Applicants Sought For Hawaii Island Na Ala Hele Trails Advisory Council

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) is inviting applications from interested person for vacant seats on the Na Ala Hele Trails and Access Program Advisory Council on Hawaii Island.

DLNR

Na Ala Hele Advisory Council members are asked to advise the program on trail and access concerns and issues, discuss and make recommendations on legal issues, and promote communication and cooperation between government and community representatives.  Advisory council members receive public comments/recommendations and consult with their constituencies when needed.

The Na Ala Hele Advisory Council consists of nine members representing each of the following categories: Hawaiian culture, trail/mountain clubs, mountain bikers, hikers, equestrians, hunters, fishers, environmentalists, landowners and trail/access advocates.

Applicants are now being sought to fill two open seats in the following categories: Hawaiian culture and fishermen. At the same time, DOFAW is also creating a qualified list of those interested in any of the listed categories. All applicants should have an appropriate background in the category area as well as an interest in representing community stakeholders related to their respected categories.

Individuals who are interested in serving on the Na Ala Hele Advisory Council may submit an application. Forms are available online at dlnr.hawaii.gov/recreation/nah. Applications should be mailed to: Na Ala Hele Program Manager, Division of Forestry and Wildlife, 19 E. Kawili St., Hilo, HI 96720, attention Clement Chang. Applications will be reviewed by the DOFAW and members of the Council. Final selections will be made by the DLNR chairperson. Applications must be received by July 6, 2014.

Search Suspended for Fisherman Off Big Island

The Coast Guard and Hawaii County Fire Department are searching for a missing fisherman off the Big Island Saturday.

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

A 56-year-old male was fishing from a 10-foot cliff near Mackenzie State Recreation Area Friday evening when reporting sources say he was  swept out to sea after either slipping or being washed off by a wave.

Watchstanders at the Sector Honolulu Command Center received notification from the Hawaii County Fire Department Friday at 9:40 p.m. and launched an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Air Station Barbers Point and diverted the Coast Guard Cutter Kiska, 110-foot patrol boat.

Hawaii County Fire Department has a rescue boat and ground team also assisting in the search.

The missing fisherman was wearing black rain gear.

For more information, contact the 14th Coast Guard District public affairs office at (808) 535-3230.

Update:

“Aerial search conducted up to 1/2 mi. offshore, dive operations conducted fronting Malama Flats area, ground search conducted from Pohoiki to Kaimu Beach. All negative findings. Search suspended till first light on Sunday June 8, 2014.”

2014 Summer Fun Programs Announced on the Big Island

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation is announcing the 2014 Summer Fun Program.

Fun program will start on June 9, 2014 at the following location and hours:

summer fun

For safety reasons, use of the facilities will be limited to Summer Fun participants during program hours.

If you are interested in registering a child please call 961-8740 or 938-2012 to find out which sites are available. Program guides can also be found at http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation.

Big Island Artist Unveils Sculpture Honoring Body Glove Founders

Big Island artist Chris Barela is unveiled his life-size statue here Thursday of the two brothers who greatly influenced the sports of surfing and diving. A bronze statue of Body Glove founders Bob and Bill Meistrell—who also invented the modern-day wetsuit—will grace the entrance to King Harbor Yacht Club at Redondo Beach’s scenic Seaside Lagoon.

Chris Barela puts the finishing touches on the life-size statue in Ventura CA

Chris Barela puts the finishing touches on the life-size statue in Ventura CA

See a mini-version of the statue on display at Barela Gallery at The Shops at Mauna Lani. For over a year, Barela sculpted the Body Glove marquette inside the Kohala Coast gallery for visiting guests to watch his techniques. After appearing at the 2014 Mavericks surf contest, the completed, 32-inch piece is back at the gallery and exhibited with photos detailing the sculpting process of the larger bronze.

To do the life-size statue, Barela built an additional studio at his Puako home where the armature, sculpt and mould were completed. The mould was packed and shipped in three different crates to Barela’s foundry in Ventura, California, where a team of skilled craftsmen used the lost wax process to complete the bronze memorial statue.

