EPA Settlement with Destination Maui Will Fund Blood Lead Testing for 350 Children

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced a settlement valued at $55,000 with Destination Maui, Inc. for failing to notify its tenants about the potential presence of lead-based paint at eight properties located on Maui.

EPA LOGO“More than half a million children in America have blood lead levels that can lead to learning disabilities and behavior problems,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “Household paint is the main source of exposure, so it’s crucial for landlords to provide tenants the information they need to protect their families from lead poisoning.”

In addition to a fine of $5,500, Destination Maui will spend approximately $49,500 to fund the testing of 350 children for lead exposure and provide blood lead analysis equipment to three community health clinics operated by Malama I Ke Ola Health Center on Maui that serve low income and homeless residents. The blood testing program will take place over the next three years, and will target uninsured children under the age of 6 years old.

An EPA inspection found that the firm did not provide information about the potential presence of lead based paint before leasing eight properties in Kahului, Kihei, Wailuku, Lahaina, Makawao, Kula, and Haiku. These actions violated the federal Toxic Substances Control Act.

The inspection was one of several conducted at property management firms in May 2011 throughout Maui that rent older housing that may have a risk of lead hazards. EPA places a high priority on addressing environmental health risks like lead poisoning that disproportionately affect children and environmental justice communities. Even low levels of lead in the blood of children can result in behavior and learning problems, lower IQ and hyperactivity, and other harmful health effects. Because such effects may not be immediately apparent in young children, testing is recommended to identify lead poisoning and take action to prevent further harm.

The federal government banned lead-based paint from housing in 1978. Federal law requires that persons and entities that sell or rent housing built before 1978, such as the units managed by Destination Maui involved in this case, provide lead hazard information to buyers or tenants. In addition, contractors who work on such housing or child-occupied facilities must be certified by EPA if they perform significant renovation, repair, or painting.

For additional information on lead in paint and the Toxic Substances Control Act requirements, please visit the EPA website at http://www2.epa.gov/lead

New Findings Show Hawaii High and Middle School Students Improve Health Behaviors

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH), Department of Education (DOE), and University of Hawaii (UH) have released new findings from the 2013 Hawaii Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) for the state and all four counties.

Department of Health

Administered to public non-charter school students in grades 6-12 throughout the state every two years, the YRBS is the only survey that monitors youth health risk behaviors on a regular basis. The next administration of the Hawaii YRBS will be conducted in spring 2015.

“The YRBS is an important tool to identify focus areas for prevention and treatment efforts,” said Health Director Linda Rosen. “The longstanding collaboration between the DOH, DOE, and UH provides an excellent data tracking system to monitor student health risk behaviors and target interventions where they are most needed,”

“Not all student health risk behaviors are obvious,” stated Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “This data provides information that our educators can use to reinforce and advise our students in making positive choices.”

Findings from the Hawaii YRBS indicate that since 2011, there have been positive changes in many student health behaviors; however, there is still room for improvement.

Physical fighting has declined, with 17 percent of high school and 22 percent of middle school students reporting that they were in a fight at least once during the past 12 months.
Marijuana use remains steady with 19 percent of high school and 8 percent of middle school students reporting use in the past 30 days.
Fewer students are binge drinking, but 25 percent of high school and 10 percent of middle school students report drinking some alcohol in the past 30 days.
The percentage of high school students who report attempting suicide in the past 12 months remains at 11 percent, while the percentage of middle school students who report attempting suicide increased to 12 percent.

For the first time, the Hawaii High School YRBS gathered information on texting and emailing by adolescents while driving. Findings indicate that the use of technology while driving continues to put youth at risk.

Among students who drove a car, 43 percent reported texting or emailing while driving during the past 30 days.

The Hawaii YRBS 2013 data also indicate varied trends in obesity-related behaviors, such as excessive screen time, physical activity, diet, and sleep.

The percentage of high school (42 percent) and middle school (41 percent) students who report using a computer for something that was not school work for three or more hours per day on an average school day has been increasing since 2007.
The percentage of high schools students who met the national recommendation for physical activity (at least 60 minutes per day on each of the past seven days) remains steady at 22 percent and the percentage of middle school students meeting this goal increased to 32 percent.
Only 27 percent of high school and 55 percent of middle school students indicate that they are getting eight or more hours of sleep on an average school night.
Soda consumption continues to decrease, with 30 percent of high school students reporting that they did not drink any sugar-sweetened soda in the past seven days.

