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Pauahi Foundation Offering Science Camps Scholarships

Science Camps of America is back for another summer and the Pauahi Foundation wants to help Hawaii Island students get to camp. The initial deadline to apply for a full scholarship has been extended to Monday, June 13. The 10-day overnight camp gives teens entering grades 8 through 12 the opportunity to explore the environmental diversity that Hawaii Island has to offer from beaches to rainforests and mountaintops.
science camp
“Hawaii Island is such an amazing place geographically, climatically and culturally,” states Science Camps Executive Director Michael Richards. “The best place to learn about the natural world is outdoors, and this compelled me to create a camp for teens to experience science in ‘nature’s greatest laboratory.’”

Camp home base is at the Pahala Plantation Cottages in Ka‘u. Some of the destinations include Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center, Mauna Kea Visitor Center, Mauna Loa Climate Observatory, Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach and many more.

The first camp session, Land and Sea, will be held June 29 to July 8 and focus on Hawaii’s ocean, forests, mountains and volcanoes. Campers will explore Hawaii’s unique flora and fauna and learn how events in the natural world affect every living creature, including humans.

The second session, Air and Space, will be held July 9 to 18 and focus on astronomy, space exploration and climate. Campers will gain a better understanding of climate change and the creation and use of alternative energy to help address global warming.

The Pauahi Foundation scholarship is for Hawaii Island residents ages 13 to 17. Preference is given to those of Native Hawaiian ancestry. To apply, visit www.pauahi.org/scholarships/science-camps-of-america/.

To extend this experience to more local teens, Science Camps offers a limited amount of partial scholarships based on financial need through the Science Camp of America Scholarship Fund. Other scholarship opportunities are still available. Contributions from the public to the Science Camp of America Scholarship Fund are welcome. To learn more about and register for Science Camps of America, visit SciCamp.org.

Kahilu Theatre Presents the Smash Hit Musical – GREASE

On Friday, June 17, at 7pm, Saturday, June 18, at 7pm, and Sunday, June 19, at 4pm, Kahilu Theatre presents the full production of GREASE (the Musical) with the Kahilu Theatre Youth Troupe.

grease logoTravel back in time to 1959 with Rydell High’s senior class, as the duck-tailed, hot-rodding “Burger Palace Boys” and the gum-snapping, hip-shaking “Pink Ladies” in bobby sox and pedal pushers, evoke the look and sound of the 1950’s in this rollicking Kahilu Produced musical.

Head “greaser” Danny Zuko, and good girl Sandy Dumbrowski, try to relive the romance of their “Summer Nights,” as the rest of the gang sings and dances its way through classics such as “Greased Lightning,” “Summer Nights,” “We Go Together,” and “You’re the One that I Want,” recalling the music of Buddy Holly, Little Richard, and Elvis Presley.

With an eight-year run on Broadway, and two subsequent revivals, along with innumerable school and community productions, GREASE is among the world’s most popular musicals, and the Kahilu Youth Troupe is sure to delight audiences!

GREASE is directed by Beth Dunnington, with musical direction by Phil Kadet, choreography by Dr. Angela Alforque, costumes by Maia Tarnas, and vocal coaching by HPAF Artistic Director Val Underwood. Kahilu Theatre enjoys artistic collaboration with the Hawaii Performing Arts Festival in this production.

Grease Rehearsal

The cast of GREASE includes P.T. Mahoney, Angela Mihelich, Noelani Anderson, Seraphim Benoist, Grace Bostock, Leilani Bostock, Sienna Byrne, Colby Camero, Michael Chu, Simon Dunlap, Sean Dunnington, Deb Goodwin, Daniel Gregg, Ryan Hooley, Hunter Kalahiki, Anna McFarland, Michelangelo McPeek, Walker McMullin, Sofia Ribeiro, Kat Rose Sullivan, Cameron Supplee, Grace Todd, and Alianna West.

The Kahilu Theatre doors open at 6pm for the Friday and Saturday performances and at 3pm for the Sunday performance. There will also be food and beverages available for sale. The Waimea Schools Art Exhibit will be showing in the Kohala Gallery.

GREASE follows the 25th Annual Putnam Spelling Bee and Godspell, both directed by Grease director Beth Dunnington, as the third annual Kahilu Youth Production in two decades.

This performance is made possible by sponsorship from Roy and Frances Simperman, Tim Bostock and Melanie Holt, Regan and Shoshana Matsumura, Zaheva and David Knowles, Bob and Donna Povich, Duncan Dempster, Mimi and Brian Kerley, and Bob and Nancy Male.

Tickets are $33 / $27 / $22 / $16 and available for purchase online at http://www.kahilutheatre.org, by calling (808) 885-6868, or at the Kahilu Theatre Box Office, at 67-1186 Lindsey Road, Kamuela, HI 96743, Monday-Friday, from 9am to 1pm.

Hulihe‘e Event Marks 40th Anniversary of Palace Band, Glee Club

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabsh Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe‘e 4 p.m. Sunday, June 12 at Hulihe‘e Palace to remember King Kamehameha I, Paiea (1738-1819).  Enjoy the voices of the Merrie Monarchs, performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘I and the Hulihe‘e Palace Band.

Hulihee Palace Band and Glee Club

Hulihee Palace Band and Glee Club

The performance marks the 40th anniversary of the Hulihe’e Palace Band and the Merrie Monarchs glee club. The two organizations were founded in 1976 by the late bandmaster Bud Dant and the late palace curator and performer, Aunty Lei Collins.