“It was like working in paradise, except for the heat and mosquitoes,” says Barela about his home studio. “It is an honor to have been chosen for this Body Glove project as the late Bob and Bill Meistrell were an inspiration to many.”

A former professional surfer who appeared on the cover of Surfing Magazine, Barela retired from the sport in the late 1980s and turned his love for the ocean into a career in sculpture, painting, photography and filmmaking.

Chris Barela with marquette of Body Glove statue in Barela Gallery

Chris Barela with marquette of Body Glove statue in Barela Gallery

“My passion is to bring awareness to the beauty of life within our oceans,” shares Barela, who is most recognized for his bronze sculpture of octopus. The Golden State native boasts public installations from the Oregon Coast to Key West, Florida, including those of Zane Grey, Hollywood Western writer; baseball great Ted Williams and the Tim Kelly statue standing sentinel at Hermosa Beach Pier. Barela was awarded first place at the 2011 Hawaii Ocean Film Festival for his short film on octopus.

For information, contact Barela Gallery at 808-885-5111 or visit www.barelagallery.com.

Hawaii Lava Flow Update

Breakouts remain active on the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow

The farthest active surface flows today were 6.5 km (4.0 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen in the upper left of the visual photograph.

The farthest active surface flows today were 6.5 km (4.0 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen in the upper left of the visual photograph.

Summit deflation in May resulted in a decrease in lava supply to the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow, with the flow front becoming inactive and stalling. Breakouts behind the flow front, however, remain active. The thermal image on the right shows these breakouts clearly as the yellow and white regions.

Today the pond was gently gas pistoning - a process that involves the cyclic rise and fall of the lava level due to gas buildup and release.

Today the pond was gently gas pistoning – a process that involves the cyclic rise and fall of the lava level due to gas buildup and release.

The lava pond in the northeast portion of Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater remains active, and has built up a slightly elevated rim following several overflows over the past week.

Gas bubbles rising through the lava pond create small blisters in the thin flexible crust near the pond margin.

Gas bubbles rising through the lava pond create small blisters in the thin flexible crust near the pond margin.

An HVO geologist shields his face from intense heat as he dips a rock hammer into an active pāhoehoe toe. After scooping out the lava it is placed in the water to quench it.

HVO routinely collects lava samples for chemical analysis, which can give insight into changes in the magmatic system.

HVO routinely collects lava samples for chemical analysis, which can give insight into changes in the magmatic system.

Good views of the lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater

The lake is roughly 150 meters (490 ft) wide by 200 meters (700 ft) long.

The lake is roughly 150 meters (490 ft) wide by 200 meters (700 ft) long.

Thin fume allowed good views of the lava lake in the Overlook crater, which is set within Halemaʻumaʻu Crater at the summit of Kīlauea.

The lake surface is constantly moving, normally from north to south (roughly from the upper-right portion of the image towards the lower-left).

The lake surface is constantly moving, normally from north to south (roughly from the upper-right portion of the image towards the lower-left).

A view of the summit lava lake from above, using a thermal camera. The thermal images clearly show the thin crustal plates that make up the surface of the lake. The plates are separated by hot incandescent cracks.

Free Keiki Performing Arts Workshop

Students entering grades 3-6 are invited to apply to the “Keiki Performing Arts Workshop” from July 28 to August 10 at Kahilu Theatre. This is a free two-week summer musical theatre and performing arts camp from 10am to 2:30pm, Monday through Saturday.

Courtesy of Steve Campbell of a young actor at a recent Kahilu Theatre Family Fun Day

Courtesy of Steve Campbell of a young actor at a recent Kahilu Theatre Family Fun Day

Founded in 2011, KPAW introduces children to different aspects of the performing arts. As schools have been forced to cut arts education, Kahilu Theatre is filling this gap by providing diverse arts education for youth.

After a physical warm-up, KPAW students participate in numerous acting games that involve physical awareness, improvisation and quick thinking. They rehearse music numbers each day, learning lyrics, tunes and choreography for the numbers. Students also explore theatre related arts and crafts, including costuming and set design. The final performance will be on Sunday, August 10th as part of Kahilu Theatre’s Family Fun Day.

