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Coast Guard Continues Search for Missing Big Island Man

Responders are continuing the search for Charles Locklar, 26, near Lapakahi State Park, Big Island, Monday.

  • Crews currently engaged in the search are:
    HC-130 Hercules airplane and MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crews from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point
  • Crews of USCGC Kittiwake (WPB-87316) from Honolulu and USCGC Kiska (WPB-1336) from Big Island
  • A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew from Coast Guard Station Maui
  • A Navy MH-60 helicopter crew from Marine Corps Base Hawaii at Kaneohe Bay
  • Air and surface assets with divers from the Big Island Fire Department
  • Weather in the area is reported as 27 mph winds with waves at 6 feet.

Locklar was last seen swimming toward shore with his uncle after their 10-foot skiff reportedly capsized due to high winds approximately a half mile offshore, Saturday.

Charles Locklar

Charles Locklar

An Urgent Marine Information Broadcast has been issued alerting mariners in the area to keep a sharp lookout and report any sightings to the Coast Guard Sector Honolulu command center.

locklar-rescue-areaAnyone with information that may help locate Locklar is asked to contact the Sector Honolulu command center at 808-842-2600.

Bay Restoration Supported by Hawaiian Electric Grant

Malama Maunalua was awarded a $15,000 grant from the Hawaiian Electric Companies to support critical conservation projects in Maunalua Bay. The grant was presented by Sean Moura, Hawaiian Electric’s wildlife biologist and an environmental scientist in the company’s Environmental Department, during a community workday at the Bay.

malama-maunalua“This award from the Hawaiian Electric Companies is an important investment in the restoration of Maunalua Bay, which is such a significant, yet fragile marine resource. We are very grateful to the Hawaiian Electric Companies for joining other organizations in making our projects with the community and scientists possible,” said Jennifer Taylor, Board President.

Hawaiian Electric’s grant will help expand the Habitat Restoration Program which includes increasing community “huki” (pull) events where volunteers assist in removing invasive alien algae, launching an initiative to restore native sea grass, developing a bay algae consortium to address the implementation of restoration techniques and monitoring, and expanding community engagement through research, internships and careers. In addition, a priority for Malama Maunalua is the development of a partner-supported knowledge geo-database to be used to guide management priorities and strategic uses for the bay.

Moura, a Hawaii Kai resident who has volunteered with Malama Maunalua, said the organization’s efforts to raise awareness of marine conservation and grow community participation aligns with Hawaiian Electric’s value of environmental stewardship. “Developing the next generation of marine stewards by engaging with public and private organizations speaks to the long-term conservation of the Bay, and we gladly support that effort.”

Malama Maunalua is a community based non-profit organization committed to restoring the health of Maunalua Bay, the near shore area in East Oahu which stretches from Black Point to Portlock Point. Malama Maunalua focuses on reducing the three major threats to Maunalua Bay – removing invasive alien algae, reducing run-off of sediment and pollutants and increasing marine life. Malama Maunalua is finding solutions to these problems through working with thousands of community volunteers and collaborating with community and conservation partners and government agencies.

Volunteer board members are Jennifer Taylor (President), Mitch D’Olier (Vice President), Jean Tsukamoto (Treasurer), Amy Monk (Secretary), Dawn Dunbar, Steve Schatz and Dr. Leighton Taylor.

To donate to the organization or to participate in a community workday, visit www.malamamaunalua.org or contact info@malamamaunalua.org.

Howl’ween Dog Walks Slated for Hilo and Kona

Costumed Furry Friends Take to the Street to Raise Pledges at the Big Island’s Largest Dog Friendly Events

The Hawaii Island Humane Society is readying plans for its annual Howl’ween Dog Walk slated for Saturday morning, October 22 in Hilo and a week later on Saturday morning, October 29 in Kona. All walkers with – or without – dogs are invited to participate and are encouraged to raise pledges to support shelter animals. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. and the walks get underway at 8:00 a.m.

dog-costume“Our Howl’ween Dog Walks bring buckets of smiles to participants, pooches and passersby. What a great way to enjoy this seasonal holiday and encourage camaraderie between pets and their owners,” said HIHS Executive Director Donna Whitaker. “Everyone always enjoys seeing the dogs – and their owners – in fantastic costumes that really add to the holiday spirit.”

