Updated Map Shows New Risk Areas for Potential Dengue Infection on the Big Island of Hawaii – Kona Now High Risk

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

An updated map of potential areas of infection by mosquito for confirmed dengue fever cases has been released:

This map should not be used to exclude any areas of the island from proactive mosquito control measures. All residents islandwide are encouraged to Fight The Bite by reducing mosquito breeding grounds and protecting themselves from mosquito bites.

Big Island Policeman Arrested on Assault of 72-Year-Old Senior Citizen

A Hawaiʻi Police Department officer has been arrested in connection with a confrontation late Friday (January 22) while off duty at an apartment complex in Kailua-Kona.

Jami Harper (photo from 2012)

Jami Harper
(photo from 2012)

At 11:14 p.m. Friday, Kona Patrol officers responded to a report of a disturbance at an apartment building on the 75-5600 block of Kuakini Highway. Investigation revealed that 39-year-old Jami Harper, an off-duty Kona Patrol officer, had confronted a 72-year-old man who lived in the apartment above him. Following the confrontation, Harper requested police assistance and medics.

The 72-year-old man was taken to Kona Community Hospital, where he was treated for facial injuries and then released on Saturday (January 23).

Also Saturday, Harper was taken to Kona Community Hospital for a medical condition. He was then transferred to Hilo Medical Center, where he remained until Wednesday (January 27). Upon his release from the hospital, he was arrested and taken to the Hilo police cellblock while detectives from the Area II Criminal Investigations Section continued the investigation.

At 11:28 a.m. Wednesday, Harper was charged with ­­­­­second-degree assault. His bail was set at $2,000, and he remains at the cellblock. Unless he posts bail, his initial court appearance will be Thursday (January 28) in Hilo District Court.

In addition to the criminal investigation, the Police Department’s Office of Professional Standards will conduct an internal administrative investigation into the incident. Harper has been placed on administrative leave without pay pending the outcome of that investigation.

Confirmed Dengue Fever Cases on the Big Island of Hawaii Rises to 241

The Dengue Fever outbreak on the Big Island continues and the total confirmed amount of cases rose by 4 more case since the last update bringing the total amount of confirmed cases to 241:

Mosquito Bite

As of January 27, 2016*:

Since the last update, HDOH has identified 4 new cases of dengue fever.  Currently, as many as 5 of the confirmed cases to date are potentially infectious to mosquitoes. All others are no longer infectious.

Potentially infectious individuals
5 Illness onset 1/17/16 to 1/21/16
Cases no longer infectious
236 Illness onset 9/11/15 to 1/16/16
Past and present confirmed cases (Cumulative TOTAL)
241

Of the confirmed cases, 217 are Hawaii Island residents and 24 are visitors.
196 cases have been adults; 45 have been children (<18 years of age). Onset of illness has ranged between 9/11/15 – 1/21/16.

As of today, a total of 1008 reported potential cases have been excluded based on test results and/or not meeting case criteria.

Scientist Sequence Genome of the ‘Alalā (Hawaiian Crow)

In collaboration with PacBio, scientists at San Diego Zoo Global and the University of Hawaii, Hilo have fully sequenced the genome of the ‘Alalā, or Hawaiian crow and shared the results of this effort at the recent annual Plant and Animal Genomics XXIV Conference in San Diego. The ‘Alalā was once reduced to a population of about 20 birds, and the sequencing of the species’ genome will be important to track any genetic challenges that may occur due to the reduced genetic diversity now seen in the species.

The sequencing of its genome comes at the beginning of what is hoped to be an important year for the Hawaiian crow. Conservationists hope to reintroduce this species into prepared habitat on the island of Hawaii later this year. The ‘Alalā has been extinct in the wild since 2002, preserved only in the program run by San Diego Zoo Global at their bird centers in Hawaii.

“We have been working for many years to build up a large enough—and genetically diverse enough—population to allow us to begin putting the ‘Alalā back in the wild,” said Bryce Masuda, conservation program manager of the San Diego Zoo’s Hawaii Endangered Bird Conservation Program. “We have achieved our goal, and are now preparing to release birds into the wild in 2016.”

The program’s goal has been to increase the ‘Alalā flock to 75 or more individuals before releasing them into their native forests on the island of Hawaii. The ‘Alalā is a member of the crow family that was brought to the brink of extinction by loss of habitat, and introduced predators and diseases. For species that have been at the brink of extinction, genetic fitness and the information stored in their genome may prove an important tool in the fight to save them.

“Learning more about the genome of the species can help us understand more about how that species will interact with and fit back into its native habitat,” said Jolene Sutton, assistant professor at the University of Hawaii, Hilo. “Through scientific collaboration with PacBio, we now have a map of ‘Alalā DNA that could prove critical to their long term recovery. We are absolutely thrilled with the quality of the sequencing, and we have already identified several gene locations that we think could have a big influence on reintroduction success.”

Consumers’ Last Chance to Enroll for 2016 Healthcare Coverage Quickly Approaches

deadline

The open enrollment period for individuals and families to sign up for 2016 healthcare coverage through HealthCare.gov ends this Sunday, Jan. 31, 2016. Individuals who were enrolled through the Hawai’i Health Connector in 2015 must re-enroll for 2016 coverage through HealthCare.gov or they will no longer be insured. Individuals and families without insurance are strongly urged to enroll either through the online portal HealthCare.gov or by phone 1-800-318-2596 by 10:00 p.m. on Jan. 31 to retain health insurance coverage in 2016.

If individuals and families would like in-person assistance, there are Kōkua on each island ready to help. Please visit hawaiihealthconnector.com/appointment for a list of partner organizations on each island or hawaiihealthconnector.com/events for a list of nearby enrollment events.

Outside of a few Special Enrollment circumstances (e.g. a period for residents from nations under the Compact of Free Association (COFA), which include the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the Republic of Palau), individuals who miss Sunday’s deadline will be unable to get health insurance through the marketplace until Jan. 1, 2017.

Body Glove to Celebrate Tatiana-Weston’s Rookie of the Year Honor with Private Dinner Prepared by Celebrity Chef Sam Choy

Body Glove to kick off their annual trip to the North Shore by hosting a celebratory dinner for WSL Rookie of the year, Tatiana Weston-Webb, prepared by World Famous Celebrity Chef Sam Choy.

