turned into ecoterrorists. Register the activists not farmers.
..

More here: We’re Farmers Not Sex Offenders

Missing Kayaker Found By Volcano National Park Ranger After Boat Breaks Up in Surf

The missing 48-year-old man who the Coast Guard and Hawaii County Police and Fire was searching for was located, Thursday.

Richard Gomez

Richard Gomez

Richard Gomez was found by a Volcano National Park Ranger after his boat broke up in the surf while attempting to come ashore, Sunday.

The park ranger rendered basic first-aid to Gomez and then assisted him to a local campsite.

“Had the boater in this case carried a reliable form of communication such as a handheld VHF radio, rescuers may have been able to eliminate several unnecessary search hours that resources were diverted from other missions,” said Cmdr. Steve Wheeler, Sector Honolulu Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator. “A VHF radio distress call can often be picked up and triangulated by the Coast Guard’s Rescue 21 system, which may reduce the search area and can change the outcome of incidents like this”.

Gomez departed Hilo in a small boat at 10 a.m., Sept. 20, 2013, and was reported missing by friends.

An HC-130 Hercules airplane crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point and crewmembers from the 87-foot Coast Guard Cutter Kittiwake assisted in the search.

– See more at: http://www.uscgnews.com/go/doc/4007/1916918/Missing-Hilo-man-located-safe#sthash.iY9vrGpZ.dpuf

Roger Christie Pleads Guilty to Distribution of Marijuana

I just got a tweet from @FreeRevChristie and it was in regards to the post that I posted the other day announcing that Roger Christie would be pleading guilty to distribution of marijuana charges today.

The tweet was short and simple and just said… “Happening”.

Roger Christie Guilty TweetI’m not sure when or if the judge has sentenced him yet.

UPDATE:

Andrew upadte

UPDATED:
Christie Release DateUPDATED:

…Christie plead guilty to one county of marijuana trafficking and two counts of failure to pay income taxes in 2008 and 2009.

Christie’s conditional plea agreement will still allow him to appeal pretrial rulings to the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Those rulings include the denial of his bid to dismiss the marijuana charges under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

His lawyer Thomas Otake said this week Christie will likely be sentenced to a five-year prison term. But Christie will have to serve only about six more months because he will be credited for the time he spent behind bars awaiting trial and because of the way federal authorities calculate prison sentences, Otake said…

More here: Big Island Marijuana Advocate Roger Christie Enters Guilty Plea

Senator Schatz Announces Over $1.5 Million for Native Hawaiian Programs

Today, U.S. Senator Brian Schatz announced $1.56 million from the Department of Health and Human Services for Native Hawaiian programs aimed at developing sustainable agriculture, creating stronger families, and expanding job opportunities by funding community-based projects.

Sen. Brian Schatz

Sen. Brian Schatz

“The grants announced today will provide job and educational opportunities that will help Native Hawaiian families ensure greater economic self-sufficiency, and better lives for their children,” said U.S. Senator Brian Schatz. “In Hawai‘i, our Native Hawaiian communities suffer from disproportionately high poverty and unemployment rates, making funding like this all the more impactful.”

  • $476,134 Sustainable Employment and Economic Development Strategy grant for the Hina’i: Hawai’i Center for Sustainable Food & Agriculture at the Hawaii Alliance for Community Based Economic Development from the Administration for Children and Families and the Administration for Native Americans
  • $396,498 Social And Economic Development grant for the Mana Mele Youth Development Project at Mana Maoli from the Administration for Children and Families and the Administration for Native Americans
  • $396,336 Social And Economic Development grant for Hale Mua at the Aha Kane Foundation for the Advancement Of Native Hawaiian to re-establish practices of traditional Hawaiian male responsibilities, including preparation of adolescent males for adulthood and their roles as men in families, community and society from the Administration for Children and Families and the Administration for Native Americans
  • $295,846 Sustainable Employment and Economic Development Strategy grant for the Employment Readiness and Career Pathways Support Services Program for Native Hawaiians at the Native Nations Education Foundation from the Administration for Children and Families and the Administration for Native Americans

 

Department of Health Investigating Dietary/Nutritional Supplement in 10 Cases of Acute Liver Inflamation and Failure

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) is investigating at least 10 cases of acute liver inflammation and failure that have occurred in the state from May through September 2013.  Thus far, the cases have been negative for infectious causes, have no history of engaging in high-risk social activities, and have no identified commonly expected risk factors for liver failure.

