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“Chip Away at Cancer” Golf Tournament

Friends of Elton Goo, former Food & Beverage manager at the Marriott are rallying and having an amazing golf fundraiser to help him fight recently-diagnosed, stage IV lung cancer.

chip-away

The tournament takes place on December 4 at 11 a.m. at Hapuna Golf Course, with food booths, DJ and prizes — followed by a four-course Whiskey Dinner at Arnie’s Restaurant (priced separately).

Rapid Ohia Death Kills Forest Giant and Confirms Spread to Hamakua

Twin Tests Verify Fungal Disease Killed Centuries Old Tree

From the road, in the Laupahoehoe Section of the Hilo Forest Reserve, Steve Bergfeld of the Hawai’i Department of Land and Natural Resources spots the enormous, towering, ōhiʻa tree; its thick branches now completely without leaves.  The Hawai’i Island Branch Manager for the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife wants to get a close-up look at the tree, after a technician first spotted it and took samples a week ago.  Two laboratory tests have confirmed that this very old tree was killed by the fast-moving fungal infection known as Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death.

ohia-death2Across Hawai’i Island, the disease is killing trees and devastating tens of thousands of acres of native forest. First reported in the Puna District in 2010, the latest aerial surveys show that the fungus has impacted nearly 50,000 acres of forest here.

Named for the rapidity in which it kills infected trees, the loss of the 100-130 foot tall ōhiʻa in the Laupahoehoe forest, and perhaps others around it, shows the disease has spread to the island’s eastern side, along the Hamakua Coast.  Bergfeld observed, “It’s devastating to look at the forest and the damage Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death is doing to our ecosystem and our watersheds. That tree is a giant in the forest. It also supports a lot of other plant life and bird life. It was an important part of our ecosystem. These trees have been here for hundreds of years and to see them go down to a disease like this is really heartbreaking.”

ohia-death1ʻŌhiʻa trees are culturally significant and their flowers are prized for lei making. Foresters consider ōhiʻa the most important species for protecting the state’s forested watersheds for its dense canopy, where virtually all domestic water supplies originate.

That’s why a strong collaboration between state and federal government agencies and conservation organizations is actively researching the cause of the disease, potential treatments, and the establishment of quarantines and protocols to prevent further spread.

ohia-death3The identification of this diseased tree is the latest example of this cooperative effort.  The tree was spotted by a technician from the U.S. Forest Service’s Institute of Pacific Island Forestry, who collected the wood samples for lab testing.  Verification of Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death, as the trees cause of death, was done by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture’s Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center in Hilo.

An entomologist from the University of Hawai’i’s College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources Extension Service also collected samples for research that suggests beetles are a primary cause for the spread of the fungus.

ohia-deathBergfeld explains the next steps involving experts from the Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death working group. “We’ll put everyone’s heads together and see what the best management strategy will be for this particular tree.  I assume, more than likely, we’ll fell the tree to get it out of the forest and cover it with tarps to keep insects from putting out frass (the powdery refuse or fragile perforated wood produced by the activity of boring insects), into the air,” he said.

Experts are very concerned that with the confirmation of Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death in this tree, the disease has spread to a previously unaffected area farther up the Hamakua Coast: a forest already impacted by a 2013-2014 outbreak of the Koa looper, a native insect that defoliates entire koa trees during rare, unexplained outbreaks.
Governor David Ige, lead scientists, and policy makers engaged in the fight against Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death, will gather for the first-ever summit on the disease at the State Capitol on

Wednesday, November 30, 2016.  The event is open to the public and is scheduled from

9 a.m. – 3 p.m. in the Capitol Auditorium.  More information on this to follow.

Big Island Police Donate 136 Boxes of Christmas Gifts for Kids Around the World

Employees from the Hawaiʻi Police Department donated 136 boxes of Christmas gifts destined for children in need around the world.

Chief Harry Kubojiri presents 136 shoeboxes full of Christmas presents donated by Police Department personnel to Nell Quay, Operation Christmas Child area coordinator of East Hawaii. To the chief's left is Steve Meek, the island's collections coordinator for the charity project.

Chief Harry Kubojiri presents 136 shoeboxes full of Christmas presents donated by Police Department personnel to Nell Quay, Operation Christmas Child area coordinator of East Hawaii. To the chief’s left is Steve Meek, the island’s collections coordinator for the charity project.

The boxes were presented to representatives of Operation Christmas Child on Thursday (November 17) at the South Hilo police station.

Operation Christmas Child is a yearly community project that reaches out to children in need who have never experienced the kindness of receiving a gift. Shoebox gifts are collected around the state in this international effort to assist those in war torn countries or suffering from famine, sickness and poverty.

Nell Quay, Operation Christmas Child’s area coordinator for East Hawaiʻi, said a shipping container carrying the gift boxes will be picked up on Tuesday to sail out of Hilo for processing in California before the presents reach their final destination. Quay said she had the privilege of going to Colombia last year to help distribute Christmas boxes at a public school in the South American nation.

