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Fred Koehnen Memoir Published – Lyman Museum Event to Honor Him

Fred J. Koehnen, Hawaii Island-born community and business leader, has had more than 90 years of action-packed experiences—but his unerring compass has always returned him to Hilo.

Fred J. Koehnen

Fred J. Koehnen

Koehnen’s just-published memoir, Been There Done That Back to Hilo, tells the story of his nine-decade odyssey. He’s hunted, fished, ridden, wrangled cattle, hiked, golfed and swum in every quarter of Hawai‘i Island.  In business, government and community service, he has diligently done what was needed, leaving a lasting mark.

Koehnen, 91, will be honored at a dinner sponsored by the Lyman Museum Sunday, Sept. 27 at Nani Mau Gardens.  A long-time member of the museum board, he is donating the proceeds from his memoir to the museum.

“Lyman Museum is a great repository of history, particularly of Hawaii Island, so it’s fitting that Fred’s book becomes part of the museum’s legacy,” said Richard Henderson, chairman of the Lyman board.

Tucked in the pages are historical tales and images of Hawaii Island from before World War II through statehood, the rise and fall of King Sugar, and the transformation of East Hawaii in response to devastating tsunamis.

As a boy, this son of German immigrants to Hilo saw glory and disgrace in the 1936 Olympics and Hitler’s pre-war Germany. He awoke at the University of Hawaii-Manoa on December 7, 1941 to Pearl Harbor’s bombing. Active in two wars—World War II and Vietnam—he was in active or reserve service for 32 years.  He’s traveled the world, read the important books and does complicated accounting in his head.

Many recognize the Koehnen name from F. Koehnen, Ltd., and the landmark Koehnen’s Building which housed a furniture and gifts store for decades.  The store was begun by Fred’s father, Friederich Koehnen, who came to Hilo in 1909 as an apprentice of sorts to the Hackfeld and Company trading firm.  Fred was born in 1924.

“We’re very pleased to be able to honor Fred and his contributions, both to our community and to the country,” said Barbara Moir, president and executive director of Lyman Museum.  “He’s been instrumental in building the museum’s base.  And as you’ll discover in his memoir, he’s also a heck of a writer!”

The book is available for $20 at the Museum’s gift shop. Tickets for the dinner honoring Koehnen are available by calling the museum at (808) 935-5021 ext. 104 or ext. 102.  Deadline is Sept. 19.

The dinner program will include an interview with Koehnen and a report on the museum’s plans for the immediate future.

 

HVO Elevating Advisory Alert for Mauna Loa

HVO seismic stations continue to record elevated rates of shallow, small-magnitude earthquakes beneath Mauna Loa’s summit, upper Southwest Rift Zone, and west flank. For at least the past year, the rate of shallow earthquakes has varied but overall has remained above the long-term average. During this same time period, HVO has measured ground deformation consistent with recharge of the volcano’s shallow magma storage system. Together, these observations indicate the volcano is no longer at a background level of activity. Accordingly, HVO is elevating the Mauna Loa alert level to ADVISORY and the aviation color code to YELLOW.

mauna-loa
This increase in alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to an eruption is certain.

Shallow earthquakes are occurring in locations similar to those that preceded Mauna Loa’s two most recent eruptions in 1975 and 1984; however, the energy release of the recent earthquakes remains comparatively low. The current rate and pattern of ground deformation is similar to that measured during inflation of Mauna Loa in 2005, an episode of unrest that did not end in an eruption.

It is possible that, as in 2005, the present heightened activity will continue for many months, or even years, without progressing to an eruption. It is also possible that the current unrest is a precursor to an eruption, as was the case prior to eruptions in 1975 and 1984. At this early stage of unrest, we cannot determine which of these possibilities is more likely.

HVO continues to monitor the volcano closely and will report any significant changes

Fall Pre-Teen Dance Party

The Hui Hīnano (a consortium of extracurricular clubs at Nāwahī) is hosting a pre-teen dance at Andrews gym for students currently in grades 6-8 on Oct. 3.
fall danceTickets are $7 pre-sale.  This is a drug and alcohol free event.

Tsunami MAY Hit Hawaii Around 3:06 AM

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center has issued a Tsunami Watch for the State of Hawaii effective 1:24 pm this afternoon.

Civildefense

An earthquake with a magnitude of 8.3 occurred off the coast of Chile.  A tsunami watch means that an earthquake has occurred with a magnitude that could possibly generate a destructive tsunami.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center continues to monitor the event and evaluate all data to confirm if a destructive Pacific Wide tsunami has been generated  If a destructive tsunami has been generated the estimated time of initial arrival in Hawaii is 3:06 am tomorrow morning.

Please monitor local radio broadcasts for further updates.

Hawaii Put on Tsunami Watch – Tsunami Waves Observed

TSUNAMI MESSAGE NUMBER 4

NWS PACIFIC TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER EWA BEACH HI

0023 UTC THU SEP 17 2015

…PTWC TSUNAMI THREAT MESSAGE…

**** NOTICE **** NOTICE **** NOTICE **** NOTICE **** NOTICE

THIS MESSAGE IS ISSUED FOR INFORMATION ONLY IN SUPPORT OF THE UNESCO/IOC PACIFIC TSUNAMI WARNING AND MITIGATION SYSTEM AND IS MEANT FOR NATIONAL AUTHORITIES IN EACH COUNTRY OF THAT SYSTEM.

NATIONAL AUTHORITIES WILL DETERMINE THE APPROPRIATE LEVEL OF ALERT FOR EACH COUNTRY AND MAY ISSUE ADDITIONAL OR MORE REFINED INFORMATION.

**** NOTICE **** NOTICE **** NOTICE **** NOTICE **** NOTICE

PRELIMINARY EARTHQUAKE PARAMETERS

———————————

* MAGNITUDE     8.3

* ORIGIN TIME   2254 UTC SEP 16 2015

* COORDINATES   31.5 SOUTH 72.0 WEST

* DEPTH         10 KM / 6 MILES

* LOCATION       NEAR THE COAST OF CENTRAL CHILE

EVALUATION

* AN EARTHQUAKE WITH A PRELIMINARY MAGNITUDE OF 8.3 OCCURRED

NEAR THE COAST OF CENTRAL CHILE AT 2254 UTC ON WEDNESDAY

SEPTEMBER 16 2015.

