Hawaii Island Humane Society Pet Walks

Just over two weeks remain until the Hawaii Island Humane Society Hilo Pet Walk at Queen Liliuokalani Park on Saturday, October 26 and the Kona Pet Walk at Kona Commons on Sunday, October 27.
petwalkThere is still plenty of time to do advanced fundraising. It’s easy with FirstGiving.com/HIHSPetWalk. Just click, create your own personal fundraising page then email family and friends far & wide to donate.

You may also download and print a registration form and solicit donations in person. Visit the News and Special Events page at HIHS.org.

As if helping shelter pets through donations to Pet Walk weren’t incentive enough, all walkers who raise $50 or more in donations receive a FREE Pet Walk tee shirt!

Hilo and Kona Pet Walk registration begins at 8am, walks begin at 9am followed by fun contests and prizes.

MAHALO to these Pet Walk 2013 sponsors:

TINGUELY DEVELOPMENT, PETCO FOUNDATION, KEAUHOU VETERINARY HOSPITAL, ALII VETERINARY HOSPITAL, THE PET HOSPITAL HILO AND PAWS UNIVERSITY.

The mission of the Hawaii Island Humane Society is to promote respect for all animals, prevent cruelty to animals, eliminate pet overpopulation, and enhance the bond between humans and animals. HIHS holds a contract with the County of Hawaii to enforce certain animal-related laws and it offers 24-hour service for injured animals and other animal emergencies, humane education classes, low-cost spay and neuter services, lost and found assistance, microchipping and more.

Big Island Police Charge Man Involved in Report of Gunshots Last Week

Hawaiʻi Island police have charged the man who was arrested last week in connection with a report of gunshots in Hilo on September 30.

Kevin Kuhia

Kevin Kuhia

At 2:25 p.m. Saturday (October5), 34-year-old Kevin Kuhia, who has no permanent address, was charged with first-degree reckless endangering, unauthorized control of a motor vehicle, ownership of a firearm prohibited and place to keep a firearm prohibited. His bail was set at $70,000.

He was held at the Hilo police cellblock until his initial court appearance on Monday (October 7).

On the afternoon of September 30, Hilo patrol officers responded to a report that a man had fired several rounds from a red Mazda Miata in front of a house on Elama Street in the Panaʻewa area.

On Thursday (October3), police located the car and Kuhia in a vacant lot on Lehua Street in the Fern Acres subdivision in Puna. Kuhia was arrested and taken into custody while detectives continued the investigation.

 

Representative Cabanilla to Serve as Majority Floor Leader

Representative Rida Cabanilla (Ocean Pointe, West Loch, Ewa Gentry, Ewa Villages, Ewa Beach), in her 10th year of service in the House of Representatives, has been selected as the new Majority Floor Leader.  She joins the House leadership team during an important time before the October 28th special session.  Previously, she served as the Chair of the Committee on Housing and the Committee on International Affairs.

Rep. Rida Cabanilla

Rep. Rida Cabanilla

Admired for her honesty, diligence and directness on the issues, Rep. Cabanilla is one of two women in the Majority leadership.  Her institutional knowledge from years of service and leadership skills as a career Lieutenant Colonel Army Officer, Registered Nurse and business woman will be significant assets to the State House.

As the Chair of the Housing Committee, Rep. Cabanilla facilitated and passed many beneficial measures, including public housing reforms, affordable rentals and the availability of senior housing.  She was also instrumental in numerous appropriations for her district.

“The confidence of my colleagues in my selection as Floor Leader is inspiring and I will continue to collaborate and work hard to serve the best interests of my constituents and the State of Hawaii,” stated Rep. Cabanilla.

For additional inquiries, please contact the Office of Rep. Cabanilla at (808) 586-6080 or by email at Repcabanilla@capitol.hawaii.gov.

Hawaii Attorney General Launches Online Notary System

The Hawaii Attorney General, Notary Public Office has launched a new online Notary system at https://notary.eHawaii.gov/. The new system is designed to help the public quickly and easily submit and pay for their applications to become a Notary or renew their Notary Commission. It also provides the Notary staff with a platform to administer new applications and renewals from their mobile devices or desktops.

notary

“This new system will reduce the amount of manual data entry and manual payments processed”

“This new system will reduce the amount of manual data entry and manual payments processed,” said Hawaii Deputy Attorney General Shari Wong. “We’ll also reduce cost by eventually doing away with all the paper-based reminders and letters. This is part of the Attorney General’s continued efforts to transform how we can serve our customers more efficiently and effectively.”

The mobile version of the system optimizes touch screen technology and smart phone interfaces by providing larger text, buttons designed for touch response and layouts for smaller screens. This provides speed and efficiency on a platform that enables the Notary Public office to quickly implement additional improvements and realize future cost savings.

The online Notary application was developed at no cost to the state and is maintained via the eHawaii.gov program, a largely self-funded public-private partnership between the State of Hawai‘i and Hawai‘i Information Consortium LLC (HIC), a Hawai‘i corporation and wholly owned subsidiary of eGovernment firm NIC Inc..

 

 

Hawaiian Electric Companies Introduce New Logo

The Hawaiian Electric Companies today introduced a new logo that represents the companies’ roots in the islands as well as their commitment to developing a better energy future for Hawaii.