Survey procedures were designed to protect students’ privacy by allowing for anonymous and voluntary participation. Before survey administration, active parental permission was obtained. Students completed the self-administered questionnaire during one class period and recorded their responses directly on a computer-scannable answer sheet.

The Hawaii YRBS is part of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). For a comparison of Hawai‘i data to the nation, visit http://nccd.cdc.gov/youthonline/App/Default.aspx.

For more information on the Hawaii YRBS visit http://health.hawaii.gov/school-health/health-survey/ or http://apps.hidoe.k12.hi.us/research/Pages/YRBS.aspx.

The full survey report, more detailed data reports by county, gender, grade and race/ethnicity, and the survey questionnaires are available at the Hawaii Health Data Warehouse website at www.hhdw.org.

Educator Effectiveness System to See Changes in School Year 2014-15

The Hawaii State Department of Education (DOE) is announcing several major changes to the Educator Effectiveness System (EES) to take effect in the upcoming school year.

DOE ReleaseThe changes reflect the DOE’s commitment to reduce burden on teachers and administrators, and are designed to simplify the EES, streamline its components and differentiate the approach for teachers based on need.

Last Fall, an EES Joint Committee was developed specifically to review the EES. The Committee includes the Hawaii State Teachers Association (HSTA), teachers, principals, administrators, technical experts and Complex Area and state staff, who met regularly throughout the past school year. The Joint Committee met with DOE leaders this week and the Board of Directors of the Hawaii Government Association (HGEA) to review proposed changes to the EES, which were sent to Schools Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi on Friday, June 6.

“The Department will continue to collaborate with educators to further improve the EES, these changes are just the beginning to refining this system and ultimately, elevating student achievement,” stated Superintendent Matayoshi. “We appreciate the work of the Joint Committee, and all of the feedback from our principals and teachers to guide us on what best practices work in our schools. We will continue to convene feedback groups and plan a formal review and feedback process for the following school year.”

“The HSTA is pleased that the DOE has committed to improve the EES,” said HSTA President Wil Okabe. “The EES Joint Committee of HSTA and DOE members has collaboratively worked together throughout this process to assess the system and provide the Superintendent with recommendations that reflect input and concerns from all stakeholders. Our goal is to make sure that every child in Hawaii has access to great public schools and teachers. We look forward to continuing to work with the DOE to improve an evaluation system that improves the practice of teaching and student learning to produce real results.”

Based on lessons learned and feedback gathered from schools, the Department is implementing a series of 18 changes for school year 2014-15, including:

  • Differentiating the number of required classroom observations based on need from twice annually to 0 for highly effective teachers; 1 or more for effective teachers, and 2 or more for marginal, unsatisfactory, or beginning teachers. Overall this means approximately 9,000 fewer classroom observations, reducing the observation workload by almost 50 percent.
  • Providing the approximately 1,800 teachers rated highly effective in SY13-14 the option to carryover their rating in lieu of repeating the evaluation.
  • Reducing the administration of the Tripod Student Survey from twice to once annually, eliminating the survey for grades K-2, and eliminating the demographic questions from the survey. Overall this means approximately 11,700 fewer survey administrations, or a 63 percent reduction in administered surveys.
  • Reducing, for most teachers, the number of required Student Learning Objectives (SLOs) from two to one annually. Overall, this means approximately 12,400 fewer required SLOs.
  • Removing the student survey as an independent component with a stand-alone rating and embedding it as subcomponent under Core Professionalism.
  • Providing flexibility within Working Portfolio and SLOs, particularly for non-classroom teachers, to reflect job duties.
  • Improving Student Growth Percentile (SGP) to replace a percentile ranking of teachers with anchors in criterion and building in a margin of error.

Principal Linell Dilwith of Stevenson Middle said, “These EES changes will make the work at the school level more manageable and ensure that we are focused on quality, not quantity. I am glad the Superintendent listened to the voices in the field.”

HGEA Executive Director Randy Perreira stated, “We are encouraged by the changes proposed by the EES Joint Committee and the opportunity for the HGEA Unit 6 Board to submit recommendations to the Superintendent. We look forward to continuing to work with the department to implement changes that will ensure the workload of principals and vice principals is manageable. Addressing the educational officers’ need for adequate systemic supports with their increasing responsibilities has been and continues to be an important issue for the HGEA.”

Some areas of future improvement include a possible cycling of evaluations; reducing the weight of the SGP and improvements to the methods and technology used to collect, store, and report information. The Department is also exploring improvements to simplify, streamline, and differentiate the implementation of the other 6 Priority Strategies.