* TSUNAMI WAVES HAVE BEEN OBSERVED.

* BASED ON ALL AVAILABLE DATA… HAZARDOUS TSUNAMI WAVES ARE  FORECAST FOR SOME COASTS.

TSUNAMI THREAT FORECAST

* TSUNAMI WAVES REACHING MORE THAN 3 METERS ABOVE THE TIDE  LEVEL ARE POSSIBLE ALONG SOME COASTS OF     CHILE.

* TSUNAMI WAVES REACHING 1 TO 3 METERS ABOVE THE TIDE LEVEL ARE  POSSIBLE ALONG SOME COASTS OF FRENCH POLYNESIA.

* TSUNAMI WAVES REACHING 0.3 TO 1 METERS ABOVE THE TIDE LEVEL ARE POSSIBLE FOR SOME COASTS OF  MEXICO… ECUADOR… PERU… ANTARCTICA… JAPAN… NEW CALEDONIA… NEW ZEALAND… MARSHALL ISLANDS… FIJI… SAMOA…     AMERICAN SAMOA… COOK ISLANDS… TOKELAU… VANUATU…     KIRIBATI… JOHNSTON ISLAND… PALMYRA ISLAND… HOWLAND AND     BAKER… TONGA… WALLIS AND FUTUNA… PITCAIRN ISLANDS…     NIUE… SOLOMON ISLANDS… RUSSIA… HAWAII… AND NW HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.

* TSUNAMI WAVES ARE FORECAST TO BE LESS THAN 0.3 METERS ABOVE  THE TIDE LEVEL FOR THE COASTS OF EL SALVADOR… GUATEMALA… HONDURAS… COSTA RICA…     NICARAGUA… PANAMA… COLOMBIA… AUSTRALIA… PHILIPPINES…TAIWAN… CHINA… NORTHERN MARIANAS… GUAM… PALAU… YAP… POHNPEI… CHUUK… KOSRAE… NAURU… WAKE ISLAND… MIDWAY ISLAND… JARVIS ISLAND… TUVALU… PAPUA NEW GUINEA… INDONESIA… VIETNAM… MALAYSIA… AND BRUNEI.

* ACTUAL AMPLITUDES AT THE COAST MAY VARY FROM FORECAST AMPLITUDES DUE TO UNCERTAINTIES IN THE FORECAST AND LOCAL  FEATURES. IN PARTICULAR MAXIMUM TSUNAMI AMPLITUDES ON ATOLLS  WILL LIKELY BE MUCH SMALLER THAN THE FORECAST INDICATES.

* FOR OTHER AREAS COVERED BY THIS PRODUCT A FORECAST HAS NOT   YET BEEN COMPUTED. THE FORECAST WILL BE EXPANDED AS NECESSARY  IN SUBSEQUENT PRODUCTS.

RECOMMENDED ACTIONS

* GOVERNMENT AGENCIES RESPONSIBLE FOR THREATENED COASTAL AREAS   SHOULD TAKE ACTION TO INFORM AND INSTRUCT ANY COASTAL   POPULATIONS AT RISK IN ACCORDANCE WITH THEIR OWN EVALUATION…  PROCEDURES AND THE LEVEL OF THREAT.

* PERSONS LOCATED IN THREATENED COASTAL AREAS SHOULD STAY ALERT  FOR INFORMATION AND FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS FROM NATIONAL AND  LOCAL AUTHORITIES.

ESTIMATED TIMES OF ARRIVAL

————————–

* ESTIMATED TIMES OF ARRIVAL -ETA- OF THE INITIAL TSUNAMI WAVE   FOR PLACES WITHIN THREATENED REGIONS ARE GIVEN BELOW. ACTUAL   ARRIVAL TIMES MAY DIFFER AND THE INITIAL WAVE MAY NOT BE THE   LARGEST. A TSUNAMI IS A SERIES OF WAVES AND THE TIME BETWEEN   WAVES CAN BE FIVE MINUTES TO ONE HOUR.

LOCATION         REGION             COORDINATES   ETA(UTC)

