Big Island Senators Welcome Public to Art at the Capitol

Big Island Senators Gilbert Kahele, Josh Green, Russell Ruderman and Malama Solomon opened their doors for an evening at the capitol “museum” during the 6th Annual Art At The Capitol event on Friday, April 4 from 4:30 – 7 p.m. Each senator brings a distinct perspective to the décor of their offices through the personalization of their walls according to interest and taste. The works of art are placed in public areas of the Capitol as part of the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts’ “Art in Public Places” program, which was established in 1967, and was the first program of its kind in the nation.

Senator Gilbert Kahele, his nine-year-old grandson Maka'i Okalani Snyder and Senate Sergeant at Arms Ben Villaflor enjoy music by the Hawaii Youth Symphony during the 6th Annual Art at the Capitol, featuring chandeliers hanging in the House and the Senate. The House Sun and the Senate Moon were done by kinetic sculptor Otto Piene.   Photo courtesy of the Senate Communications Office.

Senator Gilbert Kahele, his nine-year-old grandson Maka’i Okalani Snyder and Senate Sergeant at Arms Ben Villaflor enjoy music by the Hawaii Youth Symphony during the 6th Annual Art at the Capitol, featuring chandeliers hanging in the House and the Senate. The House Sun and the Senate Moon were done by kinetic sculptor Otto Piene. Photos courtesy of the Senate Communications Office.

More than 500 residents and visitors toured the capitol taking in all the art on display.

In Kahele’s office attendees viewed a 1972 oil painting depicting Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole by artist Patric Bauernschmidt, who is internationally recognized for her portraits of historical people. Bauernschmidt was the first artist to paint a complete set of works of Hawaiian royalty in a single style.

Kahele Office Art

“This is an elaborate piece representing Prince Kuhio, and it reminds me of my lineage and the history of our island state,” said Kahele.

Solomon’s latest acquisition is a work of art by Honolulu resident Alison Manaut called “Nonolo,” an acrylic painting completed in 1975.

Nonolo

“This piece talks about involving each person as an observer,” said Malama. “Each person will probably have a unique perspective on what it means to them. I wanted this piece in the office because it reminds me of how we legislate and create policy. We have to be creative and solve many complex problems by taking in all kinds of perspectives to come up with a creative solution.”

In Ruderman’s office is a gorgeous photograph called “Volcano House Fireplace,” an image of the lava ocean entry superimposed beneath a carving of the Pele, which is located above the fireplace in Volcano House on Hawaii Island.  The shot was an in-camera double exposure made in 1991.

Ruderman Art

“We are honored to display art from the State Foundation of Culture and the Arts,” Ruderman said.   “Paul Buklarewicz is a resident of Volcano and he is a talented photographer. The Volcano House Fireplace allows our office in Honolulu to have a piece of Hawaii Island with us every day.”

A stunning sand-blasted hand blown glass with gold lead is displayed in Green’s office. It’s called “The Sea Before Me” and was done in 1998 by Wilfred Yamazawa, who keeps an active hot glass sculpture studio in Kealakekua, where he was born.“The Sea Before Me” refers to the nurturing ocean that surrounds the Hawaiian Islands. For Yamazawa, the sea personifies the life blood that defines us because man and nature are bound by the sea – the three are inseparable.

Green Art

“This piece of art specifically reminds me of the richness and beauty that Hawaii has to offer,” said Green. “We’re humbled to have so many unique artwork from talented artists line our capitol walls and shelves.”

U Drive U Text U Pay – Big Island Police Increasing Enforcement of Distracted Drivers

Hawaiʻi Island police will increase enforcement of distracted driving as part of a national campaign called “U Drive U Text U Pay” which runs April 10 through April 15.

UDriveUTextUPayDistracted driving is a problem of national concern. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration finds that the task of driving requires a driver’s full attention in focusing on the roadway and driving maneuvers. Any distraction that diverts a driver’s attention from the primary tasks of maneuvering the vehicle and responding to critical events increases the driver’s risk of being involved in a motor vehicle crash. A distraction is anything that takes a driver’s eyes off the road, mind off the road or hands off the wheel.

On July 1, 2013, the State of Hawaiʻi enacted law prohibiting the use of cellular phones and other mobile electronic devices while operating a vehicle (with certain exceptions) and to specifically prohibit activities such as texting, instant messaging, gaming and e-mailing, which take a driver’s eyes off the road, mind off the road and hands off the wheel.

Stingrays Sting at HI-PAL Click It or Ticket Tournament

Seventy-eight youths from 10 teams participated in the HI-PAL Click It or Ticket 14 and Under Hoops Championships this past weekend, April 4-6, at Waiākea-Uka gym.

In the finals, Austin Ewing scored 13 points and Steven Texeira added 12 as Kona Stingrays ran past Hoop Dreams 53-28 to claim the championship. Keawe Silva led Hoop Dreams with 13 points.