Steve Meek, Operations Christmas Child’s collections coordinator, said donations on Hawaiʻi Island are being accepted through Monday, November 21. Shoeboxes full of gifts may be dropped off at Big Island Toyota from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and Monday or from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. They also may be dropped off at Hilo Missionary Church from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday and Monday, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday and from 1 p.m., to 5 p.m. on Sunday.

Last year Hawaiʻi Island collected more than 8,300 shoe boxes to combine with a total of more than 42,000 across the state. Internationally, 11.2 million boxes were sent to 110 countries.

Officer Baumgarner Named East Hawaii “Officer of the Month” for November

The Aloha Exchange Club of East Hawaiʻi recognized Puna Patrol Officer Joshua Baumgarner on Thursday (November 17) as the East Hawaiʻi “Officer of the Month” for November.

Aloha Exchange board member Joey Estrella presents an 'Officer of the Month' award to Officer Joshua Baumgarner.

Aloha Exchange board member Joey Estrella presents an ‘Officer of the Month’ award to Officer Joshua Baumgarner.

Baumgarner, who just began solo patrol duty in April, was honored for saving the life of a woman who would have bled to death without his aid.

On September 23, Baumgarner was among the officers who responded to a home in the Hawaiian Beaches subdivision to find a 29-year-old woman bleeding profusely after punching a glass window during a domestic dispute. The woman’s husband and young children were frantic at the scene, where the husband was unsuccessfully attempting to stem the bleeding.

Baumgarner quickly took action. He applied direct pressure to the woman’s affected artery, elevated her feet to concentrate remaining blood in her vital organs, and reassured her to prevent shock. He was successful in stopping the bleeding, and he continued to maintain constant pressure on the artery until Fire Department rescue personnel arrived on the scene about 8-10 minutes later. The woman was taken to the hospital and survived her injuries.

Sergeant Chris Correia, who nominated Baumbarner for the award, noted that the officer had training as a combat medic in the Hawaiʻi Army National Guard.

“Officer Baumgarner’s background in the medical field, as well as his calm demeanor in providing and maintaining first aid treatment saved the life of a gravely injured person,” Correia wrote in nomination papers. “His decisive action in the saving of a life truly embodies the Hawaii Police Department’s Core Values of Integrity, Professionalism, Compassion, Teamwork, and Community Satisfaction.”

As “Officer of the Month,” Baumgarner is eligible for “Officer of the Year.”

The East Hawaiʻi “Officer of the Month” award is a project of the Aloha Exchange Club of East Hawaiʻi.

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor Offers Special Programs for Youth to Gain a Better Understanding of the Attack on Pearl Harbor

In preparation for this year’s 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor has created three specialized programs, each designed to provide Hawaii’s youth with a better understanding and appreciation for what took place at Pearl Harbor 75 years ago.

pearl-harbor-youth-dayStudents, teachers and families are encouraged to participate in the following:

December 6, 2016 – Blackened Canteen Youth Symposium, 10 – 11:30 am, Pacific Aviation Museum Theater. For the last 21 years, WWII veterans from the United States and Japan have joined in silent prayer, pouring whiskey from a blackened canteen into the hallowed waters from the USS Arizona Memorial in observation of Dec 7. The annual Blackened Canteen ceremony, hosted by Pacific Aviation Museum, commemorates the friendship, honor, and reconciliation borne out of the horror of WWII. The canteen used in the ceremony was recovered from a B-29 bomber that was destroyed after colliding with another B-29 bomber over Shizuoka, Japan, in 1945.

Following the ceremony, a youth symposium will be held in the Pacific Aviation Museum Theater, from 10 – 11:30 am. The symposium will highlight the story and lessons of the Blackened

Canteen Ceremony, commemorating the friendship, honor and reconciliation borne out of the horror of WWII.

Students from Nagaoka, Japan and Kamehameha Schools in Honolulu will participate in the program, along with Dr. Hiroya Sugano and Jerry Yellin, WWII pilot and author of The Blackened Canteen. Dr. Maya Soetoro-Ng will serve as moderator.

This event is free and open to the public. Teachers at public, private, or charter schools who register their classes for the Youth Symposium will receive The Blackened Canteen classroom curriculum and an autographed copy of the book. Additionally, the cost of bus transportation to the event will be provided for registered school groups. Curriculum materials and a video of the symposium will also be available at PacificAviationMuseum.org.  Seating is very limited.

For more information or to register for this event, please visit www.PacificAviationMuseum.org/Events/75YouthSymposium

or call Lynda Davis at 808-445-9137.