The EES began in the school year 2011-12 as a pilot in 18 schools, and then expanded to 81 schools in the 2012-13 school year. As the EES was implemented in schools, the Department solicited feedback from a variety of sources developed specifically for EES feedback, including a Teacher Leader Workgroup, Joint Committee, Technical Advisory Group and Principal Workgroup.

To learn more about the EES, please visit HawaiiPublicSchools.org.

Kona International Airport Dedicates New Aircraft Rescue & Fire-Fighting Station

The state Department of Transportation (HDOT) celebrated the dedication of a new Aircraft Rescue and Fire-Fighting (ARFF) station at the Kona International Airport last week. The new 24,000 square-foot facility includes five truck bays and a fueling area, along with improved work and living areas for firefighters, office space, dorm rooms and a workout area.

Aircraft Rescue and Fire-Fighting (ARFF) station at the Kona International Airport

“The new ARFF station will enhance our readiness capabilities and help to ensure that our fire-fighters are prepared should emergencies occur at Kona International Airport,” said Ross Higashi, Deputy Director of the Airports Division. “This vital facility will help us to continue to provide a safe environment for our air travelers.”

Nearly 88-percent of the project funding for design and construction was provided by an Airport Improvements Program grant for $17 million, issued by the Federal Aviation Administration. State funds covered the remaining $2.3 million. The new station replaces the existing ARFF station which was originally built in 1980.

“In conjunction with the Kona FAA Air Traffic Control Tower, which recently opened one year ago, this new station reflects our commitment towards making our state airports safer and more efficient,” said Ford Fuchigami, HDOT Interim Director. “These projects pave the way for future improvements at Kona International as part of Governor Neil Abercrombie’s New Day Work Projects.”

Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy Names Spring 2014 Dean’s List

The following students from The Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo have been named to the Dean’s List for Spring semester 2014.

UH Hilo Moniker

The Class of 2014 was performing clinical rotations and therefore this designation does not apply.

Class of 2015
Brianne Blakesley*, Andrea Brauer*, Richard Cleave, Chao Cox*, Le Du, Jozelle Gabriel*, Davis Hanai*, Daniel Hasegawa*, Kelly Ishizuka*, Brian John, Tiffany Khan*, Traci Kusaka*, Daniel Leong*, Wei Lin*, Kristina Lo*, Chelsea Murobayashi, Tracy Ng*, Darian Oshiro, Alysia Osugi*, Jessica Parker, Jarred Prudencio*, Garrett Rhodes, Lindsey Takara*, Trina Tran*, Jill Anne Villarosa*, Nichole Wilson*, Akio Yanagisawa*
(* denotes achieving Dean’s List every semester since first year)

Class of 2016
Amy Anderson, Allen Bagalso, Lance Cabanting, David Choe, Chau Dang, Walter Domingo, Ornella Fassu, Bryce Fukunaga, Sisay Kenfe Girmay, Jerilyn Gudoy, Alexander Guimaraes, Samantha Hanabaga, John Hoang, Melissa Iida, Okezie Irondi, Leilani Isozaki, Blake Johnson, Micah KimHan, Thao Le, Quynh Le, Uoc Le, Nancy Le, Tina Liu, Melissa Monette, Raymond Okaniwa, Sarah Osellame, Joson Perreira, Kasia Quintal, Eric Sanders, Arnold Sano, Huong-Thy Ta, Andy Takahata, Mireya Talavera, Jynelle Tangonan, Christopher Thai, Carlo Tiano, Eric Tsuji, Brandon Tuzon, Kimberly Victorine, Kevin Wang, Andy Wong

Class of 2017
Sean Abreu, Trenton Aoki, Lena Asano, Robert Bautista, Megan Calderwood, Christopher Cao, Rhea Castro, Nicole Chin, Ronnijean Delenia, Christopher Diaz, Andy Diep, Nicholas Ferreira, Audrey Fung, Dann Hirayasu, David Khan, Shaun Lasky, Lauren Levine, Caleb Malinski, Sean Menda, Kevin Meno, Kelsea Mizusawa, Lauryn Mow, Loc Ngo, Phuc Nguyen, Kimberlee Roseman, Nadine So, Lillian Tran, Deandra Viluan, Hoa Vo, Brenda Yuen, Zi Zhang

Big Island Police Searching for Missing Pahoa Man

Hawaiʻi Island police are asking for the public’s help in locating a 49-year-old Pāhoa man who was reported missing.

