3.3 Magnitude Earthquake Shakes Southern Part of the Big Island Early Easter Morning

earthquake

Magnitude 3.3
Date-Time
Location 18.798°N, 156.801°W
Depth 35.3 km (21.9 miles)
Region HAWAII REGION, HAWAII
Distances
  • 114 km (71 miles) WSW (253°) from Hawaiian Ocean View, HI
  • 120 km (75 miles) SW (233°) from Honaunau-Napoopoo, HI
  • 122 km (76 miles) SW (231°) from Captain Cook, HI
  • 133 km (82 miles) SW (219°) from Kalaoa, HI
  • 206 km (128 miles) WSW (241°) from Hilo, HI
  • 299 km (186 miles) SSE (159°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 2.4 km (1.5 miles); depth +/- 4.2 km (2.6 miles)
Parameters Nph= 23, Dmin=111 km, Rmss=0.11 sec, Gp=320°,
M-type=local magnitude (ML), Version=4
Source
Event ID hv60484696

 

Two Skydiving Records Set at Skydive Hawaii on Saturday – Tandem HALO Jumps Available to Public

Yesterday, on the North Shore of Oahu at Dillingham Airfield, KITV News Reporter Andrew Pereira and I participated in setting two Hawaii State skydiving records at Skydive Hawaii.

Andrew and I get ready for the jump of our lives

Andrew and I get ready for the jump of our lives

The first record was for the “highest altitude tandem “HALO” jump” leaping from the plane at over 4 miles in space at 22,000 feet.  HALO stands  for “High Altitude Low Opening” and one of the more famous HALO jumps took place recently when RedBull Skydiver Felix Baumgartner jumped from 24 miles from space or approximately 128,000 in altitude.

Some folks may remember the first time I set the Hawaii Tandem Halo Jump when I jumped from 21,000 feet back on December 11th of 2011, as Frank T.K. Hinshaw stated the first time I jumped… every extra 1,000 feet in altitude makes the risks and the danger just that much more.

The second record set yesterday was for the “altitude and wingsuit flight time record for Hawaii of 22,000ft & 4 minutes 37 seconds in flight time,” set by Hinshaw himself.

Frank T.K. Hinshaw on the far right in his winsuit

Frank T.K. Hinshaw on the far right in his wing suit

Here is a short video of me interviewing Andrew Pereira shortly before we went up and as you can tell… he was pretty nervous about what he was about to do as this was his first time skydiving, less yet doing a HALO jump.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/WFlgZF_QVWk]

After we were instructed on what we were to do and equipped with oxygen tanks, we traversed out to the airplane where we would have no chance of turning back once we got on that plane.

Ignacio "Nacho" Martinez, Damon Tucker, Andrew Pereira and "Papa Dop" get ready to board the plane.  Photo Skydive Hawaii

Ignacio “Nacho” Martinez, Damon Tucker, Andrew Pereira and “Papa Dop” get ready to board the plane. Photo Skydive Hawaii

When we were close to 22,000 feet in altitude, “Nacho” Martinez posted the following picture to Facebook and said “Took off on load one and saw a huge school of dolphins. Then went up on the next load and saw 6 whales. Now breathing pure oxygen while climbing to 22,000 ft. How could you not love Skydive Hawaii!?”

At 12,000 feet we donned oxygen masks as the air get's thinner the higher you go.

At 12,000 feet we donned oxygen masks as the air gets thinner the higher you go.

Here is a quick clip of the freefall part of my jump from 22,000 feet:

[youtube=http://youtu.be/swv5Zym804A]

I free falled for about a minute until my tandem instructor Martinez pulled the chute at about 5,000 feet from the ground and then glided smoothly in for a stand-up landing.  I even got to steer the parachute myself for about 30 seconds and that was super cool!

I spy VH07V

I spy VH07V

Once again I can say it was cold… but it wasn’t near as cold as the first time I did the HALO.  Ever since I did the first HALO jump, they have offered this experience to the public as well… of course it costs a lot more then the regularly advertised jumps and I suggest you contact Skydive Hawaii directly at (808) 637-9700 or (808) 945-0222 if you or a group of folks are interested in doing this.

My view from 22,000 feet as we were about to jump from the plane

My view from 22,000 feet as we were about to jump from the plane

Here is the video of the second record that was broken… as T.K. said though “Set a new altitude and wingsuit flight time record for Hawaii today: 22,000ft & 4 minutes 37 seconds. . . not bad for not knowing I was going to go for the attempt until this morning. If I had inflight oxygen & gloves, I think I could get 6 minutes easy.”

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4NbkQod_bU]

I’d like to say thanks to Skydive Hawaii for giving Andrew and I this opportunity and to T.K.’s father Frank (Sr.) and the Hinshaw family for running such a great operation out on the North Shore.  They bring in a lot of tax dollars from the tourism industry and you know how much our islands depend on tourists having a good time and wanting to come back to Hawaii.

Hawaii State Legislators Honor Fallen Service Members

Hawaii state legislators gathered at the capitol here March 27 to present the Hawaii Medal of Honor to 19 families of Hawaii-born or -based service members who were killed in combat over the past year.

Left to right: Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie, Senate President Donna Mercado Kim, Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Justin Neal, House Speaker Joseph M. Souki and Air Force Maj. Gen. Darryll D.M. Wong, adjutant general of the Hawaii National Guard, pose for a photo during the Hawaii State Medal of Honor ceremony held at the capitol in Honolulu, March 27, 2013. Neal accepted the medal on behalf of his friend and colleague Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Nicholas S. Johnson. This year 19 fallen service members posthumously received the HMOH from the Hawaii State Senate and House of Representatives. DOD photo by U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael R. Holzworth

Left to right: Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie, Senate President Donna Mercado Kim, Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Justin Neal, House Speaker Joseph M. Souki and Air Force Maj. Gen. Darryll D.M. Wong, adjutant general of the Hawaii National Guard, pose for a photo during the Hawaii State Medal of Honor ceremony held at the capitol in Honolulu, March 27, 2013. Neal accepted the medal on behalf of his friend and colleague Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Nicholas S. Johnson. This year 19 fallen service members posthumously received the HMOH from the Hawaii State Senate and House of Representatives. DOD photo by U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael R. Holzworth

“We do this, a public ceremony, because we wish to express in more than just a symbolic way what it is we regard as most fundamental to recognition of what it takes to enable us to be a free people,” Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie said at the ceremony. “Why are we in such a solemn regard? It’s because we understand that in ceremonies such as this we are engaged in a public expression in what constitutes our fundamental values.”