The Hilo Howl’ween Dog Walk, produced in partnership with Aloha Ilio Rescue, takes place at Queen Liliuokalani Park. The Kona Howl’ween Dog Walk gathers the following Saturday on the bayfront Honu Lawn at Courtyard Marriott King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel.

dog-contestThe HIHS Howl’ween Dog Walks include fun contests, costumes, prizes and team challenges. Registration is free and walkers are encouraged to join the pack and help raise funds. Event proceeds help offset costs of shelter supplies and low-cost spay and neuter services to help eliminate pet overpopulation on Hawaii Island. Secure pledges can be made at www.FirstGiving.com/HIHS/howlween-dogwalk-2016.

Walkers who earn a minimum of $25 in pledges will receive a surprise gift. Those who earn $50 in pledges will receive a free Howl’ween Dog Walk t-shirt. Download pledge forms at HIHS.org.

Jovino Santos Neto in 2nd Installment of Steinway Series

Sunday, October 30, 4pm, Kahilu Theatre presents the 2nd installment of the Kahilu Steinway Series with acclaimed Brazilian composer and pianist Jovino Santos Neto.

Jovino by Daniel Sheehan

Jovino Santos Neto, Photoo by Daniel Sheehan

Three-time Latin Grammy nominee Jovino Santos Neto is among the top Brazilian musicians working today. Mr. Neto’s personal style is a creative blend of energetic grooves, deep harmonies, telepathic improvisation, and lyrical melodies inspired and informed by the colorful richness of Brazilian music. His compositions include samba, choro, baião, xote, forró, marcha, and many more styles, rooted in centuries-old musical tradition while pointing to new and adventurous harmonic languages.

In his solo piano recitals, Jovino explores all the possibilities of the instrument, combining the rhythmic and harmonic audacity of his mentor Hermeto Pascoal’s pieces with his own Brazilian tone poems, spanning the distance between lyrical and effervescent within a few measures. He also pays tribute to some of the great Brazilian composers like Jobim, Pixinguinha and Ernesto Nazareth. His commentaries on the music are enlightening and educating, providing the audience with a unique musical experience.

The Kahilu Theatre doors open at 3pm for the performance and there will be snacks and beverages available for sale at the Kahilu Theatre bar. The Kapa Kahilu exhibit will be on display in the in the Kohala Gallery.

The Steinway Series is a series of performances showcasing Kahilu Theatre’s Model D Steinway Concert Grand piano at accessible ticket prices.

Tickets are $28 / $23 / $18 / $8 and available for purchase online at http://www.kahilutheatre.org, by calling (808) 885-6868, or at the Kahilu Theatre Box Office at 67-1186 Lindsey Road, Kamuela, HI 96743, M-F 9am to 1pm.

The Steinway Series is made possible by generous sponsorship by Mike & Ruth Bernstone, Sharon Cornish-Martin, Karen Ferrara, Betty & Lee Meyerson, Dr. Marcia Wishnick & Mr. Stanley Wishnick, and Other Friends of Kahilu.

Got Drugs? Drug Take-Back Booth Joins UH Hilo College of Pharmacy Health Fair

Student pharmacists from the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (DKICP) will be assisting the National Take-Back Initiative at DKICP’s 8th Annual Health Fair on Saturday, October 22, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m, at the Prince Kuhio Plaza. This is the first time the national event has coincided with DKICP’s health fair.

got-drugs-2016The purpose of the Prescription Take-Back booth is to turn in any unused or expired medications for safe, anonymous disposal. New or used needles and syringes will not be accepted.

The student pharmacists also hope to educate the general public about the potential for abuse of medications. In Hawai’i, more than 22,300 pounds of drugs have been safely collected and disposed. Nationwide, the take-backs have collected over 3,200 tons of pharmaceuticals.

The National Take-Back Initiative is a nationwide effort led by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in partnership with the Department of Public Safety, Narcotics Enforcement Division and Department of the Attorney General, Crime Prevention and Justice Assistance Division.

