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Public Invited to View Solar-Powered Plane “Solar Impulse 2”

The Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) is pleased to announce a free public viewing of the Solar Impulse 2. The public will be able to view the aircraft and meet the crew that’s making the first flight around the world in a solar-powered plane.

Solar Impulse in Hawaii

The viewing is scheduled at the following location and time:

Saturday, April 2, 2016
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Hangar 111 at Kalaeloa Airport
Midway Street, Kapolei, HI 96707

The date of the event may need to be changed to Sunday, April 3, 2016, depending on the possibility of the plane leaving the hangar for training flights linked to weather conditions.

Those interested in attending the event are urged to register online which includes accepting a waiver granting Solar Impulse SA and their affiliates the right to use photos, video, and other materials taken at the event for promotional purposes.

On the day of the event, attendees who registered in advance will save time upon arrival by presenting a print out of their registration or by showing it on their smartphone. Those who have not registered prior to the event will not be able to utilize the express line. The public may register and read more about the waiver by clicking here.

For more information on the Solar Impulse’s mission and journey around the world, please visit their website at http://www.solarimpulse.com/.

Parking map for Hangar 111

Hawaii Health Department Confirms Second Case of Zika

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) is investigating another imported case of Zika virus in Hawaii. This is the second case of Zika to be confirmed this year by the department’s State Laboratories Division. The Kauai resident has a history of recent travel to Latin America and may still be infectious. The individual has been advised to keep indoors and stay protected from mosquitoes. No additional information will be made available about this case to respect the privacy of the individual.

microcephalyA Vector Control team will visit the individual’s residence to survey the area for mosquitoes and determine if there is a need to treat the area to reduce any mosquito breeding sites. DOH is coordinating closely with its county partners to assure a targeted and efficient response.

“As Zika continues to spread in multiple regions across the world, we anticipate that we will experience an increase in imported cases and must take precautionary measures to reduce our risk for an outbreak in Hawaii,” said Health Director Dr. Virginia Pressler. “There are several simple steps that we can take as a community to accomplish this, such as getting rid of standing water around our homes to reduce mosquito breeding sites and using repellant or protective clothing to prevent mosquito bites. It is crucial that we keep these practices top-of-mind as we prepare for travel in and out of the state, especially to areas that may be affected by Zika and other mosquito-borne illnesses.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends special precautions for women who are pregnant or may become pregnant. Pregnant women should not travel to areas with Zika. If travel cannot be avoided, women should consult with their healthcare providers first and vigilantly follow steps to protect themselves from mosquitoes.

For travel guidance, visit http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/zika-travel-information.

For information on symptoms, diagnosis and treatment, visit:

http://www.cdc.gov/zika/symptoms/index.html.

For information on Zika and pregnancy, visit: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/pregnancy/index.html.

Hokulea Arrives in Cuba

Hokulea, the legendary voyaging canoe from Hawaii internationally known for her pioneering travels, has reached another “first” in her Worldwide Voyage: arrival on the shores of Cuba. The vessel reached Havana on Friday at 7:30 a.m. local time, after traveling over a thousand nautical miles from the British Virgin Islands, where the canoe was most recently docked. Note: Havana, Cuba is six hours ahead of Hawaii time.

Hokulea Cuba

“Being part of this hardworking crew who just completed a historic sail to this island country in the Caribbean Sea is nothing short of amazing,” said Kalepa Baybayan, captain and pwo navigator. “We’re anticipating great learning experiences to emerge from our engagement with Cuba’s local community and customs. Our crew is also looking forward to sharing with Cuba’s residents Hokulea’s Malama Honua message of taking care of our precious natural resources.”

While in Cuba, the crew plans to visit Old Havana, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and meet with ICAP (Cuban Institute for Friendship with the Peoples) about US-Cuban relations.   They also plan to meet with leaders of urban sustainability and marine conservation efforts in Cuba.

Hokulea Cuba2

From Cuba, Hokulea will sail up to US waters and stop at Key West before making her arrival in the continental US at Everglades City, FL at the end of March. From Florida, the canoe will travel up the US East Coast. She is scheduled to arrive in New York City by June 8, 2016 to be part of the United Nations’ World Oceans Day.