Department of Health

The only common finding among all the cases, at this point, is the use of a dietary or nutritional supplement for the purpose of weight loss and/or muscle gain in the past six months. Cases have been reported from every county in the state.

“We are still in the early stages of this investigation and we have not identified the exact source of this condition,” said Dr. Sarah Park, State Epidemiologist. “However, we want to alert the public because of our concern that more people could potentially become ill.”

DOH has issued a statewide Medical Advisory to clinicians, clinics, and emergency departments to facilitate identifying more possible cases. DOH is collaborating closely with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as well as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, as the investigation may involve a federally regulated supplement with national distribution.

The department urges all persons who use dietary or nutritional supplements for weight loss and/or muscle gain to do so with caution and under their health care providers’ guidance and monitoring. Persons who develop symptoms, such as abdominal pain or discomfort, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea and/or vomiting, and yellow skin or eyes, should consult their health care provider immediately.

DOH is responsible for monitoring, investigating, preventing, and controlling diseases of public health impact in Hawaii, as well as ensuring the state’s ability to respond to emergencies that threaten the public’s health.

Big Island Police Identify Victim in Mysterious Pahoa Attack

Hawaiʻi Island police have identified the victim of an assault that resulted in a large deposit of blood left fronting a vacant establishment in Puna.
Blood scene
On June 26 at about 7:30 a.m., detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section and evidence specialists responded to a report of blood discovered in an alcove fronting a closed business establishment in Pāhoa. After an extensive search in the neighboring business area using a scent discriminating canine, police could not locate a victim or any additional evidence.

This picture was taken before police arrived on the scene

This picture was taken before police arrived on the scene

On August 26, detectives were able to verify previously obtained information on the identity of the victim, who is a 60-year-old Pāhoa man. He reported that he had been in an altercation with an unidentified man in Pāhoa and that during the confrontation he had sustained a superficial head wound and did not seek treatment.

Police ask anyone with information about the confrontation to contact Detective Norbert Serrao at 961-2383 or nserrao@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

 

Acting Hawaii Governor Announces Release of $26.4 Million in Capital Improvement Project Funds

Acting Governor Shan Tsutsui today announced the release of more than $26.4 million in capital improvement projects for priority repairs and improvements at state facilities and highways under the purview of the Department of Transportation.

abercrombieheader

“These investments will increase the safety of our residents while traveling on our highways as well as support the expansion of our maritime activities,” said Lieutenant Governor Shan Tsutsui.  “These projects will also continue our momentum of creating jobs and stimulating our economy.”

Allotment of funds for the following priority projects, identified by members of the State Legislature, has been approved by the Acting Governor:

$21,400 — Interstate Route H-3 Halekou Interchange to Kaneohe Marine Corps Base Hawaii safety improvement project.   These additional highway revenue bond funds will provide for the safety improvements needed for the H-3 Halekou Interchange.

$21,700 — H-1,H-2 and H201 destination signage upgrades.  These additional highway revenue bond funds will provide for additional design costs to upgrade existing signs to meet current standards.

$198,800 — Inoaole Stream Bridge replacement project, which is on Kalanianaole Highway in the vicinity of Waimanalo.  The bridge will be replaced to increase stream flow capacity in the area to reduce or eminate flooding during heavy rainfall.  These additional revenue bond funds will provide for additional design costs and acqusition of drainage easements.

$4,500,000 — Pier 31 improvements.  These special funds will provide for the demolition of a shed  and upgrades at Honolulu Harbor’s Pier 31 in relation to Pasha’s plans for a new larger shipping vessel.

$10,740,000 — DOT Harbors Division Maui District Office.  These special funds will provide for additional design and construction of a DOT Harbors Division Maui District Office, which will be relocated in the Old Kahului Railroad Building as part of the Kahului Harbor Development Plan of July 2012.

$11,000,000 — Habors Modernation Plan.  These revenue bonds will provide for the demolition of structures located at Kapalama Military Reservation and construction for a new Kapalama Container Facility to support expanding maritime activities in Honolulu Harbor.

 

Hawaii County Closes Hot Ponds at ‘Āhalanui Park After Person Allegedly Gets Sick Swimming in Pond

The Department of Parks and Recreation closed ‘Āhalanui Park in lower Puna on Thursday, September 26, after learning of an unconfirmed report that a member of the public allegedly became sick after swimming in the park’s hot pond.