December 8-9 – Discover Pearl Harbor Youth Program, 7:30 am on 12/8 to 4 pm on 12/9. Two-day program for teens that combines engaging, aviation-related STEM activities within the historically significant context of the Pearl Harbor sites. Open to students ages 12-15, program participants will spend two days at Pacific Aviation Museum and one night onboard the USS Missouri Battleship Memorial. The program will build upon the anticipated national and international youth participation in the 75th commemoration of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Discover Pearl Harbor provides youth with a greater appreciation for the sacrifices that brought peace, and ultimately, friendship, between two nations previously at war. The cry, “Remember Pearl Harbor,” will once again serve as a vital theme, as it is now a call to action for youth to learn these stories of courage, resiliency, and innovation, and to use the lessons of WWII to create a more peaceful world. Discover Pearl Harbor offers a cross-cultural opportunity for teens to gain greater understanding about the history of WWII while also learning about the impact of scientific and technological advancements that were introduced during that era.

Students will begin the program at the WWII Valor in the Pacific National Monument where history will come to life. They will hear stories of courage and sacrifice that transformed the entire world, and will visit the USS Arizona Memorial to gain a greater appreciation for the peace and friendship that has been forged between former enemies. Their experience continues at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor, where skilled instructors and costumed interpreters will share the legacy of Pearl Harbor through guided tours, hands-on activities, and team assignments.

In the evening, students will stay onboard the Missouri Battleship Memorial, engaging in activities that emphasize the historical precedent for peacemaking that emerged from WWII.

Day Two brings the students to the 21st century with an array of learning challenges that spotlight the role of technology in the increasingly global culture, and emphasize the need for collaboration and critical thinking. The program ends with a closing ceremony of remembrance and honor in historic Hangar 79.

Cost is $225 per student, $202.50 for museum members and includes meals, snacks, overnight accommodations and program on the USS Missouri Battleship, program materials and souvenir T-shirt.

Registration is limited to 50 youth.

December 10, 2016 – Pearl Harbor Youth day, 9 am – 3:30 pm. Families and visitors of all ages can explore the lessons and legacy of WWII through special presentations, exhibits, and hands-on activities. Event will engage and educate youth about the history of Pearl Harbor and its impact on young people in Hawaii and throughout the Pacific.

Featured activities include:

  • Special screening of “Under the Blood Red Sun,” followed by a presentation and Q & A session with author Graham Salisbury.
  • Historical exhibits designed and created by local high school students.
  • Thematic tours of the Museum
  • Costumed interpreters and historical demonstrations

Event is free to students 18 years and younger, free with museum admission, and free to museum members. Registration required for teachers and youth organizations that are interested in bringing large groups and wish to apply for funding assistance for bus transportation.

For more information or to register for these events, please visit www.PacificAviationMuseum.org/Events/75YouthDay or call Lynda Davis at 808-445-9137.

Big Island Police Searching for 16-Year-Old Girl Missing Since August

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for a 16-year-old Hilo girl who was reported missing.

Kailee-Ann Santiago

Kailee-Ann Santiago

Kailee-Ann Santiago was last seen in Hilo on August 22.

She is described as Puerto Rican, 5-foot, 145 pounds with brown eyes and brown shoulder-length hair.

Police ask anyone with information on her whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

‘Alalā Doing Well in Aviary in Natural Reserve Area

The five male birds living in an aviary at the Pu’u Maka`ala Natural Area Reserve on Hawai‘i island are adjusting well to their new environment according to animal care staff of the San Diego Zoo Global’s Hawai‘i Endangered Bird Conservation Program.  The birds were moved to the aviary in mid-October to allow them to acclimate to the sights and sounds of a Hawaiian forest.  This reserve is an area that conservationists have worked to preserve, protecting native plants and species, and represents the type of habitat ‘alalā were originally native to before they began to decline.

"Nahoa" rebuilds his perching ability in a custom-made sling.

“Nahoa” rebuilds his perching ability in a custom-made sling.

“Decades of intensive management by the State Dept. of Land and Natural Resources, in stewardship with local conservation partners, have led to the preservation of some of the most intact native-dominated wet and mesic forest on windward Hawai`i Island, known as Pu`u Maka`ala Natural Area Reserve,” said Jackie Gaudioso-Levita, Project Coordinator of the ‘Alalā Project.

‘Alalā are an important part of the life of the Hawaiian forest, eating and assisting with the dispersal of native plant seeds.   The reintroduction of this species, gone from the forest for more than a decade, is expected to be an important part of the overall recovery of the ecosystem.

“This reserve is the highest quality habitat and is the best place on the island of Hawai`i for the reintroduction of the ‘alalā,” said Donna Ball, Conservation Partnerships biologist, U.S.Fish and Wildlife Service.  “Pu’u Maka`ala Natural Area Reserve has all the components for the survival of this species and soon it will also have the ‘alalā, a missing species of the ecosystem that has returned.”