————————————————————

CALDERA         CHILE             27.1S 70.8W   2338 09/16

ANTOFAGASTA     CHILE             23.3S 70.4W   0001 09/17

TALCAHUANO       CHILE             36.7S 73.1W   0002 09/17

IQUIQUE         CHILE             20.2S 70.1W   0033 09/17

CORRAL           CHILE             39.8S 73.5W   0033 09/17

ARICA           CHILE             18.5S 70.3W   0044 09/17

MOLLENDO         PERU             17.1S 72.0W   0052 09/17

SAN JUAN         PERU             15.3S 75.2W   0110 09/17

GOLFO DE PENAS   CHILE             47.1S 74.9W   0146 09/17

LA PUNTA         PERU             12.1S 77.2W   0201 09/17

CHIMBOTE         PERU               9.0S 78.8W   0255 09/17

PUERTO MONTT    CHILE             41.5S 73.0W   0329 09/17

EASTER ISLAND   CHILE             27.1S 109.4W   0413 09/17

BALTRA ISLAND   ECUADOR           0.5S 90.3W   0500 09/17

THURSTON ISLAND ANTARCTICA       72.0S 100.0W   0542 09/17

PITCAIRN ISLAND PITCAIRN         25.1S 130.1W   0715 09/17

SALINA CRUZ     MEXICO           16.5N 95.2W   0743 09/17

RIKITEA         FRENCH POLYNESIA 23.1S 135.0W   0803 09/17

CABO SAN LUCAS   MEXICO           22.8N 110.0W   0920 09/17

HIVA OA         FRENCH POLYNESIA 10.0S 139.0W   0924 09/17

CAPE ADARE       ANTARCTICA       71.0S 170.0E   0928 09/17

PAPEETE         FRENCH POLYNESIA 17.5S 149.6W   1012 09/17

PUNTA ABREOJOS   MEXICO           26.7N 113.6W   1034 09/17

RAROTONGA       COOK ISLANDS     21.2S 159.8W   1043 09/17

FLINT ISLAND     KIRIBATI         11.4S 151.8W   1055 09/17

MALDEN ISLAND   KIRIBATI           3.9S 154.9W   1141 09/17

PENRYN ISLAND   COOK ISLANDS       8.9S 157.8W   1147 09/17

NIUE ISLAND     NIUE             19.0S 170.0W   1150 09/17

GISBORNE         NEW ZEALAND       38.7S 178.0E   1215 09/17

NUKUALOFA       TONGA             21.0S 175.2W   1219 09/17

PUKAPUKA ISLAND COOK ISLANDS     10.8S 165.9W   1220 09/17

EAST CAPE       NEW ZEALAND       37.7S 178.5E   1221 09/17

WELLINGTON       NEW ZEALAND       41.3S 174.8E   1225 09/17

PAGO PAGO       AMERICAN SAMOA   14.3S 170.7W   1226 09/17

CHRISTMAS ISLAN KIRIBATI           2.0N 157.5W   1231 09/17

APIA             SAMOA             13.8S 171.8W   1240 09/17

NORTH CAPE       NEW ZEALAND       34.4S 173.3E   1247 09/17

NAPIER           NEW ZEALAND       39.5S 176.9E   1257 09/17

WALLIS ISLAND   WALLIS AND FUTUN 13.3S 176.3W   1300 09/17

NUKUNONU ISLAND TOKELAU           9.2S 171.8W   1302 09/17

FUTUNA ISLAND   WALLIS AND FUTUN 14.3S 178.2W   1323 09/17

PALMYRA ISLAND   PALMYRA ISLAND     5.9N 162.1W   1325 09/17

AUCKLAND EAST   NEW ZEALAND       36.7S 175.0E   1338 09/17

SUVA             FIJI             18.1S 178.4E   1339 09/17

KANTON ISLAND   KIRIBATI           2.8S 171.7W   1342 09/17

ANATOM ISLAND   VANUATU           20.2S 169.9E   1414 09/17

HOWLAND ISLAND   HOWLAND AND BAKE   0.6N 176.6W   1426 09/17

JOHNSTON ISLAND JOHNSTON ISLAND   16.7N 169.5W   1437 09/17

NOUMEA           NEW CALEDONIA     22.3S 166.5E   1454 09/17

ESPERITU SANTO   VANUATU           15.1S 167.3E   1515 09/17

SANTA CRUZ ISLA SOLOMON ISLANDS 10.9S 165.9E   1539 09/17

TARAWA ISLAND   KIRIBATI           1.5N 173.0E   1556 09/17

MAJURO           MARSHALL ISLANDS   7.1N 171.4E   1620 09/17

KWAJALEIN       MARSHALL ISLANDS   8.7N 167.7E   1647 09/17

ENIWETOK         MARSHALL ISLANDS 11.4N 162.3E   1748 09/17

UST KAMCHATSK   RUSSIA           56.1N 162.6E   1850 09/17

PETROPAVLOVSK   RUSSIA           53.2N 159.6E   1922 09/17

URUP ISLAND     RUSSIA           46.1N 150.5E   1944 09/17

KUSHIRO         JAPAN            42.9N 144.3E   2028 09/17

KATSUURA         JAPAN             35.1N 140.3E   2059 09/17

HACHINOHE       JAPAN             40.5N 141.5E   2108 09/17

SHIMIZU         JAPAN             32.8N 133.0E   2214 09/17

NOBEOKA         JAPAN             32.5N 131.8E   2217 09/17

POTENTIAL IMPACTS

—————–

* A TSUNAMI IS A SERIES OF WAVES. THE TIME BETWEEN WAVE CRESTS  CAN VARY FROM 5 MINUTES TO AN HOUR. THE HAZARD MAY PERSIST FOR  MANY HOURS OR LONGER AFTER THE INITIAL WAVE.

* IMPACTS CAN VARY SIGNIFICANTLY FROM ONE SECTION OF COAST TO  THE NEXT DUE TO LOCAL BATHYMETRY AND THE SHAPE AND ELEVATION  OF THE SHORELINE.

* IMPACTS CAN ALSO VARY DEPENDING UPON THE STATE OF THE TIDE AT  THE TIME OF THE MAXIMUM TSUNAMI WAVES.

* PERSONS CAUGHT IN THE WATER OF A TSUNAMI MAY DROWN… BE  CRUSHED BY DEBRIS IN THE WATER… OR BE SWEPT OUT TO SEA.

TSUNAMI OBSERVATIONS

* THE FOLLOWING ARE TSUNAMI WAVE OBSERVATIONS FROM COASTAL AND/OR DEEP-OCEAN SEA LEVEL GAUGES AT THE INDICATED LOCATIONS.   THE MAXIMUM TSUNAMI HEIGHT IS MEASURED WITH RESPECT TO THE  NORMAL TIDE LEVEL.

GAUGE     TIME OF   MAXIMUM     WAVE

COORDINATES   MEASURE   TSUNAMI   PERIOD

GAUGE LOCATION       LAT   LON     (UTC)     HEIGHT   (MIN)

————————————————————-

VALPARAISO CL       33.0S 71.6W   2350   1.62M/ 5.3FT 40

CHANARAL CL         26.4S 70.6W   0010   0.67M/ 2.2FT 34

JUAN FERNANDEZ       33.6S 78.8W   0008   0.97M/ 3.2FT 08

COQUIMBO CL         30.0S 71.3W   2339   3.11M/10.2FT 20

BUCALEMU CL         34.6S 72.0W   2334   0.46M/ 1.5FT 24

CALDERA CL           27.1S 70.8W    2343   0.50M/ 1.6FT 30

SAN ANTONIO CL       33.6S 71.6W   2358   0.86M/ 2.8FT 18

DART 32402           26.7S 74.0W   2326   0.12M/ 0.4FT 36

NEXT UPDATE AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

THE NEXT MESSAGE WILL BE ISSUED IN ONE HOUR… OR SOONER IF THE SITUATION WARRANTS.

* AUTHORITATIVE INFORMATION ABOUT THE EARTHQUAKE FROM THE U.S.  GEOLOGICAL SURVEY CAN BE FOUND ON THE INTERNET AT  EARTHQUAKE.USGS.GOV/EARTHQUAKES -ALL LOWER CASE-.