Sam Choy

The event will be filmed and aired on KHON Channel 2 in a episode of “Sam Choy’s IN THE KITCHEN” later this year. Sam will raid the Body Glove refrigerator for leftovers and use his culinary magic with whatever ingredients he can find and create a gourmet meal for all. Body Glove Athlete’s Tatiana Weston-Webb, Jamie O’Brien, Mo Freitas and Garret MacNamara and Sam’s co-host John Venri will be the Chef’s will be Sam’s official assistant’s and taste testers.

Jamie O'Brien gets ready to go on a Body Glove cruise.

Jamie O’Brien gets ready to go on a Body Glove cruise.

In the days following Tati’s celebration, Body Glove will begin hosting key retailers, sales reps and athletes throughout the waiting period of Volcom Pipe Pro, January 28th – February 7th. “We look forward to the opportunity to give back to the retailers, sales reps and athletes that support the brand”, say’s Body Glove Marketing Director, Nick Meistrell. “The trip also offers a platform for us to gather feedback on new product lines, create content for future advertising campaigns, and of course enjoy some surfing with the crew. Not to mention, all this with a world class surfing competition viewable from the house!”

Hunter Ports Women's Classic - Tatiana Weston-Webb © ASP / Robertson

Hunter Ports Women’s Classic – Tatiana Weston-Webb © ASP / Robertson

Retailers in attendance and will be joined by select athletes from the Body Glove Team including aforementioned Tatiana Weston-Webb, Jamie O’Brien, Mo Freitas and Garret MacNamaras well as Anthony Walsh, Alex Gray, and Nolan Rapoza.   In true All Things Water fashion, Wake Surf Champions, Keenan and Noah Flegal will also be on hand to attempt the challenging crossover from the wake to the waves of the North Shore.

Keenan was also featured in Body Gloves award winning film “Liquid Gold” – filmed entirely on location in Dubai.

About Body Glove International

Founded in Redondo Beach, California in 1953 by twin brothers Bill and Bob Meistrell, Body Glove is the original wetsuit company. Today, the privately-owned, family-operated company is a leading global watersports brand that specializes in wetsuits, swimwear, clothing, footwear, accessories and technology products. While Body Glove has supported surfers and the surfing industry since 1953, today Body Glove sponsors one of the most respected surf and wakeboard teams in the industry. Pro surfers Tatiana Weston-Webb, Jamie O’Brien, Anthony Walsh, Alex Gray, Guinness World Record Holder Garrett McNamara, as well as wakeboarders Harley Clifford and Bob Soven are all part of the Body Glove Team. Through Reef Check, SIMA’s environmental fund, and the Surfrider Foundation, Body Glove also works hard to preserve and protect the oceans and waterways it loves. The company’s headquarters are still based in Redondo Beach, but its products are sold all over the U.S. by a network of independent retailers, at its own Dive N’ Surf retail shop and in approximately 50 countries worldwide.

Hawaii Sanctuary to Remain Focused on Humpback Whales – State Reacts to NOAA Decision

NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) has informed the State of Hawaii of its decision to continue the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary as it was first designated by Congress – as a sanctuary to protect humpback whales and their habitat.

Humpback whales off Maui

Humpback whales off Maui

Each winter, Hawaiian waters are home to the largest breeding population of humpback whales in the world. Humpbacks are a flagship species in an ecosystem full of marine mammals, fish, coral, and other valuable marine and cultural resources. The State and NOAA, along with other partners and communities, are working hard to preserve Hawaii’s marine ecosystem for the sustainable use and enjoyment of present and future generations.

“The Hawaii Dept. of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) consistently works to implement an integrated, ecosystem-based approach to management.  We believe strongly that this can only be achieved through partnerships in which each entity builds upon and leverages its unique strengths.  The Sanctuary has done this extraordinarily well with humpback whales for over 20 years and we had hoped that this expertise could be extended to other marine mammals,” said DLNR Chair Suzanne Case.  “Although ultimately the Sanctuary will not have an expanded purpose, we look forward to building upon its accomplishments, as well as highlighting its successes, particularly the Sanctuary’s world-renowned entanglement response program, at the World Conservation Congress coming to Hawaii in September,” continued Case.

“We will continue working with the appropriate divisions within NOAA, as well as communities and ocean users, to build upon the successes of the Sanctuary and better manage all of our protected species. This includes addressing the threat of harassment to spinner dolphins and of toxoplasmosis to Hawaiian monk seals and other marine mammals,” said DLNR Division of Aquatic Resources Administrator Bruce Anderson.

The State of Hawai‘i recognizes the tremendous dedication and commitment of the Sanctuary Advisory Council (SAC), which has worked tirelessly throughout the Sanctuary’s Management Plan Review process to guide and advise sanctuary management.  DLNR is eager to continue to partner with and draw on the tremendous depth of expertise of the SAC as the Sanctuary enters this new chapter.

The Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whales National Marine Sanctuary was established by Congress in 1992. It is located from the shoreline to 600 ft. depth off of Maui Nui, including Penguin Bank, and off the north shore of Kauai, the north and south shores of Oahu, and the north Kona coast of Hawai‘i Island. The sanctuary is co-managed by NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the State of Hawai‘i through the Department of Land and Natural Resources.

Hawaii State Senate to Hold Public Memorial for the Late Senator Gilbert Kahele

The Hawai‘i State Senate will open its doors to members of the public who wish to express their sympathies to the family of the late Senator Gilbert Kahele.

Senator Kahele Empty Desk

A condolence book will be made available to sign within the Senate Chambers and will be shared with the family. 

  • WHO:  Hawai‘i State Senate
  • WHAT:  Public memorial to be available in Senate Chambers
  • WHEN:  Wednesday, January 27, 2016, After session (around 12:30 p.m.) to 5:00 p.m. and Thursday, January 28, 2016 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
  • WHERE:  Senate Chambers – Hawaii State Capitol

Updated Map Pinpoints Confirmed Cases of Dengue Fever on the Big Island of Hawaii

Below is a map that depicts case locations as of 1/26/2016:

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

This map will be updated Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with location data provided by the State Department of Health. Locations may represent multiple cases. For the most up to date case counts and other information from the Department of Health, visit their website at health.hawaii.gov.

Surveying and spraying is being conducted at the residences of all suspect and confirmed cases, in addition to proactive spraying at nearby public facilities.

This map should not be used to exclude any areas of the island from proactive mosquito control measures. All residents islandwide are encouraged to Fight The Bite by reducing mosquito breeding grounds and protecting themselves from mosquito bites.

Hawaii Senate Statement on Passing of Gilbert Kahele

It is with heavy heart and great sadness that the Hawai‘i State Senate reports the passing of Senator Gilbert Kahele, Senator of the First Senatorial District.