Afternoon at Hulihe‘e is part of the palace’s series of free monthly concerts that honor Hawai‘i’s past monarchs and historical figures; donations are appreciated. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Born in Kohala on the Big Island, Kamehameha moved the heavy naha stone as a teen—a feat that prophesied he would rule the island chain. In battle, Kamehameha overtook the Big Island, Maui, Moloka‘i and O‘ahu then he put Kaua‘i and Ni‘ihau under his sovereignty by diplomacy. By 1810, the Kingdom of Hawai‘i was established and Kamehameha moved his court from Waikiki to Kailua-Kona.

“After Kamehameha formed his island kingdom he attempted to modify the impact of war on innocent citizens caught in the conflict,” says Jolee Chip, docent coordinator. “He issued an edict protecting women, children and the elderly from arbitrary attack.”

Kamehameha also instituted a law to protect the weak from the strong, recalling a blow he suffered as a young warrior when his foot was caught in a rock crevice. The opponent hit Kamehameha with a canoe paddle that splintered at impact and the command later became known as the Law of the Splintered Paddle. The king died in 1819 in Kailua-Kona.

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday—with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.

Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday- Saturday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Big Island Police Investigate 23 Counterfeit Money Cases in May

Hawaiʻi Island police are warning the public about a spike in counterfeit cases in the Hilo and Puna districts.

In May, police investigated 23 counterfeit cases in those districts compared with seven cases in April and two cases in January through March. Stores and restaurants have received counterfeit bills in $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100 denominations.

Anyone who receives a counterfeit bill is urged to call the police to file a report.
Counterfit Money
Police ask anyone with information about who is producing or passing these bills to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

UH Hilo Announces College of Arts and Sciences Spring 2016 Dean’s List

The following students in the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Arts and Sciences were named to the Dean’s List for spring 2016:

UH Hilo Moniker

Shannon Abarra, Richard Abbley, Taylor Acheson, Jenna Acia, Shelie M. Acoba, BJ Isaac Acosta, Anthony Actouka, Clifford Agcaoili, Alexandria Agdeppa, Devon Aguiar, Isaac Ahuna, Rhonda Akano, Leahi Akao, Roy Alameida, Jessalyn Albano, Jeannelle Alejo, Melinda Alles, Losalia Aloisio, John Alokoa, Alia Alvarez, Catherina Amantiad,

Frank A. Amdal, Aalona Amimoto, Victoria E. Amundsen, Erica Amundson, Brian Anderson, Shalen Anderson, Shantel Antonio, Zion Apao, Ralph Aquino, Shaylyn Arakaki, David Arakawa, Justin Araki-Kwee, Theresa Arcilla, Jerome Arellano, D’Anna Asher, Scott Ashida, Lacey Astgen, Cameron Atsumi, Jessica Bailey, Michael Bailey, Kayla Bajo, Sharlene Bala, Valerie Balken, Zoe Banfield,

Ashley Barhite, Benedick Baris, Reagan Barnhart, Ruth Bascar-Sellars, Crystal-lynn Baysa, Catherine Bellefleur, Chase Benbow, Sarah Benner, Ryan Berengue, Chakra Best, Jahnu Best, Victoria Birrenbach, Vilde R. Bjoerdal, Allexandria Blacksmith, Ashton Blair, Julianna Blair, Henry Blake, Chelsea Blaquera, Katherine Bluhm, Stephen Bond, Kelsie Bork, Sarah Brakenwagen, Courtney A. Brock,

BreAnna Brown, Eleanor Brown, Matthew Brown, Harley Broyles, Rachel Bruck, Kathryn Brunk, Kailah Buchanan, Karley Burcena, Merritt Burch, Malia Byram, Ridge Cabaccang, Alexis Cabrera, Sheldon Cabudol, Leischene Calingangan, Keala Campbell, Amanda Canda, Kirsten Cannoles, Tiari Carreira, Nicholas Carrion, Anne Carsey, Micah Carter, Kanoeuluwehianu Case, Jennifer Castro,

Kahana Cazimero, Isabella Cebreros, Jennifer Chai, Cibyl Chan, Roget Chan, Andy Chang, Maggie Chen, Edward Cheng, Kate Chikasuye, Cheuk Wang Chiu, Adam Chong, Christopher Chow, Ka Hei G. Choy, Kobie Clarke, Heather Coad, Zoe Coffman, Angela Colon, Adam S. Colton, Brandie Colwell, Stefan Coney, Michael Coombs, Cletus Correia, Presley Coryell, Alysha Cosier, Clarence Cottrell, Seneca Cox,

Janelle Coy, Cory Craig, Leanne Crain, Tifaine Crivello, Trixie A. Croad, John Crommelin, Kawelina Cruz, Justin Cueva, Jasmin Curiel, Uilani Dasalla, Theodore Dawson, Laura Deaton, Kaylee Decambra, Edwina Degrood, Theodore DeRego, Billi Derleth, Ileana Derouin-Loando, Erin Dewing, Abbie DeWitte, Danielle Dodge, Lorelei M. Domingo, Princess Dianne Domingo, Ryan Domingo, Jasmine Donner, Sadie Dossett, Cortney Dougherty, Mike Dowsett, James Drescher, Julie Duhaylongsod, Sarah Dunaway, Jennifer Eastin,

Raelyn Eckert, Jacqueline Economy, Jamie Economy, Jon Ehrenberg, Cale Elliott, Sara Ellsworth, Remedios Epp, Sara Erickson, Raynell Espaniola, Kelsie Espiritu-Tanabe, Damon Ewen, Jade Farmer, Heidi Featherstone, Maria M. Feldt, Sarah Ferguson, Taysia Figueroa, Kelsey Foreman-Bunting, Aubrey Foulk, Jeena Franco, Mitchell Fraser, Ella R. Fregeau Olmstead, Dallas Freitas, Esther Frost, Bailey Fuchs, Brittany Fuemmeler, Shaylyn Fujii, Kellsie Fujimoto,