The Kona Stingrays

The Kona Stingrays

Members of the championship team included Ewing, Texeira, Michael Hanohano, Kaanoi Kelekolio Rivers, Seth Mattos, Cherilyn Molina, Preston Morales and Mikayla Tablit.

The Stingrays, behind Ewing’s 12 points, defeated Kamehameha 43-34 to advance to the finals. Joseph Rivera scored 12 for Kamehameha. Hoop Dreams edged Hilo Spartans in double overtime 36-35 to also advance to the finals. Kiaʻi Apele led Hoop Dreams with 14 points and Makana Kanehailua added 11. Camren Statler-Ellamar scored 16 for the Spartans.

“This tournament is one of a series of events to promote seat belt use amongst youth and adults, and all participants and their parents pledge to use their seat belts,” said Community Policing Lieutenant Darren Horio. “Seat belts are the most effective safety feature ever invented for cars and they have helped saved thousands of lives. We ask all youth and adults to please use your seat belts to protect you in the unlikely event of a traffic crash and thank those that continue to use their seat belts.”

For additional information on any Click It or Ticket or HI-PAL event, please call Lieutenant Horio at 961-8121 or Officer Randy Morris at 326-4646 extension 258.

Go Wild for Culture During National Park Week at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

The National Park Service, in partnership with the National Park Foundation, will celebrate National Park Week April 19-27 with a free-admission weekend and special events nationwide.

The theme for this year’s National Park Week invites visitors to Go Wild! for history, nature, culture, wildlife, and fun in America’s national parks. At Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, the timing is perfect for visitors to “Go Wild for Culture” while celebrating Hilo’s 51st annual Merrie Monarch Festival, the most revered hula competition in the world.
Lei ‘a‘ali‘i: NPS Photo/Jay Robinson

Lei ‘a‘ali‘i: NPS Photo/Jay Robinson

 Admission to all fee-charging national parks is free from Saturday, April 19 through Sunday, April 20 to kick off National Park Week. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park will offer 12 Hawaiian cultural events planned April 23-25; these events are free but admission fees apply. All programs are part the park’s ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” cultural workshops, and are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association:
Wednesday, April 23
 
Kalo Demonstration. Join Edna and Sam Baldado as they share the cultural uses of kalo, or taro plant. See how each plant is identified by its leaf, steam, corm, color, and shape. Discover the hundreds of varieties of kalo in Hawaii, and how kalo was used for food, medicine, glue, dyes, and much more.
When: Wed., April 23 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
Feather Kāhili Workshop. Helene Hayselden will demonstrate the art of making a feather kāhili, a symbol of royalty. Watch or join in and make your kāhili to take home.
When: Wed., April 23 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
Music by Rupert Tripp, Jr. Enjoy the beautiful music and voice of singer, songwriter, and multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award nominee, Rupert Tripp, Jr.
When: Wed., April 23 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
Lā‘au Lapa‘au. Ka‘ohu Monfort shares her knowledge and love of the island’s native plants. Learn how her passion for plants and the Hawaiian culture are used to heal and nourish. See and touch a variety of medicinal plants, including kuku‘i, ‘ōlena, ha‘uowī, noni, kī, and guava.
When: Wed., April 23 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
Thursday, April 24
Feather Work. Watch Vi Makuakāne demonstrate the intricate art of feather work. Thousands of feathers are sorted, graded, trimmed, and sewn to a base. The result is a beautiful lei hulu, or feather lei.
When: Thurs., April 24 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
Kenneth Makuakāne. This multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano award-winning singer, songwriter, and producer will play original songs from his solo albums and compositions.
When: Thurs., April 24 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
‘Ohe Kapala. ‘Ohe kapala, or bamboo stamps, are used to create distinct designs for traditional Hawaiian kapa. Join Keiko Mercado as she demonstrates how ‘ohe (bamboo) are carved into beautiful designs and how they are used. There will be samples and a hands-on opportunity to learn this Hawaiian art form.
When: Thurs., April 24 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
Lei Making. Patricia Ka‘ula will demonstrate different styles of lei making: hilo, haku, hili and Ku‘i. Lei is used for everything from blessing crops, adornments for hula dancers, healing and sacred rituals, to show royal status or rank, honor guests, as peace offerings, to celebrating a birth.
When: Thurs., April 24 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
 