Sen Kahele Profile

Surrounded by his loving family, Sen. Gil Kahele passed peacefully at 7:55 a.m. surrounded by family at Queens Medical Center.

Senate President Ronald D. Kouchi issued the following statement on the passing of Sen. Kahele:

“The Hilo community and the State of Hawai‘i today has lost a great Senator, a gentleman, and passionate advocate who cared deeply about public service and the people he represented. I am honored to have served with him and I know his fellow colleagues in the Senate feel the same. 

Senator Kahele’s family thanks the public for their words of support and aloha and respectfully asks for privacy at this difficult time.

Senator Kahele’s staff will be in the office to handle the concerns and issues of the district. His Tourism and International Affairs committee will be handled by the Vice Chair, Sen. J. Kalani English.

I send heartfelt condolences to the Kahele family as we mourn the loss of this remarkable man.”  

Sen. Gil Kahele, 73, has served in the Senate since 2011, when he was appointed by Gov. Neil Abercrombie for the 2nd District, encompassing the communities of Hilo, Puna and Ka‘u on Hawai‘i Island. In 2012, he was elected to represent the community of Hilo, now known as the 1st Senatorial District as a result of reapportionment.

As a visionary and proponent for strengthening Hilo’s economy, Sen. Kahele sought ways to help create jobs and business in his district. Among his many accomplishments, Sen. Kahele was instrumental in bringing much needed funding to build the Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo.  He also was a staunch supporter behind the creation a world-class School of Aviation at the underutilized Hilo Airport and the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo.

Services for Sen. Kahele are pending.

Hawaii House Statements on Senator Kahele Passing

House Speaker Joseph M. Souki and members of the Hawaii Island delegation provided the following statements on the passing of Senator Gilbert Kahele:

Kahele in Chamber
Speaker Joseph M. Souki: “It is with great sadness that we, in the House, learned about State Senator Gil Kahele.  His contributions as a native Hawaiian, a Big Island resident and public servant to the entire state will be greatly missed. We mourn his passing and extend our thoughts and prayers to his family.”

Hawaii Island Delegation: “All of Hawaii Island and the state of Hawaii have lost a wonderful individual and energetic public servant.  As a Native Hawaiian born and raised in Milolii, Gil was truly a keiki o ka aina, and a gentleman who always had others in his heart before his own concerns. Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family and to all who felt Gil was a part of their family. He will be sorely missed at the Legislature.”

Members of the Hawaii Island delegation include representatives Mark Nakashima, Clift Tsuji, Richard Onishi, Joy San Buenaventura, Richard Creagan, Nicole Lowen and Cindy Evans.

USS Chung-Hoon to Depart on Western Pacific Deployment

The guided-missile destroyer USS Chung-Hoon (DDG 93) is scheduled to depart Jan. 27 on a regularly scheduled Strike Group deployment to the Western Pacific Ocean with the John C. Stennis Strike Group.

In 2010 I got to go out to sea with the USS Chung Hoon for a day. http://damontucker.com/2010/04/06/out-to-sea-on-the-destroyer-uss-chung-hoon/

In 2010 I got to go out to sea with the USS Chung-Hoon for a day. http://damontucker.com/2010/04/06/out-to-sea-on-the-destroyer-uss-chung-hoon/

While deployed, Chung-Hoon and its crew of more than 300 Sailors will conduct theater security cooperation and maritime presence operations with partner nations.

The mission of Chung-Hoon is to conduct sustained combat operations at sea, provide primary protection for the Navy’s aircraft carriers and battle groups, as well as serve as escort to Navy and Marine Corps amphibious forces and auxiliary ships, and conduct independent operations as necessary.

“Departing on deployment is a significant event in the life of all Sailors.” said Cmdr. Tom M. Ogden, commanding officer of Chung-Hoon. “Months of training, maintenance, and preparations all make a ship ready for deployed operations.  The crew has succeeded at every task leading up to this and deployment will be the capstone of those tremendous efforts.”

Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 37 Detachment 7, homeported at Marine Corps Base Hawaii, is scheduled to embark Chung-Hoon for the deployment. Detachment 7, known as “Paniolo,” is scheduled to deploy with a total of 28 personnel and two MH-60R Seahawk helicopters, the U.S. navy’s primary anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare platform.

“I am very excited for the upcoming deployment onboard USS Chung-Hoon, and I am extremely proud of the ‘Paniolo’ pilots, aircrewmen, and maintainers for their hard work and preparation,” said Lt. Cmdr. Justin Eckhoff, HSM-37 Detachment 7’s officer-in-charge. “We are motivated and ready to employ our two MH-60R helicopters in diverse mission areas, including anti-surface and anti-submarine warfare, in order to meet the tasking of our ship, air wing, or strike group commander.”

Chung-Hoon is assigned to Carrier Strike Group Three and Destroyer Squadron Twenty One and is homeported in Hawaii as part of U.S. 3rd Fleet and is also part of the Great Green Fleet, an initiative that highlights the Navy’s efforts to transform its energy use to increase operational capability.

Chung-Hoon was commissioned Sep. 18, 2004 and was named after Rear Admiral Gordon Pai’ea Chung-Hoon, who served during World War II and was the first Asian American Flag Officer. He is a recipient of the Navy Cross and Silver Star for conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary heroism as Commanding Officer of USS Sigsbee from May 1944 to October 1945.

U.S. 3rd Fleet leads naval forces in the Eastern Pacific from the West Coast of North America to the international date line and provides the realistic, relevant training necessary for an effective global Navy.

Rep. Ing & Thielen Introduces Industrial Hemp Legislation – Will Allow Individuals to Research, Grow and Sell Hemp in Hawaii

Representatives Kaniela Ing (Kihei, Wailea, Makena) and Representative Cynthia Thielen (Kailua, Kaneohe Bay) are joining forces to introduce a measure that expands industrial hemp research, growth, cultivation and marketing activities in Hawaii.  Following the models used in other states, including Kentucky and Colorado, the bill supports partnerships with the private sector to further explore industrial hemp’s potential contribution to the state’s economy.

hemp legislationAlexander and Baldwin’s recent announcement that it will end sugar production at Maui’s Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co. (HC&S) will free about 36,000 acres of agriculturally zoned land at the end of 2016, prompting question over what crop would replace sugar.

“There is a huge groundswell of support from the general public and members of the agriculture sector to legalize industrial hemp,” said Rep. Ing.  “While hemp is not a magic bullet for Hawaii’s struggling agriculture industry, it does deserve our consideration, especially with the closing of sugar operations by HC&S.

