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Hawaii Residents Can Spot the International Space Station Tonight

Hawaii residents can spot the International Space Station tonight (depending on clouds).

It will be visible beginning tonight, Tuesday, August 15th at 7:54 PM. It will be visible for approximately 4 minutes at a maximum height of 54 degrees. It will appear 10 degrees above the North Northwest part of the sky and disappear 47 degrees above the East part of the sky.

Kahilu Theatre Hosts Talk by Nationally Recognized Artist and Hawaiian Cultural Practitioner Bernice Akamine

Kahilu Theatre presents an Artist Talk by nationally recognized artist, Bernice Akamine, on August 19, from 10:30 – 11:30am. Ms. Akamine will give a presentation describing the scope of her art practice, and will discuss how her roots as a Hawaiian cultural practitioner informs her work. The talk is being held in conjunction with her solo exhibition at Kahilu Theatre, and during the presentation Akamine will also discuss her work on display in the galleries. Coffee and light pastry will be on offer.

Bernice Akamine speaking about her installation with to Lulani Arquette , CEO of the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (NACF) Photo by Mark Ley

“Bernice Akamine is a treasure for our state, both as a contemporary artist and as a cultural practitioner, and we are delighted to bring her work to Waimea,” says Deb Goodwin, Executive Director of Kahilu Theatre. “Her installations, Hinalua‘iko‘a and Kalo, exemplify deeply engaged and profoundly moving art, creativity we aim to showcase at Kahilu Theatre, both on stage and in our galleries. At the opening reception on August 3, Bernice spoke passionately about what inspires and influences her, giving the art richer meaning for those in attendance. Kahilu Theatre is honored to offer an additional opportunity to hear Bernice speak.”

Kahilu Theatre Development Associate David Clark describes the experience of viewing Kalo and hearing Bernice speak about it at the reception. “The large field of mixedmedia taro plants that make up the installation Kalo is beautiful in its own right, but it was so much more significant to learn about it from Bernice. Each newsprint “leaf” contains the printed signatures of residents that signed the1897-98 Ku’e: the AntiAnnexation Petitions, as well as maps of the districts in which those signatories resided. Each paper kalo plant “grows” out of a pohaku, or lava rock, donated by community members from each of the main Hawaiian Islands. This layering of source material makes the installation a living invocation of past generations and serves to remind each viewer (whether resident or visitor) of their kuleana or responsibility to protect the natural environment, the cultural traditions, and the history of this special place.”

Bernice Akamine is a sculptor and installation artist based on Hawai‘i Island. She uses a variety of media to express her ideas, and recurring themes include environmental and cultural issues. She is a recognized cultural practitioner with deep roots in Kapa and waiho‘olu‘u, Hawaiian natural dyes. Her solo exhibition at Kahilu Theatre Galleries, presents two bodies of work in both galleries.

Kalo, is a mixed media installation that consists of 83 taro plants made of stone and leaves. Hinalua‘iko‘a are suspended and free standing beaded sculptures that present an immersive environment inspired by traditional Hawaiian fish traps, sea creatures, talk radio and the Hawaiian Creation Chant, the Kumulipo.

Akamine has exhibited her work in numerous solo and group exhibitions, both nationally and internationally. Her selected awards include; a 2015 Native Hawaiian Artist Fellowship from the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation; a 2012 Community Scholar Award from the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History; and a 1999 Visiting Artist Award at the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of the American Indian in New York City.

Kahilu Exhibits, the visual arts exhibition program of the Kahilu Theatre, presents solo and thematic group shows and features local and global works of art from both emerging and established visual artists.
The Akamine exhibition, organized by Sally Lundburg, is on display through September 8. The galleries are free and open to the public Monday thru Friday, from 9am – 1pm, and during all performances and events. For more information, visit http://kahilutheatre.org/Exhibits, email gallery@kahilutheatre.org, or call (808) 885-6868.

For more information about Bernice Akamineʻs work, visit https://www.nativeartsandcultures.org/bernice-akamine or contact the artist at bamakamine@gmail.com.

20 Years Ago, Bishop Estate Scandal Led To Strict Charities Oversight in Hawaii

The essay titled “Broken Trust”, published on August 9, 1997 by the Honolulu Star Bulletin, reported widespread corruption involving Bishop Estate, the largest private property owner in the State of Hawaii, and led to the formation of a charities regulation group in the Hawaii Department of the Attorney General that exists to this day.

Click to read article

Now-retired University of Hawaii law professor Randall Roth and the late Judge Samuel P. King, along with prominent Hawaiian community members Walter Heen, Gladys Brandt, and Charles Kekumano, wrote the essay that exposed the Bishop Estate scandal involving the trustees of one of the largest charitable trusts in the United States.

Attorney General Doug Chin said: “Under former Governor Ben Cayetano, Hawaii Attorney General Margery Bronster began legal proceedings to remove the culpable trustees. We appreciate their example. For 20 years, the Department of the Attorney General has maintained strict oversight over organizations that solicit charitable contributions in Hawaii. Our office is nationally recognized for its pioneering oversight program.”