The families of ten soldiers and nine Marines were presented the medal, which has been given at the Hawaii state capitol since House Bill 8, designated as Act 21, Session Laws of Hawaii of 2005 was passed. According to the bill’s language, “The purpose of this Act is to provide for a Hawaii Medal of Honor that would help express the deep appreciation and gratitude of the People of Hawaii to the loved ones of members of the military who sacrificed their lives in defense of our nation and its freedoms.”

Jennifer Riddick looks on as her daughter wipes away tears during the Hawaii State Medal of Honor presentation ceremony held at the state capitol in Honolulu, March 27, 2013. Jennifer and her daughter received the HMOH in honor of fallen Marine Corps Master Sgt. Travis W. Riddick who was killed in action after a helicopter accident in Afghanistan. This year 19 fallen service members posthumously received the HMOH from the Hawaii State Senate and House of Representatives. DOD photo by U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael R. Holzworth

Jennifer Riddick looks on as her daughter wipes away tears during the Hawaii State Medal of Honor presentation ceremony held at the state capitol in Honolulu, March 27, 2013. Jennifer and her daughter received the HMOH in honor of fallen Marine Corps Master Sgt. Travis W. Riddick who was killed in action after a helicopter accident in Afghanistan. This year 19 fallen service members posthumously received the HMOH from the Hawaii State Senate and House of Representatives. DOD photo by U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael R. Holzworth

Prior to presenting the medal to the family members, Hawaii National Guard Adjutant General Air Force Maj. Gen. Darryll D.M. Wong expressed his gratitude to the family members and fellow service members in attendance.

“There is no honor higher that our state can bestow upon a member of our armed forces than the Hawaii Medal of Honor,” Wong said. “This is not an honor we bestow with joy, but rather we do so with heavy hearts and solemn resolve.

“Collectively, as a state, we have made it our mission to express our deepest appreciation to these brave men and women,” he continued. “We resolve to ensure the families of our service members shall always be a part of our Hawaiian Ohana, and that the ultimate sacrifice made by their loved ones will always be remembered.”  In Hawaiian culture Ohana means family, and Wong’s usage of the word connotes extended family.

Among those honored at the ceremony were six Marines from Marine Corps Air Station Kaneohe Bay, who were killed in action in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan’s Helmand province. As each of the fallen were mentioned, a family member or friend received the medal and a certificate in addition to the appreciation of the state of Hawaii, whether they grew up here or were stationed here.

Click photo for screen-resolution imageThe families of 10 soldiers and nine Marines received the Hawaii State Medal of Honor (pictured) during a ceremony at the state capitol in Honolulu, March 27, 2013. The passage of Hawaii House Bill 8, designated as Act 21, Session Laws of Hawaii of 2005, established the medal. According to the bill’s language, “The purpose of this Act is to provide for a Hawaii Medal of Honor that would help express the deep appreciation and gratitude of the People of Hawaii to the loved ones of members of the military who sacrificed their lives in defense of our nation and its freedoms.” DOD photo by U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael R. Holzworth

Click photo for screen-resolution image The families of 10 soldiers and nine Marines received the Hawaii State Medal of Honor (pictured) during a ceremony at the state capitol in Honolulu, March 27, 2013. The passage of Hawaii House Bill 8, designated as Act 21, Session Laws of Hawaii of 2005, established the medal. According to the bill’s language, “The purpose of this Act is to provide for a Hawaii Medal of Honor that would help express the deep appreciation and gratitude of the People of Hawaii to the loved ones of members of the military who sacrificed their lives in defense of our nation and its freedoms.” DOD photo by U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael R. Holzworth

Hawaii state legislature Rep. K. Mark Takai, Chairman of the Committee on Veterans, Military and International Affairs, stressed the significance of this program.

“In 2005, when we first passed this legislation, I just don’t think we understood how important this was going to be, not only to the families, but more importantly to the people of Hawaii,” said Takai, who also serves as a commissioned officer in the Hawaii Army National Guard.

Takai also highlighted the significant role the U.S. military plays in Hawaii.

“The military has been such an important part of our history,” he said. “Even pre-dating the start of World War II, the military has played a pivotal role in our state’s history. We are a unique state because of everybody coming together, including the military families, so we pay particular attention to our military.”

Air Force Maj. Gen. Darryll D.M. Wong, adjutant general of the Hawaii National Guard, provides remarks during the Hawaii State Medal of Honor ceremony held at the capitol in Honolulu, March 27, 2013. This year 19 fallen service members posthumously received the HMOH from the Hawaii State Senate and House of Representatives. DOD photo by U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael R. Holzworth

Air Force Maj. Gen. Darryll D.M. Wong, adjutant general of the Hawaii National Guard, provides remarks during the Hawaii State Medal of Honor ceremony held at the capitol in Honolulu, March 27, 2013. This year 19 fallen service members posthumously received the HMOH from the Hawaii State Senate and House of Representatives. DOD photo by U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael R. Holzworth

This is the eighth year that the Hawaii state legislature has honored people with Hawaii ties that died in wars overseas.