Keiki Performing Arts Workshop was founded by Marena Dunnington and the teens of the Teen Theatre Troupe, now the Kahilu Youth Theatre Troupe. From Waimea, Marena is now a junior at Muhlenberg College, studying theatre and education. Performing since age three, Marena’s greatest joy is working with kids in a theatrical setting. Marena says “Art is so important to childhood development and to the well-being of a community, and our hope is to expose children in our community to as much art as we can so that they can learn and grow from it.”

All of the KPAW teachers are college students pursuing performing art careers. KPAW will also be assisted by high school students from Waimea. Students only need to bring lunch, everything else will be provided by Kahilu Theatre.

Applications for KPAW are available at http://kahilutheatre.org/Education/Youth and due by June 11. Applicants will be notified of acceptance by June 17, 2014. KPAW is supported in part by the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts through appropriations from the Legislature of the State of Hawaii and by the National Endowment of the Arts.

Infectious Diseases Among Top Conditions for Hawaii’s Waitlist

Nearly one in five of Hawaii’s waitlisted patients—that is, those remaining in a hospital after the need for acute care ceases—have an infectious disease, according to discharge data analyzed by the Hawaii Health Information Corporation (HHIC), the state’s premier healthcare data collector and analyzer.

Hawaii Health Information Corporation (HHIC)Waitlist patients are those needing treatment, but not at the severity level that requires inpatient care.  These patients often continue to stay in a hospital because there are limited available community placement options that meet the patient’s needs.

According to 2011 data, infectious diseases, including septicemia, parasitic diseases and cellulitis, are the most costly conditions among waitlist patients in our state.  Septicemia (a severe blood infection that can lead to organ failure or death) is the most common and most expensive of these conditions, costing hospitals $4.7 million annually.  The number of waitlist patients with this life-threatening disease increased 163 percent between 2006 and 2011.    Waitlist patients with infectious diseases are the most difficult to place and result in a patient being waitlisted for an extended period.

The second most expensive waitlist patients are those with a tracheostomy, a surgically created opening in the neck leading directly to the trachea (windpipe), which allows a person to breathe without the use of his or her nose or mouth.  In Hawaii, this group costs hospitals $3.5 million annually.  Tracheostomy is also among the longest-stay conditions for waitlisted patients.

Also among the top 12 most costly conditions are: cerebrovascular atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries and the leading cause of heart attacks), amputation of lower limbs, hip and femur procedures for trauma, major respiratory infections, renal failure, head trauma with coma for less than an hour, and back and neck disorders.  Combined, the top 12 waitlisted conditions cost $25.6 million, representing 37 percent of the $62.7 million annual waitlist cost to hospitals in 2011.

HHIC also found that mental illness is a common underlying and complicating condition, affecting 49 percent of waitlisted patients.  Four of the top 12 longest-stay waitlisted conditions—drug and alcohol abuse, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders and depression—are mental health-related.

Between 2006 and 2011, heart failure, kidney and urinary tract infections and pneumonia received much focus in quality assurance programs and have fallen off the list of the top 12 most costly waitlist conditions.

The key barriers to community placement of waitlisted patients include insufficient staff with higher skill-mix in nursing homes and other placement alternatives to meet the needs of those with complex conditions, a lack of specialty equipment to provide appropriate care, the cost of multiple or high-cost antibiotics, and lack of community-based resources to support patients with underlying mentally illness in managing their other medical conditions.

“Meeting the complex medical and behavioral needs of waitlisted patients is a key challenge in reducing the hospital waitlist,” said Peter Sybinsky, Ph.D., president and CEO of HHIC.  “Solutions will require development of appropriate community and institutional resources and the funding sources to maintain them.  As a community, we need to take aggressive efforts to address both.”

About the Data
Findings are based on data collected from all hospitals across the state, except Tripler Army Medical Center.  The report was prepared based on funding provided by Hawaii Medical Service Association, Kaiser-Permanente, AlohaCare, Ohana Healthcare and United Healthcare, in an attempt to provide a clear description of Hawaii’s waitlist population and estimate the financial impact on Hawaii’s hospitals.