For information regarding the Hawaii Charity Registry, see http://ag.ehawaii.gov/charity/.

Another Water Pump Goes Down – North Kona Water Restrictions Mandated

This is an Emergency Water Restriction Notice for North Kona District customers for Monday August 14.

The Department of Water Supply reports Honokohau Deepwell located in North Kona is now out of service. Due to the loss of this pump this morning, North Kona customers in the area from Keauhou to Keahole and Honalo to Makalei must restrict water use to health and safety needs only. This means use water for drinking, cooking, and hygiene purposes only. Cease all other water use including all irrigation and washing of vehicle and boats.

Conserve water by flushing toilets less often and taking shorter showers.
We also recommend that residents store a sufficient amount of water (5-10) gallons for basic household needs, such as flushing toilets, hygiene and consumption in the event of service disruption.

Until further notice, the Department of Water Supply is suspending temporary service accounts and irrigation accounts in North Kona.

Department of Water Supply will be monitoring water usage and wasteful water use will be subject to further water restrictions and possible water shut off.

In order to help meet general customer demand, Water Supply has established Public Potable Water Distribution Stations at the following locations:

  • Ane Keohokalole Hwy. between Kealakehe Parkway and Kealakehe High School
  • Hina Lani between Anini St. and Manu Mele St.

For after hours emergencies, or to report any observed wasteful use of water call the DWS at 961-8790. During normal business hours, call 961-8060.
This email address will be kept updated and you will be informed of any conditions that may affect your safety.

Thank you, have a safe day, this is your Hawaii County Civil Defense.

Hawaii County Expresses Heartfelt Mahalo to Old Airport Clean-Up Volunteers

The County of Hawai’i wishes to express heartfelt thanks to all of the many volunteers and sponsors for their kokua during the massive two-day clean-up of Old Kona Airport Park, to make this facility a nicer place to play for our keiki.We thank: Youth With A Mission, Hawai’i Community Correctional Center, Friends for Fitness, Debbie and John Mabuni, Council Members Karen Eoff, Maile David and Dru Kanuha, Michael Ikeda, Alexander Hill, Clint Santos, George Correa, Joey Valenzuela, Chase De Mattos, Christopher Mae, Matthew Tailon, Paul Ebel, George Kanakua, Kathleen Lacerdo, Bina Torres, Derwin Nunes III, Irene Kauwe, Gaudens Girbisi, Sr., Cynthia Hove, Barbara Krekeler, Margie Wolfe, Cristina Garcia, Kamrirg Chaz, Carlito Yadau, Noah Nehls, Jonah Nehls, Trystan Nehls-Nachor, Skibs Nehls, Katie McKillop, Celine Kitaoka, Yamile Marquez, Irie Charity, Melvin Ho‘omauawau, Lani Ho‘omauawau, Elizabeth Elkjer and Hannah Rose (Echo City Knockouts Roller Derby), Patricia Ikeda, Christopher Au, Mark Jensen, Kalae Mills, Tania Mills, Maia Mills, Isaiah Easley, Taylor Easley, Betty DeRoy, Scott Forrington, and Billy Doaner, along with numerous spontaneous anonymous volunteers who did not sign in officially.

We also thank the following volunteers from Queen Lili‘uokalani Trust:  Kehau Harrison, Ashley Flynn, Pelena Keeling, Lyle Gomes, Michael Shibata, Richard Teanio, Jr., Kalena Spinola, BJ Ells, Justin Murata, Bernaldo Quanan, Morgan Leleiwi, and Mana Purdy.

We thank the following businesses and non-profit organizations:  Sustainable Island Products, Davis Tile & Marble, Courtyard Marriott-King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel, Costco Wholesale, KTA Super Stores, Foodland, Pine Tree Café, Walmart, McDonalds, Starbucks, Royal Kona Resort, Hawai’i Sober Living & Recovery Center, Hawai’i Land Care, Tante and Aracelli Urban Foundation, Umeke’s Fish Market Bar & Grill, Chubby’s at the Avalux Café, Safeway, 808 Building Maintenance, Signature Flight Support – BBA Aviation, Bongo Ben’s Island Café, Adobo on Board, and Kohanaiki.

The Department of Parks and Recreation is grateful for the assistance and support of the Hawai’i Police Department, the Department of Public Works, the Department of Environmental Management, the Civil Defense Agency, the Fire Department, the Office of the Corporation Counsel, the Department of Housing and Community Development, and the Office of the Mayor.

Mayor Kim Gets Honorable Mention at US Conference of Mayors’s Climate Protection Awards

The United States Conference of Mayors 11th anniversary Winners Mayors’ Climate protection awards:

Honorable Mentions (Large City) – Hawai’i Mayor Harry Kim and the Lalamilo Windfarm Project:

Hawai’i Department of Water Supply’s (DWS) Lalamilo Windfarm project officially opened for commercial operations in September 2016, with five turbines generating 3.3 megawatts of electricity with no-export to the grid.
As an island state, the State of Hawai’i has been at the mercy of imported fossil fuel supplies. The Lalamilo Windfarm contributes to the State of Hawai’i’s Clean Energy Initiative’s goal of 100 percent renewable energy by 2045.

