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Dept. of Education Reminds Parents to Secure Vehicles in School Parking Lots

The Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) reminds parents to always secure their vehicles in school parking lots to prevent thefts.  Five vehicle break-ins using similar methods of entry have occurred at East Oahu public schools in September during after-school hours.  In each case, vehicle windows were broken and small items inside were stolen, including purses, bags, cell phones and laptop computers.

break-in

“Parents are reminded to be vigilant and always remove valuables or hide them from direct sight,”said HIDOE spokesperson Donalyn Dela Cruz.  “Although there is normally lots of activity on campuses during afterschool hours, such crimes of opportunity can take place in seconds, especially when valuables are left in plain sight.”

Parents can take actions to make their vehicle less attractive to property theft, including avoiding leaving valuables inside in open view, locking valuables in the trunk and installing anti-theft alarm systems.  Bags, such as backpacks and shopping bags, may be seen as a carrier of valuables by thieves and should be hidden from view.

Hawaii Electric Bills to Increase – Company Cites Albizia Trees and System Upgrades for Increase

Company cites costs of albizia clearing, system upgrades

Hawaii Electric Light proposed the first increase of base rates in nearly six years to help pay for operating costs, including expanded vegetation management focusing on albizia tree removal, as well as system upgrades to increase reliability, improve customer service and integrate more renewable energy.

The request is for a 6.5 percent increase in revenues, or $19.3 million.

Rate reviews are required by the Public Utilities Commission (PUC) every three years.

If approved, a typical residential bill for 500 kilowatt hours on Hawaii Island would increase by $9.31 a month to $171.16. The proposed rate change will be reviewed by regulators and would likely not take effect until the summer of 2017 at the earliest.

Thanks to lower fuel prices, bills reflecting the new rates, if approved today, would still be lower than a year ago.

In 2013, with PUC approval, Hawaii Electric Light withdrew its request to increase base rates, leaving in place the same base rates established in 2010.

As part of the current review, Hawaii Electric Light is proposing benchmarks to measure its performance in key areas, such as customer service, reliability and communication for the rooftop solar interconnection process and to link certain revenues to that performance.

$14M spent clearing albizia since 2014

Among the increased operating costs driving the rate change is an extensive vegetation management and tree removal initiative.

albizia

The threat from invasive albizia trees toppling in high winds became clear after Tropical Storm Iselle in 2014 and led the company to triple its annual spending on vegetation management. Since 2014, Hawaii Electric Light has spent $14 million on tree trimming and removal, concentrating on areas where falling albizias threaten utility equipment and highways.

The tree removal program, which is continuing, reduced the impacts of the recent tropical storms Darby and Madeline on roads and power lines, resulting in fewer outages and faster power restoration.

Investments in customer service pay off

Hawaii Electric Light has also spent more than $14 million over the past six years improving customer service systems, developing technical solutions to integrate more private rooftop solar, replacing and upgrading equipment to improve efficiency and reliability and developing detailed plans to achieve the state’s goal of 100 percent renewable energy. The company has absorbed a large portion of these increased costs in the years between rate cases without passing them on to customers.

Investments in more customer service staffing and new technology have resulted in significantly improved service, including reduced call-waiting times. The percentage of customer calls answered within 30 seconds went from 33 percent in 2010 to 93 percent in 2015. And in surveys of customers who called in to stop, start or change electric service in 2015, 94 percent said they were satisfied with the experience.

Renewable energy use grows to 49%, highest in state

Hawaii Electric Light has increased its use of renewable energy from 35 percent in 2010 to 49 percent today, using wind, hydroelectricity, solar and geothermal to replace oil imported to generate electricity. The company reduced its use of oil by 13 percent over the same period. Part of the proposed rate adjustment will help pay for continued improvements to the power grid to help integrate even more renewable resources while improving reliability.

By the end of 2016, Hawaii Electric Light will have made more than $290 million in capital investments over the past six years, including replacing and upgrading transmission lines in West Hawaii; modernizing generation equipment to increase efficiency; increasing grid capacity and system reliability; and adding or replacing lines and transformers as well as more than 4,500 poles for new and expanded service.

Hawaii Electric Light has “decoupled” rates – a regulatory model that periodically adjusts rates to remove the company’s need to increase sales to recover a level of PUC-approved costs for providing service to all customers. The company is required to submit full rate cases every three years for an updated review by the PUC of the current costs of service.