Since departing Hawaiian waters in May 2014, Hokulea has sailed more than 21,500 nautical miles and made stops in 12 countries and 55 ports, weaving a “Lei of Hope” around the world. Along the way, more than 160 volunteer crew members have helped to sail Hokulea accompanied by escort vessel Gershon II to spread the message of malama honua (or taking care of Island Earth) by promoting sustainability and environmental consciousness, as well as exchanging ideas with the countries she has visited.

Hokulea Cuba3

So far, crew members have connected with over 45,000 people in communities across the South Pacific, Tasman Sea and Indian Ocean including Samoa, Aotearoa (New Zealand), Australia, Indonesia, Mauritius, South Africa and Brazil. For a midway recap of the Worldwide Voyage, please view http://www.hokulea.com/2015-worldwide-voyage-recap/

Click here for an archive of news releases since Hokulea’s 2014 Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage launch.

Hokulea first set out on the Pacific Ocean in 1975. Since then, she has traveled to multiple countries across the globe, reawakening a Hawaiian cultural renaissance in the process through reviving the traditional art of wayfinding – navigating the sea guided by nature using the ocean swells, stars, and wind.

Funds Received to Pilot an Innovative Resources Enforcement Educating Fishers (REEF) Project

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR), Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) has received grant funding to pilot an innovative Resources Enforcement Educating Fishers (REEF) project, starting this spring. The funding is provided by the Harold K.L. Castle Foundation.

Hawaii Reef

Across the island, the most common coastal interaction for DOCARE is with fishermen.  Often this interaction is a punitive measure like a citation.

DOCARE, the enforcement arm of DLNR, has long recognized the importance of building relationships with the public. The goal of the REEF project is to provide opportunities for officers and fishers to engage in activities together, such as site visits to walk shorelines and clarify state rules and regulations.

Studies have shown that when an officer takes the time to participate in something that is important to a certain segment of the community, this shows that they really care about people, not just about writing citations.

“Many fishers have asked for trainings to understand the “western science” behind rules and regulations…” said Luna Kekoa, Makai Watch coordinator for DOCARE, “…but fishers feel a lot of current training lacks cultural sensitivity.”

To address this concern, a component of the REEF project will include a newly developed `Ike Kai curriculum that incorporates relevant cultural knowledge and sensitivities, while covering rules and regulations from the Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) and the Division of Boating and Ocean Recreation (DOBOR).

DOCARE Chief Tommy Friel says, “Education is a critical component to help people understand why it is important to comply with the rules and regulations our officers enforce. Building this relationship is the means by which education is best achieved.”

For more information on the `Ike Kai curriculum visit the Makai Watch website: https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/makaiwatch

Coast Guard Rescues 50-Year-Old Female Who Went for Accidental Overnight Swim

The Coast Guard rescued a 50-year-old female swimmer Sunday, who had reportedly been in the water overnight.
Keehi Lagoon
At 11:20 a.m.Sunday, good Samaritans aboard the Navatek I, a tour boat operating out of Honolulu, spotted the woman in distress in the vicinity of Ke’ehi Lagoon.

She was recovered by a 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu at 11:30 a.m.

She was taken to Kewalo Basin Harbor where local emergency medical services personnel and the Honolulu Police Department were waiting to provide further assistance. The swimmer reportedly appeared in good condition and declined any medical services. 

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Honolulu’s command center received a call at 11:25 a.m.Sunday, from the captain of the Navatek I informing them that they located the swimmer approximately 1 mile out of Ke’ehi Lagoon.

The woman reportedly told responders she went swimming between 9 and 10 p.m. Saturday, in the Waikiki area and was taken out to sea by the current.

“It’s never a good idea to swim by yourself, especially at night,” said Petty Officer 3rd Class Aaron Lenk, a duty watchstander at Sector Honolulu. “If you are going out, inform someone where you plan to go as well as when you plan to return. That way if you do not return promptly, the proper authorities can be notified to search for you. We are happy that she was located safely especially after a long night in the water.”

Hawaii Nurse Injects Herself With Propofol While on Duty and Passes Out

The state Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs (DCCA) and the state Boards and Commissions released a summary of disciplinary actions through the month of February 2016 taken on individuals and entities with professional and vocational licenses in Hawaii.  These disciplinary actions include dispositions based upon either the results of contested case hearings or settlement agreements submitted by the parties.  Respondents enter into settlement agreements as a compromise of claims and to conserve on the expenses of proceeding with an administrative hearing.