 ‘Āhalanui Park Hot Ponds

‘Āhalanui Park Hot Ponds

Ensuring the health and safety of all park users remains the top priority of the Department of Parks and Recreation. In an abundance of caution, Director Clayton Honma took immediate action to close the park and request the Hawai‘i Department of Health’s Clean Water Branch test the pond’s water quality.

‘Āhalanui Park will remain closed pending the Department’s receipt of the test results and assurance that the water quality continues to fall within safety guidelines.

The Department of Parks and Recreation apologizes for any inconvenience the temporary closure may cause and thanks the public for its understanding.

For more information, please contact Jason Armstrong, Public Information Officer, at 345-9105, or jarmstrong@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Aloha Exchange Club of East Hawaii Recognizes East Hawaii “Officer of the Month”

The Aloha Exchange Club of East Hawaiʻi recognized Officer Frank Mohica on Thursday (September 26) as the East Hawaiʻi “Officer of the Month” for September.

Officer Frank Mohica

Officer Frank Mohica

Mohica, a Community Policing officer assigned to the South Hilo District, was honored for bringing about a peaceful resolution after a barricaded gunman fired shots in a residential subdivision in Puna.

On August 21, a convicted felon abused his female companion, left the house enraged, got into a motor vehicle accident and fled the scene.

Officers searching for him later discovered he had returned to the house and taken a firearm registered to the woman.

Hours later, police received several reports of gunshots being fired in another populated residential subdivision. When they arrived, they learned that the shooter was the same man from the earlier incident. The neighbors were evacuated and a standoff ensued with the suspect, who was intoxicated, belligerent and uncooperative.

Officer Mohica, who volunteers on the Hostage Negotiation Team, was off duty when he was alerted and responded to the scene.

Police discovered that the suspect’s father was also present on the property. Mohica quickly established an avenue of communication with the father and began to develop a rapport with him. Over time, he persuaded both the suspect and the father to surrender to police without incident.

When detectives obtained a search warrant for the premises, they recovered a rifle, a semi-automatic handgun, ammunition and spent casings. The suspect was charged with nine offenses.

As “Officer of the Month,” Mohica is eligible for “Officer of the Year.”

The East Hawaiʻi “Officer of the Month” award is a project of the Aloha Exchange Club of East Hawaiʻi.

Na Pua No`eau Receives Funding to Continue Providing Education for Students of Hawaiian Ancestry

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Na Pua No`eau has received funding from the U.S. Department of Education to continue providing health career pathway education for students of Hawaiian ancestry in kindergarten through college and professional schools.

Na Pua Noeau
The award represents the second year of a three-year grant totaling $502, 692 per year to fund the Ke Ola Mau Project, which seeks to increase the number of Native Hawaiian students entering the health profession.

Last year, nearly 2,000 students and family members took part in the project, which utilized existing Na Pua No`eau Centers on all the islands to conduct program activities throughout Hawaiʻi. Through the project and its partners, eligible Hawaiian students at UH Hilo and UH Manoa majoring in a health career field may also receive academic support, cultural strengthening, community support, and a stipend.

For more information, call Rachel at the Ke Ola Mau office at (808) 933-3887 (UH Hilo) or Kehau at (808) 956-9410 (UH Manoa).

Environmental Protection Agency Awards Hawaii $1.1 Million to Control Polluted Water Runoff

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently awarded the Hawaii Department of Health a $1.1 million grant to implement its Polluted Runoff Control (PRC) Program and to support water quality improvement projects.

“EPA’s grant helps Hawaii reduce harmful stormwater runoff,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “Our goal, along with the Department of Health, is to protect coastal waters and coral reefs from the effects of polluted surface water.”

When it rains, water flows downhill from Hawai`i’s high island ridges to the ocean, washing pollutants into the streams and rivers. (Kaaawa Valley, Oahu)

When it rains, water flows downhill from Hawai`i’s high island ridges to the ocean, washing pollutants into the streams and rivers. (Kaaawa Valley, Oahu)

Hawaii DOH will contribute $746,000 in state funds to the EPA grant for a total budget of $1.91 million to implement its state program developed under the authority of Section 319 of the federal Clean Water Act. Grant funds support both state staff and local organizations to develop and implement watershed plans to achieve water quality improvement goals. The funding is specifically for such nonpoint source water pollution control projects and cannot be used for other water pollution discharges or spills like the recent molasses spill into Honolulu Harbor.