The ‘alalā, or Hawaiian crow, has been extinct in the wild since 2002, preserved only at the Keauhou and Maui Bird Conservation Centers managed by San Diego Zoo Global.  With more than 100 individuals of the species now preserved at the centers, conservationists are ready to put them back into their native forests.  Although it was hoped to release the birds this month, the release was unexpectedly and cautiously postponed to ensure the transmitters that will track the birds could be properly refined.

“‘Alalā are very intelligent and precocious birds and are inclined to play with and manipulate new items, so our ability to observe their behaviors closely and give them more time allows us to make adjustments to the tracking systems we will be using once they are released,” said Bryce Masuda, conservation program manager of the Hawai‘i Endangered Bird Conservation Program. “It is important for us to track these birds once they go out into the forest so that we can continue to support them as they explore their new home.”

Hawai’i  Dept. of Land and Natural Resources mission statement – Enhance, protect, conserve and manage Hawaii’s unique and limited natural, cultural and historic resources held in public trust for current and future generations of the people of Hawai’i nei, and its visitors, in partnership with others from the public and private sectors.

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. The mission of the Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office is to conserve and restore native biodiversity and ecological integrity of Pacific Island ecosystems for the benefit of present and future generations through leadership, science-based management and collaborative partnerships.

Bringing species back from the brink of extinction is the goal of San Diego Zoo Global. As a leader in conservation, the work of San Diego Zoo Global includes on-site wildlife conservation efforts (representing both plants and animals) at the San Diego Zoo, San Diego Zoo Safari Park, and San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, as well as international field programs on six continents. The work of these entities is inspiring children through the San Diego Zoo Kids network, reaching out through the Internet and in children’s hospitals nationwide. The work of San Diego Zoo Global is made possible by the San Diego Zoo Global Wildlife Conservancy and is supported in part by the Foundation of San Diego Zoo Global.

Help Celebrate the ʻAlalā on Saturday in Hilo

E Hoʻolāʻau Hou ka ʻAlalā 

‘Alala are unique treasures of our Hawaiian forests, revered in Hawaiian culture. This very intelligent native bird is found nowhere else on earth. It’s been extinct in the wild for some time and is our only native crow still surviving in captivity. The DLNR ʻAlalā Project is holding a community celebration in advance of the first release of the Native Hawaiian crow back into the wild, to be scheduled in the next few weeks.

alala-celebrationWhat:   Everyone is invited to join us for the celebration of one of Hawai‘i’s most interesting native forest birds. Learn about the ʻAlalā Project, the extraordinary efforts underway to best ensure their reintroduction and survival in their native habitats, Fun for the whole ‘ohana.  Enjoy videos, keiki activities and conservation information displays and booths.

When:  Saturday, November 19th from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Where: Mokupāpapa Discovery Center, 76 Kamehameha Ave. in downtown Hilo.

Who:  The ʻAlalā Project is a partnership between the State of Hawaiʻi Division of Forestry and Wildlife, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and San Diego Zoo Global.

PISCES Partners with UH Hilo and NASA for Simulated Human Mars Mission on Hawaii Island

The Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES) is partnering with the University of Hawaii at Hilo and NASA this month in a ground breaking research project to prepare for an eventual manned mission to Mars.

mars-simulationThe project, called BASALT (Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains), is focused on developing operation protocols for a joint human-robotic exploration of Mars in the search for extraterrestrial life. BASALT scientists and crew members are conducting simulated missions in two locations which closely resemble the Martian landscape at different areas: Mauna Ulu at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the Eastern Snake River Plain in Idaho.

Currently, the BASALT team is investigating Mauna Ulu by traversing the rugged lava terrain to collect rock samples for both biologic and geologic analysis.

“We add a twist to our scientific fieldwork by conducting it under simulated Mars mission constraints,” said Dr. Darlene Lim, geobiologist and principal investigator for the BASALT research project. “By doing so, we can evaluate operational concepts and a variety of supporting capabilities that range from software to hardware components with respect to their anticipated value for the human exploration of Mars.”

One of their constraints is a communication time delay to simulate the latency of transmissions experienced between planets. Dr. Lim and her team are hoping to develop a tricorder-like device, as envisioned in Star Trek, to be able to identify rock samples using a hand-held instrument.

The researchers hope to better understand the habitability of Mars by studying Mauna Ulu, which is a high-fidelity analog for the landscape of early Mars when volcanism and water were common.

“No one has really worked this out yet,” said John Hamilton, PISCES test logistics and education/public outreach manager. “We want to work out the kinks during these exercises so we have it together on a real mission. By the time they go to Mars, they’ll have a rock-solid plan.”

The BASALT team consists of scientists, engineers, mission operators and active astronauts. Roughly a dozen students from the University of Hawaii at Hilo are also assisting with the project. Hamilton, who is also a faculty member with the University of Hawaii at Hilo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, is serving on the BASALT Science Team, overseeing data collection, logistics, and student assignments. The research project is central to NASA’s Journey to Mars program.