“I believe industrial hemp now has bi-partisan support, as well as widespread support across generations.  It’s time has come.”

“With its ability to cleanse the soil of toxins, industrial hemp could be an environmentally friendly replacement for our agriculture industry,” says Representative Thielen, a longtime and enthusiastic supporter of legalizing industrial hemp.

“Hemp is often grown without pesticides or herbicides due to its natural ability to ward off unwanted insects and weeds.  Furthermore, hemp’s potential as a biofuel feedstock could be a game-changer for Hawaii.  There are over 25,000 different uses for hemp and in U.S. alone, the market for hemp seed oil and fiber is approximately $600 million a year.”

Grounded Vessel at Kohanaiki to be Removed By Salvage Firm – Operator Cited

Salvage operations are expected to begin this week to remove a 39’ Coast-Guard documented powerboat “Hoku Kea,” which ran aground Friday evening off Kohanaiki beach, west Hawaii. 
Hawaii County closed Kohanaiki Beach Park pending removal of the boat and hazmat. Fuel leaked from the boat onto the immediate area of the beach, and debris from the boat was also found in the area.
Kohanaiki Beach Park

Kohanaiki Beach Park

The “Hoku Kea” is owned by Hoku Boats LLC. The owner had pollution insurance which hired PENCO to remove 400 gallons of diesel, a few quarts of oil and seven batteries on Sunday morning. They have also signed a contract with Cates International which will be on site tomorrow morning to begin the salvage removal process.   
The vessel owner was cited by DLNR for operating a vessel without a valid boating safety certificate required by state boating rules.
Swimmers and surfers are being asked to stay out of the water until authorities can clean up the fuel spill and remove the boat and debris from the area. 

Lyman Museum Lecture – Why Early Hawaiians Moved to Mainland

Even before Kamehameha I founded his kingdom, Native Hawaiians were traveling to distant ports and visiting far-off lands. Kanaka labor is credited with helping to settle the northwest coast of North America, from fur trading to gold mining, and Hawaiians also participated in the U.S. Civil War. But what would be sufficiently attractive to draw them away from paradise … and why would some choose to make their new homes permanent?

Hawaii in CaliforniaOn Monday, February 8, from 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Lyman Museum, Hawai‘i Island historian Boyd D. Bond shares this little-known aspect of Hawaiian history.

The nationally accredited and Smithsonian-affiliated Lyman Museum showcases the natural and cultural history of Hawai`i. Located in historic downtown Hilo at 276 Haili Street, the Museum is open Monday through Saturday, 10:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Admission to this program is free to Museum members, $3 for nonmembers. First come, first seated. For additional information, call (808) 935-5021 or visit www.lymanmuseum.org.

DLNR to Conduct Animal Control Activities at Mauna Kea Forest Lands

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) will conduct animal control activities specifically for trapping mouflon/feral sheep hybrids; staff hunting, and/or aerial shooting from helicopters for feral goats, feral sheep, mouflon and mouflon/feral sheep hybrids within palila critical habitat in the Mauna Kea Forest Reserve (Unit A), Mauna Kea Ice Age Natural Area Reserve (Unit K), Palila Mitigation Lands, and the Ka‘ohe Game Management Area (Unit G) on the island of Hawai‘i.

Mauna Kea seen from Mauna Loa

Mauna Kea seen from Mauna Loa

Aerial shooting is required for compliance with the federal court order mandating the removal of sheep and goats from critical habitat for palila, a bird endemic to Hawaii.

Control schedules dates are February 10 and 11, and May, 4 and 5, 2016.  There will be no closure for May 3, 2016, but DOFAW will be collaring animals.  Public access to Mauna Kea Forest Reserve, Mauna Kea Ice Age Natural Area Reserve, Palila Mitigation Lands, the Ka‘ohe Game Management Area and Mauna Kea Hunter Access Road will be restricted and allowed BY PERMIT ONLY for public animal salvage purposes on the following dates:

7 a.m. February 10, and May 4, 2016
6 a.m. February 11, and May 5, 2016

These actions are pursuant to HAR§ 13-130-19 and § 13-104-23(a) (3). The Mauna Kea Observatory Road will remain open.

The temporary closure is needed to minimize the dangers of incompatible uses in the forest area and safely conduct animal control activities. To implement the closure, both the Hale Pohaku and Kilohana gated entrances to Unit A and G and the gate behind Mauna Kea State Recreation Area will be locked/reopened as follows:

Locked 7 p.m. February 9, 2016, and reopened 7 p.m. February 11, 2016
Locked 7 p.m. May 3, 2016, and reopened 7 p.m. May 5, 2016

Copies of the map illustrating the area subject to aerial shooting on these dates are available for inspection at the Division of Forestry and Wildlife Hawai‘i island offices.

Due to high public participation, telephone call-ins to the DOFAW Kamuela office at (808) 887-6063 for receiving salvage permits will be conducted from 9 a.m. February 3, 2016, to 10 a.m. the day before each shoot day. One permit will be issued per call per vehicle for one day only.

Applicants can have their names added to a stand-by list for additional days, should all slots not be filled by other applicants. No standbys waiting at the gates will be allowed access. The driver, occupants, vehicle license plate, and make/model of vehicle are needed when calling in.

A maximum of 15 permitted vehicles will be allowed at the Ahumoa location and 15 permitted vehicles at the Pu‘u Mali location.

Carcasses taken during the shoot will be available to the permitted public for salvage at the following locations (4-wheel drive vehicle are required, and access permits will be issued). There is no guarantee that animals will be able to be salvaged.

Salvage locations are subject to change:

  • On February 10, and May 4, 2016, at Ahumoa. Permittees must meet at Kilohana hunter check station at 7 a.m. sharp.
  • On February 11, and May 5, at Pu‘u Mali. Permittees must meet across from the Waimea Veterinary office on Mana Road at 6 a.m. sharp.

Contact the Division of Forestry and Wildlife in Hilo at (808) 974-4221 or in Kamuela at (808) 887-6063 for additional details regarding meat salvage or access permits.

Full Text – Hawaii State of the State By Governor Ige

Gov. David Ige today delivered his second State of the State address. The governor outlined his plans for a renaissance for Kalihi, including the future of the O‘ahu Community Correctional Center, air conditioning for Hawai‘i’s public schools, affordable housing which is key to addressing homelessness across the state and proposed investments in public housing, the Hawai‘i State Hospital, agriculture and the environment and innovation economy.

State of the State Ige

A copy of Governor Ige’s address follows:

Speaker Souki, President Kouchi, former governors, distinguished justices of the courts, representatives of our congressional delegation, members of the Hawaii State Legislature, county mayors and other elected officials, honored guests, family and friends,

Good morning and aloha.