Ashley Fukuchi, Maki Fukuhara, Trent Furuta, Dylan Gable, Nicholas Galliani, April Gaoiran, Nicole Garcia, Zachary Geisterfer, StacyMae Gelacio, Meghan George, Emma-Lei Gerrish, Tuan Giai Giang, Kahri Golden, Kassidy Gonsalves, Annabel Gonzalez, Acacia Goo, Rachel Gorenflo, Beverly A. Gorospe, Marc D. Grande, Siera Green,

Zechariah Greene, Rachel A. Greer-Smith, Chrisovolandou Gronowski, Riana Grothmann, Rihei Grothmann, Heidi Guan, Alexander Guerrero, Natalie Hagemann, Brittany Hale, Carli Hand, Kye Harford, Arielle Harnik, Molly Harris, Rose Hart, Bridge Hartman, Stephen Hasegawa, Alexander Hedglen, Dakota Helfrich, John Herman, Rachel Heu, Brad Higa, Tyler Hoffman, Tiana Honda,

Lauren Hong, Alena Hookano, Tanya Hooper, Trenton Hooper, Alyssa Hoshide, Jordan Howard, Kainoa Howard, Samantha Howell, ZhiLing Huang, Robert Huelskamp, Adrian Huff, Brianne Huggins, Jonathan Hults-Ferko, Thien Huynh, Laura Ibbotson, Andi Igawa, Kadi Igawa, Alleonore-Destiny Iguin, Runa Ikeno, Kayla Ing, Ching Ip, Courtney Ip, Sepe S. Isaac, Joanne Isabella, Yui Isogai, Cameron Ita, Daylen Ita,

Alexa Jacobs, Dana J. Jennings, Bethanie Johnson, Lindsay Johnson, Casey Jones, Kailani Jones, Mikayla Jones, Jamie Josephson, Jessica J. Julian, Jessica Justo, Kahuliau Kaai, Kayuri Kadoya, Natasha Kahana, Shaylyn Kahawai, Kelii Kailipaka, Kahoruko Kajiya, Nainoa Kalaukoa, Ellie-Jean Kalawe, Bree Kalima, Tayler Kaniho, Vebjoern Karisari, Melvalee Kaulia, Germaine Kaululaau, Hokuto Kawashima,

Jill Keely, Joanne Keliikoa, Bianca Keohokapu, Micah Kerr, Ada Kettner, Chantelle Kiessner, Bokyung Kim, Chan Gyeom Kim, Mary L. Kimura, Andrew J. H. Kinloch, Rachel Kishimoto, Joshua Kitagawa, Keely Kitamura, Faasalafa Kitiona, Rachel Klein, Alexandra Kler Lago, William Kobus, Kamrie Koi, Cody Kojima, Felicia Kolb, Lisa Kosilla, Maya Kottwitz, Ayaka Koyama, Michelle Kuehn, Johann Kuipers, Morgan Kultala, Desmond K. K. Lai, Mia Lamirand,

Brittney Lane, Danielle Larson, Samantha Lathrop, Brandon Lau, Joshua Lawcock, Da Hai Lee, Robert Lee, Shalyn Lewis, QiXin Li, Hannah Lipman, Eileen Liu, Emerson J. Llaguno, Gerard Lono, Piikea Lono, Sheena Lopes, Kawehi Lopez, Catherine Lord, Kristi Lovell, Michael Lovell, Noelle Lovesy, Rebekah Loving, Vanessa Lua, Sharlene Macasieb, Kimberly Magsipoc, Lily Mahan, Brandon Mahle,

Wilson Malone, Danielle Marrufo, Kelly Martin-Young, Shae Massie, Anna C. Masuda, Carle-Ann Mata, Moriah Mathson, Kasey Matsumoto, Kelley Matsumoto, Aspen Mauch, Michelle Mazzetti, Shaina McEnroe, Meghan McGrath, Kayla McKown, Jared McLean, Brendan McQuillan, Korin Medeiros, Leslie Medina, Matthew Merritt, Zoey Meyers, William Midgley, Anna B. Mikkelsen, Bryce Miles-Leighton, Zayin Minia, Risako Mise, Lauren Mizuba, Nicole Monette,

Ariel Moniz, Brendan Moore, Ariyana Moran, Juliann Morris, Candice Moses, Meghan Mulley, Jenny Nagatori, Brandon Naihe, Lorelei Nakagawa, Tori Nakagawa, Richard Nakamura, Blayne Nakasone Sakata, Joseph Nakoa, Robynn A. Namnama, Kirstie Naone, Jordan L. Nauka, Ariel Navarro, Shanice Navarro, Christopher Nelson, Nena Nena Jr., Keith Nerida, Kelsey Nguyen, Cameron Nicholson, Richelle G. Nicolas, Keenan Nishioka, Dylan Oakes, Aaron O’Connor, Ryuta Ogawa, Helio M. A. Oliveira De Araujo, Morgan Olson, Nicole Ortiz,

Jebe G. Pacris, John D. Padapat, Isaac Pang, Jessica Pang, Jannah Pante, Pauleen Pante, Joshua Parep, Ciarra-Lynn Parinas, John Parker, Kailey Pascoe, Ishani S. S. Patel, Tyson Pavao, Leomanaolamaikalani Peleiholani Blankenfeld, Ulupuamahinamaikalani Peleiholani-Blankenfeld, Graham Pernell,