“PISCES is honored to be working together with the University of Hawaii at Hilo and NASA Ames on this project,” said Rodrigo Romo, PISCES program manager. “Collaborative work with Ames has been in the frontline of applied research for PISCES recently. The fact that university students get the opportunity to participate in events like the BASALT project will help them meet the demands of a very competitive industry.”

PISCES was selected last year by NASA’s highly competitive PSTAR (Planetary Science and Technology Through Analog Research) program to participate in the four-year, $4.2 million BASALT project, which is being administered by the University of Hawaii at Hilo. The BASALT research team will be conducting their research on Hawaii Island until Nov. 18.

For more information visit PISCES’ website at www.pacificspacecenter.com.

“Hawaii: Next 50 Contest” Offers New Prize

A new prize will allow students winners of the Hawaii: Next 50 Contest to interface with innovation professionals and navigate their ideas from conception to reality.

hawaii-next-50Sultan Ventures will provide one-on-one mentorship opportunities for the winners in each contest category as well as host an innovation boot camp for the top-24 scoring participants.

The 2017 contest focuses on using technology to solve problems in affordable housing, food sustainability, or economic industries. All students in grades 4 – 12 are eligible to submit their solutions now through January 31, 2017. In addition to the mentorship, winners will be honored at the Hawaii State Capitol, attend a luncheon with key legislators, and receive a monetary prize.

“This contest hinges on the premise that the next big, great idea to help our state can come from anyone,” said Representative Takashi Ohno. “These opportunities to hone their ideas into actual solutions are a way we can show kids that it’s possible for them to make a real-world impact now.”

The Hawaii: Next 50 Contest is inspired by former Governor George Ariyoshi’s book, Hawaii: The Past Fifty Years, The Next Fifty Years, and students will read the book before launching their own ideas for Hawaii’s future in an essay or multimedia creation. Free copies of the book can be requested online at www.HawaiiNext50.com.

The contest is a collaboration of the Hawaii State House of Representatives, aio Foundation, Hawaii Crop Improvement Association, the Chamber of Commerce Hawaii and Sultan Ventures.

More information can be found online at www.HawaiiNext50.com or email HawaiiNext50@gmail.com.


Hawaii: Next 50 Contest

WHO:      Students enrolled in grades 4 – 12 are eligible to enter.

WHAT:     Students are asked to read Hawaii: The Past Fifty Years, The Next Fifty Years and respond to the question Looking ahead to the next 50 years, imagine how we can use current technology or future technology to:

  • Create more affordable housing
  • Achieve food sustainability
  • Promote new and innovative industries

Students are encouraged to get creative and find solutions using technology in one of the three topics. The technology utilized can exist currently or be an idea that might be possible in the future as long as the details are explained in the contest entry.

Submissions will be accepted in two categories: essay or multimedia (e.g. drawing, painting, other art piece, video, etc.)

Free copies of Hawaii: The Past Fifty Years, The Next Fifty Years are available by request at www.HawaiiNext50.com.

WHEN:    All entries must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. on January 31, 2017. Winners to be announced in March 2017.

WHY:   To challenge the up-and-coming generation to become stakeholders in shaping our future. Prizes include:

  • Floor presentation at the Hawaii State Capitol
  • Luncheon with state legislators
  • Two-hour mentorship program with Sultan Ventures
  • Monetary prize
  • Winning entry published online

The top-24 scoring entries will also be invited to an innovation boot camp hosted by Sultan Ventures.

Hawaiian Electric Companies Help Protect Customers by Joining Anti-Scam Coalition

Yesterday, the Hawaiian Electric Companies joined with fellow electric companies across the country, as well as utilities in the natural gas and water sectors, to observe the inaugural Utilities United Against Scams Day (UUAS Day). The day was supported by awareness and education activities throughout the week.

utility-scamsMost utility scams involve criminals posing as electric, natural gas, or water provider employees-either in-person, over the phone, or online-and demanding immediate payment via cash or reloadable debit cards while falsely threatening to disconnect the customer’s service. These criminals can be very convincing and often target those who are most vulnerable, including small business owners, seniors, and non-native English speakers. However, with the right information, customers can learn to avoid and report these predatory scams.

Customers who believe they have been targeted by scammers impersonating an employee of Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric, or Hawaii Electric Light Company should follow these tips:

  • Hang up the phone or close the door, and call our customer service center at:
    • Oahu: (808) 548-7311
    • Maui: (808) 871-9777
    • Molokai and Lanai: 1-877-871-8461
    • Hilo: (808) 969-6999
    • Kona: (808) 329-3584
    • Waimea: (808) 885-4605
  • Decline to pay any caller or visitor claiming to be a Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric, or Hawaii Electric Light representative using a prepaid card, such as a Green Dot card, a wire transfer, or similar forms of payment – especially those requiring an intermediary.
  • Ignore suspicious requests for personal information such as bank account numbers,user names and passwords, credit card numbers, or Social Security numbers.
  • Delete all emails that demand immediate payment or personal information.
  • Contact local police or contact the Federal Trade Commission at: https://www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov/

UUAS is a collaborative effort among the electric, gas, and water utility industries to help prevent utility service fraud through education, awareness, and customer advocacy initiatives. A primary goal of this collective effort is to help customers learn how to identify and avoid utility-related scams.