For more information, contact Tracey Niimi at 932-7139.

Test Post… Go Seahawks!

This is a test post of the Damon Tucker Emergency Broadcasting System.

If you are receiving this message… please ignore and have a great day. (I’m just making sure my site is running smoothly again)

The Seahawks rule by the way.
seahawk-plane
Aloha,

Damon Tucker

Coast Guard, Big Island Fire Department Search for Missing Boater Near Lapakahi State Park, Big Island

Coast Guard and Big Island Fire Department crews are searching for a missing boater near Lapakahi State Park, Big Island, in a case that began late Saturday.

Charles Locklar

Charles Locklar

Missing is 26-year-old Charles Locklar. Locklar was last seen swimming toward shore with his uncle after their 10-foot skiff reportedly capsized due to high winds approximately a half mile offshore.

At 9:50 p.m., an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point launched to conduct a search of the area and the crew of the USCGC Kittiwake (WPB-87316) operating off Maui was diverted. Air assets and ground crews from the Big Island Fire Department are also assisting in the search.

An Urgent Marine Information Broadcast has been issued alerting mariners in the area to keep a sharp lookout and report any sightings to the Coast Guard Sector Honolulu command center.

At 7:45 p.m., Sector Honolulu watchstanders received a call from Big Island Fire Department personnel stating they received notification of the vessel capsizing in high winds with two people aboard and both men had reportedly swum for shore. One of the pair made it to shore, but called 911 when he could not find the other, his nephew.

Anyone with information that may help locate Locklar is asked to contact the Sector Honolulu command center at 808-842-2600.

Weather conditions are currently reported as east winds of 21 mph gusting to 31 mph. Waves are at a foot with a west-southwest swell.

The Kittiwake crew was previously engaged in another case off Maui. The USCGC Galveston Island (WPB-1349) has relieved the Kittiwake in the continuing search for missing free diver Josh Goodwin that began Friday. Responders from multiple agencies worked on that search throughout the day. The Galveston Island crew is continuing that search throughout the night and will be joined by additional crews at first light. Both Kittiwake and Galveston Island are homeported out of Honolulu.

Editors Note On Lost Posts

Sorry folks… the mainland server that my website sits on had a “major meltdown” last night.

Posts for the last few weeks were lost.

At least we are back online.

Department of Health Workers Doing Door-to-Door Surveys Saturday on Oahu

Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) workers and Medical Reserve Corps volunteers will be canvassing neighborhoods in McCully-Moiliili, Makiki-Lower Punchbowl, and Ala Moana-Kakaako on Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016 from 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon to conduct a Community Health Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER). Participation in the door-to-door survey is confidential and voluntary.

department-of-healthHousehold in these areas can expect to see teams of two volunteers wearing DOH identification badges and carrying clip boards. The purpose of this survey, or CASPER, is to gain a clearer picture of possible public health needs in case of an emergency or disaster. The survey includes general questions about household size, makeup and existing emergency preparations. The information gathered will help DOH and state and county partners better understand how Honolulu communities prepare for public health emergencies to then better shape response and recovery plans.

The pilot project was presented at a McCully/Moiliili neighborhood board and other meetings in the past months to encourage participation and collaboration. Project results will be shared with the respective area neighborhood boards and state and county emergency management agency partners. For more information, contact the Public Health Preparedness Branch at (808) 587-6569.

The Department of Health’s Public Health Preparedness Branch is funded by a Hospital Preparedness Program – Public Health Emergency Preparedness cooperative agreement with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Through the grant, the branch works to prepare for, respond to, and assist in recovery from natural and human-caused public health emergencies and threats.

The Hawaii Medical Reserve Corps has local volunteer members throughout the state and is housed within the Public Health Preparedness Branch. Volunteers are asked to attend quarterly meetings, participate in disaster preparedness exercises, and assist with non-emergency community health activities, such as the Stop Flu at School program, vision screening clinics, and community health fairs.