This year, the PRC Program will update Hawaii’s State Management Program Plan for addressing polluted runoff over the next five years. The plan will identify strategic priorities, establish both environmental and program goals and milestones, and discuss how partners will be engaged to most effectively to improve water quality.

Recently, Hawaii DOH used Clean Water Act Section 319 funds to address land-based pollution in the West Maui area to protect coral reefs. West Maui is a priority area for the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force and the State of Hawaii Coral Program.

On-the-ground projects are strategically focused in specific watersheds to increase the likelihood of achieving environmental results. Previous competitively selected projects include:

  • Heeia Stream Restoration Project to stabilize eroding stream banks and restore native vegetation along the Heeia stream to reduce nutrient and sediment loads on windward Oahu.
  • Implementation of large scale agricultural management practices to reduce sediment and nutrient runoff in the Honouliuli Stream watershed.
  • A rain garden ‘how-to’ manual and the installation of several rain gardens to demonstrate an effective way to reduce the volume of polluted stormwater runoff in developed areas
  • Installation of fencing in Maui mountain watersheds to reduce the impacts of feral ungulate populations in sensitive watershed areas.

The 1987 amendments to the Clean Water Act established the Section 319 Nonpoint Source Management Program. Section 319 addresses the need for greater federal leadership to help focus state and local nonpoint source efforts. Under Section 319, states, territories and tribes receive grant money to support a wide variety of activities including technical assistance, financial assistance, education, training, technology transfer, restoratioin projects and monitoring efforts to assess progress toward water quality goals. EPA awards annual continuing program grants, based on a national distribution formula, to implement approved state programs.

The EPA’s Pacific Southwest Region (Region 9) administers and enforces federal environmental laws in Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, the Pacific Islands and 148 tribal nations — home to more than 48 million people. The EPA is also a significant source of funding. In 2013, more than 85 percent of the $631 million regional operating budget flowed to state and tribal agencies, local governments, non-profit organizations and private-sector companies in the form of grants and contracts. This funding pays for drinking water and wastewater infrastructure, air pollution reduction programs, Superfund site cleanups and many other activities that protect human health and natural resources.

Study Proves Cancer Cases NOT HIGHER on Kauai Then the Rest of the State of Hawaii

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) jointly with the Hawaii Tumor Registry and University of Hawaii Cancer Center is releasing an evaluation of the incidence of cancer on Kauai and each of its census tracts. The evaluation found that there is not a higher incidence of cancer on Kauai compared to the rest of the state; except for melanoma of the skin, a cancer related to ultraviolet exposure.

The evaluation was conducted at the request of Kauai legislators and community members in response to concerns about the health impact of pesticides used by agricultural chemical companies.

Kauai Cancer Report

Click to view the full report

The analysis found that cancers of the breast, endometrium, Hodgkin lymphoma, liver, ovary, prostate and thyroid were lower on Kauai compared to the entire state of Hawaii. Higher rates of melanoma on Kauai were found and may be explained by a larger proportion of older adults of Caucasian ancestry with high levels of lifetime sun exposure residing in the northern region of Kauai.

“Cancer clusters are rare, especially those that are linked to environmental exposures. Doctors and scientists often cannot explain why one person develops cancer and another does not,” said Dr. Barbara Brooks, DOH Toxicologist.

Cancer may be caused by a variety of factors acting alone or together, usually over a period of many years. These risk factors include age, family history and exposures to viruses and bacteria, lifestyle choices, sunlight exposure and on the job exposure to chemicals.

Of the more than 12,000 cancer deaths in Hawaii between 2000 and 2005, it is estimated that nearly 30 percent could have been prevented by avoiding tobacco use and up to 35 percent could have been averted by improving nutrition and maintaining a normal body weight. Geographic, economic, and educational barriers and other social inequities influence lifestyle factors that increase a person’s chance of developing cancer.

Health Director Loretta Fuddy said, “DOH through its Foundations for Healthy Generations Initiative is committed to addressing the social conditions and physical environments where people live, work and play in order to improve the health of all groups in Hawaii.”