Yuriy Shvydkova

Yuriy Shvydkova

Yuriy Shvydkova is described as 6-feet tall and 300 pounds, with medium-length partially gray hair, brown eyes and a fair complexion. He may be operating a 2005 White Nissan Sentra.

He was last seen in Nanawale early on the morning of Monday, June 9.

Police ask anyone with information on his whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

POLL – Hawaii U.S. Senate Race


POLL – Hawaii State Senate District 4


POLL – Hawaii State Senate District 3


POLL – Hawaii State Senate District 1


U.S. Senate Candidate Forum to be Held in Hilo

A U.S. Senate Candidate Forum featuring U.S. Senator Brian Schatz and U.S. Congresswoman Colleen Hanabusa will be held on Wednesday, July 2, 2014, 6:30 p.m. at Sangha Hall, 424 Kilauea Avenue in Hilo. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m.

Schatz Hanabusa

The forum is sponsored by the Hawai‘i Island Chamber of Commerce, Japanese Chamber of Commerce & Industry of Hawaii, Hawaii Island REALTORS, Hawaii Island Contractors’ Association, Kanoelehua Industrial Area Association and the Hawaii Island Portuguese Chamber of Commerce. This public forum is open to the community free of charge.

The sponsoring organizations have organized this important opportunity to educate their members and the public about the issues relevant to the U.S. Senate, the candidates’ backgrounds, and how well they will meet the needs of the people of Hawai‘i Island and our state.

The forum will be moderated by Sherry Bracken, Public Affairs Director, Mahalo Broadcasting and host of the Sunday interview show Island Issues for LAVA 105.3 fm and on KKOA 107.7 fm.  She also reports on Hawai‘i Island news for Hawaii Public Radio. Questions will not be taken from the audience at the forum but the public is invited to submit questions in advance to admin@hicc.biz and to info@lava105.com.   Sign waving will not be allowed on the Sangha Hall/ Hilo Hongwanji property and campaign signs will not be allowed in the hall.

The forum will be broadcasted live on radio station LAVA 105.3 fm and online www.hawaii247.com from 6:30 p.m. until 8 p.m. Food, snacks and drinks will be available for sale at the event.

The League of Women Voters will be at the forum to provide voter registration.

For more information, please call the Hawai‘i Island Chamber of Commerce office at (808) 935-7178.

“Kohala Officer of the Quarter” Recognized

The Big Island Visitors Security Association recognized Officer Cory Gray as “Kohala Officer of the Quarter” during a ceremony Friday (June 13) at the Fairmont Orchid resort in South Kohala.

Sergeant Jason Berryhill displays a 'Kohala Officer of the Quarter' framed certificate honoring Officer Cory Gray.

Sergeant Jason Berryhill displays a ‘Kohala Officer of the Quarter’ framed certificate honoring Officer Cory Gray.

Officer Gray was honored for his dedication to duty and diligence in DUI investigations.

In January, Gray was assigned to a special enforcement effort initiated in the South Kohala District to increase DUI enforcement. From January to March, the district’s DUI enforcement nearly doubled, and Gray made half of the arrests himself. His efforts contributed to a zero DUI fatality rate in the South Kohala District.

Gray’s achievements were an inspiration to his co-workers. As a result, he was selected to be a field training officer, allowing him to train a recruit officer in how to detect and investigate DUI violators.

The Big Island Visitors Security Association is an organization of hotel and airport security managers and visitor industry professionals. The “Kohala Officer of the Quarter” is a newly-formed program for the organization to recognize outstanding officers from the North Kohala and South Kohala districts.

Hawaii County to Assume Responsibility of Mauna Kea State Park – Will Be Renamed Mauna Kea Recreation Area

Mauna Kea State Park will be closed for renovation starting Tuesday, July 1, and remain closed until further notice. However, temporary restrooms will be provided to accommodate the public. They will be kept open around the clock and located at the administrative building fronting the park’s main entrance.

Mauna Kea State Park

The shutdown is needed to expedite the work and ensure the public’s safety while the park’s restrooms, parking lot and picnic area are refurbished. Maintenance crews will be using heavy equipment to improve the park located near the 34-mile marker of the Daniel K. Inouye Highway, also known as Saddle Road.

Work will be performed by the Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation with support from the Department of Public Works. On July 1, Hawai‘i County will assume responsibility for Mauna Kea State Park. Plans call for renaming the park Mauna Kea Recreation Area.

The public will be notified when the park is reopened. Until then, no camping reservations will be taken and permits required for overnight use will not be issued.