* FURTHER INFORMATION ABOUT THIS EVENT MAY BE FOUND AT   PTWC.WEATHER.GOV AND AT WWW.TSUNAMI.GOV.

* COASTAL REGIONS OF HAWAII… AMERICAN SAMOA… GUAM… AND  CNMI SHOULD REFER TO PACIFIC TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER MESSAGES  SPECIFICALLY FOR THOSE PLACES THAT CAN BE FOUND AT PTWC.WEATHER.GOV.

* COASTAL REGIONS OF CALIFORNIA… OREGON… WASHINGTON…BRITISH COLUMBIA AND ALASKA SHOULD ONLY REFER TO U.S. NATIONAL TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER MESSAGES THAT CAN BE FOUND AT NTWC.ARH.NOAA.GOV.

Hawaii’s Health Insurance Premiums on the Rise, Burden to Employers

Hawaii’s health insurance premiums for small businesses have risen an average of seven percent annually since 2003. That’s according to “The Challenges Facing Hawaii 40 Years After the Prepaid Health Care Act (PHCA),” a study conducted by Hawaii Health Information Corporation, the state’s premier healthcare data collector and analyzer.

Healthcare dataPassed in 1974, the State’s PHCA has contributed to one of the lowest uninsured rates as well as the lowest and slowest growing health insurance premiums in the nation. Still, the cost of health care—physician, hospital and insurance services, prescription drugs, equipment and supplies—is steadily increasing.

ACA is Impacting Rising Costs
On top of increasing health care costs, premiums are expected to rise further as a result of various Affordable Care Act-related fees. For example, HMSA’s fees in 2014 totaled $65.4 million, and as was done across the country, fees were passed directly on to consumers. Four out of nine percent of HMSA’s premium increases for small business was attributed to ACA-related fees in that same year.

The most significant ACA-related fee is the insurance provider fee, imposed on all insurers to subsidize health insurance for eligible individuals who purchase a plan on a health exchange. In implementation year 2014, $8 billion was collected nationwide. Nearly 60 percent of HMSA’s 2014 ACA-related fees—$39 million—represented the insurance provider fee. The insurance provider fee is permanent and expected to increase two to three percent per year to cover the subsidies for health care premiums. The fee is projected to reach $14.3 billion in 2018.

The second fee helps finance the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. Initially set at $1 per insured person during FY 2013, the fee increased to $2 per insured person on all plans during FY 2014. Going forward, the fee will be adjusted based on the U.S. average rate of health care inflation, which was nearly three percent per year from 2010 to 2013.

Since the ACA prohibits denying individuals health insurance based on pre-existing conditions, the third fee involves subsidizing high-risk enrollees through the transitional reinsurance and risk-adjustment programs. Scheduled to last only three years, the transitional reinsurance program collected and distributed $10 billion in 2014 (translates to a $63 fee per covered life); $6 billion is anticipated in 2015 and $4 billion in 2016. The risk adjustment program is permanent; insurers with lower-risk enrollees will pay insurers with higher risk enrollees within the same state.

The final fee is a sustainability fee to finance health insurance exchanges since federal funds have been exhausted. By the end of 2014, Hawaii imposed a two percent sustainability fee on premiums purchased that year on the then state-run exchange. Since Hawaii no longer has a state-based exchange, sustainability fees collected will go to funding the federal marketplace, HealthCare.gov.

The employee-employer cost share structure laid out in the PHCA, rising health care costs and in recent years, these ACA-related fees, has led to employers in Hawaii paying an increase of more than 3,000 percent to cover their portion of employer-based healthcare coverage since 1974.

“The Affordable Care Act, while a real advance for the rest of the country, is placing a special burden upon Hawaii, which has already achieved much of what the ACA has set as health goals for the nation,” said Peter Sybinsky, CEO of HHIC. “These burdens—payment reductions, high insurance taxes, additional health benefits—all make it more difficult to maintain the historical commitment to universal coverage that has made Hawaii a leader in health reform.  As a community, we need to work together to respond appropriately to this major challenge.”

Public Invited to Watch Presidential Debates at UH Hilo

The public is invited to watch the 2016 Presidential debates at the University of Hawaii-Hilo’s Wentworth Bldg. off Lanikaula St.
uhh-017The next Republican debate is scheduled for 2 p.m. this Wednesday, Sept. 16…come view it from 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. and stick around for the discussion.  There is no admission charge but parking fees may be in effect.
The first Democratic Party Presidential debate is planned for Tuesday, Oct. 13 yet but the time of that event has not been announced. Public viewing on the UHH campus is planned for the Democratic debate as well. Call 965-8945 for more information.

2015 Photo Contest – “Big Island On Foot”

All around Hawai’i Island, a walk in the park, beachside stroll, mountain hike, or random wander through town can reveal serene, spectacular and surprising images. In the fast-paced age of selfies and instant sharing, the “Big Island On Foot” 2015 Photo Contest invites amateur photographers of all ages island-wide to slow down, walk around, and see what there is to capture with the camera.

Photo Contest Waimea

The Big Island on Foot: Amazing Things You See When You Are Walking About is presented as an opportunity for amateur photographers by the community-building 501(c)(3) nonprofit, Waimea Alive! Submissions for the contest open September 15.

Photos will be reviewed anonymously by a panel of expert judges, and evaluated as to (1) Appropriateness to Theme, (2) Creativity, and (3) Photographic Quality. Winners will be announced during a photo gallery exhibit at the Historic Spencer House, on Thursday, Nov. 12 at 5 p.m.

“The photo contest is something we do for the community, just for fun. And we thought the ‘on foot’ concept worked really well,” said Waimea Alive! Board Member Paul Johnston. “It’s a way to encourage people to step out of bounds a little. Don’t just drive around in your car looking for photo ops; get out in nature or go to town and find something that catches your attention. And don’t worry if you’re not a walker—we completely welcome the unique perspective of folks who travel by wheelchair or scooter.”