The Hawaii Tumor Registry conducts cancer surveillance and maintains a confidential database of information on all reportable cases of cancer, benign brain tumors and many blood disorders diagnosed in Hawaii. The Registry is jointly operated by the University of Hawaii Cancer Center and DOH.

The DOH Hazard Evaluation and Emergency Response Office provides leadership, support, and partnership in preventing, planning for, responding to, and enforcing environmental laws relating to releases or threats of releases of hazardous substances.

The full evaluation report is available on the DOH website at www.health.hawaii.gov.

 

Teams Sought for HI-PAL 33rd Annual Winter Basketball Classic

The Hawaiʻi Police Department’s Hawaiʻi Police Activities League and the County of Hawaiʻi Department of Parks and Recreation will hold the 33rd Annual Winter Basketball Classic on Thursday, December 26, through Sunday, December 29.

Officer Joey Botello

Officer Joey Botello

Entries will be accepted for the following age group divisions and played at the following locations:

5/6 and 7/8 (may be co-ed) at Edith Kanakaʻole Tennis Stadium
Boys 9/10 and Girls 10 & under at the Kawananakoa Hall gymnasium in Keaukaha
Boys 11/12 and Girls 12 & under at the Hilo Armory
Boys 13/14 and Girls 14 & under at Ah Fook-Chinen Civic Auditorium

The age cutoff is December 31, 2013.

All championship games will be played at Ah Fook-Chinen Civic Auditorium on Sunday, December 29.

There is a registration fee of $60 per team for age 8-and-under teams. For teams ages 9 and above, the registration fee is $80 per team. The registration fee for outer island teams is $25.

Deadline to enter is Friday, December 6. Each team will be required to complete a registration packet, which must be submitted by the deadline.

Registration forms and information will be available at a future date on the Department of Parks and Recreation’s website. Completed forms are to be submitted to:

County of Hawaiʻi, Department of Parks & Recreation
Recreation Office
799 Piʻilani Street
Hilo, HI 96720

Additional information, as it becomes available, will be provided for interested persons.

Teams interested in participating or persons requesting additional information may call Officer Joseph Botelho Jr. in East Hawaiʻi at 961-8121, Officer Randy Morris in West Hawaiʻi at 326-4646, ext. 258, or Darrell Yamamoto at the Department of Parks & Recreation at 961-8740, extension 25.

 

Free Child Safety Seat Checks Saturday in Hilo

Firefighters at Central Fire Station in South Hilo are conducting child safety seat checks this Saturday from 10:00 AM to Noon at Central Fire Station on 466 Kinoole Street.
child safety seat checks

The event will allow fifteen certified technicians to provide parents and caregivers with the proper installation and guidance for the use of child car safety seats.

The check up will take about 30 minutes and the technicians can assist three to six vehicles an hour.  Bring your Keiki’s to the Fire Station to see the Fire Engine and Ambulance. Goodies will be available for the children.  Appointments may also be arranged by calling Mel at 896-1336.

Traffic control will be in place during the even and parents and caregivers are asked to enter the fire station through Ponahawai Street entrance

State law requires all children under the age of four to be secured in a car seat; children between the ages of 4 and 7 are to be secured in booster seats.  Older children must be secured in a seat belt and it is recommended that they sit in the back seat of the vehicle. Over 90% of child passenger safety seats inspected were noted to be installed incorrectly.

Island residents should be aware there is an anonymous car seat hotline (961-2226) to report sightings of children not properly restrained in a vehicle.  Callers should be prepared to provide a license plate number, car make/model/color, the date and location of the car.  A letter will be sent to the registered owner about the violation.

National statistics conclude that accidental injuries, especially those involving car crashes, pose the greatest threat to the lives of young children.  Statistics also show using car safety seats and seat belts correctly are the best way to prevent this from happening.  National statistics also show an estimated 8,959 lives were saved by child restraints from 1975 to 2008.

 

Hawaii’s History of Destructive Earthquakes the Focus of Two Talks and The Great Hawaii ShakeOut Earthquake Drill

Hawaii’s long history of destructive earthquakes and actions that residents can take to reduce injury during the next one will be the topics of two presentations on Tuesday, October 1.  Both talks are open to the public.