Hawaii Health Centers to Receive $753K for IT Enhancements

Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard announced today that 14 Hawaiʻi Health Centers will receive a total of $753,064 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to support health information technology (IT) enhancements. The funding is part of more than $87 million provided by HHS to 1,310 health centers in every U.S. state, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and the Pacific Basin. The funding will support health IT enhancements to accelerate health centers’ transition to value-based models of care, improve efforts to share and use information to support better decisions, and increase engagement in delivery system transformation. This is the first significant investment directly awarded to health centers to support the purchase of health IT since 2009.

health-center“Health centers across Hawaiʻi provide high-quality health and wellness services that our communities depend upon. Yet, in Hawaiʻi and in states across the country, remote locations, lack of funding, and staff shortages make it difficult to keep up with rapidly changing healthcare technology,” said Rep. Tulsi Gabbard. “Investing in our local health centers will increase information sharing, improve electronic healthcare record systems, and expand access to comprehensive, quality care for people in every county across the state.”

The following organizations are the Hawaiʻi recipients of the HHS health IT enhancement funds:

  • Hilo – $66,682 for the Bay Clinic
  • Wailuku – $52,900 for the Community Clinic of Maui
  • Honokaʻa – $46,535 for the Hamakua Health Center
  • Hana – $42,428 for the Hana Community Health Center
  • Līhuʻe – $46,320 for Hoʻola Lahui Hawaiʻi
  • Honolulu – $73,739 for the Kalihi-Palama Health Center
  • Honolulu – $54,075 for Kokua Kalihi Valley Comprehensive Family Services
  • Kahuku – $48,198 for the Koʻolauloa Community Health and Wellness Center
  • Lanaʻi City – $41,749 for the Lanaʻi Community Health Center
  • Kaunakakai – $42,884 for Molokaʻi Ohana Health Care
  • Waiʻanae – $81,237 for the Waiʻanae District Comprehensive Health and Hospital Board
  • Honolulu – $55,087 for the Waikiki Health Center
  • Waimānalo – $46,056 for the Waimānalo Health Center
  • Kailua-Kona – $55,174 for the West Hawaiʻi CommunityHealthCenter

For a list of all fiscal year 2016 Delivery System Health Information Investment Awards recipients, visit: http://bphc.hrsa.gov/programopportunities/fundingopportunities/dshii/fy2016awards/index.html

To learn more about HRSA’s Health Center Program, visit: http://bphc.hrsa.gov/about/index.html

To find a health center in your area, visit: http://findahealthcenter.hrsa.gov/

Video – Ali’i Drive Open Following Watermain Break

The Hawaii Police Department reports that Alii Drive between the intersections of Hualalai Road and Walua Road in Kailua Kona is now open.

alii-flood

This portion of Alii Drive was previously closed due to ponding as a result of a watermain break.

Video via Councilman Greggor Illagan:

New “Fun Pass” Being Introduced at Hawaii County Fair

E.K Fernandez shows will be introducing their fun pass card system in this year’s 66th Annual Hawaii county Fair which runs from Sept. 22nd to the 25th.

fun-pass-cardsPlease understand cards are none refundable once purchased and only good for the following:

All E.K Fernandez carnival rides, all games and novelty wagons and all EK food wagons Pizza, cotton candy, funnel cake, hamburger, and corn dog wagons.

fun-pass-standThese cards will be pre-sold starting Sept 21-22 ,2016 from 10:00am until 5 pm each day! Location will be in the fairs grounds next to our information Booth area behind the Afook-Chinnen Civic auditorium

ALL ENTRY GATES WILL STILL BE CASH ONLY and ALL OTHER FOOD BOOTHS AND SODA BOOTH VENDORS ARE CONSIDERED CASH ONLY ZONES, which means please have CASH available to purchase in these areas, placing all your money on fun pass cards may limit you to selected participating areas of EK Fernandez Shows and food wagons.

parking-for-fair

New HVO Map Shows Location of New Lava Breakout

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field.

hvo-map-91916The area of the active flow field as of September 1 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the active flow as mapped on September 12 is shown in red. Older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2016) are shown in gray.

Map of coastal flow field with thermal overlay

This map includes a georeferenced thermal image mosaic showing the distribution of active and recently active breakouts on the coastal flow field.

hvo-map-91916a The thermal mosaic was acquired during a helicopter overflight on September 12. The episode 61g flow field is outlined in yellow to show the extent of the flow.

Informational Meeting for Manta Ray Viewing Rules This Weekend

A public information meeting will be held this Saturday to discuss new, proposed rules for the Makako Bay and Keauhou manta ray viewing sites in Kona.

manta-rayThe Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR), Boating and Ocean Recreation Division (DOBOR) has scheduled the meeting on September 24, 2016 from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Palamanui Campus of Windward Community College, 73-4255 Ane Keohokalole Highway, Room B-126, in Kailua-Kona, Hawai‘i. The meeting was rescheduled from Sept. 3 due to severe weather forecasts earlier this month.