Last year’s contest yielded over 150 entries from 55 amateur photographers. Elin Kalaniopio took first place with her joyful black and white portrait of a child tring to climb aboard a pony. Second place went to Michael Varney for a stunning surf shot, and third, to Pablo McLoud for his sweeping Waimea landscape.

Honorable mentions went to Christian Enns (2), James (J.J.) Higgenson, Elin Kalaniopio, Malia McKendry, Pablo McLoud, Kathryn Rawle, Anthony Roberts, Nancy Carr Smith, Rosary K., DS. Souza, Jordan Vedelli, Mahealani Winters and Titus Winters.

Partner company Waimea Instant Printing will be accepting photo entries, printed on paper (with completed entry form and fee), as of Sept. 15. They have also offered to provide color prints on quality photocopy paper at the discounted price of $1 per print.

Anyone who routinely sells images in any market is not eligible. Deadline to enter is Nov. 4. Entry fee is $15 for up to three images for those 18 years old and up; only $10 for entrants under 18. For rules, entry forms and more information, visit www.waimeaalive.org or www.Facebook.com/HistoricSpencerHouse.

New Activities Mark 20th Taste of the Hawaiian Range

While “grazing” at over 60 culinary stations and exhibit booths, attendees at the 20th Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range can get in on some new activities that all promote local and sustainable food production on Hawai‘i Island.

The Taste of the Hawaiian Range is one of my sons favorite events!

The Taste of the Hawaiian Range is one of my sons favorite events!

The anniversary event is 6-8 p.m. Friday, October 9 at the Hilton Waikoloa Village and boasts a stellar lineup of participating chefs from O’ahu, Maui and Hawai‘i Island—plus sampling by local food producers and compelling exhibits presenting topics related to our island agriculture.

Each attending family will receive a complimentary copy of the Taste of the Hawaiian Range 20th Anniversary Cookbooklet, filled with recipes by local chefs and members of the local beef industry. Find out how the Arakis of Kuhio Grille make Miso Pork Pot Roast and what’s the secret for Merriman’s Kahua Ranch Lamb Jook.

taste2015

Also new in 2015 is a digital scavenger hunt where up to 500 guests can answer questions, take photos and learn more about Big Isle agriculture—using their smart phones —for a chance to win prizes like restaurant gift certificates and local food products.

In addition, attendees will be able to connect with exhibit booths through a QR code image posted at each table. The code will connect smart phone users to online product discounts, coupons and links for educational resources.

“These digital activities will enable attendees to take advantage of discount offers from our participating local food producers for up to a year after the event,” explains Christine Osterwalder, Taste exhibit chair. “Guests will also be able to download digital handouts from our educational exhibitors. Info will be conveniently accessible at the click of a button and celebrates the amazing variety of agricultural products here on the Big Island.”

taste2015a

Anniversary festivities will include honoring the event’s 20-year participants and others who have been long-term Taste supporters.

Culinary headliners for this year’s event include Bravo’s “Top Chef” Fan Favorite Sheldon Simeona of Maui’s Migrant Restaurant; Kevin Hanney of Oahu’s 12th Avenue Grill, the 2015 Hale Aina Best Restaurant of the Year; and the host of TV’s “Family Ingredients,” Ed Kenny of Honolulu’s Town Restaurant.

These celebrity chefs, and 30-some others, will be preparing delectable dishes using pasture-raised beef, lamb, goat, mutton and pork. A variety of beef cuts—from tongue to tail— are utilized so chefs and attendees can get acquainted with not-so-familiar cuts while having fun. The pasture-raised beef is sourced from local, humanely raised cattle that are free of antibiotics and hormones. Enjoy familiar cuts like sirloin tip and ribs, plus tripe and the infamous “rocky mountain oysters” or bull testicles.

The Rocky Mountain Oyster Display

The Rocky Mountain Oyster Display

Hawaii Regional Cuisine founders Roy Yamaguchi and Peter Merriman will lead the pre-gala’s educational offerings, which are open to the public. Using oxtail and beef tenderloin, Chef Yamaguchi of Roy’s instructs the 2015 edition of Cooking Pasture-Raised Beef 101 at 3 p.m. Peter Merriman of Merriman’s Restaurants offers a presentation on purchasing local for the professional kitchen that is geared for college culinary students at 1:30 p.m.

Pre-sale tickets for Taste are $45 and $60 at the door. Entry to Cooking 101 is $10 while the 1:30 p.m. class is free. Tickets are on sale at island-wide locations and online. Tickets locations include Kuhio Grille in Hilo, JJ’s Country Market in Honoka‘a, Kamuela Liquors and Parker Ranch Store in Waimea, Kona Wine Market in Kailua-Kona and Kohala Essence Shop at the Hilton Waikoloa Village. Purchase tickets online at www.TasteoftheHawaiianRange.com.

Watch for ticket giveaways on Facebook at Taste of the Hawaiian Range and Twitter #TasteHI.

A free parking and shuttle service to Taste is available from ‘Anaeho‘omalu Bay noon-10 p.m.; follow parking signs on Waikoloa Beach Drive. Guests are encouraged to come early to avoid shuttle lines. For general event information, phone (808) 969-8209.

Anyone who requires an auxiliary aid or service for effective communication or a modification of policies and procedures to participate in this event should contact Russell Nagata at 808-969-8209 no later than September 7.

taste2015bMealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range and Agriculture Festival provides a venue for sustainable agricultural education, encouragement and support of locally produced ag products. The premiere ag-tourism event is a partnership between CTAHR, Hawaii Cattlemen’s Association, Hawaii Cattlemen’s Council, Kulana Foods, UH-Hilo CAFNRM, County of Hawaii Dept. on Environmental Management and community volunteers. Sponsorship also includes the Hawaii Tourism Authority, the Hawaii County Research and Development, Hawaii Community College Food Service & Culinary Program, Kamehameha Schools, KTA SuperStores, West Hawaii Today and Pacific Radio Group. The quality and growth of this event are rooted in small business participation, sponsorship and in-kind donations. For more information, visit www.TasteoftheHawaiianRange.com.

 

Hawaii League of Women Voters to Participate in National Voter Registration Day Activities

The League of Women Voters of Hawai’i County will be participating in National Voter Registration Day, a nationwide, non-partisan effort to register thousands of voters this fall on Tuesday, Sept. 22.