You can learn more about the Utilities United Against Scams effort at www.hawaiianelectric.com, www.mauielectric.com, www.hawaiielectriclight.com, or www.eei.org, including further tips and resources to help spot and avoid utility scams.

2017 Pahoa Holiday Parade Information and Application

Pahoa Mainstreet Association would like to cordially invite you to join them in making this year’s Pāhoa Holiday Parade our best ever.

parade-pahoa-picInstructions for the parade and below is the application for the parade.  Please complete the application and return the form and the entry fee as soon as possible.  Please keep the instructions and rules page for reference.

We are also looking for event volunteers, goodies we can hand out to the keiki, and monetary donations that will help us purchase insurance & security.  With your kokua we can create an awesome community experience that we can all be truly proud of!

This year’s Parade Celebration will include:

  • Harry Kim, Mayor Elect
  • Nancy Kramer CPA, Grand Marshall
  • Ho’olaule’a at Pāhoa High and Intermediate School
  • Crafts & Food at Sacred Heart Church
  • Judging for Awards at First Hawaiian Bank
  • Free Santa Photos at Savio Realty
  • Pāhoa Merchant Specials + More

Please have the application completed and returned as soon as possible and no later than Monday,  November 30th, 2016.  Parade Entry Fee is $25.

If you wish to volunteer on parade day, donate goodies for the keiki hand-outs, or if you have any questions, please contact MSPA secretary, Henry Brazil @ 785-5395 or hgb3LLC@gmail.com.

We are seeking donations in-kind for prizes or if you wish to make a monetary donation, please make your check out to Mainstreet Pāhoa Association and mail it to Mainstreet Pāhoa Association PO Box 1189 Pāhoa, HI 96778.

Mahalo Nui Loa from Mainstreet Pāhoa Association!

pahoa-santa


  • Date and Time- Saturday, December 3, 2016, 9:30 am. SHARP!  Line-up begins promptly at 9 am. In the event of SEVERE rain, thunder, lightning, etc., the parade will be canceled and will not be rescheduled. Please try and be there at least 30 minutes earlier (8:45) so that your group can get organized.
  • Parade Route-The parade will begin at Pāhoa High School Parking Lot and end at Apaa Street.
  • Staging Area-Parade participants need to begin lining up near the beginning of the parade route by the Pāhoa  High School  They will be directed to their order in the Parade by volunteers who will use their discretion based on all of this year’s entrants.
  • Placement in the Parade-Entrants will be placed in order at the discretion of the Parade Director (Committee).  This decision will be based on type of entry, whether an animal is part of the entry, noise level, age of entrants and primarily safety.
  • Entrants-The Pāhoa  Holiday Parade is open to many different units including Color Guards, floats, marching units, emergency vehicles, equine or animal entries, car clubs, novelty units, commercial or business entries and political units.  We welcome all groups and individuals to participate as entrants so long as they conform to the Parade Instructions and Rules.  In the interest of presenting the finest entertainment value to the spectators, all groups are encouraged to enter decorated floats, music units and themed entries.
  • All parade entries must be in good taste and contribute entertainment value to the Holiday Parade theme, “Go Pāhoa ”   Participants should be dressed in uniform/costume or ride in a decorated vehicle, float or bicycle.
  • At check-in, you will be provided a number, please place your parade number in the left front windshield of the vehicle (or as close to the front left of your entry as possible) for proper identification at the judges stand.
  • All entries must keep moving and in the line of march at all times.  Units must not stop along the parade route at any time.  No driver or parade participant shall consume, possess or be under the influence of intoxicating or controlled substances during this event.
  • No “For Sale” signs on any vehicles.
  • Mainstreet Pāhoa Association will provide the only Santa in the Parade.
  • Candy Distribution-In the interest of safety, there will be absolutely NO CANDY THROWING from parade entries. However we encourage individuals in your entry to walk to the curb and distribute candy. This can really get the crowds excited.
  • Entries with Animals-You are responsible for all animals in the staging area and throughout the parade route.  Horses should be calm and comfortable in the excitement of a parade setting.  All animal entrants should have adequate drinking water provided for the animals and clean-up details.
  • Equine Safety-Unless involved with an entry including horses, all participants will refrain from entering the equine staging area.  The Parade Director will make every effort to space out the horse entries.  If you are placed after a horse entry, take care not to approach horses from behind, as that is a horse “strike zone”.  Do not crowd or push them forward, remember that they are animals not cars and need their space to feel comfortable. If you need to approach a horseback rider, the best approach is toward the shoulder, without making eye-contact with the horse.
  • All entries will be considered for Awards- Awards to be determined by Mainstreet Pāhoa  Association.
  • We reserve the right to restrict, content, signage and refuse access to the parade route for any unregistered, non-complying and/or inappropriate entry.  Unacceptable entries will be directed to leave the parade staging area.  Pre-registration required.