Robert Cazimero Book Signing. Robert Cazimero, a highly regarded and respected kumu hula, will sign the latest edition of Men of Hula, which will be available for sale. This 2011 edition by award-winning author Benton Sen chronicles how the hula teacher and Nā Hālau Kamalei shattered the stereotypical image of hula (girls in grass skirts and coconut bras) by revitalizing the masculine aspects of the ancient dance.
When: Thurs., April 24 from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center
Friday, April 25
Kapa Demonstration. Kapa maker Ku‘uleimomi Makuakāne-Salāve‘a shares the art of kapa making. See how the inner bark of the paper mulberry tree is beaten into cloth.
When: Fri., April 25 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
Ulana Lauhala. Members of ‘Aha Pūhala o Puna perpetuate the ancient art of lauhala weaving. Observe this art form and learn to weave your own lauhala star from the leaves of the hala, or pandanus tree.
When: Fri., April 25 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
Music by Lito Arkangel. Listen to music by Lito Arkangel, one of Hawai‘i Island’s most popular entertainers, as he plays his original compositions and Hawaiian favorites.
Lito Arkangel photo courtesy of Lito Arkangel and Extreme Exposure Fine Art Gallery

Lito Arkangel photo courtesy of Lito Arkangel and Extreme Exposure Fine Art Gallery

When: Fri., April 25 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
‘Ohe Hanu Iho Demo. Join National Park Service Master Volunteer Ed Shiinoki and Park Ranger Andrea Kaawaloa-Okita and create your own nose flute. Thin-walled Hawaiian bamboo was used to make a three-hole wind instrument called ‘ohe hano ihu or bamboo nose flute. Today, the supply of bamboo is very limited so Asian bamboo is used instead. Andrea and Ed will share the many uses of the bamboo, demonstrate how to make your own ‘ohe hano ihu, and teach you how to play it, too.
When: Fri., April 25 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai
In addition to the cultural programs at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park during National Park Week , there are Stewardship at the Summit volunteer opportunities, Kahuku hikes, and After Dark in the Park programs. Check the park website for a complete schedule.

Former U.S. Vice President Al Gore to Present Public Lecture at UH Mānoa

The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Sea Grant College Program and U.S. Senator Brian Schatz (D- Hawai‘i) announced today that former U.S. Vice President Al Gore will present a free public lecture at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa campus on Tuesday, April 15, 2014, at 7 p.m. in the Stan Sheriff Center.

Former U.S. Vice President Al Gore

Former U.S. Vice President Al Gore

The seminar is the capstone of the day-long summit, Ascent, organized by UH and Senator Schatz, which will welcome notable dignitaries from around the country to Hawai‘i in order to discuss and propose solutions to Hawai‘i’s most pressing problems. The topics include renewable energy, sustainable energy and water use, and the impacts of human practice and climate change on the essential resources.

Vice President Gore, known for his visionary leadership and decades of work on reducing the harmful impacts of climate change, will be sharing his insight on these and related topics and how they relate to Hawai‘i.

“We are very fortunate that former Vice President Gore will be in Hawai‘i to address an issue that is very important to our university and community,” said UHM Chancellor Tom Apple. “We hope the discussion about sustainability and climate change have a lasting impact and will push Hawai‘i into the global arena.”

“Vice President Gore has been a true friend and ally in the climate change fight. He is a leading voice on clean energy and I am honored he is joining us to discuss Hawai‘i’s future,” said Senator Brian Schatz, Chairman of the Senate Water and Power Energy Subcommittee. “Our state has charted a path forward for a clean energy economy and served as a model for the rest of the country. We need to continue to promote the development of clean energy, which will make Hawai‘i more sustainable and self-sufficient.”

“I am continually impressed by Hawai‘i’s innovative thinking, from clean energy to water to transit,” said Vice President Gore. “Through his work as chairman of the U.S. Senate’s Water and Power subcommittee, Senator Schatz is proving himself as a committed leader for our country while simultaneously shining a light on Hawai‘i’s achievements as a national leader on clean energy, sustainability, and climate adaptation.”

The seminar is part of the Stephen and Marylyn Pauley Seminar in Sustainability series, organized by the University of Hawai‘i Sea Grant College Program and co-hosted by the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, the University of Hawai‘i Foundation, and other partners, which periodically hosts speakers of the highest distinction. The University’s most prestigious seminar series honors the Pauley Foundation’s significant support of the University of Hawai‘i, Dr. Stephen Pauley’s remarkable individual sustainability efforts, and Mrs. Marylyn Pauley’s national and visionary leadership in higher education.

Stephen and Marylyn Pauley Seminars in Sustainability are only offered when a particularly significant, timely and critical issue and notable speaker are identified. Seminar topics are diverse with academic, social, cultural, and economic importance. To date the seminars have included light pollution, human health and community design, energy independence and climate change, and fiscal sustainability.

The free seminar is co-hosted by the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Sea Grant College Program, the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Chancellor’s Office, and the University of Hawai‘i Foundation. It will be held at the Stan Sheriff Center which can accommodate approximately 10,000 people.

The Egg and I – Nake’u Awai’s Pre-Merrie Monarch Fundraiser

Springtime on Hawai‘i Island means Easter, Merrie Monarch, and Nake‘u Awai’s annual Fashion Show Fundraiser, happening Saturday, April 19, 2014 at the Kahilu Theatre. A benefit for the Theatre, the lively production features Awai’s iconic aloha designs, dozens and dozens of Easter Eggs, and beautiful songs that celebrate Waimea.