HELCO Logo

“We’re proud of our long history of service to our islands. At the same time, we know we need to continue to change and do better,” said Dick Rosenblum, Hawaiian Electric president and CEO. “We’re working hard to lower bills for our customers, improve our service, and develop more low-cost clean energy. The logo is a symbol of those commitments.”

Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric, and Hawaii Electric Light Company have initiated ambitious projects to deliver on these commitments. Some of the latest actions include:

  • Pursuing, with Public Utilities Commission approval, five new low-cost renewable energy projects on Oahu – including four solar farms and one wind farm – with a combined capacity of 64 megawatts
  • Making it easier, faster, and cheaper for customers to install photovoltaic projects (as of August 2013, there were more than 34,000 installed PV systems across the companies’ service territories with a combined capacity of approximately 250 megawatts)
  • Planning the deactivation of older, less efficient utility generating units on Oahu, Maui and Hawaii Island for a combined 226 megawatts – about 14 percent of generation owned by the utilities

In the coming weeks, the companies will be announcing more projects to lower bills, improve service and develop more low-cost renewable energy.

“With oil prices driving up electric bills, we know how tough it is for our customers. Through projects like these, we’re working to bring customers some relief,” Rosenblum said. “This won’t happen overnight, but these are steps to help get us there.”

An estimated 18 percent of the electricity currently used by customers on Oahu and Hawaii Island and in Maui County comes from renewable resources, already ahead of the state’s goal of 15 percent by 2015. So far this year, this use of clean energy has saved customers an estimated $243 million by reducing oil use by 1.9 million barrels.

The new logo was developed by respected designer Sig Zane of Hilo and combines traditional Hawaiian design elements with a modern look. Zane worked on the design with his wife, cultural expert Nalani Kanakaole, and their son Kuhao. They drew upon Hawaiian Electric’s 122-year history for their inspiration.

“From the very beginning, when King Kalakaua pioneered electricity at Iolani Palace and chartered Hawaiian Electric, the company has played a key role in Hawaii’s growth. We wanted to create a design that captures that history and reflects the way the company connects our communities,” Zane said.

Our New Logo:
A Symbol of Where We’ve Been, Who We Are, and Where We’re Going

AN IMPORTANT MOMENT IN TIME

At Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric, and Hawaii Electric Light Company, we’re proud of our long history of service to our communities. But we know it’s not enough for us just to look back. Looking forward, we know we can and need to do better. At the top of our priority list:

  • Lowering bills for our customers
  • Improving service
  • Developing more low-cost clean energy

As we reaffirm our responsibility to our customers and communities, we’ve introduced a new logo – one that represents our deep roots in these islands as well as our commitment to creating a better energy future for Hawaii.

A REFLECTION OF OUR HERITAGE

The new logo was developed by respected Hilo designer Sig Zane and combines traditional Hawaiian design elements with a modern look. Zane worked on the design with his wife, cultural expert Nalani Kanakaole, and their son Kuhao. They drew upon Hawaiian Electric’s 122-year history for their inspiration.

“From the very beginning, when King Kalakaua pioneered electricity at Iolani Palace and chartered Hawaiian Electric, the company has played a key role in Hawaii’s growth,” Zane said. “We wanted to create a design that captures that history and reflects the way the company connects our communities.”

Learn more about the story behind the logo by watching the video on this page.

The cost of designing and introducing the logo is not included in customers’ electric rates. To save on costs, the logo is being phased in gradually through the normal course of business.

A SYMBOL OF OUR COMMITMENTS

Today we reaffirm our commitment to our customers – to lower bills, improve service and develop more renewable energy. To deliver on our commitments, we’re taking a number of important steps:

  • Pursuing low-cost renewable energy projects to reduce our use of high-priced oil
  • Continuing to help customers to install solar power
  • Planning the deactivation of some of our older power plants
  • Modernizing our systems and electric grids to improve reliability
  • Improving customer service with new technology and added staff

While the logo is an important symbol of our commitments, we know that, in the end, our actions will speak the loudest. So each and every day, we’re working hard to live up to what our logo represents. And we look forward to working with you, our customers and communities to achieve a clean energy future for Hawaii.

In the coming months, customers will begin to see the logo on company websites, signs, vehicles, uniforms, ID badges, and mailings. To save on costs, the logo will be phased in gradually through the normal course of business. For example, existing inventories of materials will be used up before replacement items that carry the new logo are ordered.

Backyard Forest Restoration Workshop at Volcano Art Center

You could one day look out into your own backyard and see a vibrant, thriving native forest with the learning tools provided by botanist Tim Tunison during his “Backyard Forest Restoration” workshop, held from 9:30am to 2:30pm on Saturday, October 26 at Volcano Art Center’s Niaulani Campus in Volcano Village.

Botanist Tim Tunison leads attendees through the Niaulani Rain Forest during VAC's 2012 Backyard Forest Restoration workshop.

Botanist Tim Tunison leads attendees through the Niaulani Rain Forest during VAC’s 2012 Backyard Forest Restoration workshop.