Manta ray viewing opportunities on the Kona coast are unique worldwide  Tours are presently conducted in two specific areas where mantas tend to congregate at night to feed on plankton – at Makako Bay (Garden Eel Cove) and at the coastline fronting the Sheraton Keauhou Bay Hotel.  The activity has become so popular in recent years that it has reached a point that is unsustainable and unsafe. Regulation is needed to preserve the resource and address the dangers posed by overcrowding of boats and swimmers/divers in the water.

The first part of the meeting will be devoted to discussing the history of manta ray viewing on the Kona coast. The second part of the meeting will be to present DOBOR’s proposed management plan in detail and collect feedback from all interested stakeholders.

DOBOR staffers have been working closely with DLNR Division of Aquatic Resources staff, commercial tour operators, the staff of the Sheraton Keauhou Bay Hotel and other stakeholders to draft administrative rules to mitigate environmental hazards and decrease the potential risk for accidents causing harm to people or manta rays.

In 2016 DOBOR has been surveying the two manta viewing sites to determine where and how additional moorings could be placed to alleviate coral damage from vessel anchoring and allow for a safe, sustainable and environmentally conscious regulation of commercial manta diving activities.

DOBOR has drafted a proposed management plan and potential management options for the sites based on two years of collected stakeholder input.  The proposed management plan contemplates strategies such as prohibiting anchoring at the sites, limiting the number of commercial operators, prohibiting rafting, and restricting live boating to improve safety.

In order to give stakeholders time to review the proposed management plan before the September 24 meeting, DOBOR released the plan on its website on September 10, 2016.  Interested parties can access the proposed management plan and get meeting updates by visiting DOBOR’s meeting announcement page: http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/dobor/meetings/

(The original meeting announcement was issued Sept. 1, 2016).

Hawaii Public Utilities Commission Approves Tariff for Interim Time-of-Use Rates

The Hawaii Public Utilities Commission (“PUC” or “Commission”) issued an order on Friday, September 16, 2016, instructing the Hawaiian Electric Companies (the “HECO Companies”) to offer a tariff giving customers the option of enrolling in a new time-of-use (“TOU”) program, which allows customers to manage their electricity consumption to reduce monthly bills and benefits the overall grid.  The HECO Companies serve the islands of Hawaii, Lanai, Maui, Molokai, and Oahu.

Click to read docket

Click to read docket

Traditional electricity prices are flat and do not change based on time of day. TOU programs are designed to price electricity in a way that reflects electricity’s true costs by charging customers different rates at different times of the day, instead of a flat rate.  This encourages customers to reduce electricity use during times when electricity is more expensive to produce, while allowing them to take advantage of less expensive electricity being offered at other times.

The optional TOU rates approved by the Commission offer lower electricity prices during the daytime to encourage customers to use energy when solar and other lower-cost renewables are available. In exchange, the TOU rates are higher during the evening when the overall electricity demand is greatest (the system “peak”). The TOU program is the result of collaborative efforts of the HECO Companies and interested stakeholders, including local community groups, non-profit organizations, and renewable energy companies.

The “on-peak” TOU period coincides with the time of day during which the HECO Companies typically experience the highest volume of residential customer demand.  This period has the highest TOU electricity rate, higher than the price a typical customer would be subject to under the current residential tariff.  The “mid-day” period represents the time of day during which the HECO Companies typically experience relatively lower residential customer demand and higher level of solar PV and other renewable generation. This “mid-day” period features the lowest TOU period rate, below what a typical customer would pay under the current residential tariff.  TOU rates are intended to encourage customers to shift their demand from the “on-peak” evening period to the “mid-day” period and to enable more cost-effective integration of renewable energy.

Several key features of the TOU Program include:

  • Open, voluntary, optional enrollment to all residential customers of the HECO Companies.
  • A rate structure with three distinct time periods, each with its own “TOU” rate: (1) a “mid-day” period from 9am up to 5pm; (2) an “on-peak” period from 5pm up to 10pm; and (3) an “off-peak” period overnight from 10pm up to 9am.
  • A “shadow bill” feature which will allow program participants to compare their bill under the TOU program to what their bill would have been under their previous residential tariff, in order to determine if the program is beneficial to them.
  • A two-year program duration, subject to change by the Commission.
  • An option for customers to opt-out of the program at any time, without penalty.