Hauanio and Minami-Judd Retire from Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park

Two long-term employees of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park recently announced their retirement after many years of service:

Clarence “Aku” Hauanio retired May 30, 2014 after 29 years of service to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

NPS Photo of Aku Hauanio

NPS Photo of Aku Hauanio

Aku worked for the Natural Resources Management division as a pest control worker, and was devoted to protecting the endangered species within the park, including the nēnē (endemic Hawaiian goose), and the ‘u‘au (Hawaiian petrel).

Residents of Kalapana, Aku and his ‘ohana (family) created a legacy at the park by serving the NPS for four generations. His grandfather, John Pa‘i Hauanio, Sr., worked here, as did Aku’s father, John Pa‘i Hauanio Jr., who built the rock wall and park sign that welcome visitors entering from the south. The much-photographed grove of coconut palms trees on the makai (ocean) side of the end of Chain of Craters Road was planted by John Jr., and marks the ancient Hawaiian village of Panau. Aku’s sons, Kainoa and Ikua, have both worked and volunteered at the park.

Aku’s influence on the park community is extraordinary. He worked in several program areas, including Protection, Maintenance, and Natural Resources Management. He worked on backcountry trails, built miles and miles of fence, and removed invasive, non-native weeds to protect native plant and animal communities in the park. According to his field supervisor, Nēnē Recovery Project Manager Kathleen Misajon, Aku’s hard work and dedication to the program over the past 10 years has greatly contributed to an increase in the park’s population from 152 to 250 wild birds.

“Aku contributed his skills to many aspects of our program, from fencing projects and feral animal control to monitoring nests and helping band the endangered geese,” Misajon said.

Aku is also a canoe builder, and inspired a community of outrigger canoe paddlers, dedicating countless hours to coaching teams that paddled together competitively, and for fun. An avid fisherman who uses traditional Hawaiian as well as modern techniques, Aku is looking forward to spending more time on the ocean during his retirement. He will continue to live in and care for Kalapana with family.

Gail Minami-Judd retired from Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on May 31, 2014, following 31 years of dedication to the National Park Service (NPS). She served as the Supervisory Park Ranger and Kīlauea District Ranger for the Protection Division since 1990.

NPS Photo of Gail Minami-Judd by David Boyle.

NPS Photo of Gail Minami-Judd by David Boyle.

Gail began her career at the USS Arizona Memorial on O‘ahu in 1983, graduated from the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in 1986, then transferred to Hawai‘i Volcanoes in 1987 as a Visitor and Resource Protection Ranger. Her supervisor, Chief Ranger Talmadge Magno, describes her career as “exemplary.”

“We recognize and applaud Gail for her dedication to the mission of the NPS in protecting the natural and cultural features of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, and providing the leadership to maintain the safety of staff and visitors in this dynamic environment,” Magno said.

Gail’s support for the Pacific Island Network, Pacific West Region, and national programs are also noted, and she achieved numerous accolades and certifications, including achieving and maintaining a Level 1 law enforcement commission for 28 years; obtaining the level of short-haul spotter in aviation; emergency medical technician; park scuba diver; and wildland firefighter and structural firefighter.

“Gail’s service as Operations Chief and Incident Commander as well as Acting Chief Ranger during numerous periods and serious incidents and natural disasters were key to the success of each operation and a testament to her high level of expertise and dedication,” Magno said.

Some of these noted operations included:

  • The Department of the Interior (DOI) Special Commendation for HAVO Drug Law Enforcement Program, 1989
  • DOI Excellence of Service for Park Ranger Rescue Team, 1990
  • Excellence of Service Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Rescue, 1993
  • Excellence of Service Emergency Response Big Island Air Crash, 1999

Gail also earned the Julie Cross Women in Law Enforcement Memorial in 1988. More recently, Gail’s leadership with eruption operations led to the Andrew Clark Hecht Memorial Public Safety Achievement Award in 2009 for the mitigation of hazards and high levels of SO2 associated with the current eruptions.

Gail will remain in Volcano with her husband, former park criminal investigator Jeff Judd, and their three children.

 

Bus Service to Waikoloa Village Resorts and Waimea Begin

Aloha,

Mass Transit has just informed us that the new Waikoloa Village Bus Routes to the Resorts and Waimea have started.