Trevor Perry, Mark Petner, Sharon Petrosky, Terri Pinyerd, Avion Plummer, Wakea Po, Michelle Popek, Arwen Potochney, Gavrielle Pressman, Froile Queja, Kylee Quevedo, Jasmin M. Quiamas, Natalie Quinajon, Sheri Quon, David J. Ramones, Crystal Rances, Kaylee Rapoza, Kaydee Rapozo, Nicole Rascon, Larry Rawlins, Evangeline Raza, Keana Rees, Marleah Renti Cruz, Chelsea Requelman,

Ashley A. Resurreccion, Travis Richard, Taumie Richie, Emily Risley, Tatiana Robson, Ashley Romero, Shyla Ronia, Kainoa Rosa, Megan Rose, Robin Rudolph, Nina Sabahi, Josiane Saccu, Melanie Sacro, Tessie Sadino, Julie A. Sagabaen, Gabriella Sanchez, Chelsea Sato, Jacey Savage, Kristen Savea, Tomoki Sawada, Tatianna Schenk-Lee,

Crystal Schiszler, Dehrich Schmidt-Chya, Sinead Scholl, James Scott, Artem Sergeyev, Ishael Shaw-De Mello, Marleena Sheffield, Ang Sheng, Albert Shim, Jaci Shinoda, Keani Shirai, Kayla Shiroma, Keian Shon, Sabrina Shores, Malia Silva, Lindsay Simmons, Heather Simon, Hazel F. Sivila, Trevor Slevin, James Smith, Kathleen Smith, Kiana Soloria, Carrie Soo Hoo, Krismon Sotiangco, Megan Souza, Sarah O. L. C. Spicer, Jamie N. Sporcic, Lauren Spreen, Kimberlee Staats,

Ryan Stack, Ashlin Stahlberg, Erin Stamper, Maria Steadmon, Angelica Steele, Emma Stevens, Marguerite Stith, Taylor Stokesbary, Jeremiah Storie, Tiffany Stranathan, Marley Strand-Nicolaisen, Cole Stremski-Borero, Jason Su, Kylee Sullivan, Taliesin Sumner, Tyler Sumner, Sarah Swenson, Randolph Tafua, Irie Taguchi, Ryan Taifane, Peniamina Taii, Erlynn Takahashi, Melia Takakusagi, Casey Tamura, Chiko Tanahara, Devin Tanaka, Victoria Taomia, Morgan Tate,

Reuben Tate, Temau Teikitekahioho-Wolff, Allicyn Texeira, Gin Tezuka, Travis Thieme, Ginger Thomas, Melanie Thomason, Pueo Tinglin, Julie Tom, Kaycie Tomei, Shonosuke Tomomatsu, Ashley C. Tomori, Brandon Tomota, Ryotaro Toshima, Irene Transfiguracion, Taylor Traub, Kyndra Trevino-Scott, Saori Uchida, Sabrina Uchino,

Lavin Uehara, Mary-Fem Urena, Brenna Usher, Aundrea Vidal, Lixie A. Villanueva, Leilani VisikoKnox-Johnson, Anthony Vizzone, Michael Voight, Ashley Vongsy, Kaipoleimanu Wahinepio, Shayla Waiki, Amirah Waite, George R. Wakefield, Jasmin Wamar-Deponte, HeNaniNoOeKaWahineUioIkePono Wandasan, Kenton Wandasan,

Seng-Khooi Wang, Jordyn Waracka, Vernon Warnock, Sondra Warren, Valerie K. Wasser, Evan Watanabe, Joerg M. Weber, John Whitworth, Brian Wild, Magnus Wilhelmsen, Alexis Williams, Leah Wilson, Skyla Wilson, Vanessa Winchester-Sye, Michelle Winkler, Ashley Winslow, Tanya Wong, Tiana Wong, Chayata Wongpojanee,

Daniel Wright, Chelsie Wung, Marilyn Yamamoto, Phillip Yawata, Miho Yokotani, Cheyne Yonemori, Sayuri Yoshimura, Deanna Young, Tyler Young, Anwar A. Yu, Hye Lin Yu, Trisha Yuen, Jacqueline Yuw, Luana Zablan, Nils Zahn, Turfa Zaman, and Yeva Zobova.

Big Island Film Festival Announces Class of 2016 Award Winners

The 2016 Big Island Film Festival at the Fairmont Orchid, Hawaii announces the 2016 Award Winners:

Best Student Short: Breathe
Best Hawai’i Short: Surrender Call
Best Family Short: Rated
Best Foreign Short: Regression

Producers Milan Andrjasevic, Leanne Melissa Bishop and Michael P. Mason of the film "Regression". Milan was also the Director and writer.

Producers Milan Andrjasevic, Leanne Melissa Bishop and Michael P. Mason of the film “Regression”. Milan was also the Director and writer.

Best Short: Monty and the Runaway Furnace

Film Producer Vinnie Taranto from Florida. He produced the film "Monty and the Runaway Furnace"

Film Producer Vinnie Taranto from Florida. He produced the film “Monty and the Runaway Furnace”

The Barbara Award: New Generations
Best Foreign Feature: Psychoanalysis

James Raue

Film Director/Writer James Raue of Psychoanalysis

Best Hawai’i Feature: THROUPLE The Movie

Zoe Eisenberg and Phillips Payson from Throuple.

Zoe Eisenberg and Phillips Payson from Throuple.

Best Family Feature: Catfish Blues
Best Feature: The Closer

Audience Choice Short: Water Girl

Producer Richard Gonzalez (Right) writer Karen Rose (lei) and cast of the film "Water Girl". Emily Lathrop (age 11, center) is the star.