The Commission instructed the HECO Companies to file a tariff for the interim TOU program within thirty days, at which time the tariff will take effect and the program will be open for enrollment.  The complete Order, as well as links to the docket record, may be found on the Commission’s website at: http://puc.hawaii.gov/.

Hawaii DLNR Conducting Animal Control Aerial Shooting Activities on the Big Island

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) will conduct animal control activities specifically for trapping mouflon/feral sheep hybrids; staff hunting, and/or aerial shooting from helicopters for feral goats, feral sheep, mouflon and mouflon/feral sheep hybrids within palila critical habitat in the Mauna Kea Forest Reserve (Unit A), Mauna Kea Ice Age Natural Area Reserve (Unit K), Palila Mitigation Lands, and the Ka‘ohe Game Management Area (Unit G) on the island of Hawai‘i.

mouflonAerial shooting is required for compliance with the federal court order mandating the removal of sheep and goats from critical habitat for palila, a bird endemic to Hawai‘i.

Control schedules are October 25 and 26, November 14 and 15, and December 19 and 20, 2016.  Public access to Mauna Kea Forest Reserve, Mauna Kea Ice Age Natural Area Reserve, Palila Mitigation Lands, the Ka‘ohe Game Management Area and Mauna Kea Hunter Access Road will be restricted and allowed BY PERMIT ONLY for animal salvage purposes on the following dates:

  • 7 a.m. October 25, November 14, and December 19, 2016
  • 6 a.m. October 26, November 15, and December 20, 2016

These actions are pursuant to Hawai‘i Administrative Rules Ch. 13-130-19 and § 13-104-23(a) (3). The Mauna Kea Observatory Road will remain open.  The temporary closure is needed to minimize the dangers of incompatible uses in the forest area and safely conduct animal control activities. To implement the closure, both the Hale Pohaku and Kilohana gated entrances to Unit A and G and the gate behind Mauna Kea State Recreation Area will be locked/reopened as follows:

  • Locked 7 p.m. October 24, 2016, and reopened 7 p.m. October 26, 2016
  • Locked 7 p.m. November 13, 2016, and reopened 7 p.m. November 15, 2016
  • Locked 7 p.m. December 18, 2016 and reopened 7 p.m. December 20, 2016

Copies of the map illustrating the area subject to aerial shooting on these dates are available for inspection at the Division of Forestry and Wildlife Office.

Due to high public participation, telephone call-ins to the DOFAW Kamuela Office at (808) 887-6063 for receiving salvage permits will be conducted from 9 a.m. October 19, 2016, to 10 a.m. the day before each shoot day. One permit will be issued per call per vehicle for one day only.  Applicants can have their names added to a stand-by list for additional days, should all slots not be filled by other applicants. No standbys waiting at the gates will be allowed access. The driver, occupants, vehicle license plate, and make/model of vehicle are needed when calling in.  A maximum of 15 permitted vehicles will be allowed at the Pu‘u Ko‘ohi location and 15 permitted vehicles at the Pu‘u Mali location.

Carcasses taken during the shoot will be available to the permitted public for salvage at the following locations (4-wheel drive vehicle are required, and access permits will be issued). There is no guarantee that animals will be able to be salvaged.

Salvage locations are subject to change:

  • On October 25, November 14, and December 19, 2016, at Pu‘u Ko‘ohi. Permittees must meet at Mauna Kea Recreation Area at 7 a.m. sharp.
  • On October 26, November 15, and December 20, 2016 at Pu‘u Mali. Permittees must meet across from the Waimea Veterinary office on Mana Road at 6 a.m. sharp.

Contact the Division of Forestry and Wildlife in Hilo at (808) 974-4221 or in Kamuela at (808) 887-6063 for additional details regarding meat salvage or access permits.

Honolulu District Court Users May Experience Delays in Accessing Building Elevators

Two of the four elevators at the Honolulu District Court building (1111 Alakea Street, Honolulu, HI, 96813) are temporarily out of service.  One of the elevators is being repaired locally, and the other elevator will require parts from the mainland.  We apologize for the inconvenience and ask for your patience as we work to make these repairs as soon as possible.

Court users are being asked to please anticipate and plan for delays when entering and exiting the building.  When exiting the building, there are also public escalators available descending from the fourth floor to the first floor.  There are also public stairwells available when exiting the building.