The Egg and I

Doors open at 11 a.m. to give guests a chance to shop for Awai’s signature aloha wear, rarely available away from his Honolulu studio. Handmade items by local crafters are also available for sale, as well as box lunches by Palani French Bakers to enjoy at tables on the lawn, before the show begins at 12:30 p.m.

A distinctive designer of island fashion for over thirty years, Nake‘u Awai is well-known for his unique prints and flattering silhouettes for every body size and shape. His annual spring productions have been described as part-Broadway, part runway—one-of-a-kind events that never fail to tell a story, using fashion, hula, history, music, both traditional and contemporary, and lots of surprises.

Models in Awai’s “company” include Pat Bergin, Kauanoe Chang, Sharon Goodman, Liana Aveiro, Aulii Kirsch, Margo Wray, Peter Souza, Wally Wong and other familiar faces. And, key performers from the community include John Wray, Alva Kamalani, Desiree Cruz, Everett Knowles and the Waimea Hawaiian Civic Club, who will present a medley of songs by Helen Desha Beamer.

“I always wanted to emphasize the music of Helen Desha Beamer, one of the Big Island’s best writers, who wrote the classic songs of Waimea,” said Awai. His production wraps the region’s paniolo heritage with songs from “Oklahoma,” with elements of spring, Easter stories like an island-style Peter Cottontail, and festive fashion for men and women. “We create the visual scene,” said Awai, “And the performers just happen to be wearing our fashions.”

In addition, Awai invites the community to enter a special Egg Decorating Contest, with prizes presented by the judges in several categories. There is no entry fee, and all are welcome to use their imagination.

Sweetest Egg – Big Island Candies
Best Waimea Egg – Native Books/ Na Mea Hawaii
Best Ka Lei Egg – Roen Hufford
Trippiest Egg – Nake‘u Awai (a “trippy” tee shirt, designed by Nake‘u )
Most Stylish Egg – Nake‘u Awai (a beautiful bear made from Nake‘u fabric in moire)

A very special and entertaining occasion on the Saturday before Easter, “The Egg and I” invites groups of friends join in, support the Theatre and celebrate Spring. Tickets $45 with box lunch, $30 show only. Please call 885-6868 or visit www.KahiluTheatre.org

Big Island Police Charge Hilo Man With Meth Trafficking and Other Offenses

Hawaiʻi Island police have charged a Hilo man with meth trafficking and other offenses stemming from the execution of a search warrant on Monday (April 7).

At 6:55 p.m. Monday, officers from the Area I Vice Section served the search warrant at a home in the Waiākea Uka area of Hilo. They recovered 84.4 grams of crystal methamphetamine with an estimated street value of $17,500, paraphernalia associated with the distribution and use of crystal meth and 30.6 grams of marijuana.

Wesley Kailimai

Wesley Kailimai

Police arrested 45-year-old Wesley Kailimai of Hilo and took him to the Hilo police cellblock while Vice Section detectives continued the investigation.

At 11:45 a.m. Tuesday (April 8), detectives charged Kailimai with first-degree meth trafficking, second-degree promotion of a detrimental drug, two counts of third-degree promotion of a dangerous drug and three counts of possessing drug paraphernalia. His bail was set at $301,000.

He remains in the cellblock pending his initial court appearance scheduled for Wednesday (April 9).

Lava Flow Update – Kahauale’a 2 Flow Continues Moving Through Forest

The Kahaualeʻa 2 flow remains active, with scattered pāhoehoe breakouts driving slow advancement of the flow field through the forest.

Breakouts at the flow margins trigger forest fires, and numerous plumes of smoke. Today, the flow front was 8.2 km (5.1 miles) northeast of the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō.
A comparison of a thermal image (left) with a normal photograph (right) of the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow front. Brighter colors in the thermal image depict hotter surface temperatures, with white and yellow areas showing active pāhoehoe breakouts. These breakouts are distributed in a scattered fashion across this portion of the flow field. The vent for the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow is on Puʻu ʻŌʻō, visible in the upper left of the photograph.

A view of Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater from the north, looking southeast. In the foreground, the crater rim has red hues due to oxidized cinder and spatter from the early days of Puʻu ʻŌʻō in the 1980s. In the center of the photograph, the black crater floor consists of lava flows erupted in the last several years, with several spatter cones built upon these flows. Near the left edge of the photograph, a small perched lava pond has been active in recent months. A closer view of the lava pond in the northeast portion of Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater. The lava pond has partially closed over the past several weeks, and today was about 5 meters (yards) in diameter – about half of the diameter from two weeks ago. The pond was spattering, with small bits of airborne spatter visible in this photograph.