Producer Richard Gonzalez (Right) writer Karen Rose (lei) and cast of the film “Water Girl”. Emily Lathrop (age 11, center) is the star.

Audience Choice Feature: Catfish Blues

Catfish Blues

The festival concludes tonight with a “Best of the Fest” concert from 5-7 p.m. where there will be a silent auction to benefit Fisher House at Tripler Army Medical Center. Auction items will be on display at the Tennis Pavilion of Fairmont Orchid, Hawai’i while the legendary band HAPA will entertain folks.

Winning bids will be announced at 7 p.m. then at 7:30 p.m. the festival will show the Audience Choices for Short (Monty and the Runaway Furnace) and Feature Films (Catfish Blues). These films were selected by votes during the previous four days.

$45 general admission, $35 kama’āina, $10/5 keiki 7-12. All seats are $5 more at the door.

Purchase tickets online.

Films only: Adult $8, Keiki $5. All seats are $5 more at the door. (Doors Open 7 p.m.)

Bellamy Young Receives 2016 Golden Honu Award From Big Island Film Festival

Last night at the Big Island Film Festival at the Fairmont Orchid, Hawaii… actress Bellamy Young was awarded a 2016 Golden Honu Award.

Big Island Film Festival Director Leo Sears and Bellamy Young after Bellamy received the Golden Honu Award.

Big Island Film Festival Director Leo Sears and Bellamy Young after Bellamy received the Golden Honu Award.

Bellamy has been at the festival since Thursday interacting with fans and enjoying the films being presented.

Actor Michael Gross and Bellamy at the Mayor's Reception.

Actor Michael Gross and Bellamy at the Mayor’s Reception.

Last night she also had a question and answer session with Variety Magazines Features Writer Peter Caranicas where she talked about her career and the current hit show “Scandal” where she plays the lead character of the First Lady of the United States, Melody “Mellie” Grant.

Bellamy talks about her career with Variety Magazine Features Editor Peter Caranicas

Bellamy talks about her career with Variety Magazine Features Editor Peter Caranicas

After the question and answer session inside the Fairmont Orchids Lehua Theater, Bellamy went outside where she met with filmmakers, producers, writers, and fans.

Bellamy was literally "blown" away by the guys that I have penned the Tiki Torch Guys.

Bellamy was literally “blown” away by the guys that I have penned the Tiki Torch Guys.

You can watch full episodes online of “Scandal” anytime here: http://abc.go.com/shows/scandal/episode-guide

This is the 11th year the Big Island Film Festival has entertained and promoted films from around the world and tomorrow from 5-7 p.m. there will be a silent auction to benefit Fisher House at Tripler Army Medical Center.  Auction items will be on display at the Tennis Pavilion of Fairmont Orchid, Hawai’i while the legendary band HAPA will entertain folks.

Winning bids will be announced at 7 p.m. then at 7:30 p.m. the festival will show the Audience Choices for  Short and Feature Films. These films were selected by votes during the previous four days.

$45 general admission, $35 kama’āina, $10/5 keiki 7-12. All seats are $5 more at the door.

Purchase tickets online.

Films only: Adult $8, Keiki $5. All seats are $5 more at the door. (Doors Open 7 p.m.)

Trustee Screening Committee Names Three Finalists for KSBE Board of Trustees

The Probate Court’s Trustee Screening Committee filed a report in Court identifying the names of three finalists the Committee recommends for the current vacancy on Kamehameha Schools’ Board of Trustees.

KSBE Logo

The three finalists are (in alphabetical order):

  • Kamanamaikalani Beamer
  • Maenette K.P. Ah Nee-Benham
  • Kanoelani Naone

The Screening Committee reported that they reviewed resumes and vision statements of 70 applicants. They also conducted personal interviews with semi-finalists to determine that the three finalists best meet the Probate Court’s requirements and desirable qualities and characteristics.

The court is accepting comments on these finalists until 4:00 p.m. on June 14, 2016. Comments received before the deadline will be filed with the Probate Court. Comments may be submitted as follows:

Email: jobs@inkinen.com
Regular mail:
Trustee Screening Committee
c/o Inkinen & Associates
1003 Bishop Street, Suite 1477
Honolulu, HI 96813

Hilo to Tanzania – Open Community Forum

The Rotary Club of South Hilo, in partnership with Short n Sweet Bakery and Café, and The Church of the Holy Apostles, is inviting the community to a free Open Community Forum presenting the experiences of four Peace Corps Volunteers and their time in Tanzania.  The forum will be on Wednesday June 8 at 5:00 pm at the Church of the Holy Apostles located at 1407 Kapiʻolani St., Hilo.

Returning Peace Corp Volunteers to speak at the Church of the Holy Apostles—1407 Kapiʻolani Street, Hilo

Returning Peace Corp Volunteers to speak at the Church of the Holy Apostles—1407 Kapiʻolani Street, Hilo

The featured speaker is Kanoelehua Ho along with three of her Peace Corp colleagues; Rochelle Latka, Sarah Munteanu, and Ginny Worley.  Their talk will focus on their experiences of being a Peace Corps Volunteer, and about Ho’s projects in Tanzania.

Ho a Kamehameha Schools Keaʻau alumna graduated from Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington in 2013.  In February 2014, she headed to Tanzania to start her assignment for the Peace Corps.  During her 27 month stay in Tanzania Ho has led numerous projects in her village including several funded with the help of a $3000 grant from the Rotary Club of South Hilo.  With the grant, Ho led a project that completed the village’s visiting physician house and completed a system bringing running water to its health clinic.