 

Coast Guard Sentinels to Continue Hawaiian Watch

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Honolulu are called to action by a urgent request for assistance. A vessel captain reports that his 24-foot charter vessel, the Mellow Yellow, is disabled six miles east of the Big Island of Hawaii with two people aboard. The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Kiska launches as they have done so many times before.

The charter vessel Mellow Yellow, center, is escorted back to Hilo by the crew aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Kiska, foreground, March 3, 2013, approximately six miles off the coast of the Big Island of Hawaii. Kiska crewmembers responded to the disabled boat after receiving a report stating the Mellow Yellow had a steering malfunction. Kiska engineers boarded the Mellow Yellow and made temporary repairs to assist the crew by making a rudder system out of wood and rope. Kiska crewmembers remained aboard and escorted the Mellow Yellow back to shore and completed a post search and rescue boarding. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

The charter vessel Mellow Yellow, center, is escorted back to Hilo by the crew aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Kiska, foreground, approximately six miles off the coast of the Big Island of Hawaii. Kiska crewmembers responded to the disabled boat after receiving a report stating the Mellow Yellow had a steering malfunction. Kiska engineers boarded the Mellow Yellow and made temporary repairs to assist the crew by making a rudder system out of wood and rope. Kiska crewmembers remained aboard and escorted the Mellow Yellow back to shore and completed a post search and rescue boarding. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Chief Petty Officer Jacob Buckley, a machinery technician stationed aboard the 110-foot Island Class patrol boat, noted that conditions were far from optimal. Fighting through eight to 10-foot seas and 20-knot winds, the crew arrived on scene and managed to lower their small boat into the water to render assistance. Once aboard the Mellow Yellow, they inspected the entire steering system to see if repairs were possible.

“After seeing there was no way to make repairs to the installed steering system, we had two options,” Buckley said. The options were either tow the Mellow Yellow and crew back to shore or try to rig an emergency steering system and drive them back to Hilo. With daylight waning and a tow requiring reduced speeds, the crew decided to improvise.

Buckley and other crewmembers made an emergency steering system by rigging a six-foot board to the left outboard engine. They secured it in place using duct tape, 20-feet of line and a little ingenuity, allowing the vessel to be steered as they escorted it back to shore.

Chief Petty Officer Jacob L. Buckley, a machinery technician from the Coast Guard Cutter Kiska, helps steer the Mellow Yellow back to shore, March 3, 2013 approximately six miles off the Big Island of Hawaii. Kiska crewmembers responded to the disabled boat after receiving a report stating the Mellow Yellow had a steering malfunction. Kiska engineers boarded the Mellow Yellow and made temporary repairs to assist the crew by making a rudder system out of wood and rope. Kiska crewmembers remained aboard and escorted the Mellow Yellow back to shore and completed a post search and rescue boarding. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Chief Petty Officer Jacob L. Buckley, a machinery technician from the Coast Guard Cutter Kiska, helps steer the Mellow Yellow back to shore, approximately six miles off the Big Island of Hawaii. Kiska crewmembers responded to the disabled boat after receiving a report stating the Mellow Yellow had a steering malfunction. Kiska engineers boarded the Mellow Yellow and made temporary repairs to assist the crew by making a rudder system out of wood and rope. Kiska crewmembers remained aboard and escorted the Mellow Yellow back to shore and completed a post search and rescue boarding. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

The 23-year-old Kiska, home-ported on the Big Island of Hawaii, is one of two 110-foot Island Class patrol boats in the Hawaiian Islands. The second, the Coast Guard Cutter Galveston Island, is home-ported in Honolulu. Since the 1980’s, the 20-person crews aboard these vessels have conducted search and rescue, law enforcement and environmental protection missions throughout the Hawaiian Islands and the Pacific.

The Coast Guard Cutter Galveston Island, a 110-foot Island Class patrol boat, sits on stilts at a dry dock in Honolulu, Feb. 14, 2013. The Galveston Island is having maintenance done in order to extend the cutter's service life. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Anthony L. Soto)

The Coast Guard Cutter Galveston Island, a 110-foot Island Class patrol boat, sits on stilts at a dry dock in Honolulu.  The Galveston Island is having maintenance done in order to extend the cutter’s service life. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Anthony L. Soto)

Despite the capabilities of these ships, most of the 110’s in the Coast Guard are past their intended service life, established when a ship is designed. As cutters age, crewmembers endure numerous engineering challenges in keeping them operational. Continued heavy use requires constant maintenance and repair. These needs are increasingly preventing the crews from being able to perform their designated missions.

“The cutter does experience casualties. They range from sewage issues, gray-water issues, exhaust leaks, minor system malfunctions to something larger,” said Chief Petty Officer David Jones, a machinery technician and the Galveston Island engineering officer. “Usually they’re small problems, but they take time to fix, and they add up.”

Due to the age of the Galveston Island and Kiska, some parts are no longer available from the manufacturer or the manufacturer is no longer in business. That being the case, getting underway highly depends on whether or not the part that is needed is essential to the ship’s functioning.

The combined issues cost the crews valuable time and reduce service to the people of the Hawaiian Islands, Jones noted. As maintenance issues become more complex the potential impact on mission execution increases. In the context of a search and rescue case this could lead to loss of life.

The delicate balance between maintenance and operations has not gone unnoticed and efforts are being undertaken at the highest levels of the service to ensure the missions and service of the Coast Guard patrol boat fleet are maintained.

“Parts availability and conditions of the ships have been key considerations in the decision to bring new ships to the fleet,” said Lt. Justin Nadolny, a Fast Response Cutter sponsor representative at the Coast Guard’s Office of Cutter Forces in Washington D.C.

The Acquisitions Directorate, the office in charge of recapitalization projects, has worked with industry partners to develop the Sentinel Class Fast Response Cutter. This new class of ship features an array of new technologies, communications systems and living quarters for the crew. Four of these ships are already in use in Miami and two are set to be stationed in Hawaii within the next decade.