Among the challenges in developing this project were permitting hurdles, most notably those involving the expected take of endangered bats and sea birds such as petrels.

Lighting was installed at downward facing angles and down-shielded to avoid attraction and disorientation of night-flying seabirds. It also will be less attractive to insects at turbine blade heights which may attract bats.

The turbines are also programmed to cut in and produce energy only when the wind exceeds 5 meters per second and the blades are feathered into the wind when the wind speeds are below 5 meters per second to minimize impact to both bats and birds. Bird flight diverters were also installed to minimize the potential for birds colliding with the overhead electrical transmission lines.
The windfarm is designed to provide a renewable energy source and a stable rate platform for the Department of Water Supply’s pumping equipment for the next 20 years. The CO2 offset for the Lalamilo Windfarm is estimated at 5,000 metric tons of CO2 per year.

At the 2015 groundbreaking for Lalamilo

This is arguably the first time in Hawai’i, and perhaps the nation, that a local government has developed such a wind-powered, water-pumping facility capable of significant greenhouse gas reductions at no cost to the taxpayer.

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Colorado, in partnership with DWS and the Department of Research and Development, worked out models of the energy output potential for the windfarm site, at no cost to DWS or its customers. In April 2013, the project was awarded to Lalamilo Windfarm Wind
Company LLC, which designed, constructed, owns, and maintains the facility, through a Power Purchase Agreement. Planning, design, and construction were also done at no cost to DWS.

The turbines of the Windfarm are located on 78 acres adjacent to eight DWS water wells in Lalamilo Windfarm, South Kohala, on the site of a previous windfarm built in the mid-1980s. The use of wind energy while reducing our dependence on imported fossil fuels, also ensures a stable source of energy that is expected to reduce energy costs to DWS and its customers over the next
20 years.

Fire at Mauna Loa Macadamia Nut Factory Causes $105,000 in Damage

A fire at a structure last night at the Mauna Loa Macadamia Nut Factory caused over $100,000 in damage early Monday morning:Location: Mauna Loa Macadamia Nut Factory

Found at Scene: 20’x30′ structure at rear of Mauna Loa Macadamia Nut processing plant fully engulfed

Cause: Unknown

Remarks: Smoke and flames visible from Hwy 11 and Macadamia Nut Dr. Upon arrival found 20’x30′ structure fully engulfed. Security guard described structure as a mac nut husk dryer. Fire was under control at 0313. Wet down and mop up was prolonged due to access and abundance of macadamia nut mulch. HFD Inspectors on scene investigating at time of press release.

25-Year-Old Oceanview Man Dies in Kona Car Crash

A 25-year-old Captain Cook man died following a single vehicle crash Sunday evening (August 13), in Kailua-Kona. He has been positively identified as Nelsin Santos, 25 of Oceanview.Responding to an 8:30 p.m. call, police determined that a 2016 Toyota 4Runner operated by a 24-year-old Kailua- Kona man had been traveling west on Kaiminani Drive at the intersection of Ane Keohokalole when it was involved in a collision with Santos who had been walking within the westbound lane of Kaiminani Drive.

Mr. Santos sustained critical injuries from the collision and was transported to the Kona Community Hospital where he was later pronounced dead on (August 13), at 9:27 p.m.

An autopsy has been ordered to determine the exact cause of d eath.

Officers from the Traffic Enforcement Unit have initiated a Negligent Homicide investigation and are asking anyone who may have witnessed the crash to call Officer Justin Hooser at (808) 326-4646, ext. 229. Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide Crime Stoppers at (808) 961-8300.

This is the twenty-second traffic fatality this year compared with fifteen at this time last year.

East Hawaii Residents Asked to Reduce Water Usage Due to Ongoing Dry Conditions

Due to the ongoing dry conditions, the Department of Water Supply is requesting customers in the affected areas to reduce your daily water usage by 10%. Listed are some ways to conserve water to reach the 10% goal:

AFFECTED AREAS: HAKALAU-WAILEA, SOUTH HILO, HAWAI‘I NINOLE, NORTH HILO, HAWAI‘I

  • Wash only full loads of laundry or dishes at a time. 
  • Check faucets and pipes for leaks. 
  • Serve drinking water only when requested. 
  • Keep a container of drinking water in the refrigerator. Use drinking water wisely.
  • Do not let water run unnecessarily. Please shut the water off when you wash or brush your teeth. Use a glass to rinse when brushing your teeth.
  • When bathing or showering, use water only to wet and rinse off. 
  • Do not fill up the bathtub. 
  • Do not flush toilets unnecessarily. 
  • Review and reduce frequency of irrigation schedule by adjusting timers appropriately.

All irrigation and agricultural users should keep water usage to a minimum. Irrigate only at night from 8:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. This measure will reduce water loss due to evaporation, and minimize water system usage during peak demand.For more information, please contact the Department at (808) 961-8790 or (808) 961-8060 during normal business hours or visit our website at www.hawaiidws.org.