The DCCA and the Boards and Commissions are responsible for ensuring those with professional and vocational licenses are performing up to the standards prescribed by state law.

propofol

This particular case involving a nurse at the Hilo Community Surgery Center caught my attention:

Respondent:        Victoria T. Moats (Hawaii Island)

Case Number:      RNS 2015-57-L

Sanction:              Voluntary surrender of license                                                                  

Effective Date:     2-11-16

Respondent allegedly violated HRS § 457-12(a)(6) and HAR § 16-89-60(7)(D) by engaging in unprofessional conduct.  Respondent allegedly self-injected Propofol into herself while on duty as a nurse at the Hilo Community Surgery Center in Hilo, Hawaii, causing her to lose consciousness. (Board approved Settlement Agreement.)

Sir Richard Branson Welcomes Navigator Nainoa Thompson and Hokulea to the British Virgin Islands

Legendary voyaging canoe Hokulea made a special stop and visited The Branson Estate on Moskito Island, which is owned by Sir Richard Branson, founder of the Virgin Group.

Branson and Nainoa

Branson greeted master navigator Nainoa Thompson and the crew as the canoe arrived on March 5, 2016.  The visit gave Branson and Thompson an opportunity to share their respective efforts and thoughts about ocean conservation.  During the visit, Thompson also honoured Branson as a Great Navigator of Island Earth in recognition for his contribution to the Earth and mankind and for his lifetime achievement of making the world a better place. During the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage, Thompson has been seeking out the Earth’s great navigators and has honored leaders such His Holiness Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

During the two day visit at Moskito Island, the crew was hosted at a welcome gathering and were able to explore the island’s pristine beaches.

Branson and Hokulea“On behalf of the Polynesian Voyaging Society and the Worldwide Voyage, it was an honor to bring Hokulea to Moskito Island while we are sailing through the Caribbean,” said Thompson.  “We were able to learn more about Sir Richard Branson’s work to conserve the Caribbean and hear how the region is becoming a leader in ocean conservation and sustainability,” he added.

Sir Richard Branson, Virgin Group Founder, said: “The Hokulea, just like our ocean, is majestic and performs remarkably so it’s good to see she is sailing around the world urging citizens of our planet to care of our oceans.

“Caribbean islands emit less than 1% of total global greenhouse gases, but with rising sea levels and extreme weather events, they are bearing the brunt of climate change. I truly believe the small islands in the Caribbean can be global leaders in ocean conservation and sustainability. By working together we can act as a test bed to demonstrate and scale innovative, clean energy solutions.”

Branson and Nainoa 2

While on Moskito Island, the crew also hosted Branson, community members and students from the environmental club of Lavity Stoutt Community College on a sail on Hokulea.

Both Branson and Thompson are members of the Ocean Elders, an independent group of global leaders focused on the protection of the ocean.

Confirmed Dengue Fever Cases on the Big Island of Hawaii Rises to 261

The Dengue Fever outbreak on the Big Island continues and the total confirmed amount of cases rose by 1 more since the last update bringing the total amount of confirmed cases to 261:

Mosquito Bite

Since the last update, HDOH has identified 1 new cases of dengue fever.  Currently, as many as 1 of the confirmed cases to date are potentially infectious to mosquitoes. All others are no longer infectious.

IMPORTANT: Infectious mosquitoes may still be present, even if no cases remain infectious to mosquitoes. “Fight the bite” preventative measures remain crucial throughout the Big Island.

Potentially infectious individuals
1 onset 3/4/16
Cases no longer infectious
260 Illness onset 9/11/15 to 2/13/16
Past and present confirmed cases (Cumulative TOTAL)
261

Of the confirmed cases, 236 are Hawaii Island residents and 25 are visitors.
215 cases have been adults; 46 have been children (<18 years of age). Onset of illness has ranged between 9/11/15 – 3/4/16.

As of today, a total of 1440 reported potential cases have been excluded based on test results and/or not meeting case criteria.

USS Oklahoma Sailor to Receive Full Honors at Funeral Service – Identification Delayed 7 Decades

Navy Machinist’s Mate 1st Class Vernon T. Luke, 43, of Green Bay, Wisconsin, will be buried March 9 at 11:30 a.m. with full military honors at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (Punchbowl).