The project also brought 20 beehives to the village, to teach beekeeping and provide honey.  Besides providing income to buy HIV medication, the bees also will help pollinate a plant that can help treat HIV.  The grant also purchased two acres, where Ho and the villagers planted 300 avocado trees.  The avocado crop serves as another source of income.

“It’s truly amazing all of the lives Kanoe has been able to impact in her work with the Peace Corps.  The community is so incredibly proud of all she has done.  We are really looking forward to seeing and hearing about all she and her colleagues experienced in Tanzania,” said Rotary Club of South Hilo President Kim Arakawa.

The award winning Short n Sweet Bakery and Café will be providing light refreshments for the event.  For more information please contact (808) 741-1475.

Soldiers In The Battle Against Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death; Passion for Hawaii Forests Prompts Participation

Dozens of scientists, foresters, surveyors, researchers, and educators are actively involved in the fight to try and stop the spread of Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death. The fungal disease has decimated tens of thousands of acres of native ‘ōhi‘a on the Big Island. A virtual army of specialists from a wide array of federal, state, county, and non-profit organizations are engaged in the fight to find a treatment and simultaneously to stop it in its tracks. That’s where education and outreach come in.

ohia death

Anya Tagawa and Jeff Bagshaw of the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife’s (DOFAW)    Natural Area Reserve (NAR) program are two of the soldiers on the frontline of spreading awareness about Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death.  They’ve each created signs that hunters, hikers,     mountain bikers and other people recreating on state public lands will soon see.  DLNR Chair Suzanne Case said,  “It is critical that every person who goes into the woods or forest anywhere in Hawaii, takes steps to prevent this disease from spreading. Anya and Jeff’s work along with a team of other outreach experts, is vitally important in getting kama‘āina and visitors alike to be certain they don’t inadvertently track the fungus from place to place.”

Their individual signs are different in appearance, but contain the same basic message. Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death kills one of the most important native trees quickly and in wide swaths.  Failing to follow the simple recommendations outlined on both signs could make you responsible for spreading this disease inter-island and intra-island.

Tagawa’s passion is borne of a life spent in the forest. She comments, “My life has always been intertwined with ‘ōhi‘a, with our native forests. I grew up hiking, exploring, and being captivated by our forests. I continue to learn about their unparalleled uniqueness and feel an intimate    connection with these special places. Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death threatens this way of life. It is imperative that we do all what we can to ensure ‘ōhi‘a is present for our future generations to experience, engage, and form a relationship with. It is critical for the continued persistence of the countless unique plants and animals that rely on ‘ōhi’a.”

Bagshaw is the outreach coordinator at the Ahihi-Kina‘u NAR on Maui’s south shore. The nearest wild ‘ōhi’a is dozens of miles away yet he designed the sign for the Na Ala Hele Trails Access system, because he, like his colleagues, is deeply concerned about the fate of Hawai‘i’s ‘ōhi’a forests.

He said, “We hope hikers and all forest users will start to be conscious  wherever they go, even if there’s ‘ōhi’a there or not. We’d like them to realize, that they could be taking something into the forest that affects our native ecosystems. ‘Ōhi’a are the backbone of our native rainforest; they feed the honeycreepers, they protect the watershed.  I can’t imagine a Hawaiian rainforest without ‘ōhi’a.”

Recently, Bagshaw, his staff, and volunteers conducted awareness surveys with visitors to the Ahihi-Kina‘u NAR.  They’ve found very few people have any knowledge about ōhi’a or Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death.  They’re heartened though, by people’s willingness to adopt the preventative measures outlined on each of the trail signs.

Tagawa’s signs will eventually be at every DOFAW trailhead on the Big Island: more than 50 in all. On Maui, Bagshaw’s signs are being placed at all Na Ala Hele trailheads.

Soldiers in the Fight Against Rapid Ohia Death- Video News Release from Hawaii DLNR on Vimeo.

East Hawaii Officer of the Month: Jared Cabatu

The Aloha Exchange Club of East Hawaiʻi recognized Officer Jared Cabatu on Thursday (May 26) as the East Hawaiʻi “Officer of the Month” for May.

Aloha Exchange Club member Joey Estrella presents an 'Officer of the Month' award to Officer Jared Cabatu.

Aloha Exchange Club member Joey Estrella presents an ‘Officer of the Month’ award to Officer Jared Cabatu.

Cabatu was honored for his outstanding accomplishment in patrol operations that led to the recovery of a stolen federal vehicle.

On April 26, three pickup trucks were stolen from the University of Hawaiʻi Institute of Astronomy. In the days that followed, Cabatu worked to solve the case and learned that a vehicle matching the description of the ones stolen had been seen in the upper Hilo area. Following that lead, he located the vehicle in the Waiākea Uka area and determined that its license plate had been stolen from another vehicle. When he attempted to contact the occupants, they fled.

Officer Cabatu immediately communicated information about the vehicle and the suspects to his fellow South Hilo Patrol officers, leading to the recovery of the vehicle and the arrest of two men and a woman. As a result, detectives assigned to the case were able to develop additional leads and information.

Cabatu was previously named “Officer of the Month” In March 2013 and October 2015. As “Officer of the Month,” he is eligible for “Officer of the Year.”

The East Hawaiʻi “Officer of the Month” award is a project of the Aloha Exchange Club of East Hawaiʻi.

UH Hilo’s Lam Receives Prestigious Fulbright Award

Carolina Lam, director of global education at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Center for Global Education and Exchange, has received a prestigious Fulbright International Education Administrators (IEA) Award to visit South Korea.