Emergency Water Restriction Notice for North Kona District

This is an Emergency Water Restriction Notice for North Kona District customers for Sunday August 13 at 11:45 AM.

The Department of Water Supply reports Honokohau Deepwell located in North Kona is now out of service.

Due to the loss of this pump this morning, North Kona customers in the area from Keauhou to Keahole and Honalo to Makalei must restrict water use to health and safety needs only. This means use water for drinking, cooking, and hygiene purposes only.  Cease all other water use including all irrigation and washing of vehicle and boats.

Conserve water by flushing toilets less often and taking shorter showers.

We also recommend that residents store a sufficient amount of water (5-10) gallons for basic household needs, such as flushing toilets, hygiene and consumption in the event of service disruption.

Until further notice, the Department of Water Supply is suspending temporary service accounts and irrigation accounts in North Kona.

For after hours emergencies, or to report any observed wasteful use of water call the DWS at 961-8790. During normal business hours, call 961-8060

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard Honors Hawaiʻi Purple Heart Recipients at Official Medal Presentation Ceremony

At the Oʻahu Veterans Center today, Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02) joined the Military Order of the Purple Heart (MOPH), Rainbow Chapter 483 (Honolulu) in honoring twelve recipients of the Purple Heart Medal at an official presentation ceremony.

The recipients, who included veterans from World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War, were awarded the Purple Heart Medal by the Army for their wounds in combat, but never received a formal presentation of their medals, as is required by Army regulations. The congresswoman presented each honoree with the Purple Heart Medal and delivered remarks about the significance of the official presentation ceremony, the high cost of war and the critical importance of caring for our veterans when they return home from war.

The Purple Heart is awarded to members of the armed forces of the U.S. who are wounded by an instrument of war in the hands of the enemy and posthumously to the next of kin in the name of those who are killed in action or die of wounds received in action. It is specifically a combat decoration.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard said, “Those making decisions about when and where to go to war often forget who pays the high price—our veterans who return home with wounds visible and invisible, our servicemembers on active duty, and their families. The veterans we recognized today have waited more than forty years for the recognition they have earned and deserve. Today’s ceremony closes the circle for these veterans and their families who have sacrificed so much.”

Addressing the recipients and their family members, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard said, “Today we honor you with a medal that none of you wanted or asked for, but that is earned by those who sacrifice most. You stand in the ranks of people like Hawaiʻi’s Senator Daniel Inouye, President John. F. Kennedy, and so many more. We honor you, as we do them, our nation’s most prominent and distinguished heroes.”

Commentary – National Park Service & Queen Kaahumanu Highway Frontage Road

The Kona Community Development Plan has a frontage road going from Honokohau Harbor to Kona Int’l Airport alongside Queen Kaahumanu Highway. One of the segments is completed, and another should be completed within the next three months. These are being constructed by NELHA and the Kohanaiki Shores development.

Aerial View of Kaloko Fishpond at Kaloko-Honokohau National Park

The three remaining unfinished roadway segments go through Hawaii Department of Transportation, privately owned, and Kaloko-Honokohau National Park lands. One of these landowners, the National Park Service, will pose a challenge to completing the entire frontage road. They’ve stated a road can’t bisect the park because it will negatively impact the park’s resources.

I respect the National Park Service’s concerns, but extending this roadway between Kohanaiki Shores to Kealakehe Parkway could be a win-win for the park and the community. If this road is constructed, it will eventually give the community an alternative route between the airport and Honokohau Harbor.

This road will also help in traffic circulation and provide an alternative route if there is a traffic accident on Queen Kaahumanu Highway. It will also help the National Park Service by providing better accessibility to park resources and allow them to do more interpretive outreach with park visitors. This would be particularly effective if this proposed roadway follows the alignment of the Ala Mamalahoa Trail through the park.

The National Park Service’s opposition towards this roadway extension can’t be understated, but I propose these following conditions to allay their longstanding concerns. The roadway segment going through the National Park would limited to two lanes with narrow shoulders to reduce its footprint on the sensitive historical resources.  In addition, a thorough analysis of these potential alignments should be conducted. The alignment with the least impact on historical and environmental resources should be selected.

Aaron Stene
Kailua-Kona

Details On Last Nights Emergency Landing at Hilo International Airport

At 10:21 pm last night Hawaii Fire Department was dispatched to an aircraft emergency. A Hawaiian Airlines Boeing 767 carrying 276 passengers and crew from Kauai to LAX experienced smoke in the cockpit and was diverted to Hilo International Airport.

The aircraft was 2 hours into their flight when diverted. All units were on scene prior to touchdown. The plane landed safely and taxied to the terminal without further incident. The cause of smoke is under investigation.

Statement Regarding School Bus Situation on Maui

“We continue to work diligently day in and day out to recruit and train drivers. Over the last week, we have made significant progress. However, we need to hire 14 more drivers to fully service temporarily suspended and consolidated routes for Baldwin, Lahainaluna and Maui high schools and Iao Intermediate.

We are in daily communication with HIDOE about where we are with driver recruitment and how we can strategically restore routes. Our contracts with HIDOE included changes to multiple pick-up and drop off locations and times, some of which may be different from years past.