Navy Machinist's Mate 1st Class Vernon T. Luke

Navy Machinist’s Mate 1st Class Vernon T. Luke

Luke was aboard USS Oklahoma (BB 37) during Imperial Japan’s attack of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. He was killed in action, but identification of his remains was delayed for more than seven decades.

Luke’s remains had been previously thought to be “unrecoverable” and “unidentifiable.” But thanks to determined efforts of Pearl Harbor Survivor and former Navy Chief Petty Officer Ray Emory, the remains of Luke and other USS Oklahoma Sailors were disinterred for identification by the Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA). Emory was stationed aboard USS Honolulu (CL 48) on Dec. 7, 1941.

“Chief Ray Emory works tirelessly to get his shipmates identified and properly honored,” said Rear Adm. John Fuller, commander of Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific. “We owe Ray a huge debt of gratitude for his research, compassion and ongoing commitment to our Sailors and their families,” Fuller said.

Both Fuller and Emory will attend Luke’s funeral service and meet with family members. The service will include a flag detail, firing detail, bugler and military chaplain.

Updated Map Shows Risk Areas for Potential Dengue Infection – No Areas at High Risk

An updated map of potential areas of infection by mosquito for confirmed dengue fever cases has been released:

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

The response to the ongoing Dengue Fever outbreak continues. Although the number and frequency of new confirmed cases appears to be on the decline, the outbreak is not anticipated to be considered over anytime in the near future. Therefore we need everyone’s help to continue to Fight the Bite.

Of the confirmed cases, 235 are Hawaii Island residents and 25 are visitors.
214 cases have been adults; 46 have been children (<18 years of age). Onset of illness has ranged between 9/11/15 – 2/13/16.

As of today, a total of 1391 reported potential cases have been excluded based on test results and/or not meeting case criteria.

Hawaii Department of Health Statement on First Case of Zika This Year

The Hawaii State Department of Health has confirmed the first imported case of Zika in Hawaii this year. The individual had a history of travel in the Pacific and has since recovered and is no longer infectious. The case was confirmed this week by the department’s State Laboratories Division.

Mosquito sucking blood on a human hand

Mosquito sucking blood on a human hand

The department conducted an investigation of the case and has determined there is no health risk to the public.

To protect the privacy of the individual, no other information will be made available about the case.“Because people frequently travel to areas abroad where Zika virus is present, we can expect that we may see more imported cases in the coming months,” said Health Director Dr. Virginia Pressler. “With Zika, and our current dengue outbreak, it’s important for everyone in the state to reduce mosquito breeding areas by getting rid of standing water, and use repellant or protective clothing to prevent mosquito bites.”

The department sent an advisory to healthcare providers statewide on Feb. 17, 2016 updating them on clinical guidance for Zika virus and urging them to be aware of areas abroad where Zika virus is circulating.

In 2015, the Department of Health reported four imported cases of Zika virus in the state.

For travel guidance go to http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/zika-travel-information For information on symptoms, diagnosis and treatment go to: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/symptoms/index.html For information on Zika and pregnancy go to: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/pregnancy/index.html

Video – Undercover Investigation Reveals Hawaii’s Illegal Ivory Trade

The illegal ivory trade is flourishing in Hawaii, with ivory dealers and businesses giving pointers to customers about how to skirt federal law to smuggle ivory out of the country without required permits.

elephant tusk

These were the findings of an undercover investigation by The Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International that discovered ivory being sold in various venues, including jewelry stores, antique and collectibles stores – even a swap meet.

The illegal ivory trade is flourishing in Hawaii, with ivory dealers and businesses giving pointers to customers about how to skirt federal law to smuggle ivory out of the country without required permits. These were the findings of an undercover investigation by The Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International that discovered ivory being sold in various venues, including jewelry stores, antique and collectible stores and a swap meet.

As shown in the undercover footage, the sellers had none of the documentation required under federal law to demonstrate the legality of the ivory items they were offering for sale. The lack of documentation provides cover for illegal ivory to be laundered into the marketplace. The investigator found ivory jewelry, figurines and tusks for sale. Some of the ivory looked as if it was newly obtained. As documented on the video, dealers are openly selling ivory of dubious origin and giving tips to customers on smuggling ivory out of the country or across state lines without required permits.