After Alexander & Baldwin announced the end of sugar production on Maui, I visited the people who work there.  Among them was a diesel mechanic, a fourth generation plantation worker, whose family history was interwoven with the sugar plantations.

He talked with pride about his work and life, and I shared that pride in recalling my own family’s life on the plantation.  I was also struck by the realization that his family’s future would forever be altered by the closure of sugar.

Like many of you here, I was saddened for those workers whose lives will be changed forever.  At the same time, I reflected on the challenges that we face moving forward.

Today, we live in a time of extraordinary change, where the past seems to have little relevance to what is happening today, let alone tomorrow.  And while the past doesn’t provide us with a precise roadmap to the future, it does give us the very things we need to find our path:  values, sensibilities and the ways in which we treat each other—with aloha.

Sugar is gone, as are many other aspects of the Hawaii we once knew.   In their place, however, there is an exciting new world beckoning us.  And that is what I want to talk about this morning—about this new world and the challenges we face as we govern—about doing things the right way to make things happen.

TRUTHFULNESS
It begins with being truthful.  We, in government, are obligated to be truthful, even when the truth is not easy or popular.  When we live without truth, our actions fail to pass the test of time.  Moreover, we tend to repeat our mistakes because we have not learned from them.

A few years ago, we saw the demise of the SuperFerry.  Its failure has been attributed to environmental objections and a hostile court.  But that is not exactly what happened.  The fact is the state failed to follow the law.  When we tried a legal end run, it also failed.  The point is the state should have followed the law and done the right thing in the first place.

While the circumstances are very different, we are now going through some very difficult days with the Thirty Meter Telescope.  When I visited Mauna Kea last April, I felt deeply that something was not right.

Even though I personally believe that the telescope needs to be built, it was also clear to me that many things have gone very wrong along the way.  As a result, I have taken the time to listen to a lot of people—listening to their hopes as well as their concerns.

In its recent ruling, the Supreme Court did not say don’t do this project.  What it did say was that the state didn’t do the right things in the approval process.  It told us we needed to do a better job of listening to people and giving them a real opportunity to be heard.

The unrelenting search for truth, knowledge and understanding is an essential part of our human makeup.  It helps us become who we are.

So does our obligation to be true to our past and cultural heritage.

That’s why it’s so unfortunate that our past and our future have been pitted against each other on the slopes of Mauna Kea.  As Governor, I am committed to realigning our values and our actions. They are what define us as a community and allow us to move forward – proud of our past and facing our future with strength and confidence.

I am committed to pursuing this project and I hope its sponsors will stay with us.  And this time, we will listen carefully to all, reflect seriously on what we have heard and, whatever we do in the end, we will do it the right way.

A PUBLIC TRUST
Governing the right way also means managing public funds as a public trust.  That’s especially true when it comes to taking care of our debts and obligations.

The state’s obligation to the public pension and health benefit funds represent two of our biggest fixed expenses.  We need to find better ways to meet this challenge.  Their continued growth is a challenge that will remain with us for many years.  We must find ways to do better in meeting this challenge so as not to burden future generations of taxpayers.

Last year, we changed the way in which we funded those obligations that will save hundreds of millions of dollars in the future.  In the past, the state’s contributions to the fund were made in installments that spread over 12 months.  By consolidating those contributions into a single payment at the beginning of each fiscal year, we will realize contributions or taxpayer savings of up to half a billion dollars over the next 20 years.

Furthermore, my supplemental budget request to the Legislature includes paying 100 percent of the annual required contributions rather than 60 percent for the next two fiscal years.  If authorized, this will further save more than $300 million in required contributions over the next 20 years.

Tax Modernization Program
We’ve also been working hard to implement expenditure control policies and create fiscal initiatives such as a tax modernization program.
While the history of the tax department’s computer programs is not a good one, the recent initiative to upgrade those programs is on time, on budget and meeting our first-year expectations.  It will take until 2018 to complete, but we are already seeing progress in the collection of the general excise and transient accommodation taxes.

Greater efficiencies have increased tax revenues and saved taxpayer dollars.  At the same time, our tax-fraud unit identified over $20 million in fraudulent claims in the last fiscal year and, so far this year, it has found another $11 million.  Let’s be clear. Stopping tax fraud is about fairness for all those who faithfully pay their share each year.

We know this work delays tax refunds and we are working hard to minimize those delays.  If you bear with us during this transition, we will soon have a system that will be better able to catch fraud, without the time, cost and work required to do so today.

Federal Funds
In some cases, the state has struggled to spend federal monies in a timely way.  This issue has vexed us for too long.  We are starting to make progress.  The Department of Transportation reduced its Fiscal Year 2015 project pipeline balance by over $100 million.  This is the largest drop in five years and is the lowest it has been since Fiscal Year 2002.

I am also pleased to announce that the Federal Environmental Protection Agency has determined that our State Department of Health is now in compliance in spending down the Drinking Water Fund.  As a result, the remaining balance totaling $8 million for Fiscal Year 2015 is being released for use locally.

We have more work to do on this critical issue, but we are making real progress.

Bond Financing
We also know that when public funds are managed better, the cost of borrowing money decreases.  Last November we completed a $750 million state bond sale—the first for this administration—and were able to refinance some of our bonds.  This resulted in savings of about $61 million in our debt service requirement.

Because of all these initiatives, we were able to balance the state budget by last June, even though the state was projected to close the last fiscal year in the red.

Maui Public Hospitals
While we have made progress, there continues to be areas of concern.  One of these is the operation of the hospitals on our neighbor islands and in rural communities.  It is getting harder and harder for us as a state to operate these hospitals well.

We need the resources the private sector can bring to bear on the increasingly complex issues and challenges of health care.  We recently signed a historic agreement transferring the operation and management of the Maui Region health care facilities from the state to Kaiser Permanente.  There is still work ahead but this is a great step forward.  Thanks to all of you for working with us to make this happen.

In these and many other ways, we are committed to maintaining your trust—the public’s trust—and to closely mind the state’s purse strings as we prioritize and invest in the projects and programs that are long overdue.

WORKING WITH THE COMMUNITY
When we govern in the right way, we conduct the people’s business WITH the community, not against it or around it or without it.  I’ve long had strong concerns about the way the redevelopment in Kakaako proceeded.  So do a lot of people who felt left out.

We have a great opportunity to learn from past experience and do things differently going forward.  We have an immediate opportunity to get it right in Kalihi.