Carolina Lam, Director, Global Education at UH Hilo

Carolina Lam, Director, Global Education at UH Hilo

The purpose of the program is to provide international education administrators an opportunity to learn about the host country’s educational system and network with Korean and U.S. cohort colleagues. Lam will spend two weeks in June traveling throughout South Korea, meeting with representatives from the country’s universities, along with selected government and private sector agencies.

“I am honored to have been selected to participate in this program,” Lam said. “I look forward to learning more about South Korea’s culture and educational system, and visiting with at least four of our 11 partner universities that are located there.”

The IEA award is part of the Fulbright Scholar program, which sends approximately 1,100 U.S. faculty and professionals abroad each year. Fulbright programs are international education exchanges that are sponsored by the U.S. government and designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries.

For more information, visit http://www.cies.org.

Hawaii Residents Can Spot the International Space Station Tonight

Hawaii residents can spot the International Space Station tonight (depending on clouds).

International Space Station

It will be visible beginning tonight, Thursday, May 26, at 8:02 PM. It will be visible for approximately 6 minutes at a Maximum Height of 61 degrees. It will appear 11 degrees above the Southwest part of the sky and disappear 11 degrees above the North Northeast part of the sky.

New Lava Flow Map Hints at Direction of New Flows

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field in relation to the eastern part of the Island of Hawaiʻi.

flow 525a

The new breakouts from Puʻu ʻŌʻō that began on May 24 are shown in red, as mapped on May 25. The area of the original June 27th lava flow field is shown in pink, as last mapped in detail on May 9.

Click to enlarge

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth’s surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The base map is a partly transparent regional land cover map from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Coastal Management draped over a 1983 10-m digital elevation model (DEM). The bathymetry is also from NOAA. Click to enlarge

Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows erupted prior to June 27, 2014, are shown in gray. The black box shows the extent of the accompanying large scale map.

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field. The new breakouts from Puʻu ʻŌʻō that began on May 24 are shown in red, as mapped on May 25. The area of the original June 27th lava flow field is shown in pink, as last mapped in detail on May 9. Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows erupted prior to June 27, 2014, are shown in gray. Puʻu ʻŌʻō is at lower left.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

The blue lines show steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 digital elevation model (DEM; for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth’s surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The base map is a partly transparent 1:24,000-scale USGS digital topographic map draped over a 1983 10-m digital elevation model (DEM).

Free Window Screening Workshop #FightTheBite

Lowes, Habitat For Humanity West Hawaii and the State Health Department have created a “Free Window Screening” workshop day on June 16th from 10-1 in the Lowe’s parking lot near the garden area to help repair people’s screens and teach residents how to do it themselves, as well.

Lowes Fight the Bite

Qualified residents can sign up to have Habitat folks provide the materials to make sure people have homes with screens to avoid contracting mosquito borne illnesses. Perk? A free BBQ from Randy’s BBQ!

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Breakouts Continue – No Significant Advancement

The two breakouts that began at Puʻu ʻŌʻō yesterday (May 24) are still active.

As of 8:30 a.m., HST, today, May 25, 2016, lava continued to flow from two breakout sites on the flanks of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone, which was shrouded by rain and steam during HVO’s morning overflight.

Click to enlarge

This morning, the active portions of both flows remained relatively short, extending no more than 1 km (0.6 miles) from their breakout points. The northern breakout, shown here, changed course slightly overnight, but is still directed towards the northwest in an impressive channel, with lava spreading out at the flow front. Click to enlarge

At the northern breakout (see maps at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/), a new lobe of lava broke out of yesterday’s active channel and was advancing to the northwest. This new lobe of lava had advanced about 950 m (0.6 mi) as of this morning. Yesterday’s channel—now inactive—is visible to the right of today’s flow.

hvo52516b

In this thermal image of the northern breakout, the active lava channel and flow front are clearly revealed as bright yellow and pink colors. The channel that was active yesterday, but now stagnate, is visible as a bluish-purple line to the right of today’s active flow.

This morning (May 25, 2016), the northern breakout on Puʻu ʻŌʻō was feeding an impressive channel of lava that extended about 950 m (0.6 mi) northwest of the cone. This channel was about 10 m (32 ft) wide as of 8:30 a.m., HST.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

The second flow from the eastern breakout on Puʻu ʻŌʻō—in the area of the “Peace Day” flow that broke out in September 2011—remained active as of this morning, and its total length was about 1.2 km (0.75 mi) long.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

This lava flow was slowly spreading laterally, but the flow front had stalled.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Despite heavy rain, which resulted in blurry spots on this photo due to water droplets on the camera lens, HVO scientists were able to do some of the work they hoped to accomplish during this morning’s overflight.

Click to enlarge

Here, an HVO geologist maps the location of active lava from the eastern breakout on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Click to enlarge

Amidst steam created by rain falling on the hot lava, another HVO geologist uses a rock hammer to collect a sample of the active flow.

Analyses of this sample will yield data on the temperature and chemical makeup of the lava, information that is needed to help determine what's happening within the volcano.  Click to enlarge

Analyses of this sample will yield data on the temperature and chemical makeup of the lava, information that is needed to help determine what’s happening within the volcano. Click to enlarge

Nēnē Class of 2016 Takes Flight

It’s springtime and nēnē have begun to reappear in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, after being less visible since fall and winter, when they hunker down to nest, raise goslings and grow a new set of flight feathers (molt).