HPP Bus Picture

So now in the morning you can catch the bus from Waikoloa Village down to the Waikoloa Resorts, use a transfer to go the other Resorts and return in the afternoon.

Also you can use it to go to Waimea at 8:15 in the morning and return to Waikoloa village at 1:05 in the afternoon.

We apologize for any inconvenience the delayed start might have caused,

Council Member Margaret Wille

Puna Students Participate in Medeival Games on Oahu

Students from Mālamalama Waldorf School recently participated in the Medieval Games at Camp Erdman on the North Shore of Oahu. This is a hands on experience of sixth grade curriculum, which studies medieval history in depth.

Two members of Cheshire compete in pillow jousting, as the King pays heed to their style and technique

Two members of Cheshire compete in pillow jousting, as the King pays heed to their
style and technique.

Students dressed in tunics adorned with hand stitched family crests and were divided into shires (Cheshire, Berkshire, Hampshire and Yorkshire), each shire engaged in four events, archery, jousting (with pillow sacks), stilt walking and conquering a 30 foot vertical climbing wall. Waldorf schools from
throughout the state participate in this annual event, hosted by Honolulu Waldorf School.

Waldorf Education strives to provide experiential learning experiences for its students by utilizing the head, heart and hands while learning, creating real life experiences, allowing the student to live what they are learning.

Mālamalama Waldorf School is the only non-sectarian, non-denominational independent Waldorf School on the island of Hawai’i offering the internationally recognized Waldorf curriculum. If you would like your child to benefit from an amazing education please contact us at 808-982-7701 or visit us @ www.hawaiiwaldorf.org and enroll today!

Big Island Police Searching for Men Involved in Puna Home Invasion

Hawaiʻi Island police are investigating a home invasion early Monday morning (June 1) in Puna.

Shortly after 3 a.m., officers responded to a report of a home invasion on Ala Heiau Road in the lower part of the Hawaiian Paradise Park subdivision after receiving a report that two men, one armed and both wearing masks, had entered a house and confronted the occupants.

Composite Sketch

Composite Sketch

Police learned that a 68-year-old man and his 70-year-old wife had been at home at when the two suspects entered the residence through an unlocked door and started to remove items from a bedroom. One of the suspects struck and threatened the male victim.

The suspects then left from the rear of the house with electronic items.

Composite Sketch

Composite Sketch

This case is classified as first-degree burglary, first-degree terroristic threatening and third-degree assault.

Police ask anyone with information on this case or anyone who recognizes the suspects from these composite drawings to contact Detective Grant Todd by phone at 961-2385 or by email at gtodd@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Five Big Island Organizations Awarded Aloha Grown Malama Honua Award

A total of five (5) Big Island organizations were awarded with the 2014 Aloha Grown Malama Honua Award. Each received a $500 award towards a specific project, program or initiative that embodies Aloha Grown’s philosophy to “Support Local, Sustain the Aina & Share the Aloha.”

From L-R (front row): Katie Arrayan (ʻAlo Kēhau parent), Ikaika Arrayan (ʻAlo Kēhau kindergarten student), Kaui Takamine (ʻAlo Kēhau 1st grade student), Kaweloanu Castro (ʻAlo Kēhau kindergarten student), Kekapalehua Castro (Pūnana Leo preschooler), Kaiea Akau LaClair (Pūnana Leo preschooler), and Kalua Castro (ʻAlo Kēhau and Pūnana Leo parent). From L-R (back row):  Camille Kalahiki (Parker Ranch Store - Assistant Manager), Leilani Griego (ʻAlo Kēhau parent), Uilani Macabio (ʻAlo Kēhau – Parent & Office Staff), Kanalu Lacy (ʻAlo Kēhau 2nd grade student), Laʻakea Takamine (ʻAlo Kēhau 3rd grade student), Koʻiawe Griego (ʻAlo Kēhau 3rd grade student), Jane Lee (Kohala Elementary School Discovery Garden – FoodCorps Service Member), Maluhia O`Donnell (Pūnana Leo – Site Coordinator), and Tracey Akau (Parker Ranch Store - Manager).