Court matters handled at this busy courthouse include small claims and regular claims cases, landlord-tenant disputes, traffic cases, and misdemeanors. The facility also houses two circuit court divisions handling domestic violence jury trials.

elevators

HELCO Aerial Line Inspections Next Week

To improve system reliability, Hawaii Electric Light Company will conduct aerial line inspections of its major overhead transmission lines from Monday, Sept. 26, to Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016.

helicopter-line-inspectionThe islandwide inspections are scheduled from 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. However, exact times and routes will depend on weather conditions. Inspections will be conducted in a Manuiwa Airways helicopter and require the aircraft to fly low and slow which may cause some noise disturbances.

Hawaii Electric Light apologizes for any disruptions this may cause and sincerely thanks the community for their cooperation and understanding.

If there are any questions or concerns, please call 969-6666.

Water Main Break Closes Kona Road

The Hawaii Police Department reports a temporary road closure of Alii Drive in Kailua Kona, from Hualalai Road to Walua Road, due to ponding of water from a water main break.

Photo via Fern Gavalek

Photo via Fern Gavelek

Motorist are being advised to avoid this location and take alternate routes. The expected closure times are approximately 4 to 6 hours.

Hawaii Preschool Open Doors Application Period Begins Today

The Department of Human Services encourages families to apply for its Preschool Open Doors (POD) program between Monday, September 19 and Monday, October 31, 2016.  Applications received during this period will be considered for preschool participation during January 1, 2017 and June 30, 2017.

preschool-open-doorsThis program, which currently serves more than 1,300 children statewide, provides child care subsidies to eligible low- and moderate-income families to pay preschool tuition. POD aims to provide children whose families might otherwise not be able to afford preschool the opportunity to gain essential skills to be successful in school and in life.

To qualify for the program, children must be eligible to enter kindergarten in the 2017-2018 school year (born between August 1, 2011 and July 31, 2012). Families are reminded that a child must be five years old on or before July 31 to enter kindergarten. Families may choose any one of the 438 State-licensed preschools. Underserved or at-risk children receive priority consideration for the POD program, and funds are limited.

Interested families may request an application beginning Monday, September 19, 2016 from the Department’s POD contractor, PATCH, by visiting www.patchhawaii.org or calling 791-2130 or toll free 1-800-746-5620.  PATCH can also help families locate a preschool convenient for them.

Applications must be received by October 31, 2016 to be considered during the January 1, 2017-June 30, 2017 program period. Applications should be dropped off, mailed, or faxed to the following:

PATCH – POD
560 N. Nimitz Hwy, Suite 218
Honolulu, HI 96817
Fax: (808) 694-3066

Eligibility and priorities for POD program selection are detailed in HAR §17-799, which is available online at humanservices.hawaii.gov/admin-rules-2/admin-rules-for-programs. For more information about other DHS programs and services, visit humanservices.hawaii.gov

Volcano Art Center Announces Award Winners in Return of ‘Alalā Art Contest

Volcano Art Center is proud to present Return of ‘Alalā: Restoring The Voice Of Hawai`i’s Native Forests, a statewide multimedia art competition featuring Hawai`i’s endemic ‘Alalā.

The exhibit will be on display at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park through October 9th, 2016.  Proceeds from the exhibition support the Hawai`i Endangered Bird Conservation Program and celebrate the reintroduction of the Alalā into Hawaii’s forests this November.  The exhibit is open to the public and free of charge although park entrance fees apply.

“Volcano Art Center wishes to express a sincere thank you to the participating artists who submitted work,” states Gallery Manager Emily C. Weiss.  “The juried show is a terrific representation of this unique species, in many different media, by over 40 different artists.  Special mahalo to the jurors: Paul Banko, Ph.D., Clifford Hague and Michelle Schwengel-Regala who had the difficult task of choosing 43 artworks from the over 80 entries submitted to include in the exhibit.

ʻAlalā No. 2, oil painting by Reyn Ojiri

ʻAlalā No. 2, oil painting by Reyn Ojiri

The Best of Show award was granted to Reyn Ojiri for his oil painting titled ‘Alalā No. 2.  Two first place awards were also presented in the professional category.

Into The Forest Again, watercolor painting by John D. Dawson

Into The Forest Again, watercolor painting by John D. Dawson

First place in the 2-D category went to John D. Dawson for his watercolor titled Into The Forest Again, and the first place award in 3-D was awarded to Elizabeth Miller for her ‘Alala Caws and Coaxes Her World Awake, a hand-tooled aluminum and india ink wall sculpture.

'Alala Caws and Coaxes Her World Awake, aluminum and india inks sculpture by Elizabeth Miller

‘Alala Caws and Coaxes Her World Awake, aluminum and india inks sculpture by Elizabeth Miller

Three awards were also granted in the hobbyist division.  First place to Maria Macias, second place to Lisa Komarczyk and third place to Alice Hostica. These works plus the other 36 pieces juried into the exhibition can be viewed at Volcano Art Center Gallery daily from 9am -5pm until October 9th.