One of the harshest realities facing us today is that we need to tear down the Oahu Correctional Facility in Kalihi and build a new facility in Halawa.  The jail is severely overcrowded and in disrepair and we must take action.

Therefore, I am introducing a bill to move this forward.

The facility will be designed to take advantage of all that we have learned about incarceration, and the need to give inmates a real opportunity to change their lives.  Once the correctional facility has been moved, we can take advantage of the transit-oriented development opportunities created by the rail transit system.

In the next couple of weeks, I intend to put together a group of community leaders who will convene a series of community meetings to let Kalihi speak about what Kalihi wants and what role it will play in the future of Honolulu.

The land at Dillingham and Puuhale could be used for affordable housing, open space for recreation, commercial development and the jobs that it would bring, education and many other possibilities.  And there are other state housing and mixed-use developments in various stages of planning and development in Kalihi.

In short, this is a tremendous opportunity to reposition Kalihi for the future.

This Kalihi 21st Century initiative truly gives us the opportunity to do community planning the right way.  No one deserves this more than the people of Kalihi.

This is long overdue.

GOVERNING WITH COMPASSION
Governing in the right way is about people.  That’s why we will do what needs to be done with compassion.

Homelessness in Hawaii presents a complex and difficult issue.  On one hand, we need to ensure that our parks and sidewalks remain open and safe for all to use.  But we will do this with compassion and respect, especially when families with young children are involved.  We will be sure that shelters are available for them.

We cannot force people into shelters, but we can do our best to help those families.  That’s why we increased funding for the Housing First effort and organized a Landlord Summit to encourage acceptance of more low-income and homeless tenants from building owners.

We are also currently in the final stages of renovating a 5,000-square-foot maintenance facility in Kakaako to house up to 240 people a year.  This facility will not be just another shelter.  Instead, it will be a Family Assessment Center that will quickly connect families to longer term housing.

An additional $8.3 million has been included in my budget for Fiscal Year 2017 to operate the Family Assessment Center, expand the Housing First Program on the neighbor islands, and establish a new Rapid Re-housing program throughout the state.

The ultimate goal of the state’s efforts to address homelessness is to make permanent housing available.

I am also pleased to announce that the state will be investing $5 million immediately to jumpstart a new public-private partnership with Aloha United Way.  It will provide direct funding for rapid re-housing, homeless prevention services and establish a statewide referral system. It will also develop long-term homeless strategies to address the needs of the most vulnerable individuals, including unaccompanied youth and those with chronic health concerns.

This initiative is expected to provide immediate relief to an estimated 1300 households.

My thanks to the Legislature, county mayors and the many community groups committed to helping homeless families and individuals throughout the state.

Affordable Housing
You cannot talk about homelessness without talking about the major reason why it has become so widespread.  And that is the lack of affordable housing.  It is estimated that 66,000 housing units are needed in the coming years. The state alone cannot fill the gap, but the state wants to do its part.

That’s why we are working with the private sector to develop a comprehensive approach to reduce regulatory barriers, strengthen financial tools, streamline procedures and re-orient policies toward increasing housing production.  We’ve expanded our partnerships with the private sector to build more affordable homes and rentals across the state.

Last year, the Hawaii Housing Finance and Development Corporation awarded about $10 million in low-income housing tax credit and $108 million in loans and bonds to leverage over $660 million in total development costs.

This year, because of the great demand, we are seeking $75 million for the Rental Housing Revolving Fund to make more money available for low-income rentals.

But the biggest roadblock to developing more homes is the lack of adequate infrastructure that allows housing projects to even begin.  The state can make a major contribution by funding projects such as roads and water systems.

That’s why I am proposing legislation to allow us to use the Dwelling Unit Revolving Fund for infrastructure development.  We are also asking for a $25-million increase to that fund in Fiscal Year 2017.

Public Housing
We’re also thinking outside the box in renovating the state’s public housing facilities.

The North School Street redevelopment project will be one of three Oahu public housing initiatives to enter into a public-private partnership that allows for a mixed-use/mixed income model.  Kuhio Park Terrace and Mayor Wright Homes are the other two.

These projects will redefine our concept of public housing and make it more efficient, more welcoming and more compassionate.

With the Mayor Wright Homes, we are in the process of formulating a master development agreement with Hunt Companies that has the potential of adding additional mixed-income units.  A development agreement with the Michaels Group for phase two of Kuhio Park Terrace is also imminent, with the potential for additional affordable units.

Private Sector and County Initiatives
There are other purely private sector projects in various stages of development that will contribute thousands of additional units, including Hoopili in East Kapolei and Koa Ridge in Central Oahu.  Combined, there will be over 10,000 units coming on line in the next few years.  While that is still not enough, it is a solid beginning.

We will also need innovative help from other levels of government.  I want to thank Honolulu Mayor Caldwell and the City Council for thinking out of the box to create an “accessory dwelling unit” plan to increase rentals.

Perhaps the greatest opportunities for housing on Oahu rest with transit-oriented development.  We will be working closely with you on affordable housing initiatives in this key area.  And mahalo to Mayor Carvalho of Kauai, Mayor Arakawa of Maui, Mayor Kenoi of Hawaii Island, and their respective county councils for stepping up their island-tailored efforts to house our people.

Hawaii State Hospital
Compassion must also extend to those who struggle each day with mental health issues.  Behavioral health issues are often the underlying cause of many of our social, health and economic challenges.  In fact, mental health is the single-most pressing unmet health issue facing our state.

That’s why we’re investing $160.5 million in a new forensic mental health facility on the grounds of the State Hospital in Kaneohe.  And we’ve budgeted $4.7 million in Fiscal Year 2017 to cover projected operating deficits at the State Hospital.

No one who has ever visited these facilities would ever question the need for these improvements.  We must address the severe overcrowding as well as the safety of our state employees.  We will work with you to find ways to accelerate the design and construction of this critically needed facility.

It is long overdue.

FOR THE SAKE OF THE CHILDREN
Governing in the right way also looks to the future.  For me, our highest single obligation is to take care of our children.

We need to cool our classrooms now, in energy-efficient ways that align with our commitment to end our dependence on imported fossil fuels.  Clean energy technology is changing rapidly and it’s becoming more efficient.  The Department of Education has already launched an energy-efficiency program called Ka Hei.  This is a start and we need to take it farther.

I am working with the DOE, other state departments, utilities and clean energy companies to cool 1,000 public school classrooms by the end of this year and thousands more each year through the end of 2018.

We are going to get this job done.