“The FRC’s offer significantly improved sea keeping over the 110,” Nadolny said. “It has a much better ability to launch its small boat and improved crew habitability.” Nadolny also pointed out that the FRC’s are capable of traveling farther than the 110’s, an important factor in Hawaii’s vast area of operations.

Today, two 110-foot patrol boats provide essential missions to the Hawaiian Islands and beyond, but due to the increase of maintenance issues, their time is running out. With the introduction of the Sentinel Class Fast Response Cutter, a new and capable platform will provide the Hawaiian community with readiness they can rely for generations to come.

Hayden Meets Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard and is Recognized at the State Capital

Today at the Hawaii State Capital building auditorium, kids from around the State were recognized for their winning artwork for the art that has hung in the State Capital for “Youth Art Month” sponsored by the Hawaii Art Education Association.

Five kids from Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Campus were selected to go over there today based on judges decision on who’s art was the best in each class and the judges selected my son!

Hayden with his art piece "Kaleidoscope of Planets"

Hayden with his art piece “Kaleidoscope of Planets”

Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard is back from Washington D.C. and she was the person that presented the awards.

Hayden and Tulsi Kneeling

Congresswoman Gabbard Congratulates Hayden before the ceremony begins

I knew that my son was getting awarded along with all the other kids that were there… but I was even more surprised that his artwork was considered “TOP TEN” in the STATE!

Hayden got a special certificate for being "Top Ten" according to the judges.

Hayden got a special certificate for being “Top Ten” according to the judges.

Congratulations to all the kids that were recognized today.  Of course I’m especially proud of my son!

Who's the bigger poser?

Who’s the bigger poser?

Mahalo to Congresswoman Gabbard for taking the time to take some pictures with him.

Google Glasses Winners Announced – List of Winners

Well I feel very fortunate to be one of 8,000 Google users to be selected to try out the new Google Glasses.

Here is the tweet that I tweeted that landed me this privilege:

Winning Tweet

Click twice to read

You can view the full list of winners here:  Google Glass First Wave Recipients.

This is what I said in my winning tweet:
#ifihadglass I would show the world what Hawaii is like as a resident and not just as a tourist.

Coming Soon – The Ka‘u Coffee Festival

The Ka‘u Coffee Festival perks with java-jumping fun starting April 27 and culminating the weekend of May 4-5 with a ho‘olaule‘a on Saturday and coffee education on Sunday.

Ka‘u Coffee Festival is coming soon.  Photo by Fern Gavelek

Ka‘u Coffee Festival is coming soon. Photo by Fern Gavelek

Serving as an economic stimulus for the rural Ka‘u region, the festival is supported by the County of Hawai‘i Department of Research & Development, Hawai‘i Tourism Authority and Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture.

  • On Saturday evening April 27 enjoy foodie fun at Simply Elegant: 2nd Annual Ka‘u Farmers’ Table at The Inn at Kalaekilohana. The limited seating Table features locally sourced gastronomy with live entertainment. Advance only tickets are $75 at www.kau-hawaii.com.
  • On Sunday afternoon, April 28 the Triple C Recipe Contest returns to Ka‘u Coffee Mill with competition in cookies, candies and crackers, all made with Ka‘u coffee. Attendance and coffee tasting are free; find contest entry info at kaucoffeemill.com.
  • During the week visit Ka’u coffee farms. Enjoy the beauty of Ka‘u, Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach, Honu‘apo fishponds, the cliffs of Ka Lae – the southernmost place in the U.S., and the nearby Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Stay in one of the many accommodations in Ka‘u. See participating coffee farms and accommodations at www.kaucoffeefest.com.
  • On Wednesday May 1 explore flume systems of the sugarcane era and development of hydroelectric power on a Ka‘u Mountain Water System Hike. Fee. Limited to 30 with lunch provided. Visit www.kaucoffeemill.com or phone 808-928-0550.
  • On Friday May 3 enjoy Coffee & Cattle Day at Aikane Plantation Coffee farm, where descendants of the first coffee farmer in Ka‘u explain how coffee is integrated into other agriculture. Fee. Lunch included. Visit www.aikaneplantation.com or phone 808-927-2252.
  • On Friday May 3 observe the heavens from the summit of Makanau at Ka‘u Star Gazing, 7:30-10 p.m. Fee. To sign up, see www.kaucoffeemill.com or call 808-928-0550.
  • On Saturday, May 4 enjoy the Ka‘u Coffee Festival Ho‘olaule‘a, with a full day of music, hula, food, local crafts, coffee tastings and farm tours at the Pahala Community Center. Festival entry is free; Ka‘u Coffee Experience coffee tasting $5; farm tours $20. Call 929-9550 or visit www.KauCoffeeFest.com.
  • On Sunday, May 5 learn about the coffee industry at the Ka‘u Coffee College at Pahala Community Center. Free, donations appreciated. Call 929-9550 or visit www.KauCoffeeFest.com

Founded in a coffee tradition hailing to the 1800s—plus the hard work of sugar employees who lost their jobs in 1996—Ka‘u coffee burst onto the specialty coffee scene by winning numerous awards. These accolades highlight the unique combination of people and place that makes Ka‘u coffee a favorite across the globe. The festival’s mission is to raise awareness of Ka‘u as a world-class, coffee-growing origin.

Ka‘u Coffee Festival vendor and sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information and festival updates, visit kaucoffeefest.com, follow the Ka‘u Coffee Festival on Facebook and Twitter or call 808-929-9550.

 

I’ve Been Selected to Try Out the New Google Glasses!!!!

Oh my god!  I just got selected to be one of the BETA users of the new GOOGLE Glasses!!!

Google GlassOf course I will have to fly to the mainland and sign off on a bunch of things before I become one of Googles Testers!!!!

I hope this isn’t a joke and will keep folks updated!