An adult pair of nēnē in pūkiawe bush near Crater Rim Drive in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. NPS Photo/Kathleen Misajon

An adult pair of nēnē in pūkiawe bush near Crater Rim Drive in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. NPS Photo/Kathleen Misajon

Nēnē have started to flock, and younger nēnē are taking their first flights. Drivers are reminded to slow down and watch out for the native geese on roadways in and out of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

Two young fledglings were killed last Saturday on Crater Rim Drive, between Kīlauea Overlook and Jaggar Museum, by an unknown motorist. The young birds, which were around six months old, were discovered by a park ranger.

“Young fledglings test out their wings and explore new territories this time of year,” said Wildlife Biologist Kathleen Misajon, Manager of the Nēnē Recovery Program at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. “The park uses nēnē crossing signs to alert motorists to key areas, however, until the young birds learn the ropes from their parents, the areas they choose to land can be unpredictable. It’s so important to be extra vigilant when driving so these kinds of accidents don’t happen,” Misajon said.

Nēnē, the largest native land animal in Hawai‘i, are present in the park and other locations on Hawai‘i Island year-round. They blend in with their surroundings and can be difficult for drivers to spot. They are federally listed as endangered.

Nēnē crossing signs posted throughout the park call attention to roadside areas frequented by nēnē. These include Crater Rim Drive, Chain of Craters Road, and sections of Highway 11. Motorists are urged to use extra caution in signed nēnē crossing areas, and to obey posted speed limits.

A young nēnē fledgling tests its wings in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. NPS Photo/Kathleen Misajon

A young nēnē fledgling tests its wings in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. NPS Photo/Kathleen Misajon

By 1952, only 30 birds remained statewide.  Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park began efforts to recover the species in the 1970s.  The Nēnē Recovery Program continues today, and more than 250 birds thrive in the park from sea level to around 8,000 feet. More than 2,500 nēnē exist statewide.

Wild nēnē, the world’s rarest goose, are only found in Hawai‘i and are the last survivor of several other endemic geese. Their strong feet sport padded toes and reduced webbing, an adaptation that allows them to traverse rough terrain like lava plains. Most nēnē fly between nighttime roosts and daytime feeding grounds. Watch this short Public Service Announcement for more information. To report nēnē on the road in the park, call 808-985-6170. Outside the park, call 808-974-4221.

Kona Drug Court Food Drive for Hawaii Island’s Food Bank

judiciaryThe Kona Drug Court has selected The Food Basket, Inc., “Hawai‘i Island’s Food Bank,” as the focus of its 2016 National Drug Court Month community service project, to give back to the charity that provides for Big Island residents in need, including children from low-income or homeless families, elderly, veterans, and many addicts in the early stages of recovery.

The Kona Drug Court asks the West Hawaii community to help support The Food Basket, Inc., by dropping off donations of non-perishable foods to Drug Court volunteers, who will be dressed in red t-shirts, in front of the KTA Super Store in Kailua-Kona.

For more information on Friday’s food drive please contact Grayson K. Hashida, Hawaii Island Drug Court Coordinator at (808) 443-2201.

  • WHAT: Kona Drug Court Food Drive for Hawaii Island’s Food Bank
  • WHO: The Kona Drug Court
  • WHEN: Friday May 27, 2016, from 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
  • WHERE:    KTA Super Store Kailua-Kona, in the Kona Coast Shopping Center,  74-5594 Palani Road, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii


This Weekend – Democratic Party of Hawaiʻi 2016 State Convention

The Democratic Party of Hawaiʻi will have its 2016 State Convention this weekend, May 28th and May 29th, at the Sheraton Waikiki.

Democratic Party of HawaiiThe highlight will be the election of the new Party Chairperson on Sunday to replace outgoing Chair Stephanie Ohigashi who served a two year term. Candidates for Party Chair are Jacce Mikulanec, Tyler Dos Santos-Tam, Florence Kong Kee and Tim Vandeveer.

Other scheduled activities include:

Saturday, May 28, 2016

  • Opening Ceremonies & Plenary
  • Party Executive Officer Reports
  • Executive Branch Reports
  • Convention Committee Reports
  • Election of State Central Committee members, National Convention Delegates, and Presidential Electors
  • Legislative Branch Reports

Sunday, May 29, 2016

  • Session Reconvenes & U.S. Senate and Congressional Member Reports
  • Announcement of Election Results from May 28, 2016
  • Election of the National Committeewoman, National Committeeman, and State Party Chair
  • Meritorious Award Presentation
  • Convention Committee Reports (Cont.)

“Our biennial convention is a special time for Hawaiʻi Democrats. With over a thousand delegates, alternates, party officials, elected officials, student observers and guests gathering at this convention, it’s an opportunity to visit with old friends, make new friends and to do the important work of moving Hawaiʻi forward,” Chair Stephanie Ohigashi said. “I absolutely look forward to seeing my fellow Hawaiʻi Democrats from across the state.”

Map of New Breakouts at Puʻu ʻŌʻō

This map of two new breakouts at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, which began just before 7:00 a.m., HST, this morning, shows the extent of the lava flows based on aerial photos that were taken at 8:30 a.m.

The new breakouts had not extended beyond the boundary of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō flow field at the time the photos were taken, and neither lava flow currently poses an immediate threat to nearby communities. Click to enlarge

The new breakouts had not extended beyond the boundary of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō flow field at the time the photos were taken, and neither lava flow currently poses an immediate threat to nearby communities. Click to enlarge

At the time, the larger flow from the northern breakout was traveling down the north flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, towards the northwest, and was about 1 km (0.6 miles) long, and the flow from the eastern breakout was about 700 meters (0.4 miles) long. The aerial photos used to map the flows are shown over an older satellite image. The new breakouts had not extended beyond the boundary of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō flow field at the time the photos were taken, and neither lava flow currently poses an immediate threat to nearby communities.