Puna Picks Breadfruit for Community Based Economic Development

On Saturday, May 10, 2014 from 8:30 am – 12:00 pm the Breadfruit—From Tree to Table workshop will be held at Ho‘oulu Lāhui, the site of  Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School at Pū‘āla‘a, adjacent to the ‘Āhalanui County Park warm ponds in Puna. The workshop is $12 per person and advance registration online is required. The workshop will be followed by a luncheon featuring breadfruit prepared by Chef Casey Halpern from Café Pesto.

Auntie Shirley Kauhaihao of Ke‘ei, South Kona, will be demonstrating how to select and prepare ‘ulu fruit. (Photo by Craig Elevitch)

Auntie Shirley Kauhaihao of Ke‘ei, South Kona, will be demonstrating how to select and prepare ‘ulu fruit. (Photo by Craig Elevitch)

The half-day Breadfruit—From Tree to Table workshop will assist Hawai‘i’s breadfruit growers in supplying grocery stores, restaurants and farmers markets with high quality breadfruit, and help chefs become more familiar with breadfruit handling and preparation in the kitchen.

Backyard growers and home users of breadfruit will also find the workshop pertinent to home and community use of breadfruit.

Topics and speakers include:  “Tree to Table”—harvesting techniques, tricks and tools, and postharvest handling, presented by Ian Cole, Collection Manager, Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden. “Beyond Sticky”—preparing breadfruit for use in a variety of dishes or for storage, presented by Shirley Kauhaihao, Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu.  “Cultural Perspective” —Breadfruit and the cultural importance in Hawai‘i, presented by mahi‘ai and educator Nick Kala Francisco. “Some Like It Sweet”—making dishes from ripe breadfruit, presented by John Cadman, Pono Pies. “Going To Market”—marketing and value added products, presented by Craig Elevitch, Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network and Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu project. Gourmet to Home Cooking—exploring favorite local recipes and new ways to cook with breadfruit, presented by Mariposa Blanco of Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School.

Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School is a Hawaiian values-based charter school that believes in creating economic opportunities for the community through the production of value-added products from breadfruit and other crops. ‘Ike ‘Āina—From the Seed to the Table is an agriculture and culinary arts program at the school that connects culture, agriculture and healthy eating. The Breadfruit—From Tree to Table workshop expands this mission further into the community, exposing the community to possible economic opportunities derived from the cultivation and preparation of breadfruit. During lunch, there will be a demonstration of how to make ‘ulu flour from breadfruit dried in the solar dehydrator. Breadfruit

Breadfruit—From Tree to Table is presented by Ho‘oulu Lāhui, Kua O Ka Lā Public Charter School, and the Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu—Revitalizing Breadfruit project. The workshop is funded through a grant from the County of Hawai‘i, Department of Research and Development and with luncheon support from Café Pesto.

Advance registration is required. The workshop is $12 per person, and includes lunch.  To register please visit www.breadfruit.info or call 990-4243.

Big Island Police Searching for Missing 17-Year-Old Hilo Boy

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for a 17-year-old Hilo boy who was reported missing.

Isaiah Fourshey

Isaiah Fourshey

Isaiah Fourshey was last seen in Hilo on March 25. He is described as 5-foot-10, 170 pounds with brown eyes and dark brown hair.

Police ask anyone with information on his whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Big Island Police Searching for Missing 15-Year-Old Hilo Girl

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for a 15-year-old Hilo girl who was reported missing.

Tiffany Faris-Saffery McCandless

Tiffany Faris-Saffery McCandless

Tiffany Faris-Saffery McCandless was last seen in Hilo on March 25. She is described as 5-foot-2, 185 pounds with brown eyes and brown hair.

Police ask anyone with information on her whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Big Island Police Searching for 17-Year-Old Kona Girl… Again

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for a 17-year-old Kailua-Kona girl who was reported missing.

Addie Cragg

Addie Cragg

Addie Cragg was last seen in Kona on January 8. She is described as 5-foot-5, 140 pounds with blue eyes and long, straight strawberry hair.

Police ask anyone with information on her whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential

Hilo Man Charged with Felonies for Unlicensed Contractor Fraud

A Hilo man has been charged with three felonies after allegedly posing as a licensed contractor.

Ricky Mesa

Ricky Mesa

At 4:34 p.m. Friday (April 4) 37-year-old Ricky Mesa was charged with first-degree theft and two felony counts of unlicensed contractor fraud. His bail was set at $60,000. He was held at the Hilo police cellblock pending his initial court appearance on Monday (April 7).

The charges stem from two separate incidents in 2012. In September 2012, Mesa identified himself as a licensed contractor to a Hilo couple to do electrical, plumbing and drywall work. In November 2012, he identified himself as a licensed contractor and received more than $30,000 to install a photovoltaic system for a 69-year-old Pāhoa man but never completed the work.

He was charged under a law that went into effect in July 2012 that makes it a felony to perform work while falsely claiming to be a licensed contractor.

Hawaii Life Picked Up for Two More Seasons – Opens Hilo Office

Hawaii Life Real Estate Brokers recently expanded their Big Island operations with the opening of their new Hilo office.