Learn where to begin in developing a step-by-step plan of action and what the long-term requirements of restoring or recreating a native forest are. The day begins within the Niaulani Rain Forest, which Volcano Art Center has been restoring since 1996.

“What I liked most about Tim’s class was that it began in a beautiful forest that is a tangible example of successful restoration strategies,” says Oliver Kinsley, who attended the workshop in previous years. “Tim is very passionate about what he does, an endless treasure trove of information.”

After examining award-winning results inside of the Niaulani Rain Forest, attendees carpool to the botanist’s own backyard inside of the Village, where he is in the early stages of restoring it to native rain forest habitat.

“I explain the nuts and bolts of weed control, how to do it safely and not harm native plants intermixed with weeds. We also discuss how to identify a target forest community to model efforts after, and the important differences between true ecological restoration, replacement communities, and general horticultural landscaping,” says Tunison.

Forest Restoration

A brief demonstration on how to begin a simple propagation project completes the day. Students take home an informative supplemental CD. Tuition is $15. Pre-registration is required. Contact Volcano Art Center at (808) 967-8222 to reserve your space in the workshop.

This educational offering is made possible in part by a grant from the Hawaii Tourism Authority’s Natural Resources Program. 100% of tuition monies are used to help perpetuate the Niaulani Rain Forest for future generations.

Volcano Art Center (VAC) is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1974 to develop, promote and perpetuate the artistic, cultural and environmental heritage of Hawaii’s people through the arts and education.

Coast Guard Airdrops Blood to Cruise Ship for Man With Internal Bleeding

A Coast Guard aircrew flew approximately 1,036 miles to airdrop blood and medical supplies to a cruise ship northeast of the Hawaiian Islands Sunday.

A Coast Guard aircrew from Air Station Barbers Point flew approximately 1,036 miles to airdrop a container of lifesaving blood to a cruise ship northeast of the Hawaiian islands Oct. 6, 2013. Personnel aboard the cruise ship Oosterdam contacted the Coast Guard requesting medical assistance for an ailing passenger. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

A Coast Guard aircrew from Air Station Barbers Point flew approximately 1,036 miles to airdrop a container of lifesaving blood to a cruise ship northeast of the Hawaiian islands Oct. 6, 2013. Personnel aboard the cruise ship Oosterdam contacted the Coast Guard requesting medical assistance for an ailing passenger. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Personnel aboard the cruise ship Oosterdam contacted watchstanders at Coast Guard Joint Rescue Coordination Center Honolulu at approximately 4 a.m. requesting medical assistance for an ailing passenger. The ship’s onboard doctor was treating the 70-year-old man for internal bleeding.

A Coast Guard aircrew from Air Station Barbers Point flew approximately 1,036 miles to airdrop a container of lifesaving blood to a cruise ship northeast of the Hawaiian islands Oct. 6, 2013. Personnel aboard the cruise ship Oosterdam contacted the Coast Guard requesting medical assistance for an ailing passenger. (U.S. Coast Guard photo) Read more: http://www.dvidshub.net/image/1031882/coast-guard-crew-airdrops-lifesaving-blood#.UlS4zBD3OZd#ixzz2hBbUlsG2

 (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

A Coast Guard flight surgeon was consulted and recommended an airdrop of blood, platelets and transfusion equipment.

A Coast Guard aircrew from Air Station Barbers Point flew approximately 1,036 miles to airdrop a container of lifesaving blood to a cruise ship northeast of the Hawaiian islands Oct. 6, 2013. Personnel aboard the cruise ship Oosterdam contacted the Coast Guard requesting medical assistance for an ailing passenger. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

 (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

At approximately 11:30 a.m., a Coast Guard HC-130 Hercules aircrew from Air Station Barbers Point successfully dropped six units of blood, one pack of platelets and two transfusion kits received from Tripler Army Medical Center and the Blood Bank of Hawaii via parachute to medical personnel aboard the Oosterdam.

The cruise ship will maintain communication with the Coast Guard until it arrives in Lahaina, Maui, Tuesday.

A Coast Guard aircrew from Air Station Barbers Point flew approximately 1,036 miles to airdrop a container of lifesaving blood to a cruise ship northeast of the Hawaiian islands Oct. 6, 2013. Personnel aboard the cruise ship Oosterdam contacted the Coast Guard requesting medical assistance for an ailing passenger. (U.S. Coast Guard photo) Read more: http://www.dvidshub.net/image/1031882/coast-guard-crew-airdrops-lifesaving-blood#.UlS4zBD3OZd#ixzz2hBbUlsG2

 (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Coast Guard aircraft are equipped to drop lifesaving equipment to individuals in distress. Life rafts, radios, emergency rations and medical supplies are the most common, but flexibility in operations is necessary in order to save lives at sea.

For more information, contact the 14th Coast Guard District public affairs office at (808) 535-3230.

 

Department of Health Requesting Voluntary Removal of OxyElite Pro Pending Investigation of Cases of Liver Failure and Acute Hepatitis

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) is alerting local retailers and requesting the voluntary removal from sale of the product OxyElite Pro pending an ongoing investigation of cases of liver failure and acute hepatitis. DOH Food and Drug Branch today began notifying retailers and distributors to voluntarily suspend sales and remove the product from store shelves until further notice. The public is advised to discontinue use of the product at this time.