From L-R (front row): Katie Arrayan (ʻAlo Kēhau parent), Ikaika Arrayan (ʻAlo Kēhau kindergarten student), Kaui Takamine (ʻAlo Kēhau 1st grade student), Kaweloanu Castro (ʻAlo Kēhau kindergarten student), Kekapalehua Castro (Pūnana Leo preschooler), Kaiea Akau LaClair (Pūnana Leo preschooler), and Kalua Castro (ʻAlo Kēhau and Pūnana Leo parent).  From L-R (back row): Camille Kalahiki (Parker Ranch Store – Assistant Manager), Leilani Griego (ʻAlo Kēhau parent), Uilani Macabio (ʻAlo Kēhau – Parent & Office Staff), Kanalu Lacy (ʻAlo Kēhau 2nd grade student), Laʻakea Takamine (ʻAlo Kēhau 3rd grade student), Koʻiawe Griego (ʻAlo Kēhau 3rd grade student), Jane Lee (Kohala Elementary School Discovery Garden – FoodCorps Service Member), Maluhia O`Donnell (Pūnana Leo – Site Coordinator), and Tracey Akau (Parker Ranch Store – Manager).

Congratulations to the following 2014 Malama Honua Award recipients! Following are their projects/programs that promote sustainability (in alphabetical order):

  • Alo Kehau o ka Aina Mauna – “Malama Puu” project
  • Kohala Elementary School – “Discovery Garden” project
  • Laupahoehoe Community Public Charter School – “Farm to School” program
  • Naalehu School Garden – “Aquaponics Garden Unit” project
  • Punana Leo o Waimea – “Malaai expansion” project

“We were extremely pleased to once again see such a great response to our Aloha Grown Malama Honua Fund program,” said Aloha Grown Store Manager Tyler Owens. “We received a number of applications and essays from well-deserving organizations.”

Parker Ranch Store Manager Tracey Akau noted, “it was inspiring to see how many organizations are committed to sustainability efforts in our Big Island communities.”

Aloha Grown is committed to supporting sustainability efforts in Hawaii. Two percent of every Aloha Grown sale goes to the Malama Honua Fund, which then awards local nonprofits, schools, organizations and initiatives with similar sustainability missions.

To view the essays submitted by all 2014 Malama Honua Award recipients, visit www.alohagrown.com/malama-honua-fund.html

For more information on Aloha Grown, visit www.alohagrown.com.

Yes… That Was Me in Today’s Wreck at Malama Market Intersection

Today at about 10:30 my cousin and I were driving back home after dropping my wife’s car off at Kolohe Auto Repair when we got in an accident at the Malama Market intersection on Highway 130 here in Pahoa.

View from inside the car right after the wreck.

View from inside the car right after the wreck.  I tried to get out of the car but was too stunned to even move and my neck and back hurt so felt it was best to just stay put.

I was the passenger in a 2009 Scion that took the brunt of the impact.  Simply put… what happened shouldn’t have happened had the driver we hit was paying attention.

We were driving towards Kalapana on Highway 130 and the driver of a Jeep Wrangler was driving towards town direction.  He moved into the left turn lane at the Malama Market intersection and came to a stop.

As we were going at the speed limit recommended for the area of 45 MPH… right as we got to the intersection… the Jeep Wrangler decided that he was going to take a left turn in to the Malama Market area.

The driver of the car I was in… slammed on her brakes but it was too late and we slammed into the car.

I spent all day in the hospital getting everything from Cat Scans to X-Rays while the whole day my neck was in some sort of collar to keep me from moving it.

I’m now happy to report that I’m back home with the diagnosis of serious whiplash and I have a nice gash down the shin of my left leg.

Highway 130 and this Malama Market intersection have been one of the most dangerous ones in the State and today it proved itself to me personally.

The State KNOWS there is a problem with this intersection yet accidents continue to happen there almost daily.  People have lost limbs, lost cars, broken bones and still yet nothing has been done.

There is plans to install a round-a-bout at this intersection in the next few months… I’m not sure how that will work in the long run.
pahoa roundMore posts related to accidents on Highway 130 can be found here:  Highway 130

Shark Bites Woman Near Palmyra Atoll – Victim Medically Evacuated to Oahu

The Coast Guard medically evacuated a woman after she was bitten by a shark near Palmyra Atoll, Sunday.