Mahalo Google and Project Glass!

http://www.google.com/glass/start/

Many folks on the internet are considering this the same thing as winning the “Golden Ticket to the Willie Wonka Chocolate Factory”.

I’m totally stoked and will learn more about what I need to do to get these glasses.

From my current understanding… I will need to pay my own way to the mainland to get them… but it’s so worth it!!!!

Governor Announces Nominations to Land Board, Water Commission

Gov. Neil Abercrombie today announced the nominations of James A. Gomes to the Board of Land and Natural Resources (BLNR) and Kamanamaikalani Beamer, Ph.D. and Milton D. Pavao to the Commission of Water Resource Management (CWRM). Their 4-year terms are effective July 1, 2013, subject to state Senate confirmation.

abercrombieheader“Each of these nominees are not only accomplished in their respective fields and occupations; they are also deeply invested to the future of these islands and our natural resources,” Gov. Abercrombie said. “I have the utmost confidence in their ability to serve the people of Hawaii in the responsible management of our land and water resources, which are critical to the future security and vitality of our state.”

James A. Gomes is the operation manager for Ulupalakua Ranch Ltd. He has served on the Maui County Liquor Commission since 2000, including as vice-chairman and chairman; on the board of the Maui Cattlemen’s Association since 2006; and as director of the Central Maui Soil and Water Conservation District since 2007 (recently re-elected to serve a 5-year term). Previously, he served as director of Wailuku Mill Yard, a member of Mayor James Apana’s Community Advisory Board, and a delegate to the Hawaii Cattlemen’s Council. Gomes earned a liberal arts degree at UH Maui College. Born on Maui, he is a resident of Kula.

“Kamana” Beamer is the director of the First Nations Futures Program and an assistant professor at the University of Hawaii Hawaiinuiakea School of Hawaiian Knowledge and William S. Richardson School of Law. A graduate of Kamehameha Schools, Beamer is fluent in Hawaiian language and earned bachelor’s degrees (double major) in Hawaiian Studies and Philosophy as well as a master’s degree and Ph.D. in geography at the University of Hawaii. Beamer also earned an associate’s degree from Marymount College and a First Nations Futures Institute Certificate from Stanford University. Beamer is a resident of Oahu and Hawaii Island.

Milton D. Pavao retired in 2011 as manager and chief engineer for the Hawaii County Department of Water Supply. He is a licensed professional engineer and earned the Engineer of the Year Award in 1999 from the Hawaii Society of Professional Engineers. He is also the co-founder of the Kona Water Roundtable. Pavao earned a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the University of Hawaii. He is a resident of Keaau.

The BLNR is composed of seven members, three at-large and one from each of the State of Hawaii’s four land districts. CWRM consists of seven members with five members appointed by the Governor. The chairperson of the BLNR serves as the CWRM chairperson, and the Director of Health serves as an ex officio voting member.

Konawaena Student is Driving Force Behind Sustainability Resolution

Two years ago an essay contest on sustainability caught the attention of Trevor Tanaka, currently a senior at Konawaena High School on Hawaii Island. He realized that he did not know a lot about sustainability and, more importantly, while private schools incorporated sustainable education into their courses, it was woefully absent from the public school curriculum.

Trevor Tanaka

Trevor Tanaka

Trevor’s journey to do something about this began at the Hawaii State Student Council’s Secondary Student Conference in the fall of 2011 where he presented a resolution requiring public schools throughout the State to incorporate sustainable education into their science curriculum.  At the conference, the resolution garnered the support of 85% of the student delegation.  He was then nominated by Nancy Redfeather from The Kohala Center to join the Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative (SHYLI) and presented his resolution at the 2012 Youth Leadership Summit for Sustainable Development in Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, last July and at the SHYLI Youth Leadership Forum in Kamuela in January 2013.

In addition to drafting HCR 178 and its companion SCR192, Tanaka solicited officials like Mayor Billy Kenoi and other Big Island community leaders to submit testimony.  Earlier this week Trevor came to Honolulu to testify on his resolution before the House Committee on Education. HCR178 passed the House committee and will go to the full House for a vote before being sent to the Senate for its consideration.

“When I meet someone like Trevor I know that the future of Hawaii is in good hands,” said  Rep. Denny Coffman (District 5: Na’alehu, Ocean View, Capt. Cook, Kealakekua, Kailua-Kona) who introduced the resolution on Trevor’s behalf.

“Trevor discovered a gap in his school curriculum and decided to take the initiative and do something about it.  We could all learn a thing or two from this exceptional young man,” Coffman added.

Bill to Create Public Funding Option for Elections Headed to Final Committee

Advocates for campaign finance reform were pleased today when the Senate Ways and Means Committee passed House Bill 1481.  The bill would create a law that would modernize Hawaii’s outdated partial public funding program for elections.

HB 1481

The original public funding program was implemented during the 1978 Constitutional Convention, but has become ineffective over time.  In the 2012 election cycle, only one house candidate used the program.  Advocates in favor of house bill 1481 say it is now time to upgrade the old program.

“Delegates in 1978 fought hard to implement this important program, and we owe it to them to modernize it to make it useful once again”, said Kory Payne, executive director for Voter Owned Hawaii, a non-partisan non profit organization working to pass the bill.

This proposed policy has been gaining national attention also.  Public Campaign is a non-partisan, non-profit that works on federal legislation for publicly funded elections and has been supporting organizations locally.   According to Nick Nyhart, president and CEO of Public Campaign, “States are the true laboratories of democracy and Hawaii has the chance to be a national leader in addressing the growing influence of special interests in our political system.”

“We’re delighted with this bill’s passage, and excited about the prospect of leveling the playing field for House candidates,” said Janet Mason, Vice President of League of Women Voters, Hawaii.

In 2008, Voter Owned Hawaii led and effort to implement a similar program for Big Island County elections.  That program ran in the 2010 and 2012 elections and was deemed successful.  Currently, five out of nine councilors on the Big Island were elected without accepting money from special interests.