Getting students to school, safely, is paramount which is why we invested in a brand new bus fleet for Maui and have an extensive screening and training process for our drivers.

We had hoped to be fully ready on day one of school, but repeated appeals and challenges of our contract award by Robert’s Hawaii, which lost contracts on Maui and Kauai, set our hiring timetable back. That, coupled with the growing national bus driver shortage crisis, means finding high quality drivers hasn’t been easy.

We sincerely apologize to students, families and the community for the inconvenience caused by the temporary disruption in service and appreciate their patience as we work to resolve this situation.”

Louis Gomes, President of Ground Transport Incorporated

Questions and Answers: Hawaii and the Threat of a North Korean Missile Strike

Click to enlarge

1. Why now? Has the North Korea missile threat increased so much recently that you were urged to begin preparations for an attack?

Preparations for the North Korea missile and nuclear threat began in late 2016 when this assessment suggested early preparations should be initiated. Hawaii has maintained plans to cope with missile testing since 2009. The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency (HI-EMA) conducts a Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (THIRA) every year. This process examines potential hazards and threats to the State of Hawaii including natural (hurricane, tsunami), technological (cyberterrorism) and man-made (acts of terrorism) hazards.

2. I have heard that planning for a nuclear attack from North Korea is futile given most of the population will be killed or critically injured. Is that true?

No. Current estimates of human casualties based on the size (yield) of North Korean nuclear weapon technology strongly suggests an explosion less than 3 miles in diameter. More than 90% of the population would survive the direct effects of such an explosion. Planning and preparedness are essential to protect those survivors from delayed residual radiation (fallout) and other effects of the attack such as the loss of utilities and communication systems, structural fires, etc.

3. How will the public learn of a possible missile launch from North Korea?

Approximately 5 minutes into the launch sequence, the U.S. Pacific Command will notify the Hawaii State Warning Point (SWP) that a missile is in route from North Korea. The SWP is staffed on a 24-hour, 7 day-a-week basis by skilled emergency management professionals.
Upon receipt of the notification, the SWP will activate the ‘Attack-Warning’ signal on all outdoor sirens statewide (wailing sound) and transmit a warning advisory on radio, television and cellular telephones within 2 minutes.

4. What should Hawaii residents and visitors do when they hear the ‘Attack-Warning’ siren signal?

All residents and visitors must immediately seek shelter in a building or other substantial structure. Once the sirens sound, residents and visitors will have less than 12 to 15 minutes before missile impact.

5. Was the recent public messaging recommending that each individual/family maintain a 14-day survival kit made because of the North Korea threat?

The 14-day recommendation was made following an intensive analysis suggesting that Hawaii could experience a major disruption to maritime transportation (shipping and ports) in the event of a major hurricane. This recommendation does however complement the potential need for 14 days of sheltering following a nuclear attack.

6. When will schools begin nuclear drills?

Schools are not expected to conduct drills specific to a nuclear attack. Existing drills known as ‘lock down’ drills serve the same purpose. These drills are regularly conducted at all schools statewide and are considered more than adequate in terms of protecting students and staff.

7. When will the new ‘Attack-Warning’ siren signal will available and how will it be tested?

The new (second) ‘Attack-Warning’ siren signal (wailing sound) will be available for use beginning in November 2017. The signal will be tested on the first working day of every month thereafter together with the existing ‘Attention-Alert’ signal (steady sound) used for other emergencies.

8. Are there public shelters (blast or fallout) designated in our communities?

No. There are currently no designated shelters in the State of Hawaii at this time. The short warning time (12 to 15 minutes) would not allow for residents or visitors to locate such a shelter in advance of missile impact.

9. How long will residents and visitors need to remain sheltered following a nuclear detonation?

In most cases, only until the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency has assessed residual radiation and fallout. This could be as little as a few hours or as long as 14 days.

10.  What is fallout?

Debris including soil, fragments of destroyed buildings and other material will be drawn into the cloud of a nuclear detonation and propelled into the sky. This debris will begin to settle back to earth within hours. This debris includes residual radiation that poses a significant health risk to humans and animals.

11. How can I tell if nuclear radiation is present?

Nuclear radiation cannot be perceived by the human senses (sight, smell, etc.). Specialized instruments are needed to detect its presence and intensity. Those instruments are available for use by public safety agencies across the State of Hawaii.

12. How long will nuclear radiation persist after a nuclear detonation?

A: Radiation from nuclear detonation in the form of fallout decays very rapidly. Days to weeks in most situations.

13. Are the neighbor island safe?

We do not know. North Korean missile technology may not be adequately advanced to accurately target a specific island or location. Although most analysts believe the desired target will be Oahu given the concentration of military and government facilities, a missile may stray and impact the open ocean or even a neighbor island. All areas of the State of Hawaii must consider the possibility of missile impact.

14. How will the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency communicate with the public post-impact? I have heard that most broadcast stations and other forms of electronic communications (cellular telephones, radio, television) will be damaged or destroyed.