To start, we will use $100 million of Green Energy Market Securitization funds to immediately install energy-efficiency measures and air conditioning units in classrooms where our children need it the most.  By using existing GEMS program dollars, the Department of Education and its energy-efficiency partner, OpTerra, can quickly access affordable financing for a large portion of its cost to air condition our classrooms.

I know you share my concerns.  Let’s work together to support our kids.  You have my personal commitment that I will do all in my power to serve them.  I’ll work with anyone else who wants to do the same.

This, too, is long overdue.

LEGACY BUILDING
Finally, good governance creates a legacy—what we leave our children.

When I look at all the things we are doing right now, I see two legacy building elements in our current budget:  They are strengthening our economic foundation and encouraging innovation.

Economic Foundations
Tourism is one of our primary economic engines, generating over $14 billion each year in visitor spending and employing nearly 150,000 workers.  It’s essential for us to maintain our global position as a leader in the industry.

To do this, we need to make travel to Hawaii as easy as possible by expanding U.S. Customs pre-clearance for international visitors, particularly from Japan.  Honolulu is the fourth largest port of entry in the United States.

Through a CIP funding appropriation, we want to establish Kona as a second international airport, giving visitors more travel options and conveniences.

We are also asking for funds to modernize our airports and automate the passport control system.  This will enrich the visitor experience and encourage more carriers to fly here.

Agriculture and the Environment
In agriculture, we must move more aggressively to take on threats to our homegrown resources, with the creation of the Hawaii Invasive Species Authority.

Yes, it’s long overdue.

The authority is just part of a broader framework for sustainability in Hawaii that will connect all of our efforts in resource protection, water production and fishery restoration to support sustainable communities throughout the state.

Maui Sugar Lands
As I noted earlier, the end of sugar production in Hawaii provides us with new opportunities.  Here is the fundamental question:  In the future when we look upward to Central Maui, will we see green productive farmlands, a fallow dust bowl or more homes for the super wealthy?

We must learn from the failures of the past and vow not to repeat them.  Because we are running out of chances.

And so we will work steadfastly with Alexander & Baldwin and Mayor Arakawa to keep these lands in agriculture as a first priority.  This is a long-term top agenda item for everyone who loves what Hawaii stands for and where we came from as a people.

Our Military Family
The military is also a primary driver of our economy, and a very important one.  But that’s not how I want to focus on it today.

Many of us have friends and neighbors serving in the military here.   They are so much a part of us that we sometimes forget the risks and dangers that are a constant part of their lives.

We were tragically reminded of this when we lost twelve Marines recently.  I know we all grieve and pray with their families.  We were also reminded of the importance of what our military does in protecting democracy and peace in the Pacific and throughout the world.

And so to our military members and veterans here in the chamber today—to those who we owe so much—I’d like to ask them to stand and be recognized.

The Innovation Economy
In years past, our parents were forced to confront the reality that times were changing—that the plantations could no longer drive Hawaii’s economy, and a new economic engine had to be found.

Their answer was tourism. Today, with tourism at near capacity, we face a similar dilemma.

For those who haven’t noticed, innovation, fueled by technology, is driving the global economy at breakneck speed.  We simply must create an economic environment that enables Hawaii’s entrepreneurs to turn ideas into products and services so that we can compete in today’s global economy.

And we know that deploying a strong broadband capacity is critical to that kind of environment.

More importantly, innovation is not just a technological phenomenon.  It crosses all industries, including agriculture, fashion, “media and design,” clean energy, and healthcare.  And it creates good paying jobs that keep our best and brightest here where we need them.

For that reason, I am proposing we set aside $30 million over the next six years from our corporate tax revenues to support innovation enterprises.

We also need to support accelerator and venture fund activities to give talented entrepreneurs the means to create new products and services.  In addition, our investments will also help attract private money.

My strongest personal partner in this is University of Hawaii President David Lassner.  We are members of the Islander Wonk’s Club; there’s a sign-up sheet outside.  So it’s not too late to join!

VALUE BASED ACTIONS
Finally, making things right to make things happen is not just a nice slogan.

If we are truthful and act accordingly, if we value the public trust, if we govern with the people, if we are strong yet compassionate, if we take special care of our children, if we look to all of our futures, then we can more than meet the challenges we face today and tomorrow.

I began my remarks by talking about the end of sugar and the values handed down to us from our parents and grandparents who worked on those plantations.  I talked about the importance of transforming those values into action.

That takes leadership.  The kind of leadership and guidance provided by the late Ron Bright.

Ron was a teacher at Castle High School who transformed Hawaii, one student at a time, by engaging them in the performing arts.  He understood the importance of values.

His classroom was the theatrical stage where he directed generations of students in an imaginary world.  But the lessons they learned there were about life and the real world.  In his productions as artistic director of Castle’s Performing Arts Center, Ron celebrated our differences, reminded us of our common humanity and joyfully depicted life in all of its manifestations.

At this time, I’d like to recognize Ron’s family who is with us today.

Ron’s total commitment to the affirmation of life through education must continue to guide us.  Today, we need only watch the news on TV to see examples of man’s inhumanity to man, triggered by the fear of differences—racial, religious, national.  There are of course real dangers in the world that must be squarely met.

But it is also true that the world is becoming a smaller place where pluralism is increasingly the rule rather than the exception.  These conditions call less for fear and hostility and more for the unyielding affirmation of diversity.  We have found a way in these islands—anchored by a remarkable host culture and the enriching waves of immigration from east and west—to value and venerate who we are.

Many and yet one.

It is a lesson we have learned over time and it is an active pledge we must keep and live by every day.  The transcendent call from our island state to the surrounding world is that when we demean others we betray ourselves.

There is a finer, better way.  Pledge to it, make it real every day and lead the way.

Mahalo, and I look forward to the work ahead.

Confirmed Dengue Fever Cases on the Big Island of Hawaii Rises to 237

The Dengue Fever outbreak on the Big Island continues and the total confirmed amount of cases rose by 4 more case since the last update bringing the total amount of confirmed cases to 237:

Mosquito Bite

As of January 25, 2016*:

Since the last update, HDOH has identified 4 new cases of dengue fever.  Currently, as many as 3 of the confirmed cases to date are potentially infectious to mosquitoes. All others are no longer infectious.

Potentially infectious individuals
3 Illness onset 1/16/16 to 1/17/16
Cases no longer infectious
234 Illness onset 9/11/15 to 1/13/16
Past and present confirmed cases (Cumulative TOTAL)
237

Of the confirmed cases, 214 are Hawaii Island residents and 23 are visitors.
193 cases have been adults; 44 have been children (<18 years of age). Onset of illness has ranged between 9/11/15 – 1/17/16.