Payne says the program is intended to serve taxpayers.  “Special interests donate to politicians to get a return on their investment, and right now they’ve cornered the market on elections and the public is not invited to the party.  Publicly funded elections will save taxpayer money by allowing politicians to make decisions based upon what’s best for the people instead of campaign donors,” he said.

 

Steven Spielberg Movie “Blaws” to Be Filmed in Hawaii???

I just noticed the following and it’s kind of a trip… not sure how true it is:

…The movie’s tentative title is “Blaws,” and it’s about an ageing reporter who blogs while he’s trying to catch a big fish. When Spielberg told me it would be shot in Hawaii and he needed a month of my time, I figured that was a dealbreaker…

More here: Video: Spielberg taps reporter for new movie.

I’ve looked online for other information about this pending movie but I can’t find anything about it now.  Here is a picture of Peter Fischetti whom the quote can be attributed to.

Peter Fischetti is the new Corona-Norco reporter for The Press-Enterprise

Peter Fischetti is the new Corona-Norco reporter for The Press-Enterprise

Department of Education Schools Lead Strong Hawaii Showing at National Student Television Awards

Led by five awards from Waianae High School, public schools captured 16 of 17 awards won by Hawaii schools this month at the 10th Annual Student Television Network (STN) Convention in Los Angeles, Calif.

DOE Release

Nearly 2,500 students from 153 middle and high schools across the country attended this year’s convention, March 7-10. Hawaii was well represented with the third-largest contingent with 15 public and private schools. During the four-day convention, students and teachers were able to select from more than 90 breakout sessions taught by industry professionals covering all areas of broadcast journalism, video production, filmmaking and media.

Also as part of the convention, STN held onsite contests for video production in 27 categories, during which public schools dominated Hawaii’s cadre of awards. Kamehameha Schools Maui took home a second-place award in the “Tell the Story” category. Here is how island public schools placed in the competition:

Waianae High School:
1st Place – Convention Recap
1st Place – STN Excellence Award for Monthly Broadcast
2nd Place – Laptop Journalist
3rd Place – Short Story
Honorable Mention – Broadcast News Writing

Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School (Kauai):
1st Place – Spot Feature
2nd Place – Middle School Movie Trailer
3rd Pace – Middle School Public Service Announcement
Honorable Mention – Middle School Anchoring

Waianae Intermediate School:
2nd Place – Middle School Music Video
2nd Place – Sweet 16 Broadcast Journalism

Moanalua High School:
Honorable Mention – Laptop Journalist
Honorable Mention – Music Video

Waiakea Intermediate School (Hawaii Island):
3rd Place – Middle School Anchoring

Waiakea High School (Hawaii Island):
Honorable Mention – High School Anchoring

Maui Waena Intermediate School (Maui):
Honorable Mention – Middle School Public Service Announcement

“There is an extraordinary wealth of talent among our public schools,” said Candy Suiso, a Waianae High teacher considered one of the pioneers of student video production in Hawaii. “Waianae High continues to set the standard among Hawaii’s schools, but what is rewarding is to see how many other schools have invested in this medium as part of their curriculum over the past decade.”

Waianae High School’s videos are available for viewing at http://vimeo.com/spwhs, while Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School’s winning videos can be found at http://vimeo.com/cktvmediaproductions.

STN is a nonprofit organization started in 1999 by a group of dedicated teachers who volunteered their time, energy, and vision. With hundreds of affiliate public and private schools, STN embraces the educational components of broadcast journalism, video production, filmmaking and media by networking students and teachers with professionals in the industry. A list of competition winners can be found at http://www.studenttelevision.com/convention.htm.

 

 

70 Year-Old Canadian Man Drowns at Kahalu’u Beach Park

A 70-year-old Canadian man apparently drowned Wednesday (March 27) at Kahaluʻu Beach Park.

HPDBadgeResponding to a 3:40 p.m. call, Kona police officers learned that witnesses had observed a swimmer snorkeling when he became motionless about 40 feet from shore. A lifeguard brought the man ashore and began cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The victim was taken to Kona Community Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 4:13 p.m.

He has been identified as Ian Michael Gordon of Alberta, Canada.

Police have initiated a coroner’s inquest and are awaiting autopsy results to determine the exact cause of death.

 

Public Meeting Announced for Pahoa Park Master Plan

The County Department of Parks and Recreationannounces a public meeting to present the final Master Plan for the proposed development of Pahoa District Park:

When:​​April 10th, Wednesday

Location:​Pāhoa Neighborhood Facility

Time:​​6pm to 7pm

Staff from the project’s design team, headed by WCIT Architecture, along with County representatives from the Mayor’s Office and the Department of Parks and Recreation will be conducting this meeting to present the final Master Plan and related project information to park stakeholders and the public.

Persons requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting should call 9618311 at least 3 days prior to meeting date.

House of Representatives Honors Hawaii School Leaders During Annual Education Week at the Legislature

As part of week-long activities during its annual Education Week at the Legislature, the State House of Representatives honored school leaders for their dedication to their students and profession.  Several resolutions and public presentations were sponsored by House Education Committee Chair, Rep. Roy Takumi (D, Pearl City-Manana-Waipio) and Vice Chair Rep. Takashi Ohno (D, Liliha-Puunui-Alewa Heights-Nuuanu).

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“The individuals before us today have devoted their lives to the children of Hawaii through their tenacious efforts to provide them with better skills to take on the future,” said Takumi in an introduction of honorees, “They bring dedication and passion to their profession everyday and deserve to be commended for their efforts.”

Ohno, himself a former elementary school teacher added, “These teachers, principals, librarians and the schools they represent have proven themselves worthy of celebration as paragons of educational excellence and achievements.”