OxyElite Pro

DOH is currently investigating 29 cases of acute hepatitis and liver failure that have occurred in the state from May through October 2013 and may be related to the use of diet supplements for weight loss and/or muscle building. The cases under investigation include two individuals that have undergone liver transplants and one death.

“Twenty-four cases reported using OxyElite Pro before their illness,” said Dr. Sarah Park, State Epidemiologist. “No other supplement or medication has been identified in common among more than two patients.”

“The department continues to urge people who use dietary or nutritional supplements for weight loss and/or muscle gain to talk with their doctor or health care provider,” said Health Director Loretta Fuddy. “Anyone who develops symptoms such as abdominal pain or discomfort, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea and /or vomiting, and yellow skin or eyes, should consult their doctor immediately.”

DOH is working closely with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention throughout the ongoing investigation.

 

Fisherman Pleads Guilty to Multiple Fishing Violations

A Hau‘ula fisherman pled no contest on Sept. 26, 2013, to multiple fishing violations in Kane‘ohe District Court and was sentenced to 213 hours of community service work, in lieu of a $1,500 fine, plus one year of probation.

Travis K. Fonoimoana, 34, was cited by a Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) officer on Feb. 2, 2013, on the shoreline in Punalu‘u for violating Hawai‘i Administrative Rules (HAR) 13-75-12.4(a)(2)(B) relating to laynets, HAR 13-95-10 for ‘O‘io, and HAR 13-95-23(a) for Moi.

Illegal length and mesh size net. DOCARE photo.

Illegal length and mesh size net. DOCARE photo.

He was found possessing and using four laynets longer than 125 feet in length and with less than 2 ¾ inches stretched mesh, as well as for taking several ‘o‘io under 14 inches and several moi under 11 inches — which are the minimum legal sizes.

Undersized fish. Photo by DOCARE.

Undersized fish. Photo by DOCARE.

The state asked that the fisherman’s laynets be destroyed, but the Kane‘ohe District Court judge returned it to the owner with a warning that he must comply with the terms and conditions of probation.

For more information on fishing regulations, refer to DLNR Division of Aquatic Resources’ website located at http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/dar.

“Enforcement of laynet use is crucial in DLNR’s mission to ensure the sustainability of marine resources through compliance with state rules in Hawaiian waters, and to ensure that endangered species are not harmed,” said William J. Aila, Jr., DLNR chairperson.

 

Big Island Police to Hold Community Meeting in Kohala

The Hawaiʻi Police Department will hold a community meeting on Tuesday, October 15, from noon to 2 p.m. at the Kohala Intergenerational Center.

HPDBadgeThe purpose of the meeting is to allow the public to meet the Police Department’s command staff and to discuss concerns with the police chief and commanders who oversee police operations in the North Kohala District.

This North Kohala event continues the district community meetings, which are rotated throughout the eight police districts on the Big Island. To aid police commanders in focusing on specific concerns, it is requested that participation be limited to persons who live or work in the North Kohala District.

Those interested in participating but unable to attend may call Captain Jason Cortez at 889-6540, stop by the North Kohala police station in Kapaʻau, or e-mail their concerns or comments to copsysop@hawaiipolice.com

 

Body Glove Invites the Public to Their 60th Anniversary on the Big Island with Huge Party

Body Glove International, the original surf and dive industry pioneer and creator of the first commercially viable wetsuit will celebrate its 60th Anniversary in Kailua Kona, Hawaii.  The family-owned and operated business is excited to share its heritage and history via a kick-off party at The Royal Kona Resort on October 24, 2013 at 4 PM at Don the Beachcomber – Bar area.

Click to read about the history of Body Glove

Click to read about the history of Body Glove

The event will be open to the public with a free live concert by Grammy nominated Henry Kapono and Body Glove giveaways courtesy of its Hawaiian partners – Body Glove Cruises and Tiki Shark Art Hawaii Inc.The two day celebration will continue with a Body Glove / Tiki Mug Release party at The WYLAND Kona Oceanfront Gallery on Alii Drive October 25, 2013 at 6 PM to 9:30PM – open to the public as well.

State and City officials along with Surf legends and Body Glove Team Riders will be in attendance.

“We are excited to be sharing our history with the folks in Hawaii” stated Billy Meistrell – Owner and Senior Vice President “it is going to be the party of the year and all are welcome to attend and help us cut and eat the celebratory cake” he added.

Abbas Hassan SVP for Tiki Shark / Body Glove GCC had this to say, “we are honored to have the second and third generation of the original founding family members of Body Glove come to our island to celebrate this special event.

About Body Glove
Founded in 1953, Body Glove is a leading, worldwide water sports brand specializing in wetsuits, swimwear, clothing, footwear, accessories, and technology accessories. The company sponsors one of the most respected surf and wakeboard teams in the industry with such powerhouse names as pro surfers Jamie O’Brien, Cheyne Magnusson, Anthony Walsh, Alex Gray and Holly Beck and wake boarders Rusty Malinoski, Harley Clifford, Bob Soven and Jeff McKee. Body Glove and Jean-Michel Cousteau and his Ocean Futures Society have formed a legendary alliance to help preserve and protect the ocean while providing ocean and diving geared equipment to water enthusiasts around the globe. Some of the proceeds from the sale if those products go directly to Ocean Futures Society. Through Reef Check, SIMA’s environmental fund, and the Surfrider Foundation, Body Glove also works to preserve the purity of the waters it loves. Body Glove products are sold in the U.S. by a network of independent retailers. Body Glove is also sold in approximately 50 countries internationally.