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Joint Rescue Coordination Center Honolulu received a call from the Palmyra research facility director reporting that a 37-year-old female patient sustained a shark bite to her left hand.

A Coast Guard flight surgeon consulted with the medical staff treating the victim and determined that a medevac was warranted due to the risk of infection and possible nerve and tendon damage. Commercial aircraft were not available until Tuesday.

An HC-130 Hercules airplane crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point launched to Palmyra Atoll to conduct the medevac. The woman was transported to Air Station Barbers Point on Oahu where emergency medical technicians safely transported her to Kaiser Permanente Moanalua Medical Center and Clinic for further treatment.

The aircrew flew more than 1,000 miles from Hawaii to Palmyra Atoll to complete the medevac. This is comparable to dispatching an ambulance from Seattle to respond to a patient in San Diego. The 14th Coast Guard District encompasses more than 12.2 million square miles of the Central and South Pacific.

There are four HC-130 Hercules airplanes based on Oahu serving the Central and South Pacific. These aircraft are the primary means of conducting long range missions and are scheduled to be replaced by the HC-130J, which will bring increased speed, range and capability to the Coast Guard mission in the Pacific. For more information on the HC-130J visit http://www.uscg.mil/acquisition/programs/air.asp.

For more information on this case, or the Coast Guard’s role in long range search and rescue, contact the 14th Coast Guard District public affairs office at.(808) 535-3230.

Hawaii Applauds Obama Administration’s Climate Change for Power Plants – Rest of the Country Following Hawaii’s Lead

The White House today released new rules under the Clean Air Act governing what existing power plants must do to reduce earth-warming greenhouse gas emissions.  These rules provide states flexibility to utilize energy efficiency and renewable energy, such as outlined in the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI), as compliance measures.

President Barack Obama, with Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy, center, talks with EPA staff members who worked on the power-plant emissions standards, in the Rose Garden of the White House, June 2, 2014.

President Barack Obama, with Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy, center, talks with EPA staff members who worked on the power-plant emissions standards, in the Rose Garden of the White House, June 2, 2014.

Gov. Abercrombie applauded the new rules, stating, “Hawaii is at the forefront of responding to climate change through our Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative, which serves as a substantial economic driver while reducing our dependence on imported oil.  By building such flexibility into the rules, President Obama is encouraging the rest of the country to follow Hawaii’s lead in pursuing clean energy.”

New financial tools under development by the Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) to increase deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency measures are well-timed to empower the state’s energy consumers to contribute to greenhouse gas reductions through use of renewable energy like rooftop solar.

“Hawaii’s Green Energy Market Securitization financing tool, or GEMS, will expand low-cost financing to clean energy solutions while helping the state gain credit for reducing carbon through lesser use of petroleum products to generate electricity,” said DBEDT Director Richard Lim.

Proposed by the governor in his 2013 State of the State address and signed into law later that year, GEMS is an innovative, clean energy financing program designed to make clean energy improvements affordable and accessible to Hawaii consumers, especially underserved markets such as low- and moderate-income homeowners, renters and nonprofits.

These new rules requiring carbon dioxide emissions reductions from power plants were issued pursuant to Section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act.  During the its extensive process to hear from stakeholders throughout the nation the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reached out to Hawaii.  The state submitted a set of consolidated comments developed by the Hawaii Department of Health, Hawaii State Public Utilities Commission (PUC) and DBEDT regarding state plans to meet federal carbon emission reduction targets for existing electricity generation units.

Mark Glick, the administrator of the State Energy Office, acknowledged EPA’s innovative approach and outreach to Hawaii.  “EPA is clearly recognizing innovative policies like the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative, by allowing states to utilize energy efficiency and renewable energy as greenhouse gas compliance measures.   Hawaii is able to comply with little or no financial impact on our businesses and residents by allowing our ongoing clean energy agenda to count for reductions in greenhouse gas emissions,” Glick said.