Hawaii Life Real Estate Companies Hilo Location

Hawaii Life Real Estate Companies Hilo Location

Nearly 200 people attended the grand opening ceremony held March 28 at the firm’s new East Hawaii location at 500 Kalanianaole Ave. in Keaukaha. The newly renovated office encompasses 3,078 square feet.

According to Hawaii Life President and Principal Broker Matt Beall, “Hawaii Life is really honored to be so well-received in Hilo. We’re committed to serving all of Hawaii, and East Hawaii is such an important part of that commitment. It’s really a special community.”

The Hilo location marks the third office on Hawaii Island for the fast-growing real estate firm, which also has offices in Kailua-Kona and Puako. Of the firm’s 65 agents island-wide, 17 will work out of the new Hilo office.

In February the firm announced the expansion of its headquarters in Princeville, Kauai and last week announced plans to open a second office in Wailea, Maui.

With 187 agents statewide and 10 offices statewide, Hawaii Life has grown steadily since it was founded in 2008. In 2012 it was ranked the third-fastest growing company in the state according to Pacific Business News’ Fastest 50 list.

Hawaii Life is featured on the cable network HGTV with a show by the same name. The show, which follows different brokers as they help clients find their perfect home in Hawaii, was recently picked up for two more seasons.

For more information on Hawaii Life Real Estate Brokers or its new Hilo office, contact Katie Minkus, Statewide Director of Sales, 1-800-667-5028, or email katieminkus@hawaiilife.com.

Kailua Kanikapila Community Picnic with Darlene Ahuna and John Cruz

It’s time to bring the community back Hawaiian style to Hale Halawai with a Kailua Kanikapila Community Picnic and it’s free.

Relax. Kick back. Bring your own chairs and mats. Enjoy the sunset. Pack a picnic and bring the whole family down to Hale Halawai from 4 pm until sunset on Saturday, April 19.

Enjoying myself with John Cruz jamming in the back

Enjoying myself with John Cruz jamming in the back

Bring your pupus and enjoy a picnic along the ocean while listening to the great Hawaiian music sounds of Darlene Ahuna and John Cruz. There will be games for the keiki and a taco truck available for those who prefer to purchase food.

Hilo’s Darlene Ahuna is a multiple Na Hoku Hanohano award winner including Female Vocalist of the Year. John Cruz’s Artistic Soul album won Contemporary Album of the Year and Cruz was named Most Promising Artist. Cruz is also a Grammy winner with his song Jo Bo’s Night featured on CD Slack Key Guitar Volume 2, the first Grammy awarded for Hawaiian music.

The Kailua Kanikapila Community Picnic event is sponsored by the Kailua Village Business Improvement District, Hawaii Tourism Authority, and the County of Hawaii. Contact HKVevents@yahoo.com a minimum of 5 days in advance to request an auxiliary aid or reasonable modification.

Big Island Police Arrest Three Men Suspected of Residential Burglary

Hawaiʻi Island police have arrested three men suspected of committing a residential burglary in Hilo.

On Thursday (April 3), South Hilo Patrol officers, along with investigators from the Special Enforcement Unit and the Area I Juvenile Aid Section, responded to a 12:15 p.m. report from a neighbor of an active burglary occurring at a Likeke Street home where two men fled the residence on foot. Patrol officers, assisted by detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section, determined that the suspects forcefully entered the house and removed jewelry, cash and a smart tablet having a total estimated value of $6,675.

Ethan Legaspi

Ethan Legaspi

At 1:10 p.m. Thursday, police arrested 23 year-old Ethan Legaspi of Hilo in connection with this burglary after responding officers located him on Laula Road. Through their continued investigation, Special Enforcement Unit officers identified the two other men suspected to have been involved in this incident.

Kawika Larinaga-Napihaa

Kawika Larinaga-Napihaa

At 5:10 p.m. on Friday (April 4) police arrested 23-year-old Kawika Larinaga-Napihaa of Hilo on suspicion of burglary and on an outstanding bench warrant for criminal contempt of court. Another Hilo resident, 23-year-old Noah Simeona, was arrested in connection with this incident at 7 p.m. Friday.

Noah Simeona

Noah Simeona

After consulting with prosecutors, police charged Legaspi on Friday afternoon with one count of burglary and one count of theft. His bail was set at $26,000.On Saturday evening (April 5), police charged Larinaga-Napihaa with one count of burglary. His bail was set at $25,000. Larinaga-Napihaa was also being held in lieu of $750 bail for his bench warrant. Both were held at the Hilo police cellblock pending their initial court appearance Monday afternoon (April 7).

Simeona was released from custody late Friday evening pending further investigation.