Ground Broken For Miloliʻi Community Enrichment and Historical Center

Pa’a Pono Miloliʻi Inc. a non-profit 501(c)(3) dedicated to improving the lives of the residents of the native Hawaiian fishing village of Miloliʻi has broken ground on a $1 million community center in Miloliʻi. Through a 2006 Congressional Housing and Urban Development grant championed by the late United States Senator Daniel K. Inouye, the project completed all design and planning requirements this summer and broke ground in September.

Milo

The facility will feature a 3,200 square foot open air community center with enclosed areas designated for classrooms, historical library, office space, gift store, and a certified kitchen.

Adjacent to the main facility will be a comfort station /restroom, guest quarters and a hale waʻa for storage and maintenance of Miloliʻi canoes. The entire facility is being built on a 40,000 square foot parcel leased from the Department of Land & Natural Resources and will include a parking lot, native Hawaiian landscaping, water storage and solar photovoltaic power system.

Milo2

Paʻa Pono Miloliʻi Inc. completed Federal and State Chapter 343 EIS requirements,  County Of Hawaiʻi Special Management Area requirements, National Historic Preservation, Archaeological Survey, Conservation District Use Permit and Hawaiʻi County Plan and Building Approval in order to begin construction on the facility. The project, when completed, meets all ADA requirements and would not have been possible without the coordination and help of the United States Office of Housing and Urban Development, State of Hawaiʻi Department of Land and Natural Resources and The County of Hawaiʻi. The design and planning team of Farber and Associates, Honua Consulting, Lewellyn Architectural and Design, Robert C. Smelker Associates, Island Survey and Engineering Partners of Hilo completed all planning and design requirements over a two year time period.

The center is being built by JCP Construction of Hilo and is scheduled to be completed in the Fall of 2015.

Big Island Men to Walk in High Heels to Raise Awareness of Sexual Assault

YWCA Hawaii Island hosts the third annual “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” on Saturday, October 26, 2013 at 7:30 a.m.  In East Hawaii, the one-mile march begins at the YWCA Ululani Street campus.  In West Hawaii, the march will be at the Kona International Market.  October is Domestic Violence Awareness month and is a call to end sexual assault, rape and gender violence in the community.

Mayor Kenoi holding his selected pair of heels for the 2012 Walk-a-Mile event

Mayor Kenoi holding his selected pair of heels for the 2012 Walk-a-Mile event

Mayor Billy Kenoi and Deputy Managing Director Wally Lau will lead the march and address participants at the YWCA kick-off sites in Hilo and Kona, respectively.  Also joining the march and leading their respective organizations are Police Chief Harry Kubojiri, Fire Chief Darren Rosario, County Prosecutor Mitch Roth, Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveria, Police Deputy Chief Paul Ferreira, Police Assistant Chief Paul Kealoha, and radio personality J.E. Orozco.

“Inspired by the saying, ‘You can’t understand a person’s experience until you’ve walked a mile in their shoes,’ we’re asking men to walk in women’s shoes to show their support to end violence against women and girls,” said Karen Hayashida, YWCA board president.  “Every three hours someone on Hawaii Island is sexually assaulted, which is unacceptable.  The community must work together to create a safer, healthier place to live and work.”

The event is sponsored by KTA Superstores, Hawaii Radiology, Big Island Toyota, HPM Building Supply, HFS Federal Credit Union, Atlas Insurance and Target in Kailua-Kona.

All proceeds from the event directly benefit the YWCA Hawaii Island Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS) program, the only 24-hour, 7-days a week rape crisis center for the island. SASS services are free and include crisis counseling, therapy for assault victims and their families, and violence prevention education for schools and the community.

March participants are asked to report to the kick-off sites by 7:30 a.m. to register, select their shoes and warm up for the walk.  All participants must complete an entry form and submit a $25 fee.  The community is invited to participate in the event and help raise funds to meet the $25,000 goal.  For more information, visit ywcahawaiiisland.org or call the YWCA Hawaii Island office at 935-7141.

About the YWCA Hawaii Island
YWCA Hawaii Island is a not-for-profit membership organization whose mission is the elimination of racism and empowerment of women.  Established in 1919, the organization offers services and programs which include: a nationally accredited preschool; the only Teen Court for the Big Island; and the only home visitation program to prevent child abuse and neglect for 0-3 year olds in all of East Hawai’i.

The YWCA Hawaii Island is part of the YWCA USA, the oldest and largest national women’s organization with the mission of empowering women and eliminating racism.  Nationally, the YWCA represents 2 million women, girls and their families in the US each year.  Globally, the YWCA USA is a member of World YWCA, which has affiliates in over 100 countries that serve 25 million women and girls worldwide.