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Hawaii Senate Accepting Applications for Upcoming Legislative Session

The Hawai‘i State Senate is accepting job applications for the upcoming 2017 legislative session.

capitalWorking at the Hawai‘i State Senate offers individuals an opportunity to work in a dynamic public service organization, work closely with elected officials and the public, and learn more about the legislative process.

Session jobs require a 4 to 6 month commitment, depending on the position. Most begin on January 3, 2017 and end on the last day of the legislative session.

Senate employees working 20 hours or more per week are eligible for health insurance through the Hawai‘i Employer-Union Health Benefits Trust Fund.

More information about employment opportunities with the Hawai‘i State Senate can be found online at http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/sjobs.aspx.

To apply, please send a cover letter, position reference number, and resume to sclerk2@capitol.hawaii.gov.

Big Island Police Searching for Missing 16-Year-Old Kailua-Kona Boy

11/17/16 UPDATE: Hawaiʻi Island police have located 16-year-old Kaleb Boyd of Kailua-Kona, who was reported missing.  He was found Wednesday afternoon (November 17) in Kailua-Kona.

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for a 16-year-old Kailua-Kona boy who was reported missing.

Kaleb Boyd

Kaleb Boyd

Kaleb Boyd was last seen September 1 in Kailua-Kona.

He is described as 5-foot-10, 150 pounds with blond hair and blue eyes.

Police ask anyone with information on his whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300. Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Coast Guard Searching for Helicopter Near Molokai

The Coast Guard is searching for an overdue helicopter with two persons aboard near the south side of Molokai, Wednesday.

A Coast Guard C130

A Coast Guard HC130

Multiple Coast Guard air and surface crews and a Maui Fire Department aircrew are currently searching in the area.

Crews currently engaged in the search are:

  • HC-130 Hercules airplane and MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crews from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point.
  • Crews of USCGC Kittiwake (WPB-87316) homeported in Honolulu, was diverted from operations off Maui.
  • Air1 helicopter crew from Maui Fire Department.

The helicopter was reported overdue by the owner’s employee at 6:55 a.m. Wednesday. The employee called 911 and dispatch notified the Coast Guard Sector Honolulu command center personnel who in turn relayed the call to the watchstanders at Coast Guard Joint Rescue Communications Center in Honolulu. The black, privately owned helicopter reportedly departed Honolulu Tuesday evening with two people aboard and did not arrive to a private helicopter pad on Molokai as expected.

An urgent marine information broadcast requesting assistance from mariners in the southern Molokai area has been issued.

Anyone with information that may help locate the helicopter or crew is asked to contact the Sector Honolulu command center at 808-842-2600.

Weather conditions are currently reported as 21 to 23 mph winds, partly sunny with showers.

2017 Closure Schedule Announced for Select Hawaii County Parks

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation announces its 2017 closure schedule for ‘Āhalanui Park, Isaac Kepo‘okalani Hale Beach Park, Kahalu‘u Beach Park and Spencer Park at ‘Ōhai‘ula Beach. Monthly closures are necessary to maintain and repair high-use parks without exposing park patrons to potential hazards associated with large-scale maintenance work.

hot-pondsLocated in Puna, ‘Āhalanui Park will be closed between 6 a.m. and 1 p.m. on the second Wednesday of each month, with the exception of the October closure, which will occur on the third Wednesday of that month. The closure dates are:

  • January 11
  • February 8
  • March 8
  • April 12
  • May 10
  • June 14
  • July 12
  • August 9
  • September 13
  • October 18 (third Wednesday due to schools’ Fall Break)
  • November 8
  • December 13

Located in Puna, Isaac Kepo‘okalani Hale Beach Park will be closed on the third Wednesday of each month and reopened at 1 p.m. on the following day. Overnight camping permits will not be issued for the night before each closure date. The closure dates are:

  • January 18
  • February 15
  • March 15
  • April 19
  • May 17
  • June 21
  • July 19
  • August 16
  • September 20
  • October 18
  • November 15
  • December 20

Located in North Kona, Kahalu‘u Beach Park will be closed until 10 a.m. on the first or second Tuesday of each month. The closure dates are:

  • January 10
  • February 7
  • March 7
  • April 4
  • May 2
  • June 6
  • July 11
  • August 1
  • September 5
  • October 3
  • November 7
  • December 5

Located in South Kohala, Spencer Park at ‘Ōhai‘ula Beach will be closed all day on the following dates:

  • January 11-12
  • February 8-9
  • March 8-9
  • April 12-13
  • May 9-11
  • June – No scheduled closures
  • July – No scheduled closures
  • August – No scheduled closures
  • September 12-14
  • October 11-12
  • November 8-9
  • December 13-14

The Department of Parks and Recreation thanks the public for its understanding and cooperation during these temporary closures.