Police remind the public to remain vigilant in securing the windows and doors to their homes and businesses. Residents are encouraged to report suspicious activity by calling the Police Department’s non-emergency number at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide number for Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Kona Man Charged With Nine Offenses Following Shots Being Fired in Apartment and Resort

Hawaiʻi Island police have charged a 39-year-old Kailua-Kona man with nine offenses in connection with an incident involving numerous shots being fired in his Kona apartment and at a resort parking lot.

Raymond Lee Robinson

Raymond Lee Robinson

At 11 a.m. Monday (April 7), Raymond Lee Robinson was charged with first-degree terroristic threatening, first-degree reckless endangering, second-degree reckless endangering, third-degree criminal property damage, loaded firearm on a highway, place to keep ammunition and three counts of place to keep firearms.

At 12:03 p.m. Saturday, Kona Patrol officers responded to a report of shots being fired in a parking lot of a Kailua-Kona resort near the intersection of Kuakini Highway and Palani Road. As police approached the man, who was seated in a rental vehicle, he fired numerous shots into the air and made verbal threats against the officers. He was arrested shortly thereafter and taken to the Kona police cellblock pending further investigation.

No one was injured during the shooting and police received no reports of damage from the gunshots. Officers recovered numerous spent casings from the vicinity.

It was later learned that just prior to this incident, shots had been reported at Robinson’s apartment located off Kakahiaka Road, in Kailua-Kona. There were no reported injuries at or around his apartment.

Detectives from the Area II Criminal Investigations Section obtained search warrants for the car and apartment. They recovered two handguns, a rifle and ammunition from the vehicle as well as a handgun and ammunition from the apartment. They also recovered spent handgun casings from the apartment, which had gunshot damage inside.

Robinson’s bail was set at $123,000. He remains at the cellblock pending his initial court appearance scheduled for Tuesday (April 8).

Hawaii Teacher Survey Results Regarding Educator Effectiveness System

The Hawaii State Department of Education (DOE) and the Hawaii State Teachers Association (HSTA) recently conducted a joint survey regarding the Educator Effectiveness System (EES), which was implemented statewide at the beginning of the 2013-14 school year. The purpose of the joint survey was to gather teacher feedback on their experiences and opinions regarding the EES to help better understand its strengths and identify areas for improvement.

DOE ReleaseFunded by the Castle Foundation and conducted by Ward Research Inc., the online survey was sent to the HSTA’s 13,500 teacher members, 4,280 (30%) of which completed the survey between the Feb. 25 and March 11 survey period. Respondents represented all districts and types of teachers. This level of response provides a maximum sampling error of only +/- 1.3 percent.

Results from the survey indicate varying degrees in understanding the EES and provide a good starting point in better identifying areas for improvement. Key survey findings include:

  • One in five respondents indicated high levels of understanding of the EES (18% rating ‘top three’ box or 8-10 where 10 = completely understand) while a comparable proportion indicated low levels of understanding of the EES (20% rating ‘bottom three’ box or 1-3 where 1 = do not understand at all)
  • Classroom Observations reflected the highest levels of reported understanding (36%) and the Hawaii Student Growth Model the lowest (12%)
  • One in five respondents indicated strong agreement (‘top three’ box or 8-10 rating where 10 = strongly agree) that they have applied the EES information towards improving their professional practice (18%), their instructional practice (18%), and toward improving student growth and learning (18%)
  • An emerging theme identified in the survey was providing teachers more time to prepare for the various requirements within the components, more guidance and clarity, and providing examples of successful stories by distinguished teachers.

“The Department of Education is actively engaged in an ongoing data review process that involves working with teachers, principals and other groups,” said Schools Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “The EES is intended to provide timely, actionable and professional feedback, and support to improve teacher practice and student outcomes. We’re grateful to the teachers and various groups who are ensuring that the system fairly assesses the effectiveness of educators. This survey will be used as part of a collective process to help better understand strengths and identify areas for improvement.”

“The HSTA’s goal is to make sure that every child in Hawaii has access to the best teachers in our public school system,” said Wil Okabe, HSTA president. “When we started this process, we agreed that the Joint Committee of DOE and HSTA representatives would gather data and feedback from our members in order to implement collaborative adjustments and improvements to the EES.”

“The joint survey reflected what we have been hearing from teachers. That the EES is a work in progress, and teachers feel that more needs to be done so that the EES can help improve the practice of teaching. Our teachers clearly expressed the need for more time to implement the EES, more guidance, and more clarity of the expectations and process,” said Okabe.

“We are committed to the EES and will continue to collaborate with the DOE to improve this system and develop a fair and effective resource that should be designed to, ultimately, improve our educational system for Hawaii’s students,” added Okabe.