When a nuclear weapon detonates, one of the direct effects produced is called an Electromagnetic Pulse (or EMP). EMP has the potential of destroying electrical devices and telecommunications systems. It may also disrupt electrical power and other essential utilities. Broadcast stations many miles distant from the explosion (such as on another island) will survive EMP effects. Our current plans are to utilize AM and FM broadcast radio stations on unaffected islands to provide essential information to the public. This means residents and visitors should include a battery-powered AM-FM radio in their 14-day survival kit.

15. How can I learn more about the nuclear threat and preparedness?

Public outreach and online information is available to all Hawaii residents.
Hawaii Emergency Management Agency Email: HawaiiEma@hawaii.gov Web: http://dod.hawaii.gov/hiema/ Telephone: 808 -733-4300 or contact your county emergency management agency:

  • Kauai Emergency Management Agency 808-241-1800
  • Honolulu Department of Emergency Management 808-723-8960
  • Maui Emergency management Agency 808-270-7285
  • Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency 808-935-0031

Ready.Gov website https://www.ready.gov/nuclear-blast

Registration Opens for Hawaii LifeSmarts Competition

The Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs (DCCA) Office of the Securities Commissioner announces the start of the 2017-2018 Hawaii LifeSmarts Competition.

LifeSmarts is a free, national educational program that teaches students critical life skills in five key areas: Personal Finance, Consumer Rights & Responsibilities, Health & Safety, the Environment, and Technology through online quizzes and in-person competitions.  Teams must consist of one adult coach/teacher and at least 4 students.

The online portion of the competition will be open from Tuesday, August 1, 2017, to Friday, December 1, 2017 at 7 p.m. HST.  The four highest scoring high school teams will be invited to compete at the state championship competition in Honolulu on February 3, 2018.  The winning team will represent Hawaii at the national LifeSmarts competition, scheduled for April 21-24, 2018 in San Diego, CA.

“We are proud to be a sponsor of Hawaii LifeSmarts and we encourage teams to sign up,” said Securities Commissioner Ty Nohara.

Middle school or “Junior Varsity” (JV) teams with students in grades 6-8 may participate in an online-only competition from August 1, 2017 to January 31, 2018.  Winners of the JV competition will be recognized online.

For more information about the Hawaii LifeSmarts program, please visit www.lifesmartshawaii.com or contact the LifeSmarts State Coordinator, Theresa Kong Kee, at 587-7400 or tkongkee@dcca.hawaii.gov.

The Hawaii LifeSmarts program is locally sponsored by the Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs (DCCA) Office of the Securities Commissioner, in partnership with the Hawaii Credit Union League, and is run by the National Consumers League. Over 1,300 local students have participated in Hawaii LifeSmarts since 2005.  Local businesses interested in becoming a sponsor of the Hawaii LifeSmarts program are welcome to contact the State Coordinator for more information.

Two People Treading Water Rescued Off Capsized Vessel Off Kaloli Point

Two people were rescued off a capsized vessel off Kaloli Point this morning around 11:00.

Location: Open Ocean Quarter Mile off Shore area of Kaloli Point

Found at Scene: Ocean Rescue

Cause: Capsized Boat

Remarks: Responded to report of capsized vessel in the area of either Hilo Bay or Kaloli Point. Company 1 and Chopper 1 unable to locate vessel in Hilo Bay. Chopper 1 was able to locate a 20 foot Bayliner partially submerged in ocean ~ 1/4 mile from shoreline in the area of Kaloli Point with 2 occupants treading water beside it.  Both parties safely rescued from the ocean by Chopper 1 and rescue personnel, assisted to safe area by Engine 18. No injuries reported. US Coast Guard to arrange salvage of boat with owner. No further assistance needed.

Hawaii Anti-Bullying Campaign Marks Its 10th Year

The E Ola Pono campaign celebrated its 10th year, and was created as a cultural response to bullying in the schools. Student groups are encouraged to actively Grow Pono – to foster respect and harmony. Six schools in three divisions received recognition and monetary awards for their campaigns.

The E Ola Pono campaign encourages youth groups to promote peace, pono and respect at their schools and communities through student–led campaigns.  Photo Credit: E Ola Pono

The E Ola Pono campaign, which encourages youth groups to promote peace, pono and respect at their schools and communities through student–led campaigns, celebrated its 10th year with winning projects from across the state. The campaign was created as a cultural response to bullying in the schools. Student groups are encouraged to actively Grow Pono – to foster respect and harmony.

“This campaign is an excellent example of showcasing student voice and leadership,” said Superintendent Christina Kishimoto. “Congratulations to the winning schools and all of the entrants who put a lot of thought and time into these projects that promote positivity within our schools and communities.”

Six schools in three divisions received recognition and monetary awards for their campaigns.

Elementary Division:

First Place: Na Wai Ola P ublic Charter School (PCS), Mountain View, Hawaiʻi Island – Na Wai Ola PCS’ māla (garden) program teaches students how to grow food, medicines and plants with aloha and respect. Shari Frias, the agricultural Science teacher and advisor for their pono campaign, observed that students who have been at their school for a few years have a personal connection and understanding of their māla, the environment and themselves. The older students have developed a strong connection to place. She tells her students that, “every plant in our māla has a place, and kulelana just like you. If we care about ourselves the way we care for our plants we will be pono, and balanced.”