The Honorees 

  • Karen Kutsunai, 2013 Teacher of the Year, is a social studies teacher at Kailua Intermediate School. She brings an innovative, student-based inquiry approach to secondary education, setting high expectations that have yielded exceptional results. Her genuine care for students extends to the entire school community through her establishment of monthly Ohana club socials for faculty to discuss issues and improve relationships.
  • Marcus Pottenger, a social studies teacher at Hokulani Elementary School, is the 2013 Honolulu District Teacher of the Year.
  • Tracie Higashi, an art teacher at Hickam Elementary School, is the 2013 Central District Teacher of the Year.
  • Victoria Coffin, a teacher at Keoneula Elementary School is the 2013 Leeward District Teacher of the Year.
  • Amoreena Nestman, an English teacher at Kealakehe Elementary School, is the 2013 Hawaii District Teacher of the Year.
  • Aaron Locque, a social studies teacher at Maui Waena Intermediate School, is the 2013 Maui District Teacher of the Year.
  • Paul Holwegner, a science teacher at Chieftess Kamakahelei Middle School, is the 2013 Kauai District Teacher of the Year.
  • Julia Segawa a science teacher at R.L. Stevenson Middle School, and Charles Souza Jr., a former teacher at Stevenson Middle School are recipients of the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching.

School administrators and librarians were also recognized for their outstanding accomplishments:

  • Debra Lindsey, currently the principal of Kauai High School, was the recipient of the 2012 Masayuki Tokioka Excellence in School Leadership Award as the principal of Koloa Elementary School for her leadership, hard work and vision in transforming Koloa Elementary School into a model learning institution.
  • Randiann Porras-Tang, the principal at Waialua High and Intermediate School, is the 2012 National Association of Secondary School Principals Hawaii High School Principal of the Year.
  • Frank Fernandes, the principal at Kaimuki Middle School has been selected as the 2012 National Association of Secondary School Principals Hawaii Middle School Principal of the Year.
  • Kenneth Lee, the principal at Nimitz Elementary School, has been named Hawaii’s 2012 National Distinguished Principal.
  • Stacey Makanoe Kawasaki was named Hawaii’s 2012 Outstanding Assistant Principal by the National Association of Elementary School Principals.
  • Patrick McNally, a librarian at the Hawaii State Library, is the recipient of Hawaii’s 2012 Librarian of the Year Award.
  • Berry Andelin, the Circulation Department Support Staff Supervisor at the Manoa Public Library, is the recipient of Hawaii’s 2012 Excellence in Service Award.

Three elementary schools have been designated as 2012-2013 Blue Ribbon Schools in the State of Hawaii thereby earning nominations at the national level. They are:

  • Nuuanu Elementary School
  • Blanche Pope Elementary School
  • Waikiki Elementary School

Big Island Police Investigating Theft of John Deere Front End Loader

Hawaiʻi Island police are investigating the theft of a tractor over the past weekend along the Hāmākua Coast.

HPDBadgeSometime between 4:30 p.m. Friday (March 22) and 8:20 a.m. Monday (March 25), a green John Deere front end loader was removed from property just mauka of the 20-mile marker on Route 19 in Ninole. The machine was equipped with a yellow Gearmore grass cutter. The items were valued at $39,000.

Anyone with information on the location of the equipment or with any other information about this case is asked to call Officer Agitau Faanunu at 962-2120.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

 

42nd Annual Queen Lili’uokalani Long Distance Outrigger Canoe Races August 30 through September 2, 2013

The 42nd Annual Queen Lili’uokalani Long Distance Outrigger Canoe Races starts Labor Day holiday weekend, Friday August 30 through Monday September 2, 2013. The world’s largest long distance canoe race is organized and hosted by Kai Opua Canoe Club, started 1929 in Kona. The Queen’s Race attracts 6-person crews from Hawaii, all throughout the U.S. and international crews from as far away as Australia, Brazil, Canada, Costa Rica, Cook Islands, Hong Kong, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Tahiti and United Kingdom.

Kai Opua Header

The 2013 Queen Lili’uokalani Long Distance Outrigger Canoe Races include the signature 18-mile long distance single hull 6-person canoe race for men and women crews; 6-mile men and women Wa‘a kaulua (double hull canoes) races;  stand-up paddleboard races including a stock 3.5 mile course and an unlimited 4.5 course sponsored by Hulakai, surfing Hawaii since 1963, OC1-man, OC2-man and Teen long distance canoe races.

Back for its fourth year is the Ali’i Challenge, blend of Survivor and Amazing Race, that includes a paddling distance of almost 17.5 miles followed by each crew of 12 negotiating a land course. Other Queen’s Race events include Walking Tour of Historic Kailua Village, International Paddlers Night, Torch Light Parade through Historic Kailua Village, Ocean lifestyle street fair, Queen Lili’uokalani Awards Ceremonies and a traditional Hawaiian Luau.

The 42nd Annual Queen Lili’uokalani Long Distance Outrigger Canoe Races is sponsored by Hawaii Tourism Authority, Queen K Tesoro, Steinlager, Seven Tiki Spiced Rum, OluKai and Courtyard Marriott King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel.

For detailed race information, course maps or to register online for the 2013 Queen Lili’uokalani Long Distance Outrigger Canoe Races, log onto www.kaiopua.org

Navy is Renewing Authorizations That Will Enable Them to Continue to Train and Test Live Sonar and Explosives at Sea

Rear Admiral Kevin R. Slates

Rear Admiral Kevin R. Slates

By Rear Adm. Kevin R. Slates
Director, Chief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness Division

The Navy is renewing authorizations that will enable us to continue to train and test live sonar and explosives at sea for another five years (2019). The process of renewing authorizations involves analyzing the possible effects of training and testing and making that data publicly available in the form of the Hawaii-Southern California Training and Testing environmental impact statement (HSTT EIS) and the Atlantic Fleet Training and Testing environmental impact statement (AFTT EIS).