Hawaii Governor to Request Presidential Disaster Declaration for Public Assistance After Surveying Storm Damage

Gov. David Ige today toured Maui’s Iao Stream area, which suffered severe damage during last week’s storm. The governor was joined by Maui Mayor Alan Arakawa, State Adjutant General, Major General Arthur Logan, Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency Administrator Vern Miyagi and other government and emergency management officials for aerial and ground tours of the disaster site.

maui-storm1The tours follow initial assessments of the disaster area by the National Guard and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

On Thursday, Gov. Ige took a 30-minute aerial tour of the site aboard a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter before surveying the disaster site on the ground where he met with residents directly affected by the storm.

maui-storm4“It truly is a sobering reminder of the power of nature and to see the impact on the stream and the change of the flows that had a devastating effect on families, the state and county. I will be sending a letter to President Obama requesting a Presidential Disaster Declaration for Public Assistance,” said Gov. Ige.

maui-storm3The governor also met with some of the 30 Hawai‘i Air and Army National Guard members who have been activated to clear out debris and boulders which have diverted the stream flow into residential areas along the stream.

Initial assessments put the state and county’s damage estimate at $15 million. About 20 families were directly impacted by the storm.

maui-storm2While the county and National Guard continue to clear out an estimated 9,000 truckloads of debris, the state and county are working to ensure the safety of the community.

maui-storm5“This is going to be a large project. Very expensive. It’s going to take months and months to try and secure this area, but it’s going to be worth it,” said Maui Mayor Alan Arakawa.

Click here for video of the governor’s aerial tour.

Hawaii Innocence Project Event Will Test Reliability of Eyewitness Identification

Could you be a reliable eyewitness? Want to test your skills with some expert attorneys?

eyewitnees-identification

On Tuesday, October 4, 2016, in recognition of “International Wrongful Conviction Day,” the Hawai‘i Innocence Project will challenge audience members to see how well they can identify a possible suspect in a mock exercise at the UH Law School.

The program, titled “Eyewitness Identification,” is scheduled from 12 noon to 1:15 p.m. in Classroom 2.  Lunch is available in the courtyard; donations are welcome.  Similar programs are taking place across the nation and around the world.

“Eyewitness Identification” aims to demonstrate pitfalls in the standard technique that has been used in courtrooms for decades. Documentation has begun to show that faulty eyewitness identification accounts for as much as 75 percent of all wrongful convictions, according to Innocence Project data.

The Hawai‘i Innocence Project is run by faculty members at the William S. Richardson School of Law, with assistance from community attorneys. In 2011, using advanced DNA testing technology, the Hawai‘i project succeeded in having Alvin Francis Jardine exonerated after he spent almost 20 years in prison for a rape and burglary he consistently maintained that he did not commit. The national organization has freed several hundred wrongly incarcerated people by using advanced DNA testing.

As part of the national Innocence Project network, Faculty Specialist Kenneth Lawson and Associate Dean Ronette Kawakami head the project and work with other attorneys on cases in Hawai‘i.  Said Law Dean Avi Soifer, “Our faculty and students, along with our cooperating attorneys, deserve great admiration for their passionate, tireless work to free those who have been unjustly imprisoned.”

The October 4 program will help show just how fallible eyewitness testimony can be.

World’s Largest Forensic Anthropology Laboratory is Completed on Oahu

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s (DPAA) Forensic Identification Laboratory recently reached construction completion at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Oahu, Hawaii. Designed by SmithGroupJJR, the new $89 million laboratory will aid in the investigation, recovery and accounting of Americans lost during the nation’s past conflicts dating back to World War II.

pow-building-2

SmithGroupJJR served as architect, MEP engineer and laboratory planner and programmer of the new DPAA Laboratory, the world’s largest forensic anthropology laboratory.

The 136,497-square-foot facility consolidates operations that were previously dispersed on three military locations on Oahu. The goal of the new facility is to improve efficiency, productivity and support the DPAA mission, which is to “provide the fullest possible accounting for missing personnel to their families and the nation.”

By bringing all operations under one roof, the new three-story facility demonstrates the unique function and mission of DPAA by providing advanced investigation laboratories, a highly sustainable and flexible working environment for staff and appropriate spaces for the families of the deceased.

Primary laboratory spaces include the DPAA Laboratory, the Material Evidence and Life Support Investigation Lab, DNA lab and a complete forensic medicine facility.