As of today, a total of 985 reported potential cases have been excluded based on test results and/or not meeting case criteria.

Public Invited to February 5 Groundbreaking for Hōnaunau Rodeo Arena Reconstruction

Please join Hawai‘i County Mayor Billy Kenoi, County Councilwoman Maile David and other dignitaries for a public groundbreaking ceremony that will be held at 3 p.m. Friday, February 5, to commemorate the start of reconstructing the Hōnaunau Rodeo Arena.

Honaunau rodeo

The ceremony will be held at the rodeo arena located at 84-5134 Hōnaunau Road, which is approximately halfway between the Hōnaunau Post Office and the Pu‘uhonua O Hōnaunau National Historic Park. Refreshments and light pupu will be served.

With the strong support of Councilwoman David, Mayor Kenoi and the Department of Parks and Recreation are investing $5.1 million to rebuild the entire rodeo arena and allow for expanded public use. Plans call for constructing a new comfort station, judges’ stand, covered spectator stands, and paved parking stalls. New panels, pens, and infill material also will be installed. A new 2,000-square-foot pavilion with concession area will support rodeo events while doubling as a much-needed venue for South Kona residents to hold public meetings, private parties, and other functions. Finally, the entire facility will be made ADA-compliant, while a completely rebuilt water system will include new water spigots that will be made available for public use.

Isemoto Contracting Co. Ltd. is expected to finish the arena reconstruction by October 2016.

For more information, please contact the Department at 961-8311.

84 Hawaii Public Schools to be Awarded for Wellness

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) is announcing a record number of Hawaii public schools that will be receiving “Excellence in Wellness” awards this spring.

Since 2013, public schools have received the award based on their outstanding implementation of the Department of Education’s Wellness Guidelines. The Guidelines are a set of standards for foods and beverages provided to students that include goals for school-based wellness committees, health and physical education, and other practices that support student health.

Click to view the report

Click to view the report

According to the annual Safety and Wellness Survey (SAWS), a total of 84 Hawaii public elementary, middle, and high schools met over 90 percent of the Wellness Guidelines during the 2014-2015 school year, up from 45 schools in 2013-2014.

“Excellence in Wellness” banners will be presented to school principals during annual fitness meets and at recognition events statewide. The awards are co-sponsored by the Hawaii Department of Health and Action for Healthy Kids.

“The increase in support for wellness in our schools is notable and we hope that this momentum will continue” said Director of Health Virginia Pressler, M.D. “This data demonstrates the successful partnership we have with the DOE to strengthen implementation and monitor the Wellness Guidelines as we move forward.”

The Hawaii Departments of Education and Health jointly administer the SAWS annually to track implementation of the Guidelines. Results indicate a consistently high level of achievement with survey respondents meeting an average of 82 percent of the DOE Wellness Guidelines in 2014-2015.

Highlights from the 2014-2015 SAWS include:

  • All school meals (100 percent) continue to meet or exceed federal nutrient standards;
  • Health and Physical Education classes align with the Hawaii Content and Performance Standards III at 94 percent and 97 percent of schools, respectively;
  • Students have at least 20 minutes a day of supervised recess, during which they are encouraged to be physically active at 84 percent of schools.

“Healthy habits not only result in a student’s physical wellness but also contribute to a successful pathway in college and career readiness,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “Implementing wellness practices is an important element to ensuring that students are prepared for life after high school. Congratulations to all the schools that have made this a priority.”

The Wellness Guidelines, SAWS, and public reporting of SAWS data fulfills requirements of the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act (2004) and the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (2010).

The Safety and Wellness Survey Data Report for School Year 2014-15 is available at: http://bit.ly/1QeM3HY.

More information about the Wellness Guidelines, visit: http://www.hawaiipublicschools.org/TeachingAndLearning/HealthAndNutrition/WellnessGuidelines/Pages/home.aspx

Schools Achieving Excellence in Wellnessin School Year 2014-2015(SAWS score of 90 percent or higher):

  • Ahuimanu Elementary
  • Kamalii Elementary
  • Nanakuli Elementary
  • Aiea High
  • Kaneohe Elementary
  • Nanakuli High & Intermediate
  • Aiea Intermediate
  • Kanoelani Elementary
  • Noelani Elementary
  • Aina Haina Elementary
  • Kapolei Elementary
  • Olomana
  • Ala Wai Elementary
  • Kapunahala Elementary
  • Paauilo Elementary & Intermediate
  • Aliiolani Elementary
  • Keaau High
  • Pahoa High & Intermediate
  • August Ahrens Elementary
  • King Intermediate
  • Palisades Elementary
  • Castle High
  • Kipapa Elementary
  • Pearl City Elementary
  • de Silva Elementary
  • Kohala High
  • Pearl Harbor Elementary
  • Hahaione Elementary
  • Koloa Elementary
  • Pope Elementary
  • Hana High and Elementary
  • Kuhio Elementary
  • Pu’u Kukui Elementary
  • Hauula Elementary
  • Laie Elementary
  • Red Hill Elementary
  • Hawaii Center for the Deaf and the Blind
  • Lehua Elementary
  • Salt Lake Elementary
  • Heeia Elementary
  • Liholiho Elementary
  • Scott Elementary
  • Helemano Elementary
  • Lokelani Intermediate
  • Solomon Elementary
  • Highlands Intermediate
  • Lunalilo Elementary
  • Sunset Beach Elementary
  • Hilo Intermediate
  • Maemae Elementary
  • Waialua Elementary
  • Honaunau Elementary
  • Makaha Elementary
  • Waianae Elementary
  • Iliahi Elementary
  • Makakilo Elementary
  • Waimea Canyon Middle
  • Kaaawa Elementary
  • Maunawili Elementary
  • Waipahu Intermediate
  • Kaahumanu Elementary
  • Mililani Ike Elementary
  • Webling Elementary
  • Kaala Elementary
  • Mililani Mauka Elementary
  • William McKinley High
  • Kahala Elementary
  • Mililani Uka Elementary
  • Wilson Elementary
  • Kahuku Elementary
  • Moanalua Middle
  • Waianae High
  • Kailua Elementary
  • Mokapu Elementary
  • Waikele Elementary
  • Kailua Intermediate
  • Molokai High
  • Waikiki Elementary
  • Kaimiloa Elementary
  • Momilani Elementary
  • Waikoloa School
  • Kalihi-uka Elementary
  • Nanaikapono Elementary
  • Waimanalo Elementary & Intermediate