“The community support and public outreach included in this exhibition exceeded expectations”, states Weiss.  VAC has decided to expand the exhibit to the Niaulani Campus in Volcano Village.  The artwork not selected by the jury will be on display Mon. – Fri., 9am -5pm at Volcano Art Center’s Administrative offices at 19-4074 Old Volcano Rd. also through Oct. 9th.

All artworks are for sale with proceeds supporting Hawai`i’s endangered birds. “VAC is proud to support this conservation effort.  We welcome the public to view the exhibit in person or online at www.volcanoartcenter.org to find out more ways to help support the ‘Alalā”, states Weiss.

For more information, please contact Emily C. Weiss at (808) 967-7565.

Volcano Art Center is a 501(c) 3 nonprofit organization created in 1974 whose mission is to promote, develop and perpetuate the artistic, cultural and environmental heritage of Hawaii through arts and education. Please visit www.volcanoartcenter.org for more information.

Wastewater Forum for West Hawaii Community on Thursday

The Office of the Governor is hosting a Wastewater Forum for the West Hawai‘i community to learn about the nuts and bolts of wastewater from a panel of state and county officials, a professor from the University of Hawai‘i and a county consultant.

wastewaterThe public is invited to submit questions for the panel to abigail.au@hawaii.gov or susan.m.kim@hawaii.gov.

Who:

  • Bruce Anderson, division administrator, DLNR aquatics resources division (moderator)
  • Sina Pruder, wastewater branch chief, State Department of Health (DOH)
  • Robert Whittier, geologist, State DOH Safe Drinking Water Branch
  • Eric Yuasa, engineering branch head, DLNR division of boating and ocean resources (DOBOR)
  • Finn McCall, engineer, DOBOR
  • William Taylor, Hawaii district branch manager, DOBOR
  • Bobby Jean Leithead Todd, director, Hawai‘i County department of environmental management
  • Dora Beck, chief, Hawai‘i County wastewater division
  • Shihwu Sung, professor of environmental engineering, UH Hilo
  • Brown and Caldwell, consultant, Hawai‘i County wastewater division

When: Thursday, September 22, 2016 from 6 to 8 p.m. Doors open at 5:30 pm

Where: West Hawaii Civic Center, County Council Chambers

Walk a Mile in Her Shoes 2016

YWCA Hawaii Island hosts the sixth annual “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” fundraiser Saturday, October 22. The one-mile march begins at 7:30 a.m. at the YWCA Ululani Street campus.
walk-a-mile-2016Hawaii County Prosecuting Attorney Mitch Roth and radio personality Darrin “DC” Carlson will lead the march.

The goal is to raise $25,000 for the YWCA Hawaii Island Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS) program, the only 24-hour, 7-days a week rape crisis center for the island. SASS services are free and include crisis counseling, therapy for assault survivors and their families, forensic evidence collection and violence prevention education for schools and the community.

“October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, so ‘Walk a Mile’ is a chance for men to literally walk in women’s shoes. It’s also an opportunity to call for an end to sex assault, rape and gender violence in our community,” said Kathleen McGilvray, CEO of YWCA Hawaii Island. “Sadly, nearly 50 percent of our SASS clients are 18 and under. Every dollar raised will be used to help survivors address and move through the trauma of sex assault.”

In 2015, SASS responded to more than 2,441 crisis and support calls from survivors and their families, opened 329 cases, provided 1,929 hours of therapy and performed 50 sexual assault forensic medical exams.

March participants are asked to report to the kick-off site (145 Ululani Street in Hilo) by 7:30 a.m. to register, select shoes and warm up for the walk. Walkers can wear decorated shoes for the judges’ choice contest. All participants must complete an entry form and submit a $25 registration fee.

Those interested in participating in the walk – individually or as a team – or being an event sponsor should contact Events@YWCAHawaiiIsland.org or call the YWCA office at 935-7141 ext 111.