The mission of the DPAA is to provide the fullest possible accounting for missing personnel to their families and the nation.

The mission of the DPAA is to provide the fullest possible accounting for missing personnel to their families and the nation.

“The process of designing this unique facility was a humbling one for our firm,” said Mark Kranz, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, design director, SmithGroupJJR. “Having the ability to meaningfully impact DPAA’s mission was a professional honor.”

The design for the new DPAA facility acknowledges the architectural legacy of Hickam Air Force Base (now Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam), while creating a uniquely Hawaiian character. A three-story garden space with outdoor lanais provides a serene respite for staff, while a chapel-like space for family viewing hovers above. Structural concrete as well as pre-cast concrete panels, which were manufactured on the island and fashioned with an abstracted Hawaiian pattern, create the primary architectural aesthetic. A one a kind craftsman-like shade trellis welcomes families and visitors to this highly secure, yet public facility.

DPAA Laboratory

The DPAA Laboratory spaces within this facility occupy the third floor of the building including 70 tables for examination. Approximately half of the floor space is devoted to conducting laboratory procedures, while the remaining half consist of a family viewing room providing a serene meeting space for families to reunite with their deceased loved ones, as well as offices and administrative spaces for the DPAA Laboratory. The general design of the DPAA Laboratory conforms to Biological Safety Level Two in accordance with requirements set forth by the Center for Disease Control/National Institutes of Health.

“The unique island and Pearl Harbor setting, coupled with this significant national mission allowed for a truly one-of-a-kind facility of national significance,” Kranz added.

Lend a Hand to Protect Volcanoes National Park on Public Lands Day this Saturday

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park celebrates 100 years protecting native ecosystems and invites everyone to lend a helping hand on National Public Lands Day (NPLD) this Saturday, Sept. 24. It’s a fee-free day, and while all park visitors can enjoy the park at no charge, NPLD volunteers will receive a free pass to use on another day of their choosing.

Keiki cut invasive Himalayan ginger from rainforest near Devastation Trail. NPS Photo/J.Ferracane

Keiki cut invasive Himalayan ginger from rainforest near Devastation Trail. NPS Photo/J.Ferracane

Join volunteers on Saturday for the Stewardship at the Summit program, from 8:45 a.m. to noon. Meet NPLD coordinator Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center, then head into the rainforest to remove invasive Himalayan ginger from the summit of Kīlauea. Wear sturdy, closed-toe shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, sunscreen, raingear, snacks, and water. Loppers/gloves provided.  No advance registration required.

While pretty and fragrant, Himalayan ginger (also called kāhili) is one of the most invasive plants in the park, and on earth. It is listed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature as one of the 100 World’s Worst Invasive Alien Species. The park strives to protect the rainforest habitat of native birds and plants, but Himalayan ginger takes over the native rainforest understory, and makes it impossible for the next generation of forest to grow. This inedible ginger species crowds out many native plants, including pa‘iniu (a Hawaiian lily), ‘ama‘u fern, and others.

Every year on NPLD, the largest single-day volunteer effort for public lands in the United States, all fee-charging national parks offer free entry. Many parks and public lands across the nation organize stewardship projects and special programs to raise awareness about why it is important to protect our public lands. To find out more, visit www.publiclandsday.org.

HPD Officers, Civilians Honored During Ceremony

Thirty-four police officers and six civilian employees are moving up the ranks in the Honolulu Police Department. They were honored today during a recognition ceremony at the Ala Moana Beach Park’s McCoy Pavilion Auditorium.
hpd-honored
Promoted to the rank of major is Ryan Nishibun. He is a 27-year veteran and will command the Human Resources Division. His earlier assignments were in District 1 (Central Honolulu), District 5 (Kalihi), and the Traffic Division. Immediately prior to his promotion, he was the executive officer for the Human Resources Division.

Promoted to the rank of captain are Stephen Silva Jr. and Roland Turner. Silva, a 24-year veteran, was a lieutenant in District 1 and will be assigned to District 5. Turner, who has 19 years of experience, was a lieutenant in District 5 and will go to the Finance Division.