Second Place: Aliʻiolani Elementary School, Honolulu, Oʻahu – The STAR Student Positive Behavior Intervention Support (PBIS) program at Aliʻiolani Elementary promoted kindness recognition. Every student at Ali’iolani wrote down a time when they were kind to someone else and the Wall of Kindness was created. Campaign advisor, Tim Hosoda, shared, “In most programs the teachers do the recognizing, but with STAR Student, the students are the ones that get to do that. We noticed that students behave better because the know their peers are always watching them.”

Middle/Intermediate Division:

First Place: Ewa Makai Middle School, Ewa Beach, Oʻahu – Ewa Makai Middle initiated a campaign to foster pono with aloha with an emphasis on morality and ethics.

Ewa Makai Middle initiated a campaign to foster pono with aloha with an emphasis on morality and ethics. Photo Credit: E Ola Pono

Through various activities like Cheer Off and No One Eats Alone Day, the students formed a strong bond. Vanessa Ching, campaign advisor, shared, “The students have embraced the true meaning of pono, which is respect for self and others, and doing what is right even when no one is around. We now realize that it is both an individual and team effort to take action and influence positive behaviors and respectful actions in our community.”

Second Place: Kailua Intermediate, Kailua, Oʻahu – Seventh and eighth grade students at Kailua Intermediate focused on how to mālama the Hamakua Marsh and the native birds in this sanctuary by watching and monitoring the birds, cleaning up trash dumped in the marsh and taking water samples. Campaign advisor Kimberly Tangaro, a science teacher at Kailua intermediate, shared, “As participants we learned how we can make small yet significant changes to help promote the health of the marsh. Our school culture was powerfully and positively impacted by learning about this unique and special place we call home or our community.”

High School Division:

First Place (tie): Farrington High School, Honolulu, Oʻahu – The Friends Program at Farrington High focused on the national “#BETHECHANGE” and “Spread the Word to End the “R” Word” initiatives because they wanted their school, students, and community to understand that they will all rise as one. Evelyn Utai, advisor of the Friends Program, shared, “The students in our Friends Program are educating their friends and classmates on what it means to be a caring individual. We promote that we are #ONEGOV” at Farrington High. It’s an amazing feeling to have my students walk through the halls and feel that they belong in the school.”

First Place (tie): Hāna High & Elementary School, Hāna, Maui – Hāna High’s ninth graders chose the topic of Environmental Sustainability. Students focused on educating the younger generation by passing down the teachings of their kupuna. Campaign advisor Angela Chronis, Hāna’s Social Studies teacher shared, “Both keiki and kupuna were excited to help take part in our campaign. After participating in E Ola Pono, students have a greater understanding and appreciation of the many steps it takes to launch a successful campaign.”

For more information about the E Ola Pono campaign and the 2016-17 winners, click here.

Five Hawaii Schools Selected to Open Pre-K Classrooms in School Year 2018-19

The Executive Office on Early Learning has selected five new schools to open new public pre-kindergarten classrooms in the 2018-19 school year. A child’s early years are critical in establishing a strong foundation for education and research has shown that early childhood education sets the foundation for life-long learning and success.

A child’s early years are critical in establishing a strong foundation for education and research has shown that early childhood education sets the foundation for life-long learning and success. Photo Dept. of Education

A child’s early years are critical in establishing a strong foundation for education and research has shown that early childhood education sets the foundation for life-long learning and success. Investing in high quality early childhood programs have resulted in narrowing achievement gaps, decreasing the need for special education and increasing high school graduation and college attendance rates.

The Executive Office on Early Learning (EOEL) launched Hawaii’s first publicly funded pre-kindergarten program in the 2014-15 school year. The program provides high-quality early learning experiences for students in the year prior to kindergarten eligibility. As a partnership between the Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) and EOEL, 21 pre-kindergarten classrooms on 19 HIDOE elementary school campuses statewide constitute Hawaii’s first state-funded pre-kindergarten program. The program, a first step toward developing Hawaii’s early learning system, is beginning its fourth year.

EOEL has selected five schools to open new public pre-kindergarten classrooms in the 2018-19 school year.  Schools were selected based on a competitive application process and include:

“Through this program, we have the opportunity to empower young children who otherwise would not have access to high quality early childhood education,” said Lauren Moriguchi, EOEL Executive Director. “This partnership has the potential to shape lives and change future trajectories. We are fortunate to have received funding for expansion of the program and are excited to open five new pre-k classrooms in the 2018-19 school year.”

Kapalama and Keolu Elementary Schools have been designated as alternates and have been invited to participate in EOEL’s Early Learning Induction Program, which is required for school teams to attend prior to opening a new EOEL Pre-Kindergarten Classroom.

For more information on pre-kindergarten and early learning, please visit http://bit.ly/1P9ewxx.

Hawaii’s Economy Continues to Grow at a Slower Pace

The Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) released its third quarter 2017 Statistical and Economic Report, which shows Hawaii’s economy continues positive growth, but at a slower pace this year and the next few years.