“Sea to Sky” – Rebuilding Hōkūalaka’i

A free youth event called “Sea to Sky” will be held this weekend.  This event is designed to bring different aspects of our island together with the common purpose of rebuilding the voyaging canoe, Hōkūalaka’i.  The Hōkūalaka’i will be used for teaching purposes on Hawaiʻi Island and beyond. Hōkūalakaʻi’s home is in the same location (Palekai) that the historic Hōkūleʻa departed from on its world wide voyage.

hokulakaiThis will be the first of many “Sea to Sky” events at Palekai in Hilo.  It will be an all day event with something for everyone to enjoy.  We have invited many members of the scientific field to have fun educational learning stations available for kids and all participants will be hosted with great food and activities. The focus of the monthly events are structured to:

  • Unite community in helping to restore the voyaging canoe, Hōkūalaka’i.
  • Promote indigenous knowledge in science programs
  • Increase cultural relevance
  • Create opportunities to pursue careers in science and culture education fields

The schedule for the September 24th will be:

  • 8:00-8:30am Informal meet, setup and discuss days activities and work planned for the canoe.
  • 8:45-9:30am ‘awa ceremony and welcome
  • 9:30-11:30am Work on Hōkūalakaʻi, Visit Learning Stations, and Site Beautification Project
  • 11:30-12:30pm Lunch
  • 1:00-4:30 Paddling, Sailing, Swimming (Ocean Activities)
  • 4:30-5:00 Closing talk and cleanup

We will have “Learning Stations” and a variety of organizations joining us each week. Come down to Palekai and join in the community effort to restore Hōkūalakaʻi and help our youth learn about the science and culture that is happening on the Big Island.

If you would like to setup a booth to help educate kids, please contact us!  This will be an on-going event to share Hawaii’s Science and Culture with our youth and each other.  We will be publishing more details and our upcoming events on our website: http://alohapueo.org/pueo-events

THURSDAY: 6th Annual Kipimana Cup – Keaau vs. Kamehameha

The Keaau Cougars will host the 6th Annual Kipimana Cup challenging the Kamehameha Warriors Thursday, this time with a new head coach who happens to be a former coach for Kamehameha.

kipimana-cup
“We are excited to host the Kipimana Cup at our campus this year,” said Iris McGuire, Keaau High School’s athletic director. “We have a new coach and style of football at Keaau High School,” she noted, referring to Aurellio Abellera, who was the defense coach for the Warriors before opting to lead the Cougars.

Hosted by W.H. Shipman, Limited, which calls Keaau home, the Kipimana Cup is a goodwill football game between the public and private schools located within a few miles radius in Keaau.

“Every year it is encouraging to see the attitude of friendship tied to this particular competition,” said Bill Walter, president of W.H. Shipman, Limited. “Team leadership has been effective in instilling what we all hoped that attitude would be: we can play hard, we can compete to win a game and we can compete here in Keaau in a spirit of good will. Similarly, we encourage incoming businesses to recognize this as a special place to do business and to work together to create an environment where our customers want to come to do business.”

Dan Lyons, head football coach for the Kamehameha Schools Keaau campus, noted the Kipimana Cup is a way of “creating a competition” among the two schools and their athletes, “but also an acknowledgement of sportsmanship” that exists between the two schools. “I just think it’s a really good thing for the community, building community togetherness with both of us being in Keaau.”

He noted that W.H. Shipman, Limited is rooted in the history of both schools, with the land originally owned by the family owned company. As for Keaau’s new coach being one of his former staffers, Lyons thinks it’s “awesome.”

“’Leo’ is a really good guy and a really good catch,” Lyons said. Noting the Cougars have already won a couple of games, he said Abellera will bring “structure, organization, character, and integrity” to the Keaau team. “I mean, he’s a very good coach and great guy. It obviously leaves a void in our program, but it certainly helps Big Island football be better.”

“I coached with Dan for the last three years, and he helped me bring back the fun in coaching and football,” Abellera said. He has actually been a math teacher at Keaau High School for the last 16 years, and this is his second time coaching there. “My dad got sick and footballl didn’t seem fun anymore,” he said.

It was Lyons and the Kamehameha Warriors that got him back into coaching. With Kamehameha on solid ground, and the Cougars in need of help, Abellera returned to Keaau.

For the Kipimana Cup Thursday, Kamehameha will show up with four wins and one loss to Kealakehe, in their most recent game on Friday. Keaau, meanwhile, will face off with the Kamehameha Warriors with two wins and one loss, having defeated the Honokaa Dragons in their most recent game last week.

Thursday’s Kipimana Cup will be a league game for both teams. Kamehameha Schools and Keaau High School didn’t always play against each other, being in different divisions — Keaau being in Division 1 and Kamehameha being in Division 2.  The Big Island Interscholastic Federation League ultimately changed that, but not before W.H. Shipman, Ltd. first pitched the annual Kipimana Cup six years ago.

W.H. Shipman, Limited provides $500 to each of the school’s booster clubs following the game, and a trophy to the winning team.
The Kamehameha Warriors have won all five of the previous Kipimana Cups, but that may be a different story this year with Abellera leading the Keaau Cougars, Lyons acknowledged.