The new lieutenants include:
Rommel Baysa, District 8 (Kapolei/Waianae)
Shellie Paiva, District 1
Scott Vierra, District 5

The new sergeants include:
Robert Canady, District 1
Everett Higa, District 7 (East Honolulu)
Wyllie Lum Jr., District 1
Kevin Takehara, District 5

The new detectives include:
Thomas Chang, Professional Standards Office
Jonathan Locey, Criminal Investigation Division
Andrew Maddock, Information Technology Division
Kalae Phillips, Criminal Investigation Division
James Shyer, Criminal Investigation Division

The new corporals include:
Keli Ah-Hoy, District 1
Christopher Bugarin, District 3 (Aiea/Pearl City/Waipahu)
Patrick Bugarin, District 8
William Daubner, District 5
Christel Davis, District 8
Michael Dela Cruz, District 5
Jason Hendricks, District 8
Celestino Herana Jr., District 2 (Mililani/Wahiawa)
Woo Kang, District 5
Mark Kealoha, District 3
Vernon Kleinschmidt, District 5
Rowney Martinez, District 1
Billy Masaniai, District 2
Tyler Medeiros, Criminal Investigation Division
Jacob Miyashiro, Traffic Division
Joseph O’Neal, District 5
Marvin Parengit, District 1
Adam Schonhardt, District 5
David Young, District 2

The six civilians include:

  • Amber Alarcon, Police Radio Dispatcher 1, Communications Division
  • Adelaida Domingo, Senior Police Documents Clerk, Records and Identification Division
  • Lorna Eugenio, Police Documents Clerk, Professional Standards Office
  • Bradly Hirata, 911 Emergency Response Operator III, Communications Division
  • Richard Perron, Police Evidence Specialist III, Scientific Investigation Section
  • Wanda Wallis, Senior Account Clerk, Finance Division

 

Hawaii Ecotourism Association Announces Winners of Sustainable Tourism Awards

Hawaii Ecotourism Association (HEA) announced the winners of sustainable tourism awards at a luncheon today in Waikiki. Twenty-three tour operators were certified as sustainable tour operators by HEA, a local nonprofit organization that protects Hawaii’s unique natural environment and host culture by promoting responsible travel.

Valley Isle Excursions, a company known providing luxury and eco-friendly tours to Hana and the road beyond, was awarded with the coveted the 2016 Sustainable Tour Operator Award. “This outstanding example of a sustainable tour operation far exceeds HEA’s mission and goal of protecting the unique natural and cultural resources of Hawaii nei,” said Aaron Lowe, President of HEA’s Board of Directors.

The 2016 Ecotour Guides of the Year were announced as follows: From Oahu – Manly Kanoa of Hokupaa and Andrew Puchalski of Kailua Beach Adventures; from Kauai – Abraham Frehm of Na Pali Experience, from Maui – Rowdy Lindsey of Hawaiian Paddle Sports and Curtis Geary of Maui Kayak Adventures; from Hawaii – Ben Catcho Jr. of KapohoKine Adventures and Richard Lindberg of Hawaiian Legacy Tours. Guides make each tour guest feel connected to Hawaii’s natural resources and Hawaiian culture. HEA is delighted to recognize the contribution of the award winners.

The Travel Writer of the Year was awarded to Shannon Wianecki. She is a prolific freelance writer who shares the natural and cultural history of the Hawaiian Islands with the readers of local and international travel magazines and books.

Pro Surfer Jamie O'Brien is sponsored by Body Glove.

Pro Surfer Jamie O’Brien is sponsored by Body Glove.

The twenty-three tour operators were awarded HEA’s Sustainable Tourism Certification for 2016-2018. They include: Under the Sea Hawaii, Hopkupaa, Dolphins and You, and Ocean Joy Cruises on Oahu; Kipu Ranch Adventures, Holo Holo Charters, and Na Pali Experience on Kauai; Aloha Kayaks Maui, Maui Nei Native Expeditions, Haleakala Bike Company, Temptation Tours, Maui Dreams Dive Company, Valley Isle Excursions, Maui Ocean Center, Maui Stand Up Paddle Boarding, Maui Surf Lessons, and Hawaii Mermaid Adventures on Maui; and Body Glove Cruises, Mauka Makai Adventures, Essential Hawaii Tours, Kona Honu Divers, Sea Quest Hawaii, and Kohala Ziplines on Hawaii.