Gov. Abercrombie added:  “Hawaii is working with the Obama Administration to align our state’s commitment to go beyond 40 percent renewable energy in the electrical power sector by 2030 and our federal and state policies to reduce our carbon footprint.   As a leading test bed for clean energy, Hawaii can demonstrate to the world how to stimulate our economy while improving the environment for future generations.”

The new EPA rules allow states to employ a range of measures to meet carbon emission targets, including renewable energy and energy efficiency projects. In Hawaii, numerous such initiatives are underway in the power generation sector under the umbrella of the HCEI.

Ongoing PUC dockets include those relating to energy efficiency portfolio standards, requests for proposals for renewable energy production, and interconnection matters. In addition, the PUC and DBEDT are working with the Hawaiian Electric Companies to better align the utility’s business model with consumer interests and the state’s public policy’s goals.

Stolen Kayaks Lead to Arrest of Hilo Man for Two Burlgaries

Stolen kayaks led to the arrest of a Hilo man for two burglaries within a week.

On Friday (May 30), a 38-year old Hilo man reported that two kayaks had been stolen from a patio attached to his Komohana Street home.

Keenan Acia

Keenan Acia

South Hilo Patrol officers located and arrested 18-year old Keenan Acia of Hilo, and recovered the stolen kayaks.

At the same time, Keenan was arrested in connection with an unrelated burglary on May 24. In that case, a 67-year-old Hilo man reported that a cell phone, digital camera, purse and prescription medications had been removed from his house.

Keenan was held at the Hilo Police cellblock while detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section continued both investigations.

At 7:25 p.m. Saturday (May 31), Keenan was charged with two counts of first-degree burglary and one count each of second-degree theft, third-degree theft and fourth-degree theft. His bail was set at $12,750.

He remained at the cellblock pending his initial court appearance scheduled for Monday.

Squatters Busted for Burglary and Theft

A Pepeʻekeo man and woman have been charged with burglary and theft for allegedly staying in an unoccupied house in Pepeʻekeo.

On Friday (May 30) police received reports of suspicious activity at a home on Kaupakueha Homestead Road, where lights were on in a house that was supposed to be unoccupied.

Akoni Perry

Akoni Perry

South Hilo Patrol Officers located and arrested 27-year old Akoni Perry, and 32-year old Holly White, and held them at the Hilo police cellblock while detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section continued the investigation.

Holly White

Holly White

At 3:10 p.m. Sunday (June 1), detectives charged Perry and White with first-degree burglary and fourth-degree theft. Bail was set at $5,250 each.

The two remained at the cellblock pending their initial court appearance scheduled for Monday (June 2).

Big Island Police Seeking Identity of Man Wanted for Fraudulent Use of Credit Card

Hawaiʻi Island police are asking for the public’s help in identifying a man wanted for fraudulent use of a credit card. The card was used at a store in Hilo for charges totaling approximately $176.

Have you seen this guy?

Have you seen this guy?

The man’s image was captured on a surveillance camera. He is described as African-American, in his late 20s with a slim build.

Police ask that anyone with information on his identity or whereabouts call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Merchants are reminded to follow proper protocol when making credit card transactions and to be especially cautious when processing large purchases—especially if the credit card doesn’t swipe properly. When in doubt, check with the credit card company.

Malama O’oma Day

ooma day

Rescue Crews Searching for Man Off Big Island

The Coast Guard, Hawaii Police Department, and Hawaii Fire Department are searching for a man reported missing near Cape Kumukahi, Hawaii, Friday.

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

Missing is 30-year-old Peter Mahoe.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Honolulu received a report from crewmembers at the Hawaii Fire Department regarding a missing 30-year-old man who was last seen Thursday between 12 p.m., and 2 p.m., climbing down a cliff face where he was picking opihi.

Mahoe’s all-terrain vehicle was found 200 feet from the area he was last seen. His family was also camping close by.

An HC-130 Hercules airplane crew and an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point were launched to search along with the crew of the 110-foot Coast Guard Cutter Kiska, homeported in Hilo, and crews from the Hawaii Police Department and the Hawaii Fire Department.

Mahoe is approximately 5 feet 6 inches tall, has shoulder length brown hair and was reported to be wearing blue boardshorts.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Coast Guard Sector Honolulu at (808) 842-2600.