Kamehameha School’s Hawai‘i campus opened on former W.H. Shipman land in 2001 and has an enrollment of a little over 1,000 students, grades K-12, while Keaau High School has an enrollment of 880 children, grades 9-12.  The school first opened in 1998, also on Shipman property.

Kipimana is how Hawaiians historically referred to Shipman. W.H. Shipman, Limited staff came up with the idea for the Kipimana Cup six years ago.

Based in the Puna for the last 130 years, W.H. Shipman, Limited currently has 17,000 acres in and around Keaau, and is active in agriculture and commercial/ industrial development and leasing. Shipman holds a long-range view toward sustainability and planned development for balanced community use.

Thursday’s Kipimana Cup will be held at Keaau High School.  Kickoff for the varsity game is expected to start around 7:30 p.m., a half hour after the 5 p.m. junior varsity game ends. Expect to pay a nominal admission.

Contact Walter at 966-9325 for more details.

Matson Pays Tribute to Master Navigator “Papa Mau”

Matson, a leading U.S. carrier in the Pacific, continued its 20th anniversary celebration in Guam and Micronesia with a special vessel naming ceremony honoring one of Micronesia’s most renowned navigators — Pius “Mau” Piailug, fondly known in the Pacific navigation community as “Papa Mau.”

Mau Piailug, who died July 12 at 78 on the western Pacific island of Satawal.

Mau Piailug, passed away on July 12, 2010 at the age of 78 on the western Pacific island of Satawal.

Members of the Piailug family arrived from islands throughout Micronesia to attend the ceremony at the Port Authority of Guam, and members of the Yapese community on Guam honored Piailug’s memory with traditional performances as the vessel was officially blessed and named “Papa Mau.”

“Matson is proud to christen the newest vessel in its Guam / Micronesia service Papa Mau in honor of ‘Mau’ Piailug’s singular influence in the perpetuation of traditional wayfinding and celestial navigation,” said Bernadette Valencia, Matson general manager for Guam and Micronesia. “As the Papa Mau navigates the islands in the Pacific for many years to come, we will be reminded of ‘Mau’s’ far reaching legacy.”

Piailug, who passed away in 2010, was from the island of Satawal and widely known for sharing his knowledge with navigators throughout the Pacific. In 1976, he guided the crew of the Hawaii voyaging canoe Hokule´a on its historic 34-day voyage from Hawaii to Tahiti using nothing but traditional navigation methods.

Nainoa Thompson, Hokule’a navigator, president of Polynesian Voyaging Society and one of five Hawaii navigators upon whom Piailug bestowed the traditional master navigator title of pwo in 2007, said of the ship naming, “It honors his name, his legacy and what he has done for all Pacific people.”

Return of the Carnival of Exotic Mayhem

Saturday, September 24 from 7pm to 11pm, local non-profit dance company Prince Dance Theatre is hosting Return to the Carnival of Exotic Mayhem, a fundraising dance party on the stage at Kahilu Theatre.

Even bigger than last year, the fundraiser will feature crazy costumes, video projections, magic, fire dancers, go-go dancers, aerialists, dance and cabaret performances from members of the company, and more, while DJ Danny Waddell serves up the best in body rocking dance music all night long in a wild and carnival like setting.

exotic-mayhemSavory treats from the Blue Dragon’s Dragon Wagon and chocolate confections from Cocoa Le’a will be available for purchase and there will be beverages for sale at the Kahilu Theatre bar.

Prince Dance Theatre is raising funds to aid in the creation of its newest work Black Matter, a collaborative effort between Artistic Director Angel Prince and Jean-Charles Cuillandre from Canada France Hawaii. Black Matter aims to be both an informative and an entertaining dance theatre piece on the topic of space and dark matter, and will also have an outreach component to it in which the company and astronomer will go into local schools to present the work in an imaginative and educational manner for students. A new evening length work created for theatres is set to premier in the spring of 2017.

exotic-mayhem-2Return to the Carnival of Exotic Mayhem is an all ages event and attendees are encouraged to dress up in fun carnival gear and join in on the mayhem. Get ready for an unforgettable night with Prince Dance Theatre at Kahilu Theatre!

Tickets are $25 for adults, $10 for under twelve, and $100 for the VIP package, which includes 2 beverage tickets, 1 food ticket, 5 prize giveaway tickets and dancer escorted entrance to VIP areas. Tickets are available at www.princedance.org or by calling Noelani at 808.854.6646