Voter Registration Day

The League encourages all U.S. citizens to register to vote, as this is the key for citizens to participate in the political process.  Those who wish to register to vote, receive a permanent absentee ballot, or update their address may pick up a mail-in Wikiwiki Voter Registration & Permanent Absentee Form from League volunteers at the following locations.

Waimea:  Sat. Sept. 19th  Waimea Homestead Market  9:30- Noon
Waikoloa: Tues, Sept. 22  Waikoloa Village Market 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Kona:  Tues. Sept. 22.   KTA on Palani Rd.   2 p.m. to  6 p.m.

Voters may also register to vote in person on Sept. 22 or any other working day at the Elections Offices :  Hilo Elections Office:25 Aupuni St., Suite 1502, Hilo 808-961-8277 or Kailua-Kona Elections Office, West Hawaii Civic Center, 74-5044 Ane Keohok_lole Highway, Building B, 2nd Floor  808-323-4400

On-line registration is also available at https://olvr.hawaii.gov/ for those who have a Hawai’i Driver’s License or Hawai’I State I.D.

The deadline to register to vote in the 2016 Primary Elections is Thursday, July 14, 2016.  The 2016 General Election voter registration deadline is Monday, October 10, 2016.

Kamehameha Schools Girl Wins Hawaii Stars Competition

Hawaii Island Kamehameha Schools Middle School (KMS) student Kyra Gomes was crowned the 2015 Hawaii Stars Teen Competition champion on tonight’s broadcast of Hawaii Stars.

Kyra on Hawaii StarsGomes, a talented 8th grader at KMS Kula Waena, started her career at a young age and has been in many performances over the years.  She received rave reviews as the lead role in the Broadway Musical “Annie” that was performed at Kamehamea Schools when she was still in elementary school and recently performed at the Hilo Palace Theater in “A Century of Hapa Haole Songs”.

Kyra, daughter of Jeffrey and Wendy Gomes of Hilo, Hawaii, performed “Proud of Your Boy” from the Disney Broadway show Aladdin.  She took initiative and went outside of the box and made a creative turn in the song and changed the lyrics to “Proud of Your Girl”.

In order to advance to the finals, there were two preliminary rounds at the 50th State Fair held at Aloha Stadium.   According to sources on the scene… “she actually made the women judges cry there as well…”

Commentary – Medical Cannabis Collective Raided

Michael Ruggles, 58, a medical cannabis patient and activist who operates the Alternative Pain Management Pu`uhonua’s Collective out of his home in Fern Acres, was raided and arrested on Thursday September 10, 2015.

Photo via Big Island Video News

Photo via Big Island Video News

Ruggles’ private medical cannabis collective provides a means for members to dispose of excess medical cannabis via transfer to other members who have also been authorized to use medical cannabis. Ruggles’ collective allows members to comply with the quantity restrictions set forth in Hawai`i’s medical marijuana laws and maintain an uninterrupted supply of safe medical cannabis.

The police served a search warrant and seized all the medical cannabis being cultivated on the property registered to multiple patients and caregivers, in addition to several Collective member’s excess medical cannabis in its various forms.

All business and tax records, members’ files containing protected health information, electronic devices, fine jewelry, professional music recording gear, other property resident firearms, his daughter’s college text book, a greeting card containing a personal message and some food were also confiscated from the collective. No property receipt was left by the police for the seized items.

Ruggles is being charged with 30 violations for allegedly operating an unauthorized dispensary even though the Pu’uhonua is operated as a collective. Bail has been set at $84,500.

The numerous collective medical cannabis patients who relied on the collective as a safe means to obtain their doctor approved medicine are now being forced to turn to the black market or go without.

The raid was based upon an undercover officer who presented a false doctor’s written certification that stated he was in the process of obtaining a medical marijuana card under an alias and was allowed to be processed as a member.

Under HRS 329 Medical Use of Marijuana Laws, conditions of use are defined and specify that patients must have a written certification under a physician to use medical cannibis and does not require the patient to register with the Department of Health and Department of Safety as a condition of use. It was under this premise, that the undercover officer was allowed to acquire medical cannabis according to a collective volunteer and member.

Ruggles’ is currently being held at a Hilo police cell block and his first court appearance is on Monday September 14 at 1pm. Friends who recently visited Ruggles say that he is in high spirits and prepared to defend the rights of medical cannabis patients to safely dispose and acquire medicine within the confines of the law.

~JR

Kohala Kai – Big Island’s Newest Development Being Touted

Kohala Kai, an exclusive, new low-density “green” oceanfront development in North Kohala is being touted to media folks next week on the north side of the Big Island of Hawaii.

Kohala Kai being developed

Kohala Kai being developed

Possibly the last, large private oceanfront ranch available in North Kohala.  498+ acres of gently rolling pasture land with over 4,100 feet of ocean frontage and 11 separate parcels.

Kohala Kai3

Ranch Location

The North Kohala Oceanfront Ranch includes a 59 + acre, immaculate and fully functioning nursery with a large storage building, greenhouse, exotic bamboo; multiple varieties of fruit trees, pineapples and nursery stock.

kohala kai location map

RANCH Location

Highlights includes a state-of-the-art, 100kW wind turbine powering a 50 HP pump from a 480 foot deep well; this system pumps 300 gallons per minute! With high quality well water and power independence this parcel of land can be used for sustainable agricultural ventures including (but not limited to) aquaculture, ranching, animal husbandry, orchard and nursery crops.

KOHALA KAI Development Location:

Kohala Kai

Video: 100 Years in 100 Seconds – Volcanoes National Park

Watch Hawaii Volcanoes National Park expand and change before your eyes as eruptions from Mauna Loa and Kīlauea alter the landscape — and the experience — in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, from 1916 to present.

This multimedia video was created by Scott Kichman and Cory Nash of the NPS Pacific Island Network’s Inventory & Monitoring team. Music by Kenneth Makuakāne.