 

Palace Event Remembers the ‘Peacock Princess’

Enjoy a free Afternoon at Hulihe’e Palace 4-5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20 to remember the late Princess Kaiulani. Presenting hula and serenade by the Merrie Monarchs, the event is part of a year-long series that honors Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Princess Victoria Kawekiu Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Kaiulani

Princess Victoria Kawekiu Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Kaiulani

Princess Victoria Kawekiu Lunalilo Kalaninuiahilapalapa Kaiulani was the last heir to the Hawaiian throne. Born in 1875 to Princess Miriam Likelike, she was the niece of King Kalakaua.

“Her father was an Edinburgh Scot named Archibald Cleghorn, who was a governor of O‘ahu,” says Casey Ballao, docent coordinator. “The young princess, who was especially fond of peacocks, lived in Waikiki at the garden estate of Ainahau. Today, it is the present location of the Sheraton Princess Kaiulani Hotel.”

A fellow Scot, Robert Lewis Stevenson, became friends with Princess Kaiulani and he wrote numerous poems about his “fair maiden.” Known for her grace and hospitality, Kaiulani traveled abroad and studied in London as a teenager. Though a long way from Hawai‘i, she soon found herself in the fight to save the monarchy from American annexationists.

“Kaiulani went to Washington and visited President Grover Cleveland and his wife to plead her cause,” adds Ballao. “Enchanted by the young, beautiful and fashionable Kaiulani, President Cleveland sent a personal representative to Hawai‘i to report on the political situation.”

Kaiulani’s aunt, Queen Lili‘uokalani, and others suggested the princess choose a husband to help Hawai‘i’s political situation: the nephew of the Emperor of Japan or her Hawaiian cousin, Prince David Kawananakoa. Bitter and disillusioned, Kaiulani realized her chance at the throne was gone forever when Hawai‘i officially became part of the U.S. in August 1898.

A few months later, after attending a wedding at Parker Ranch, Kaiulani got caught in a cold and cutting “Waimea rain” and the princess became seriously ill. “Her father came to the Big Island with the family doctor and Kaiulani improved at Mana enough to be carried by litter to a ship bound for Honolulu,” explains Ballao. “Back at Ainahau, her illness persisted, worsened and she died in two months; Kaiulani was 23 years old.”

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays; with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Also, beginning October 18, the palace will be open 5-8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays through the holiday season. Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

2013 Afternoon at Hulihe‘e schedule: 4-5 p.m. on the palace grounds

All Afternoons at Hulihe’e present hula by Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i Hula Halau and vocals by the Merrie Monarchs. Some events also include the Hulihe’e Palace Band and are noted below. On band dates, only kahiko hula is showcased. Other events offer a full hula show.

Symposium on the Religious Exemptions to the Proposed Marriage Equity Bill

In light of the upcoming special legislative session scheduled to start on October 28, a symposium on the religious exemptions to the proposed marriage equity bill will be held on Wednesday, October 9, 2013 at the Hawai‘i State Capitol Auditorium beginning at 5:30 p.m. The symposium will broadcast live on ‘Olelo channel 49.

Avi Soifer

Avi Soifer

Moderated by Avi Soifer, dean of the William S. Richardson School of Law, the panel discussion will describe the religious exemptions in the proposed marriage equity bill and will discuss possible amendments. The panel includes Andrea Freeman, assistant professor of Law at the William S. Richardson School of Law; James Hochberg, attorney for Alliance Defending Freedom and president of Hawaii Family Advocates; and Lois Perrin, legal director of ACLU of Hawaii.

The proposed marriage equity bill and other materials are available at http://tinyurl.com/SSM-HI-2013. For information about this symposium, contact Marnelli Joy Basilio at lawevent@hawaii.edu.

 

I Don’t Have the Balls to Eat Rocky Mountain Oysters – 18th Annual Taste of the Hawaiian Range Another Success

On Friday I got to attend the 18th Annual Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range that was held at the Hilton Waikoloa Village.

Doesn't this look good?

Doesn’t this look good?

Many folks think that the “Taste” is all about eating food from 6-8 pm, however, before the taste even begins there is a lot of preparation done by many groups and folks to make this one of the most successful food events in the State of Hawaii.

The line to get in

The line to get in

The Festival provides a venue for sustainable agricultural education, encouragement and support of locally produced agriculture products.

It's not all about meat!

It’s not all about meat!

The premiere ag-tourism event is a partnership between CTAHR, Hawaii Cattlemen’s Association, Hawaii Cattlemen’s Council, Kulana Foods, UH-Hilo CAFNRM, County of Hawaii Dept. on Environmental Management and community volunteers.

Experience

Kamehameha Schools is a Sponsor of the Event

Sponsorship also includes the Hawaii Tourism Authority, the Hawaii County Research and Development, Hawaii Community College Food Service & Culinary Program and KTA SuperStores. The quality and growth of this event are rooted in small business participation, sponsorship and in-kind donations.

Miss Kona Coffee was on hand.

Miss Kona Coffee was on hand.

At 1:30 there was a nutrition seminar geared for culinary students and food industry professionals that was presented by Justin Yu, most recently chef/owner of The Whole Ox. The Kaka‘ako restaurant creates its menu based on the availability of meat while using entire grass-feed beef and pig carcasses, one at a time.