USGS seismologists Wes Thelen (left) and Paul Okubo (right) working at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

USGS seismologists Wes Thelen (left) and Paul Okubo (right) working at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Paul Okubo, a seismologist with the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, will speak about “Damaging earthquakes in Hawaii and the Great Hawaii ShakeOut” in the University Classroom Building, Room 100, on the UH–Hilo main campus, 200 W. Kawili Street, in Hilo. A map of the campus is online.  This free presentation begins at 7:00 p.m.

Wes Thelen, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory’s seismic network manager, will present “Large earthquakes in the Hawaiian Islands: What you need to know” in the Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium on Crater Rim Drive, in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, at 7:00 p.m.  This “After Dark in the Park” presentation is free, but Park entrance fees apply.

Large earthquakes pose an ever-present danger to Hawaii.  Since 1868, more than 30 magnitude-6.0 or greater earthquakes have impacted residents throughout the State.  The probability that another destructive —magnitude 6.5 or higher— earthquake will strike the Hawaiian Islands in the next 10 years is 50 percent; in the next 20 years, the probability increases to 75 percent.

According to Okubo, while the Island of Hawai‘i experiences more seismicity than other Hawaiian islands, the exposure to earthquake risk spans the entire State of Hawaii.  As a recent example, he notes that the October 2006 magnitude-6.7 and 6.0 earthquakes, located in West Hawai‘i, caused $200 million in damages on the Islands of Hawai‘i and Maui, as well as an extended power outage on O‘ahu.

Thelen points out that it has been 40 years since a destructive earthquake occurred during business and school hours—the magnitude-6.2 Honomū, Hawai‘i earthquake on April 26, 1973.  Without that experience, conducting drills is even more important for all schools and businesses, as well as individuals and families, to practice “Drop! Cover! Hold on!”—actions that are proven to reduce injury in an earthquake—during the Great Hawaii ShakeOut earthquake drill on October 17.

Both Okubo and Thelen will present an overview of damaging earthquakes in Hawaii, including current theories on why they occur.  They will also talk about “The Great Hawaii ShakeOut” and what people can do to protect themselves during Hawaii’s next large earthquake.

For more information about these two presentations, visit the HVO website or call (808) 967-8844.

Hike, Explore, & Protect Kahuku

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park celebrates the tenth anniversary of the Kahuku Unit by offering free programs to introduce visitors and residents to the park’s southernmost section, October through December 2013.

NPS Photo

NPS Photo

For all activities below, enter Kahuku on the mauka (uphill) side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5, and meet near the parking area. Sturdy footwear, water, raingear, sun protection, and a snack are recommended. No advance registration is required, except for the Ka‘ū ‘Ohana Day, where registration is required.

People and Lands of Kahuku is a moderate two-mile, three-hour guided hike that loops through varied landscapes to explore the human history of Kahuku. Emerging native forests, pastures, lava fields, and other sites hold clues about ways people have lived and worked on the vast Kahuku lands from the earliest Hawaiians, through generations of ranching families, to the current staff and volunteers of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Learn about the powerful natural forces at work here and how people have adapted to, shaped, and restored this land. The guided hike is offered Oct. 13, Nov. 17, and Dec. 29; from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Palm Trail is a moderately difficult 2.6 mile loop traversing scenic pasture along an ancient cinder cone, with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer. Highlights include relics of the ranching era, sections of remnant native forest and amazing volcanic features from the 1868 eruptive fissures. A guided hike of Palm Trail is offered Oct. 20, Nov. 24, and Dec. 8; from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Ōhia Lehua. There is more to the ‘ōhi‘a lehua tree than meets the eye.  Learn about the vital role of ‘ōhi‘a lehua in native Hawaiian forests, the many forms of the ‘ōhi‘a tree, and the lehua flower. Visitors traveling through the park will be able to identify the many differences of the most prominent tree in the Kahuku Unit.  Pack a lunch to enjoy during the program. The ‘Ōhi‘a Lehua program is offered Oct. 27, Nov. 10, and Dec. 15; from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Ka‘ū ‘Ohana Day. Keiki of all ages are invited to join park rangers and explore the park’s southernmost section, Kahuku. At least one adult family member or adult must accompany the children. Enjoy a free lunch, and participate in cultural craft demonstrations. Bring a refillable water bottle, sunscreen, a hat, and sturdy hiking shoes. The event is free, but registration is required, call (808) 985-6019. Offered Nov. 23, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Waimea Women’s Center Receives OHA Grant to Offer Culturally-Relevant Prenatal Program for Native Hawaiian Women

North Hawaii Community Hospital’s (NHCH) Waimea Women’s Center (WWC) was recently awarded a two-year grant totaling $206,768 from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA). The purpose of this grant is to implement a culturally-relevant prenatal care program for Native Hawaiian women by using a group model of care known as CenteringPregnancy to address health and emotional wellbeing and improve pregnancy outcomes.