The Department of Parks and Recreation apologizes for any inconvenience caused by the temporary closure of Mauna Kea State Park and requests the public’s patience and understanding while it implements these critical improvements for the benefit of residents and visitors.

For more information, please contact Jason Armstrong, Public Information Officer, at 961-8311 or jarmstrong@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Matson’s ‘Ka Ipu ‘Aina’ (Container for the Land) Grants Available

Matson shipping company announces it’s ‘Ka Ipu ‘Aina’ (Container for the Land) Grants are available. This program is designed to underscore Matson’s environmental commitment to Hawai’i’s communities and environment.

Matson’s ‘Ka Ipu ‘Aina’ (Container for the Land) Grant was used for a clean up in Hawaii Ocean View Estates.

Matson’s ‘Ka Ipu ‘Aina’ (Container for the Land) Grant was used for a clean up in Hawaii Ocean View Estates.

Matson will donate the use of container equipment on the Big Island for environmental cleanup projects arranged by non-profit organizations.  They will pay the trucking expenses incurred in the delivery and pickup of the containers.

In addition, Matson will make a $1000 cash contribution to each of the non-profits that successfully complete a cleanup initiative.

Community Clean-up

Community Clean-up

Note:  There is a time frame for the clean up. Contact:  Mona 961-5286.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Annual Cultural Festival is July 12

Save the date and participate in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s 34th annual Cultural Festival, Saturday, July 12, 2014 at the park’s Kahuku Unit in Ka‘ū, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free!

Keiki enjoying performance by Hula Hālau Ulumamo o Hilo Palikū.  NPS photo by Jay Robinson

Keiki enjoying performance by Hula Hālau Ulumamo o Hilo Palikū. NPS photo by Jay Robinson

Enjoy hula kāhiko and music, watch skilled practitioners demonstrate their art, and try your hand at Hawaiian crafts. Taste traditional, ono Hawaiian foods. Performers this year will include Nā Hōkū Hanohano award-winning singer and ‘ukulele artist Diana Aki (the “Songbird of Miloli‘i”), Kumu Hula Mamo Brown and Hālau Ulumamo o Hilo Palikū, noted falsetto singer, Kai Ho‘opi‘i, kupuna hula by Haunani Medeiros, and more.

“The park’s annual cultural festival brings our communities together, and offers a wide range of authentic Hawaiian experiences for residents and visitors,” said Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Superintendent, Cindy Orlando. “Our park staff also look forward to this yearly opportunity to connect with our communities and share their aloha for the ‘āina,” she said.

This year’s theme is Ka‘ū hiehie i ka makani which means Ka‘ū regal in the gales, referring to the multi-directional winds that cool the land in Kahuku.

Keiki learn ‘ohe kapala (Hawaiian bamboo stamping) with Ranger Rebecca Carvalho.  NPS Photo by Jay Robinson

Keiki learn ‘ohe kapala (Hawaiian bamboo stamping) with Ranger Rebecca Carvalho. NPS Photo by Jay Robinson

Make sure to wear sunscreen and a hat. Bring water, rain jacket, and ground mat or chair. No pets. Lunch and beverages will be available for sale.  This wonderful family experience is a drug- and alcohol-free event.

The Kahuku unit is the southernmost section of the national park, and is located on the mauka (uphill) side of Highway 11 at mile marker 70.5, approximately 42 miles south of the main park entrance at Kīlauea. Free parking available.

Call 808-985-6011 or email havo_interpretation@nps.gov for more information.

Puna Man Charged After Shots Fired Inside Home Next to Womans Head

A Puna man has been charged with several offenses in connection with the discharge of a firearm in his home.

On Tuesday (June 10), Puna Patrol officers responded to a 4:32 p.m. “drop 911″ call. When they arrived at the home on Orchid Drive in the Ainaloa subdivision, they made contact with a 50-year-old woman, who reported that her husband had brandished a .22-calliber rifle and fired shots next to her head while she was lying in bed.

Leighton Kaai Jr.

Leighton Kaai Jr.

Police arrested 48-year-old Leighton Kaai Jr. and took him to the Hilo police cellblock pending further investigation by the Juvenile Aid Section, which investigates domestic abuse cases.

At 11:45 a.m. Thursday (June 12) detectives charged Kai with first-degree reckless endangering, first-degree terroristic threatening and two firearms offenses. His bail was set at $6,000. He remains at the cellblock pending his initial court appearance scheduled for Friday (June 13).