Some of the information in those EISs has been misrepresented and exaggerated. Lost in the discussion during a recent meeting of the California Coastal Commission is this fact: the best available science—and the Navy’s long track record of conducting similar training and testing—indicate our proposed activities will continue to have negligible effects on marine mammal populations. For a better understanding of these issues, read what several well-respected marine scientists have to say.

Navy Seal

Each EIS includes numbers estimating marine mammal exposures to sonar or explosives training and testing. Those numbers are based on mathematical modeling that assumes the maximum exposure/worst case scenarios, and are often mistakenly cited with alarm by people who do not recognize or accept that:

  • Live sonar and explosives training prepares Sailors to succeed in combat. The threats our Sailors face in the world’s hot spots are not restricted to convenient times or places, nor can simulators or inert weapons fully prepare them for those threats. That is why our training must be both broad and realistic.
  • Exposure to sonar does not equate to injury. Laws such as the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and the Endangered Species Act (ESA) define human impacts to marine mammals in degrees, ranging from simply hearing a sound, to mild behavioral effects, to injury and mortality.  The scientific analysis indicates that while marine mammals may be exposed to sonar during Navy training and testing, the vast majority (if not all) of marine mammals that are exposed will not be injured in any way. Animals may react to the sound, or move away, but research shows that they are likely to return quickly and resume their normal activities. Claims that the Navy is harming millions of marine mammals are ignoring this fact.
  • Our analysis overestimates the impact our activities have on marine mammals. The Navy thoroughly analyzes all of the at-sea training and testing activities, we are planning for the five-year period of our permits from the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). With NMFS concurrence, we use a mathematical model to estimate the total number of marine mammal exposures that may result from those activities. That model, which uses the best available science, estimates potential for injuries or mortalities in less than .05 percent (five in 10,000) of the marine mammal exposures associated with our activities. It does not account for avoidance actions that marine mammals are likely to take in response to our activities, or protective measures (see below) which lessen marine mammal exposure to potentially harmful activities. The reality is the impact of Navy training and testing activity on marine mammals is likely to be significantly less than what our permit requests capture.
  • The EIS numbers do not take into account the protective measures (mitigations) the Navy adopts whenever we conduct sonar or explosives training or testing. These measures include using trained marine mammal lookouts; employing aircraft and underwater listening systems to scan for marine mammals; establishing buffer zones to reduce or halt sonar transmissions when we detect marine mammals near our ships; and software tools that delineate what training and testing events we can undertake in areas associated with marine mammal activity. We developed these measures in conjunction with NMFS  and re-evaluate them annually.
  • These proposed activities are not new.  The Navy has trained and tested in these areas for more than six decades, and there has been no evidence of extensive impacts to marine mammal populations as a result. The EISs do account for increases in training and testing, as well as testing of new and upgraded systems, but these activities will continue to have negligible impacts. Some of the additional training and testing might not even occur, especially in light of current and future budget restrictions. But we need to plan for the possibility that they could.
  • Sonar and explosives training have been linked to only a handful of strandings, affecting a few dozen animals over the past 17 years. We learned from these incidents.  The March 2000 stranding in the Bahamas was a major factor behind the Navy’s decision to implement an at-sea environmental policy that requires comprehensive analysis and documentation for our training activities. Similarly, a March 2011 incident in which three dolphins were killed when they swam into the scene of explosives training near San Diego resulted in safer procedures for conducting such training. We sincerely regret those instances where our activities have led to marine mammal deaths, and have since made great strides in understanding how our actions affect marine mammals. Additionally, we have become a world leader in funding marine mammal research, dedicating more than $100 million to such research in the past five years.

The Navy cannot guarantee that our training and testing activities will have zero effects on marine mammals, but for that very reason, we justify our requirements to, and ultimately receive our permits from, the fisheries service. The experts at NMFS will only issue permits if they are confident our proposed activities will have a negligible impact on marine life — and that is exactly what NMFS has determined in its proposed final rule for the Hawaii-Southern California and Atlantic Coast/Gulf of Mexico areas.

Navy Tag

We strive to be responsible stewards of the environment as we support America’s security and prosperity. I sincerely hope those interested in these issues will focus on the science and the facts, and choose to ignore emotional, non-factual statements.

 

Public Meeting April 19 To Discuss Kuakini Highway Phase II

The County of Hawai‘i, Department of Public Works and the Federal Highway Administration are proposing improvements to Kuakini Highway between Hualālai Rd and the future intersection with the proposed Ali‘i Highway in North Kona.

Kuakini Highway Phase 2A public meeting on the project will be held April 19, at the West Hawai‘i Civic Center, 74-5044 Ane Keohokālole Highway, Building A at 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM. in Kona to:

  • Present proposed improvements that would relieve existing and future traffic congestion, increase mauka to makai connection for emergency and evacuation access by widening the road from two to four lanes, and improve roadway drainage, pedestrian and bicycle facilities.
  • Present three alternatives that are being considered: widen the road without acquiring new right-of-way, widen the road with minimal acquisition of right- of- way, or maintain the existing two- lane road with some improvements to the intersections.
  • Collect comments on the Draft Environmental Assessment (DEA); and
  • Consult with Native Hawaiian Organizations and Native Hawaiian descendants with ancestral lineal or cultural ties to, cultural knowledge or concerns for, and cultural or religious attachment to the proposed project area pursuant to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended (2006).

The review period for the DEA is March 22 to April 22, 2013.  A copy of the DEA may be viewed at the Kailua Library or, at the Department of Public Works at the West Hawai‘i Civic Center or, in Hilo at 101 Pauahi Street, Ste 7, or downloaded online at http://oeqc.doh.hawaii.gov/

If you require special accommodations or auxiliary aid/ and or services to participate in this meeting, (i.e. Sign language interpreter, large print,) please call (808) 961-8321 by April 12, 2013.