The committee has met four times over the last nine months and provided areas of potential recommendations to Superintendent Matayoshi, including:

  • Improving support for implementation (e.g. training structure, educator engagement strategy)
  • Solutions for new teachers (e.g. personnel consequences for SY 13-14 first-year teachers, differentiating evaluation criteria for first and second year teachers)
  • Supporting structures for teachers based on EES feedback and results (e.g. searchable database for teachers to find quality professional development opportunities based on area of need)
  • Transitioning between student assessments (impact on student growth as the state shifts from the Hawaii State Assessments, to the bridge assessments, and Smarter Balanced Assessments)
  • Differentiating frequency of evaluation components within the annual evaluation cycle, based on the needs of teachers
  • Reviewing scoring methodology for the Tripod student perception survey
  • Monitoring the use of multiple measures.

The Joint Committee is one of several feedback groups the DOE relies upon for structured input about EES. Other groups include the Teacher Leader Workgroup and Technical Advisory Group and a newly established Principal Workgroup.

“The survey results reinforce priority issues that are being discussed by the Joint Committee and raise some additional concerns for further discussion,” noted Matayoshi. “Teachers, administrators and the HSTA are all involved in this process, and this is just the beginning.”

The DOE and HSTA are committed to working together to improve the EES and teacher feedback is an important part of the improvement process. Following the first full year of implementation, the DOE will make any design improvements necessary based on reviews of data and consideration of feedback from the field.

Kīholo State Park Master Plan Released

Get your copy of the Kīholo State Park Final Master Plan and Final Environmental Assessment! Kiholo State Park

Land board submittal: 04/11/14

Approval of the Kīholo State Park Master Plan, Acceptance of the Final Environmental Assessment, and Issuance of a Finding of No Significant Impact for the Proposed Project, TMK: (3) 7-1-02: 02, 08; 7-1-03: 02, 07, Kīholo, North Kona, Hawai‘i.

New Bakery Opening in Hilo

A new bakery in downtown Hilo announces its grand opening celebration the week of April 14 to 20.  Located at 187 Kilauea Avenue, Papa‘a Palaoa Bakery is quite distinctive with its bright blue storefront, hanging flower baskets, and enticing aromas.

Papa‘a Palaoa Bakery announces its grand opening celebration the week of April 14 to 20.  The bakery is located at 187 Kilauea Avenue in downtown Hilo.

Papa‘a Palaoa Bakery announces its grand opening celebration the week of April 14 to 20. The bakery is located at 187 Kilauea Avenue in downtown Hilo.

“People tell us every day, ‘Oh, it smells so good,’” said bakery owner Eric Cox, whose bestsellers are the roasted three seed bread and chocolate chip walnut cookies.

Launching his storefront with a soft opening on March 1, Cox stated, “Hilo was ready for a new bread bakery.  Tons of people have walked in to say how great it is to get fresh bread downtown and to tell us, ‘We’re so glad you’re here.’”

Papa‘a Palaoa’s breads include cranberry mac nut whole wheat, oatmeal, multi-grain, olive, spicy corn, sourdough rye, sourdough whole wheat, and cinnamon raisin mac nut swirl.  Specialty items include pan forte, cinnamon rolls, and brioche with chocolate chips and vanilla cream.

With the store’s opening, Cox has added to the menu scones, muffins, cookies, and quiche, plus coffee and chai.

“We’re thrilled to be downtown,” said Cox. “The kitchen is fantastic.  It’s big, roomy, and well appointed.  By the grand opening celebration, we’ll have tables and chairs so people can hang out.  I love that people can watch us bake since it’s an open kitchen.”

Papa‘a Palaoa Bakery owner Eric Cox (front) celebrates his store’s grand opening celebration in Hilo from April 14 to 20.  Joining him are partner and baker Paul Lackner (right) plus bakers Rachel Van Etten and Nick Mount.

Papa‘a Palaoa Bakery owner Eric Cox (front) celebrates his store’s grand opening celebration in Hilo from April 14 to 20. Joining him are partner and baker Paul Lackner (right) plus bakers Rachel Van Etten and Nick Mount.

Papa‘a Palaoa Bakery was founded in December 2006, starting small and eventually expanding to include sales at farmers markets in Hilo (Wednesday and Saturday), Na‘alehu (Wednesday), Mountain View (Saturday), Pahoa (Sunday), and Volcano (Sunday).

Cox then started looking for a place to make bread available to a broader market.  He needed a bigger kitchen, because the quantity of bread he’d been making for farmers markets and various wholesale accounts was exceeding his capacity.

“Before, we were hand kneading all our bread.  Now we have a commercial mixer.  We can make so much more bread so much more quickly,” noted Cox.  “The storefront is our next step up.  Not only does it increase our business presence, it has improved our ability to make good bread.”

Cox, who joined the Hilo Downtown Improvement Association, is assisted by partner and baker Paul Lackner, plus bakers Rachel Van Etten and Nick Mount.

“We invite you to come down, check us out, and see what we have to offer, what tickles your taste buds.  Stop in and give us a try,” Cox said.  “Smells are free.”

So are samples, which rotate on a daily basis.  Papa‘a Palaoa Bakery is open from 5 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily.  For more information, call (808) 935-5700.