“As a founding member of the organization, I am excited that the number of certified operators across the State more than doubled since the 2014-2016 certifications were awarded,” said Annette Kaohelaulii, HEA Board Treasurer.

IUCN recognized HEA’s Sustainable Tourism Certification Program in the tours organized especially for this event, which just ended. The Hawaii Tourism Authority also supports HEA efforts to educate commercial tour operators and community stakeholders on best management practices for the use of natural and cultural resources. HEA’s Certification Program is only one of two statewide programs in the U.S. providing a third party, comprehensive assessment of tour providers whose operations positively affect the State’s natural and cultural resources, contribute to conservation and help sustain local communities.

Mark Alan Vocal Works Brings A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias to Hilo

Local singing students from Mark Alan Vocal Works, Mark Sheffield’s voice studio, together with singers from his UH Hilo voice studio, will present a recital of (mostly) classical songs and arias.  Together with legendary pianist Quack Moore and the new vocal ensemble VOICES, they bring their unique interpretations of classics and modern favorites to Hilo. Showtime is Friday, September 30, at 7:30 p.m. at Hilo’s Church of the Holy Cross. Admission is free.  For more information, call 238-6040.

classical-recital

A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias presents singers in various stages of vocal development – from young beginners to experienced performers – in a recital designed to showcase and celebrate their particular strengths.  Singers include RyAnne Raffipiy, Landon Ballesteros, Samantha Saiki, Rachel Edwards, Amy Horst, and Bridge Hartman, along with Mark Sheffield, who teaches the other singers. Students from Mark’s private Vocal Works studio join singers from his UH Hilo voice studio to bring to life songs of love, heartbreak, joy, and beauty.

VOICES, a new vocal ensemble also led by Mark Sheffield, joins the concert with a return to their roots. They will perform their signature motet, “The Silver Swan” by Orlando Gibbons.  The solo singers follow, celebrating classics including old Italian songs “O cessate di piagarmi” and “Caro mio ben;” while bringing to life arias such as “Si, mi chiamano Mimi” from La Boheme and Rachmaninoff’s haunting “Vocalise.” The recital earns its (mostly) classical label with the performance of pop tunes by Adele and Billy Joel, and sizzling Broadway hits including Sondheim’s great song “Being Alive.”

Mark Sheffield maintains a busy private voice studio in Hilo, where he has taught both privately and at UH Hilo for ten years. 2016 saw the inauguration of Mark’s Vocal Works program, designed to provide both individual training and theory-based practical education in the vocal arts. This year also saw the inception of VOICES, a vocal ensemble comprised of Mark’s advanced students from both his Vocal Works and UH Hilo studios. Mark is joined at the helm of this recital by Quack Moore, the Grammy-winning pianist of Hilo Palace Theater and Saturday Night Live fame, who now devotes much of her time to supporting and promoting young musicians.

When asked how he came to create A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias, Mark said, “For a decade now, my students have performed in joint studio recitals given by my wife, piano teacher Katie Sheffield, and I. Beyond this, my students have performed to acclaim in shows locally and around the country, as they pursue studies, work, and dreams of Broadway success. Now we invite our friends and our community to a recital of our very own.  Thank you, Hilo, for supporting vocal music. We look forward to singing for you.”

A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias comes to Hilo September 30, 2016, at 7:30 p.m. at Hilo’s Church of the Holy Cross for one show only.  Admission is free.  Call 238-6040 for more information.

Gonorrhea Outbreak in Hawaii Showed Increased Antibiotic Resistance

CNN reported today that there was a gonorrhea outbreak here in Hawaii recently:

Seven gonorrhea patients in Hawaii are the first known US cases in which the sexually transmitted infection showed reduced susceptibility to the single available effective treatment option, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said today. The patients were diagnosed in April and May.