For more information, please contact Jason Armstrong, Public Information Officer, at 961-8311 or Jason.Armstrong@hawaiicounty.gov.

Hilo Elks Club Sponsoring World of Magic Performance

The Hilo Elks Lodge 759 will present its annual World of Magic show from 11am to 12:30pm at downtown Hilo’s Palace Theater on Sunday, December 4, 2016.

This year’s special performer will be magician KAULANA. Born and raised in the islands of Hawai’i, KAULANA grew up knowing that he was very different from everyone else.

kaulanaAt the young age of 12, KAULANA discovered the art of magic, dreaming of one day to become a magician. After a year of intense studying, KAULANA created “TORCH”, a style of entertaining unlike any other. With his unique style of magic, KAULANA became an 8-time award-winning magician who has toured throughout the Hawaiian Islands as “The Youngest Professional Magician in Hawai’i”.

As a teenager, KAULANA received an opportunity to perform in a Las Vegas revue show in Waikiki. After a two-year run, he headlined in “Encore! Hawai’i” a variety show, which showcased talent from all over the world. After performing for sold out crowds night after night, KAULANA received the title “The Most Unique Magician in Hawai’i”.  KAULANA offers high-energy entertainment; leaving each audience with a magical experience they will never forget. KAULANA has also traveled across the Pacific to perform in Los Angeles, Arizona and Las Vegas.

What makes KAULANA so unique? KAULANA combines his knowledge of magic and his passion to entertain to create “Ho’okalakupua me ke Kaila” or “Magic with Style”.  KAULANA knew that in order for his dream to come true, he had to take magic to a new level. In each performance, KAULANA ignites the imagination of his audience and allows them to escape reality to make them “Believe, Dream & Imagine”.  KAULANA is a true entertainer, who strives daily to reach his goals by using his Heart, Soul and the Spirit of Aloha.

At the end of the show, expect Santa to make a special appearance.

Sponsored by the Elks National Foundation and community members, admissions to this performance is free, and donations are welcome.

For more information, please contact Lily at the Hilo Elks 935-1717.

Hawaii Department of Education Superintendent on Passing of Rep. Clift Tsuji

doe-logoRepresentative Clift Tsuji worked tirelessly on behalf of his constituents. Superintendent Matayoshi reflects on his relationship with the Hawaii State Department of Education and extends condolences to his family.

It is with great sadness to learn that Representative Clift Tsuji has passed away. As a Hilo native, I knew Clift and his commitment to his community and public service. Two weeks ago we spoke about his district and he expressed his support for the educational progress made. Sincere condolences go out to his family during this difficult time. He will be greatly missed.

Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard on Passing of Rep. Clift Tsuji

Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02) released the following statement today after the passing of Hawaiʻi State House Representative Clift Tsuji:

 “Today, Hawaiʻi lost a dedicated public servant. Born and raised in Papaikou, Representative Clift Tsuji served the people of Hawaiʻi Island throughout his life. After graduating from Hilo High School, Rep. Tsuji served as a U.S. Army Reservist with the 442nd Infantry out of Hilo, and continued to serve Hawaiʻi Island in various community organizations, as a successful businessman, and as a representative for the people of Keaukaha, Panaewa, Waiakea, and parts of Hilo. As chair of the House Agriculture Committee, Rep. Tsuji helped champion legislation to fight invasive species and strengthen our biosecurity.  I saw Rep. Tsuji recently at the Hilo Veterans Parade and, as usual, he was full of aloha, as he welcomed me to the community he loved so much. Today, my heart is with Rep. Tsuji’s family, friends, and all whose lives he touched.

tulsi-straw-hat

Japanese Chamber of Commerce & Industry Hawaii President’s Statement on the Passing of Rep. Clift Tsuji

clift-tsuji“The Japanese Chamber of Commerce & Industry Hawaii is deeply saddened by the news of Rep. Clift Tsuji’s passing,” said Russell Arikawa, president of the Chamber.

“He was truly a public servant, and a long-time member of our Chamber. He served our country in the 442nd Infantry from 1959 to 1965, and our beloved Hawaii Island as State Representative since 2004,” Arikawa said.

Rep. Tsuji was a strong supporter of agriculture and economic diversity for our island and state and as a Chamber, we counted on him to support our island in the Legislature. Our hearts and prayers are with his family; his genuine, friendly spirit will truly be missed,” he added.