Continue reading

USGS HVO Report – Current Configuration of Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater

Puʻu ʻŌʻō has changed dramatically over the years. This map shows the configuration of Puʻu ʻŌʻō’s current crater (outlined in yellow) and vents (marked in red).

hvo167

The base image is a mosaic created from photographs captured during a helicopter overflight on January 19, 2016. The current crater, with a maximum width of about 290 m (317 yd), is nested within a much larger crater that was present in early 2011. The current crater is about 20 m (66 ft) deep and has distinct embayments at its northeast, northwest, and south sides. These embayments were pits when the current crater formed in mid-2014. A short distance west of the current crater is a 50-m- (~165-ft-) wide pit, informallly called the West pit, that contains a 25-m- (~80-ft-) wide lava pond. The source of the currently active June 27th lava flow is a vent on the northeast flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, about 250 m (273 yd) downslope from the crater rim.

This photo looks north-northwest at the northeast embayment at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, showing the vent (a spatter cone) on the floor of the embayment.

hvo168

The heavy fume on the rim of the embayment is another vent.

This photo, also of the northeast embayment at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, is interesting because it shows the lava tube for the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow, active during 2013 and 2014, exposed high on the crater wall.

hvo169

The Kahaualeʻa 2 flow is the lava flow that preceded the currently active June 27th lava flow, which began June 27, 2014.

This photo, looking to the west, shows the two spatter cones that mark vents on the floor of the southern embayment in Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater.

This photo, looking to the west, shows the two spatter cones that mark vents on the floor of the southern embayment in Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater.

This photo looks north into the northwest embayment at Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The spatter cone on edge of the embayment (the dark object nearly surrounded by white staining) has not fed lava flows for several months, but incandescent holes on the spatter cone (not visible in this photo) show that lava still resides beneath it.

hvo171

The fume in the distance at upper right is from the June 27th flow lava tube.

This photo looks west toward the West pit on Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

This photo looks west toward the West pit on Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

The West pit, as seen in this photo looking west, contains a small lava pond that is tucked partly back under the pit’s overhanging southwest wall.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

The walls are, in fact, overhanging most of the pit’s circumference, making the pit wider at the bottom than at the top.

West Hawaii Blood Drives Cancelled Due to Dengue Fever Risk

Blood Bank of Hawaii Press Release:

blood bank of Hawaii

As of the latest posting from the State of Hawaii Department of Health, the Captain Cook and Honaunau areas on the Big Island are no longer in the high-risk area for Dengue virus.

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

However, the highly populated area of Kailua-Kona, 96740 and 96745 zip codes, are now considered high-risk areas. Due to a high percentage of blood donors in that area we have proactively cancelled the following West Hawaii drives:

  • March 9th – LDS Kona from 11:15am-5:15pm (80 pint goal)
  • March 10th – Mauna Kea Beach from 10-4:15pm (80 pint goal)
  • March 11th – Konawaena High School from 7am-1pm (78 pint goal)

To ensure we meet the patients’ needs and make up the 238-pint deficit, we have increased capacity to existing drives on Oahu and added double-bus drives in the Blood Bank of Hawaii’s headquarters parking lot on Dillingham Boulevard on March 9 and 10 from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and March 11 from 6:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause your readers and appreciate your support and effort in keeping the community informed.

Whales Sighted at Entrance to Pearl Harbor

On Sunday morning, phone lines in Hawaii buzzed with the news that whales were at the Pearl Harbor entrance.  Joint Base’s Port Operations and Harbor Patrol teams kept Navy vessels at a respectful distance, protecting what turned out to be a cow/calf pair – a mom humpback whale and her calf.

 Photos by Master at Arms Second Class Jadira Viera (Feb. 28, 2016)


Photos by Master at Arms Second Class Jadira Viera (Feb. 28, 2016)

“These whales continue to be protected under both the Endangered Species and Marine Mammal Protection Acts,” reminds Navy Region Hawaii Environmental Counsel Rebecca Hommon. “Some of these animals winter in Hawaii, mate, give birth and then head back to colder waters such as those off of Alaska to feed during the summer months.”

Photos by Master at Arms Second Class Jadira Viera (Feb. 28, 2016)

Photos by Master at Arms Second Class Jadira Viera (Feb. 28, 2016)

As soon as the whales were observed, the Navy notified the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)’s Marine Mammal Response staff.