The six men and one woman were all cured by ceftriaxone and azithromycin, the two-drug regimen recommended for treating gonorrhea by the CDC. However, laboratory tests by the Hawaii State Department of Health showed that the patients’ gonorrheal infections did not succumb as easily to the antibiotics as infections have in the past.
gonorrhea
CNN goes on to report that gonorrhea is a common sexually transmitted disease (STD):
“Gonorrhea is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections, but most people do not realize they have it. The only way they find out is through testing,” she said.
When health care providers do not treat according to the CDC’s two-drug regimen — a single shot of ceftriaxone and an oral dose of azithromycin — patients may feel better, and their symptoms may disappear, but they may still have the infection incubating inside them, explained Bolan.
“If you’re not treated correctly, you cannot rely on your symptoms to tell you you’ve been cured,” she said.
Though no failures of the current treatment regimen have been confirmed in the United States, the CDC has been closely monitoring antibiotic resistance.
“We usually see emerging decreased susceptibility or resistance coming from the West, starting with Hawaii, and then we also see a higher proportion of isolates with decreased susceptibility in men who have sex with men. This is a pattern we’ve seen with penicillin resistance and other antibiotics,” Bolan said.

PBS Hawaii Opens Doors to New Home

Hawai‘i’s statewide public television station today opened its new home to the public, after a blessing ceremony and donor thank-you event this morning.

pbs-hawaii-new-building

PBS Hawai‘i’s new home, The Clarence T.C. Ching Campus at 315 Sand Island Access Road fronting Nimitz Highway, is a $30 million facility, the result of a successful capital campaign. Construction was completed on time and on budget. The building features three multimedia studios; the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Learning Zone, which includes the home base of the station’s statewide student news network, HIKI NŌ; and open work spaces with cheerful colors and natural light.

Event attendees included three multi-million dollar funders of the building – the State government, The Clarence T.C. Ching Foundation, and the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation. PBS Hawai‘i is offering tours of the building to all donors, large and small, totaling more than 2,000 people and organizations.

“We felt deeply the trust and aloha that people have in PBS Hawai‘i as an important part of this community,” said Board Chair Robbie Alm. “They reached out and supported the diversity of perspectives that we present and the fairness they find here.”

President and CEO Leslie Wilcox said, “We can’t thank the people of Hawai‘i enough. This new home reflects the values of people throughout the state and a vision for a closer relationship with our communities. The building design supports collaboration, creativity, culture and context.”

The mission of the educational media organization is to advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches lives.

The two-story, 32,000 square-foot building was designed by architect Sheryl Seaman of Group 70 International. The general contractor was Allied Builders System, and Cumming served as owner’s representative.

Hawaii Attorney General Statement Regarding Suboxone Prescription for Opioid Detoxification

In light of recent inquiries regarding physicians’ legal authority to prescribe the drug Suboxone for the purpose of opioid detoxification or maintenance treatment of opioid dependence, Attorney General Doug Chin today issued the following statement:

“Last week the state Narcotics Enforcement Division was asked whether a doctor may prescribe the drug Suboxone for opioid detoxification or maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. NED subsequently asked the Department of the Attorney General to review the relevant statute to determine how the law should be interpreted and applied. Our analysis has concluded that current portions of section 329-38 of the Hawaii Revised Statutes can be interpreted in more than one way, but within the context of the entire section, the existing practice of doctors who prescribe Suboxone for the purpose of opioid detoxification or maintenance treatment of opioid dependence may continue. It may be appropriate to clarify this statute during the next legislative session.”

suboxoneSuboxone is a prescription medicine that contains the active ingredients buprenorphine and naloxone. It is used to treat adults who are addicted to opioids.

Hawaii Hepatitis Outbreak Increases to 276 Confirmed Cases

Since the last update, HDOH has identified 5 new cases of hepatitis A.  All cases have been in adults, 68 have required hospitalization.

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Findings of the investigation suggest that the source of the outbreak is focused on Oahu. Ten (10) individuals are residents of the islands of Hawaii, Kauai, or Maui, and four visitors have returned to the mainland.

CONFIRMED CASES OF HEPATITIS A
276

Onset of illness has ranged between 6/12/16 – 9/15/16.