New Leadership Principal Group Will Help Shape Education Priorities

After a recruitment and selection process of nearly two months, the Hawaii State Department of Education (DOE) is announcing a new Deputy Superintendent’s Principal Roundtable for the upcoming 2014-15 school year.

DOE ReleaseThe Roundtable is designed to engage with principals directly to improve communication, garner feedback, develop collaborative solutions to critical challenges, and identify individuals for future complex area, state and national leadership positions and opportunities.

Twenty-six individuals, including all members of the Hawaii Government Employees Association (HGEA) Unit 6 Board of Directors and 14 additional sitting principals from four major islands, representing a diverse mix of schools and principal experience, have been named to the Roundtable. See the list of SY2014-15 Roundtable members below.

“As a former principal who knows firsthand about the challenges our principals face each day, we are committed to a thoughtful process of selecting school leaders for this Roundtable,” said Deputy Superintendent Ronn Nozoe. “We value their feedback and their dedication to their schools, communities as we continue to transform public education.”

HGEA Executive Director Randy Perreira stated, “We are encouraged by this additional opportunity for our principals to provide feedback from the field. With this critical information, we hope to create solutions that will transition into meaningful change to positively impact the everyday work of the principals and vice principals. We look forward to working with all stakeholders to support these efforts.”

The opportunity to be part of the Roundtable was first shared with DOE principals in April. The Department received nearly 40 nominations from principals, Complex Area Superintendents, and the HGEA.

Roundtable members will meet over the summer to establish priorities. All DOE principals will be informed of the work of the Roundtable and given an opportunity to give further feedback.

“I’m looking forward to helping with finding solutions for our school leaders,” said Fred Murphy, principal, Mililani High School. “We hope to set priorities moving forward, and to help principals be as creative and dynamic as they can be at their institutions.”

The 26 Roundtable members for School Year 2014-2015 are:

  1. Lorelei Aiwohi, Kalakaua Middle School (Honolulu District, Farrington-Kaiser-Kalani)
  2. Wade Araki, Kaimuki High (Honolulu District, Kaimuki-McKinley-Roosevelt)
  3. Duwayne Abe, Salt Lake Elementary (Central District, Aiea-Moanalua-Radford)
  4. Bert Carter, Ka‘ewai Elementary (Honolulu District, Farrington-Kaiser-Kalani)*
  5. John Costales, Kalama Intermediate (Maui District, Baldwin-Kekaulike-Maui)*
  6. Patricia Dang, Kapalama Elementary (Honolulu District, Farrington-Kaiser-Kalani)*
  7. Gary Davidson, Molokai Middle School (Maui District, Hana-Lahainaluna-Lanai-Molokai)
  8. Chad Farias, Kea‘au Elementary (Hawaii District, Kau-Keaau-Pahoa)*
  9. Shelley Ferrara, Mauka Lani Elementary (Leeward District, Campbell-Kapolei)
  10. Daniel Hamada, Kapaa High (Kauai)
  11. Debra Hatada, Ka‘imiloa Elementary (Leeward District, Campbell-Kapolei)*
  12. Disa Hauge, Waianae High School (Leeward District, Nanakuli-Waianae)
  13. Keith Hayashi, Waipahu High (Leeward District, Pearl City-Waipahu)
  14. Francine Honda, Kailua High School (Windward District, Kailua-Kalaheo)*
  15. Kelcy Koga, Waiakea High School (Hawaii District, Hilo-Waiakea)*
  16. Naomi Matsuzaki, Kahalu‘u Elementary (Windward District, Castle-Kahuku)*
  17. Wilfred Murakami, Kealakehe High (West Hawaii)
  18. Fred Murphy, Mililani High School (Central District, Leilehua-Mililani-Waialua
  19. Deborah Nekomoto, Kapunahala Elementary (Windward District, Castle-Kahuku)
  20. Irene Puuohau, Hawaii Government Employees Association
  21. Fred Rose, Eleele Elementary (Kauai)*
  22. Janette Snelling, Kohala High School (West Hawaii)
  23. James Sunday, Radford High School (Central District, Aiea-Moanalua-Radford)*
  24. Brett Tanaka, Office of Curriculum Instruction, Student Support*
  25. David Tanuvasa, (Vice Principal) Waipahu High School (Leeward District, Pearl City-Waipahu)*
  26. Keoni Wilhelm, Mokapu Elementary (Windward District, Kailua-Kalaheo)

*Member of HGEA Unit 6 Board of Directors

POLL – Hawaii County Council District 9


POLL – Hawaii County Council District 8


POLL – Hawaii County Council District 6