NOAA’s David Schofield advised that “It’s probably a normal situation of a mother whale bringing her calf in close to shore.” NOAA officials expressed appreciation for the Navy’s immediate response and knowledge that these marine mammals require a certain stand-off and slow boat traffic.

Whales in Pearl Harbor 3“Humpback whales continue to be protected under the Endangered Species, Marine Mammal Protection, and  National Marine Sanctuaries Acts.  It is unlawful to approach this marine mammal species by any means within 100 yards (90 m) and to operate any aircraft within 1,000 feet (300 m).  If you see a marine mammal in distress (beached, entangled, or otherwise injured) please report the sighting immediately to Pacific Islands Region Marine Mammal Stranding & Entanglement Hotline 888-256-9840.”

Dengue Fever Outbreak Continues – Hookena Beach Park Reopening March 1st

This is a Dengue Fever information update for Friday February 26th at 1:10PM.

The response to the ongoing Dengue Fever outbreak continues.  Although the number and frequency of new confirmed cases appears to be on the decline, the outbreak is not anticipated to be considered over anytime in the near future.  Therefore we need everyone’s help to continue to Fight the Bite.

To prevent mosquito bites, wear clothing that minimizes exposed skin, use mosquito repellent on skin that cannot be covered, and avoid areas of high mosquito concentration during the early morning and late afternoon periods when mosquito activity is greatest.

If you suspect you may have dengue, remain indoors to prevent the possibility of being bitten and infecting mosquitoes, and contact a health care provider. Community health centers are working with the Department of Health to see patients who suspect they may have dengue regardless of ability to pay.

Help to reduce potential mosquito breeding areas around homes and businesses.

As of 1:00PM today the Department of Health reported no additional confirmed cases since yesterday and the total number of confirmed cases since the beginning of the outbreak is at 260. These cases include 235 residents and 25 visitors.

As there have been no confirmed cases associated with the Hookena Beach Park since November 11th and with the actions taken to include numerous sprayings and treatments of the beach park, County and Department of Health Officials will be reopening the park for normal use to include camping effective Tuesday March 1st.

Everyone is reminded that ensuring the safe and enjoyable use of our park facilities depends on everyone’s help and cooperation.  Please use repellent while visiting and enjoying the park and help to keep it clean.  If feeling ill, avoid visiting parks and public areas and remain home to prevent transmission of any communicable diseases.

For additional information on dengue and preventing the spread, go to health.hawaii.gov or call the Department of Health at 974-6001. Everyone’s help and assistance with this outbreak is much needed and appreciated.

Below is a map that depicts case locations as of 2/25/2016.

This map will be updated weekly with location data provided by the State Department of Health. Locations may represent multiple cases. For the most up to date case counts and other information from the Department of Health, visit their website at health.hawaii.gov.

Surveying and spraying is being conducted at the residences of all suspect and confirmed cases, in addition to proactive spraying at nearby public facilities.

Dengue Pinpoint 22616

Updated Map Pinpoints 1 Confirmed Case of Dengue Fever on the Big Island of Hawaii

Only 1 confirmed case of Dengue Fever has been reported on the Big Island since 2/18/16.  Below is a map that depicts case locations as of 2/25/16:

Dengue Pinpoint 22616Surveying and spraying is being conducted at the residences of all suspect and confirmed cases, in addition to proactive spraying at nearby public facilities.

This map should not be used to exclude any areas of the island from proactive mosquito control measures. All residents islandwide are encouraged to Fight The Bite by reducing mosquito breeding grounds and protecting themselves from mosquito bites.

Small Earthquake at Summit of Pu’u O’o – Lava Flows Onto Floor of Crater

A small earthquake of magnitude 3.6 occurred yesterday evening at 6 p.m. near the summit of the volcano. Over the past 24 hours, small amounts of lava flowed onto the floor of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

The summit lava lake on 2/12/16.  Photo via USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

The summit lava lake on 2/12/16. Photo via USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (click to enlarge)

Webcam images show that small amounts of lava flowed onto the crater floor from two of the incandescent vents within the Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater. Yesterday, shortly before noon, and at around 10 p.m., lava flowed onto the floor from a vent on the east side of the crater, while this morning at around 6 a.m., lava flowed from one of the vents on the west side of the crater.