Python Snake Found in Hawaii

Honolulu police captured a two-and-a-half-foot-long* snake yesterday in a garage at a Pearl City home. Residents of the Kaweloka St. home called police in the early evening and police called the Honolulu Zoo, which called an agricultural inspector.

the length of the snake was earlier reported to be four-feet long, however, the measurement is 2 1/2 feet long.

the length of the snake was earlier reported to be four-feet long, however, the measurement is 2 1/2 feet long.

In the meantime, officers captured the snake, which was identified as a non-venomous ball python and took it to the Pearl City Substation. The snake is being safeguarded at the Hawaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA) Plant Quarantine Branch. Inspectors are still investigating the incident.

Snakes are illegal in Hawaii. Ball pythons are common in the pet trade on the mainland. They are native to Western and West-Central Africa and are related to boas, which are also constrictors that subdue its prey by coiling around and suffocating it. Its diet usually consists of small mammals and birds. Ball pythons may grow up to six-feet in length.

Snakes have no natural predators in Hawaii and pose a serious threat to Hawaii’s environment.  Many species also prey on birds and their eggs, increasing the threat to endangered native birds. Large snakes can also be a danger to the public and small pets.

Individuals who have illegal animals are encouraged to turn them in under the state’s amnesty program, which provides immunity from prosecution. Illegal animals may be turned in to any HDOA Office, Honolulu Zoo or any Humane Society – no questions asked and no fines assessed.

Persons possessing illegal animals may be charged with a class C felony and subject to fines up to $200,000 and three years in prison.  Anyone with information on illegal animals should call the state’s toll-free PEST HOTLINE at 643-PEST (7378).

Who Ripped Off Kamehameha’s Spear?

Hawai’i Island Police are seeking the public’s assistance in locating the top section of the Hilo Kamehameha statue spear, taken from the Wailoa State Park area.

SpearThe Spear is described as being made of bronze, brown in color with some oxidation, with a gold in color tip, and is approximately six-foot in length and 1.25 inches in diameter. The spear was last seen on Saturday (September 5) and reported missing on today (September 6) at 2:48 p.m.

Police ask anyone with information about this incident, the identity of the suspects or the whereabouts of the stolen item to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at (808) 935-3311 or Officer Matthew Lewis at (808) 961-2213.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

“Same Canoe Local Food Challenge” Launches Next Week

Nutritious, flavorful Hawai‘i-grown food is in the spotlight during the “Same Canoe Local Food Challenge,” an ongoing project of One Island, a Big Island 501c3 nonprofit. The Same Canoe campaign launches at two Local Food Celebrations this month: Sept. 13 at South Kona Green Market, and Sept. 19 at Hawi Farmers’ Market. Bringing together island food products and food-lovers with nutrition experts to share the practical wisdom of supporting sustainable agriculture, these interactive and flavorful food events will be fun and educational for all ages.

Photo courtesy One Island

Photo courtesy One Island

The Same Canoe local food initiative encourages Hawai‘i residents to “Double It” by purchasing, growing and requesting local-grown foods when dining out. The name “Same Canoe” pays tribute to Hawai‘i’s original canoe crops, plants brought to the islands by Polynesian voyagers, and holds the lesson of the empowerment achieved when paddling together cooperatively. All in the ‘same canoe’ is also a potent reminder of our mutual interdependence as an island community and as members of the global community.

EBT/SNAP Benefits

With a commitment to build sustainable communities, Same Canoe is hosting innovative community action projects with film night, workshops and farm tour events. Current efforts include a pilot project that also provides matching local food coupons to 600 EBT/SNAP households in specific rural communities through sponsorship from the USDA.

For each $30 in grocery receipts showing EBT purchases of fresh produce, pre-enrolled households can receive a one-to-one match in local food coupons that will be redeemable at approved local food vendors, culinary and gardening classes, and farm tours for up to $120 in value. Signups are available for a limited time at the farmers’ market in Hawi, South Kona Green Market in Captain Cook and North Kona’s Sunset Market.

Local Food Coupon Book

Same Canoe is also producing a new Local Food Coupon Book offering dining, gardening and wellness discounts for any island resident or visitor. A rewarding new way to buy more local and save on food, health and gardening costs this fall, the Coupon Book is a fundraiser for local school gardens and food, ag and wellness organizations. Savings include local grocery stores, cafes, restaurants, gift stores, wellness practitioners, farm/garden centers and farm tour discounts. The book will be available at the Farmers’ Markets and through local groups (Learn more at the Local Food Celebrations.)

Many voices support local foods

The September 13 and 19 Local Food Celebration launch parties invite the public to enjoy local foods and meet the farmers who provide them, listen to great music, and learn from Hawai‘i Island’s food, wellness and agriculture leaders.

At South Kona Green Market on the 13th music will be by the Hawaiian trio Mauka Soul, and presenters include Councilwoman Maile David, Ken Love of Hawai‘i Tropical Fruit Growers, Sonia Martinez, cookbook author, Dr. Corinne de Soto, ND, and representatives from Adaptations CSA and the Ho‘opomaika’i Community Health Initiative.

In Hawi on the 19th, Councilwoman Margaret Wille, Chef Stephen Rouelle of Under the Bodhi Tree, Slow Foods, Dr. Hana Roberts, ND, Sonia Martinez cook and author, and representatives from Lokahi Garden Sanctuary are among the presenters, with music provided by David Gomes.

The Island’s Food Basket is also a participant at both events and will feature their Da Box community supported agriculture (CSA) produce subscription box being delivered island wide. The many voices of food and wellness presenters demonstrate how local foods strengthen our community, personal health, and families’ overall well-being.

“Choosing local food, I get the freshest flavors and optimal nutritional value available, with the fewest miles on it,” said Maureen Data of Adaptations farm and food hub in Kona. “I know my farmer and the farm’s methods and location, and sometimes the family being raised there. I realize that every dollar that I spend locally returns 3 times more money to our island economy.”

“Local food production is vital to the North Kohala community,” said Lokahi Garden Sanctuary owner Richard Liebmann. “North Kohala historically has been providing healthy clean food to its community for many generations. Today more than ever local food production can play a pivotal role in connecting people, and providing healthy food choices.”