North Hawaii Community Hospital

North Hawaii Community Hospital

“We are honored to partner with the Office of Hawaiian Affairs in addressing these important issues,” said Dr. Patricia Gunter, North Hawaii Medical Group Director and OB/GYN Physician at Waimea Women’s Center. CenteringPregnancy offers a group approach to prenatal care, combining three essential elements of care every pregnant woman needs: health assessment, education and support to improve pregnancy outcomes. A certified nurse midwife from NHCH’s Waimea Women’s Center facilitates 10 two-hour sessions with 8 to 10 mothers-to-be and their partner. All women are due around the same time, and sessions start in the first trimester of pregnancy. Each session includes a comfortable environment, including food and an individual health prenatal assessment, with the majority of time focused on group discussions, creating a community and an opportunity to share common experiences and concerns.

“Rather than having traditional short and frequent one-on-one visits with their healthcare provider, this group model of prenatal care known as CenteringPregnancy will better meet the needs of our unique, rural Native Hawaiian

population, which makes up nearly 30 percent of the community we serve and 50% of delivering moms at NHCH,” says Robin Ramsay, NHCH Waimea Women’s Center Certified Nurse Midwife and CenteringPregnancy facilitator. Maternal health indicators show a higher rate of infant mortality, teen birth rate and an increase in social risk factors in Native Hawaiians that is in disproportion to other ethnic groups in the state. “Our hope is to enroll eighty Native Hawaiian women into this new culturally-relevant prenatal program per year over the next two years.”

“Benefits of the CenteringPregnancy model of care are many,” says Ramsay. “It creates a community for moms-to-be, focusing on a woman’s own experiences and sharing these experiences with each other.” Additional benefits of this new group model of care include: higher patient satisfaction, mothers-to-be are more involved in their prenatal care, are more likely to deliver healthy, full-term babies and to breast feed longer.

Working in conjunction with the Waimea Women’s Center, the hospital’s Kaheleaulani, a Native Hawaiian Health Program, will provide seamless primary care services within the same culturally-sensitive framework. “Kaheleulani provides primary care services by understanding and embracing a culturally-appropriate healthcare approach for Native Hawaiians and takes into account traditional Hawaiian healing principles that differ from those of Western medicine,” says Dr. Leina’ala Crawford, Kaheleaulani Medical Director and Primary Care Physician. “We are enthusiastic about this project and understand that it will benefit the community in ways that connect our people to preventive and interactive health care,” says Crawford.

NHCH’s Waimea Women’s Center is currently the only healthcare provider on Hawaii Island offering CenteringPregnancy. In addition, Waimea Women’s Center offers a full spectrum of services for women through every stage of life, including: preconception care, prenatal care, delivery services (in the hospital’s Level I Family Birthing Unit), post partum care and gynecology services for women of all ages. WWC provides services for 2,000 to 3,000 women per year, including nearly 600 births, and accepts all insurances. WWC accepts island-wide maternal care patients on a space available basis. Waimea Women’s Center is located in the Lucy Henriques Medical Center at North Hawaii Community Hospital at 67-1123 Mamalahoa Hwy, Suites 110 and 120, Kamuela, HI 96743. For more information on CenteringPregnancy, the Waimea Women’s Center or to make an appointment, please call 808-885-9606.

NHCH Background: North Hawaii Community Hospital (NHCH) is a rural 33-bed acute care hospital located in Kamuela, on Hawai‘i Island. Non-profit and locally governed, the hospital opened in May 1996 and cares for Hawai‘i Island residents and visitors. NHCH offers an extensive set of hospital services that are centered on patient needs, creating a healing experience for the whole person – mind, body and spirit. Please visit www.NHCH.com for more information.

3.6 Magnitude Earthquake Shake Fern Acres Area of Big Island

Update: it was upgraded to a 3.6 magnitude earthquake

36 Fern Acres

A 3.5 magnitude earthquake struck the Fern Acres area of the Big Island this morning.  No Tsunami was generated from it.

35 Fern Acres