After two years of consecutive growth above 2 percent, Hawaii’s economy, as measured by the real (inflation adjusted) gross domestic product (GDP), grew by 0.9 percent during the first quarter of 2017, according to data released by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. This is the lowest quarterly growth rate since the first quarter of 2015.

“Hawaii’s economic fundamentals are still positive, although growth has slowed down,” said DBEDT Director Luis P. Salaveria. “We have the second lowest unemployment rate in the nation during the first half of 2017, and our visitor industry is performing well, with 4.6 million visitor arrivals during the first half of the year.”

There were 7,200 non-agriculture payroll jobs added during the first half of 2017, 78 percent of them were added by tourism-related industries such as accommodation, food services, retail trade, and recreation.

Labor force and employment created new record high levels during the first half year of 2017 and non-farm payroll jobs showed a historical best first 6 months. Hawaii’s unemployment rate (not seasonally adjusted) was the second lowest among all the states in the nation. Visitor arrivals increased 4.3 percent and visitor expenditures jumped 8.7 percent during the first half of the year.

However, the economic growth is not evenly allocated to all the industries. There are still a few industries that lost jobs during the first half of 2017. Construction lost 500 jobs, manufacturing and health care each lost 400 jobs, and the wholesale trade lost 300 jobs.

The job loss in construction is mainly due to the decrease in the value of building permits issued during the first half of 2016, which usually shows about one year from the time building permits are issued and the start of construction. During the first half of 2016, total value of private building permits decreased by 29.6 percent from the same period in 2015, and that decrease is reflected in the actual construction activities in the first half of this year.

After five years of continuous job growth, the manufacturing industry started to lose jobs since the fourth quarter of 2016, and during the first half of 2017, this industry lost 2.9 percent of its jobs from the same time a year ago. Compared with the job count from 1990 in the manufacturing industry, the first half of 2017 job count was 66 percent of what it was then.

Wholesale trade is another industry struggling during this business cycle. In its peak year of 2008, this industry had 18,750 payroll jobs. During the first half of 2017, this industry averaged 17,400 jobs. Wholesale trade is one of the industries that has not recovered to its pre-recession job level.

The private health care and social assistance sector had been continuously adding jobs for the last three decades, however, this sector started to lose jobs since the first quarter of this year. Though the magnitude is small, this is the first showing of a decrease in these areas since 1996.

As an indicator of the unparalleled growth across the industries, initial unemployment claims increased by 1.7 percent during the first seven months of 2017.

The good news in the construction industry is that the value of private building permits increased 15.6 percent during the first half of 2017. The value of residential permits increased 32.8 percent, commercial and industrial permit value increased 120.1 percent, and value of additions and alterations decreased by 14.2 percent. The increase in building permit value will be reflected in construction activities next year.

The most recent economic forecast for the U.S. and the world indicates that most of the economies of the world, especially those where our visitors are coming from, will experience continued economic growth in 2017 and 2018. The U.S. economy is expected to grow by 2.2 percent in 2017 and 2.4 percent in 2018, both are higher than the growth rate of 2016.

DBEDT revised the visitor industry forecast upwards with visitor arrivals now growing at 3.2 percent for 2017, 1.4 percent for 2018 and 1.5 percent for 2019 and 2020. Visitor expenditures will be at 6.5 percent for 2017, 2.2 percent for 2018, and 3.6 percent for 2019 and 2020.

DBEDT revised its projection on Hawaii’s economic growth downward for 2017, from 1.9 percent projected in the previous quarter to 1.4 percent, and between 1.3 percent to 1.5 percent between 2018 and 2020.

“The increase in visitor spending is mainly due to the price increase. For example, during the first half of 2017, hotel room rates increased 6.0 percent. Apparel prices increased 5.8 percent, and gasoline prices increase 20.4 percent. Visitors spent much of their money on these items while visiting Hawaii,” said Chief State Economist Dr. Eugene Tian. “When calculating the economic growth, the price effect is removed, so you end up seeing the visitor industry booming, while economic growth is slowing down. The real growth in the tourism industry is not large enough to offset the downturn of the few industries.”

DBEDT kept its projection on non-farm payroll job count unchanged at 1.0 percent in 2017 and falling to 0.8 percent in 2020. The unemployment rate projection is also kept unchanged at 2.9 percent in 2017 and will gradually increase to 3.4 percent by 2020.

DBEDT revised the nominal personal income growth rates downward from the previous quarter forecast in the neighborhood of 3.3 and 3.5 percent. Real personal income projections were also revised downward to below 2 percent for the next few years.

DBEDT kept its projections on the Honolulu consumer inflation rates unchanged from the forecast in the previous quarter at 2.5 percent for 2017, and 2.3 percent for the outer years. Consumer inflation rate for Honolulu during the first half of 2017 was 2.5 percent.

The DBEDT Quarterly Statistical and Economic Report contains more than 120 tables of the most recent quarterly data on Hawaii’s economy as well as narrative explanations of the trends in these data.

The full report is available at: dbedt.hawaii.gov/economic/qser/.