Students learn from the best

Students learn from the best

Yu, a native of New York City where he did whole animal butchery, came to Hawai’i this spring, after working at well-known eateries like Hawker Fare in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Chef Yu shares his insights for using whole animals and locally sourced products to create food in a sustainable way.

Chef Yu shares his insights for using whole animals and locally sourced products to create food in a sustainable way.

At 3 there was a seminar on how to gook grass-fed beef which had a  staged cooking demonstration that featured Hubert Des Marais, executive chef of The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai’i, who instructed students how to prepare two cuts of grass-fed beef: boneless brisket and tongue.

Taste of the Hawaiian Range

Chef Hubert brought more than 35 years of culinary experience in the hospitality industry spanning four continents. He has garnered numerous accolades, including being named one of “America’s 10 Best Chefs” by Food and Wine Magazine and has appeared on the Food Network and cooked at the James Beard House on numerous occasions. A proponent of food sustainability, chef utilizes food prepared by local ranchers, farmers and aquaculturists while purchasing beef by whole animal carcass. At the end of the seminar, samplings of the meats were available for the students.

This was my favorite!

This was my favorite from Hualalai Grille (Beef Skirt served w/ Lobster meat)

At 5 the pre-taste began where the media had a chance to talk to the farmers and the cooks about what they had prepared without the mad rush of having to deal with the general public that came in at 6.

Chefs putting the finishing touches on some plates

Chefs putting the finishing touches on some plates

I made it a point to eat as much as I could between 5 and about 5:40 hitting up about 15 booths of food that ranged from Beef Tri Tip served by Aloha Mondays to Kalua Pork served by Mahina Café.

Kalua in wonton shells, sweet potato on haupia.  Underneath the Kalua there was a little dash of poi.

Kalua pig in wonton shells, sweet potato on haupia. Underneath the Kalua there was a little dash of poi.

This year, I told myself I would try something different and I was going to try and eat the recipe that contained the Rocky Mountain Oysters that were served by the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel.

I met the chef and he assured me they were edible!

I met the chef and he assured me they were edible!

I actually had about 10 folks willing to pitch in to the Hawaii Island Food Basket if I were to complete the task of eating a cow ball and being able to suck it down.

This was a real cow ball... but it's now how they were served.

This was a real cow ball… but it’s now how they were served.

Chef Peter Pahk sliced up the oysters and then grilled them Korean style with organic lettuce, jasmine rice and Ko Choo Jung dipping sauce.

The Oyster Display

The Oyster Display

I was expecting them to taste a little bit like Korean Chicken but boy was I in for a major surprise.

Sliced and Diced Rocky Mountain Oysters!

Sliced and Diced Rocky Mountain Oysters!

I don’t know what happened and everyone says its mind over matter when eating things like this… but the second I took a big bite of the concoction and started to chew… the back of my tongue just closed up against my throat and I got this instant sick sensation and I felt the need to puke.  I tried my best to swallow it down… I just couldn’t do it.

Thankfully I didn’t swallow it because I probably would have heaved it up.  I did my best to discreetly cover my mouth with my hand and I spit it out into my hand and then dumped it into a recycled food bin that was set up for pig slop.

Thankfully these were nearby!

Thankfully these were nearby!

I quickly went to the drink station and drank about 4 cups of soda.  I couldn’t shake the taste from my mouth so I quickly went to the dessert station and had some sweets to try and take away the bitter taste that I had in mouth.

Opening Pule

Opening Pule

At 5:45 Kahu Danny Akaka offered a Pule Hoʻomaka (Opening Prayer) inside the ballroom and then at 6:00 he moved outside and blew the “Pu” (conch shell) and untied the Maile celebrating the beginning of the 18th Annual Taste of Hawaiian Range.

The official opening to the public

The official opening to the public

A little history about Friday’s agriculture showcase is that it started in 1996 as the Mealani Forage Field Day and A Taste of the Hawaiian Range. During the day, Mealani hosted an on-site Forage Field Day with tours of the forage gardens, educational seminars for ranchers and food producers, plus presentations by top, ag-related speakers, such as Jo Robinson, best-selling author of “Pasture Perfect” and eatwild.com. In the evening, Taste sampling was enjoyed by the public in the Kahilu Town Hall.  The event soon outgrew the location in Waimea and moved to it’s current location at the Hilton Waikoloa Village.

My son caught this picture of my wife and I walking down the corridor.

My son caught this picture of my wife and I walking down the corridor.

I got a chance to talk to one of the organizers Fern Gavalek and she stated that she thought the crowd was a little larger then last year but they haven’t got the official numbers in just yet.  Last year there was over 2,000 people in attendance including folks that attended the event, student volunteers, student chefs and restaurant staff folks manning the booths.

Video Courtesy of Big Island Video News:

You can click on the pictures below for a larger version of the pictures:

Video: C17 Drops Humvee Out the Back of Plane

During the 2012 PACRIM Navy exercises, I got to do a lot of cool things.

It was interesting listening to the pilots as they landed the plane

It was interesting listening to the pilots as they landed the plane

One of the things I got to do was ride in a C17 Transport Carrier from Oahu to the Big Island where they actually let me sit in the cockpit for the landing in Kona.