“Food tastes so much better when you know the person who grew your vegetables or raised your meat or fed the chickens who laid your eggs. The food is fresher because it hasn’t been shipped here in a container and you’ll be supporting our local economy rather than huge corporations somewhere thousands of miles away.” said Clare Bobo, President of Slow Food Hawai‘i, a food advocacy group that will participate in the Local Food Celebrations.

The Local Food Celebrations Sept. 13 and 19 welcome the entire community and people of all ages to come and enjoy the music, buy farmer-direct, sit down for tasty breakfast or lunch selections, take home a locally crafted food, and learn more about the Same Canoe Local Food Challenge and the many values offered through the new Local Food Coupon Book.

For more information on the Same Canoe Local Food Challenge, see www.oneisland.org.

Donkeys Save the Day at Volcanoes National Park

Heroes come in all shapes and sizes, and at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, some have four legs. Last week, park mules and a horse transported two injured hikers suffering from dehydration to safety.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park stock manager Jordan Barthold (first) and first responder TJ Magno head down Keauhou Trail last Thursday.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park stock manager Jordan Barthold (first) and first responder TJ Magno head down Keauhou Trail last Thursday.

The Hilo couple had planned to hike to a remote coastal campsite, but was not prepared for the intense heat, lack of shade, and rough terrain. They didn’t have hiking sticks, and their water filters broke. On the morning of Aug. 27, they started to hike out on Keauhou Trail. Both turned their ankles, and were unable to continue. They called the number on their backcountry permit, and a team of mules and first responders was dispatched.

The exhausted couple was located, and park mule Dozer and horse ‘Ōhi‘a calmly transported them to safety, while Sparkles and Clyde hauled their backpacks.

It wasn’t the first rescue for these hardy stock animals. In mid-July, Sparkles carried an O‘ahu man from Keauhou Trail to safety. The man, in his 60s, was separated from his group and became dehydrated and fatigued on the grueling eight-mile hike.

Although the stock team and the first responders saved the days, both incidents were preventable, said Park Ranger Jack Corrao.

Stock manager Jordan Barthold holds Sparkles the mule with rescued visitor from O‘ahu astride

Stock manager Jordan Barthold holds Sparkles the mule with rescued visitor from O‘ahu astride

“It’s extremely important to be prepared when going into the backcountry, or on any hike,” Corrao said.  “Have plenty of water, four quarts per person per day, and make sure your water filter works. Never get separated from your group. Know your limits,” he said. A detailed checklist of safety tips is provided with all backcountry permits, and is on the park website.

Park mules perform a variety of important duties in the 333,086-acre park. They are strong, sure-hoofed and are able to carry heavy loads over uneven terrain, said stock manager Jordan Barthold. They were vital to the recent replacement of the wooden boardwalk at Pu‘u Loa Petroglyphs. The mules are also used to transport equipment to the Hawaiian hawksbill sea turtle crew, and haul waste from the pit toilets in the coastal campgrounds, among other duties.

State Representative Recovering After Successful Surgery for Skin Cancer

State Representative Clift Tsuji underwent successful Mohs micrographic surgery this month for skin cancer.

tsuji

State Representative Clift Tsuji (Keaukaha, Hilo, Panaewa, Waiakea)

The specialized procedure’s published cure rates range up to 99% for previously untreated cancers, and was performed on an outpatient basis at Queen’s Medical Center in Honolulu in August.

“One becomes more aware of the lack of specialized surgeons on the Big Island when such a delicate procedure is necessary,” said Rep. Tsuji. “I truly believe we have amongst the best of health care providers and facilities. Unfortunately, in such procedures as mine, the surgery must be performed by a surgeon in Honolulu.”

Tsuji added, “I am aware that keeping healthy is very important. But also as a public official, I’m committed to serve our community under various conditions. I will continuously strive to do both.”

The prognosis for the Big Island lawmaker is favorable and he is resuming full activity and work schedule.

Big Island Film Festival Now Accepting New Films

Submissions will open September 1, 2015 for Big Island Film Festival at The Fairmont Orchid Hawai‘i (BIFF), accepting new, narrative films for its 11th Annual event, May 26-30, 2016. BIFF is also hosting an original screenplay contest, with entries juried by a panel of industry professionals.

Some of the participants and winners of the 2014 Big Island Film Festival

Some of the participants and winners of the 2014 Big Island Film Festival

Acclaimed by NBC story consultant Jen Grisanti in The Huffington Post, Peter Caranicas in Variety.com, and numerous MovieMaker Magazine kudos, BIFF offers the film community in Hawai’i and beyond an easygoing island environment for networking, movie-watching under the stars, food and music happenings and more.

Deadlines. Narrative short films (30 minutes or less) and feature length (60 minutes or more) completed after January 1, 2015 will be considered. Deadlines are:

  • Early Bird – November 1, 2015. Early Bird Entry Fees: $50 Feature, $40 Short, $30 Student
  • Regular – January 1, 2016. Regular Entry Fees: $60 Feature, $50 Short, $35 Student
  • Late/Final February 1, 2016. Late Entry Fees: $70 Feature, $60 Short, $40 Student

All films shot in Hawai‘i or created by filmmakers who live in Hawai‘i receive a 25% discount on entry fees (verification required), with direct submission—as do BIFF alumni from everywhere.

BIFF uses www.FilmFreeway.com for its film submissions and screenplay contest entries. An easy and affordable process, Film Freeway offers free HD online screeners, Vimeo and YouTube integration, and more.

Awards

“Golden Honu Awards” will be presented to the Best Feature and Best Short in Family, Student, Animated, Foreign, Hawai‘i and Audience Choice categories at a special Awards Brunch to honor the filmmakers and their works on Monday, May 26, 2016.

Ariel Kebbel was awarded a Golden Honu last year.

Ariel Kebbel was awarded a Golden Honu last year.

The Big Island Film Festival at The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i is a celebration of narrative filmmaking, with free family films under the stars, international features and shorts, stellar social events, celebrity receptions, screenwriting workshops, film awards and much more in an outstanding island setting. Anchor sponsors include: The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i, The Shops at Mauna Lani, Hawai‘i Tourism Authority/Hawai‘i County Department of Research and Development CPEP, and many other generous sponsors and supporters. For submission rules and application visit www.BigIslandFilmFestival.com or call 808-883-0394.