Inside the C-17

Inside the C-17

Part of this exercise involved dropping simulated supplies from the back of the plane to a target on top of Mauna Kea at the Pohakuloa Training Area.

Out in front of the C17

Out in front of the C17

Well someone just posted the following video of a C17 dropping a Jeep Humvee from a plane to the ground at Moody Air Force Base.

Public’s Help Sought in Locating Missing Oahu Mariner

The Coast Guard is asking for the public’s assistance in locating a mariner last seen departing Ala Wai boat harbor Thursday evening.

The Coast Guard asks for assistance in locating 60-year-old Greg Stephanoff last seen departing Ala Wai boat harbor on his 42-foot Catalina sloop, "C:DRIVE."

The Coast Guard asks for assistance in locating 60-year-old Greg Stephanoff last seen departing Ala Wai boat harbor on his 42-foot Catalina sloop, “C:DRIVE”.

Greg Stephanoff departed the Ala Wai boat harbor alone on his 42-foot Catalina Sloop, C:Drive, at approximately 8 p.m. Thursday. His destination was unknown and he has not been heard from since.

Stephanoff’s vessel is white with a grey canvas dodger over the cockpit. Stephanoff is 60 years old, approximately five feet eleven inches tall and 160 pounds. He was last seen wearing khaki cargo shorts and a beige aloha shirt.

Greg Stephanoff

Greg Stephanoff

Stephanoff mentioned to friends wanting to sail to Hanalei Bay on the north shore of Kauai, but a float plan was not filed.

The Coast Guard is asking all mariners to report any sightings to the Coast Guard over VHF marine radio channel 16 or to contact the Sector Honolulu Command Center at 808-842-2600.

 

Crewmember Participants Sought for Space Exploration Analog Studies

Researchers from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa are seeking crewmembers for a new series of space exploration analog studies. The new studies aim to:

  • Test a hypothesis that group cohesion over the short term predicts team performance over the long term.
  • Observe how technical, social and task roles evolve over long-duration missions.
  • Establish baselines for a wide range of human cognitive, social and emotional factors over missions of varying durations.
HI-Seas photo by Angelo Vermeulen

HI-Seas photo by Angelo Vermeulen

These types of studies are essential for NASA to understand how teams of astronauts will perform on long-duration space exploration missions, such as those that will be required for human travel to Mars. The studies will also allow researchers to recommend strategies for crew composition for such missions, and to determine how best to support such crews while they are working in space.

More Photos available through the HI-SEAS website.

More Photos available through the HI-SEAS website.

The upcoming missions will be conducted at the Hawaiʻi Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS) site, an isolated Mars-like environment on the slopes of Mauna Loa on the Big Island of Hawai‘i at approximately 8,200 feet above sea level. Crewmember participants will live in the same modern geodesic dome habitat that successfully supported a NASA-funded Mars food study that garnered national media attention in 2013 ( for more information about that mission, please see http://hi-seas.org).

Food inventory by Sian

Food inventory by Sian

Key Dates (note that dates are subject to change):

Mission A: Feb 2014 – June 2014 (4 mos)
Mission B: Aug 2014 – Apr 2015 (8 mos)
Mission C: June 2015 – May 2016 (12 mos)

About the Study: 
The upcoming missions are focused on evaluating the social, interpersonal and cognitive factors that affect team performance over time. Researchers from outside of the space analog habitat will monitor each mission to evaluate the communications strategies, crew work load and job sharing, and conflict resolution/conflict management approaches that contribute to the success of a long-duration mission.

The site is set up at an undisclosed location on Mauna Kea.

The site is set up at an undisclosed location on Mauna Kea.

Like the astronaut mission specialists they will represent, each participant will be expected to bring a significant research project or other scholarly work of his or her own to complete while inside the space analog habitat – for instance, biological or geological field research, engineering design and technology evaluation, scholarly writing, or artistic endeavors compatible with the limitations of small living quarters in an isolated location with limited internet bandwidth.

Subjects will be compensated for their participation and for associated travel and housing costs. Successful applicants will be placed into a pool from which researchers will assemble three well-balanced teams for the various study periods.

Requirements: 
Applicants must be between 21 and 65 years of age. They must be tobacco-free, able to pass a Class 2 flight physical examination, and able to understand, speak and write fluently in English. They must meet the basic requirements of the NASA astronaut program (i.e. an undergraduate degree in a science or engineering discipline, three years of experience or graduate study, etc.); in addition, they will be evaluated for experience considered valuable in the program, such as experience in complex operational environments. Pre-screening will be carried out by a panel of experts who are familiar with the astronaut selection process, but who are not involved in the rest of the study.

Candidates selected for further evaluation and screening will be contacted by e-mail to schedule a screening. There will be no charge to applicants for any screening procedures, and no risks in these procedures over and above those of daily life.

How to Apply: 
The deadline for applications is November 1, 2013. Instructions for applicants are posted at http://hi-seas.org.

For more information, visit: http://hi-seas.org

3.6 Magnitude Earthquake Shakes Leilani Estates Area of Big Island

A 3.6 magnitude earthquake just shook the Leilani Estates area of the Big Island.

36 Leilani