This current image is from a temporary thermal camera positioned on the northwest flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking southeast at Puʻu ʻŌʻō's summit crater.  The temperature scale is in degrees Celsius up to a maximum of 500 degrees (932 degrees Fahrenheit) for this camera model, and scales automatically based on the maximum and minimum temperatures within the frame.  Thick fume, image pixel size and other factors often result in image temperatures being lower than actual surface temperatures.

This current image is from a temporary thermal camera positioned on the northwest flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, looking southeast at Puʻu ʻŌʻō’s summit crater. The temperature scale is in degrees Celsius up to a maximum of 500 degrees (932 degrees Fahrenheit) for this camera model, and scales automatically based on the maximum and minimum temperatures within the frame. Thick fume, image pixel size and other factors often result in image temperatures being lower than actual surface temperatures.

Hawaii Department of Health Takes Critical Role in National Efforts to Control Zika Virus

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) State Laboratories Division is taking an active role in national efforts to control the spread of Zika Virus. Hawaii’s State Laboratories recently provided confirmatory testing for samples from American Samoa and the Marshall Islands to support these U. S. Affiliated Pacific Island Jurisdictions in verifying disease outbreak activity.

A mosquito laying eggs

A mosquito laying eggs

“Hawaii is fortunate to have an experienced and capable public health laboratory that can serve our state with timely and quality testing under emergency conditions,” said Health Director Dr. Virginia Pressler. “That same capability is not available in many other areas of the Pacific, and providing lab support to these areas, when we can, is critical to controlling the spread of diseases and reducing the risk of introduction to Hawaii.”

“With Zika emerging in U.S. island territories of American Samoa, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands, the nation is on alert,” said Dr. Thane Hancock, team leader for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) American Samoa Zika Response.

The timely response by the Hawaii Department of Health’s State Laboratories staff provided critical support for local disease investigations and for monitoring potentially exposed pregnant women.”

This month, DOH began using the CDC developed real-time reverse transcriptase (rRT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Zika virus. With this recently developed capability, DOH provided officials in American Samoa and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (Majuro), the first laboratory evidence of Zika transmission in these two U.S. affiliated jurisdictions.

“It’s always a balance to ensure our state needs are met first, but the staff here is more than willing to step up to support national efforts,” said State Laboratories Director Dr. Christian Whelen. “This work helps to better prepare us for potential issues that could arise in our state, and identifying and controlling outbreaks in the Pacific benefits all of us.”

While PCR is the best test during early onset of symptoms, testing for antibody to the viruses is preferred after about a week of illness. CDC is shipping antibody test materials to Hawaii so that the department’s State Laboratories Division can establish these capabilities over the next few weeks.

“The testing is very similar to the methodology our labs use for other RNA viruses such as Chikungunya, dengue, influenza, and measles,” added Whelen. “Our laboratory staff have been thoroughly trained to safely work with high risk specimens.”

DOH continues to work with the healthcare community, state, county, and federal officials to prepare for infectious diseases that threaten Hawaii and the Pacific. The State Laboratories Division administers a statewide laboratories program which conducts and regulates scientific analysis in support of environmental quality, health and safety, and infectious disease monitoring and control activities.

Parking on Kamehameha Highway to Be Restricted Near Waimea Bay for the Eddie Aikau Tournament

The Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) is alerting motorists of parking restrictions on Kamehameha Highway on Oahu’s North Shore in anticipation of the Quiksilver in Memory of Eddie Aikau surf tournament. No parking will be allowed on either side of Kamehameha Highway from Iliohu Place to the Saints Peter & Paul Mission beginning Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2016 at 10 pm through the duration of the tournament.

Eddie contest

Temporary barriers will be placed in the shoulders to prevent parking and allow safe pedestrian access. Honolulu Police officers will be patrolling the area enforcing the parking restriction. Vehicles parked within the restricted area will be cited and/or towed at the owner’s expense. Should the event be cancelled the barriers will be removed as quickly as possible and the parking restriction will be lifted.

HDOT is postponing planned lane closures on Kamehameha Highway along Oahu’s North Shore in anticipation of the crowds of people venturing to Waimea Bay. Previously planned utility installation and repair work on Thursday, Feb. 25 will be postponed.

Electronic message boards will be strategically placed at key decision making points including Wahiawa, Kahaluu and Kahuku to alert motorists of parking restrictions and heavy traffic on the North Shore. Additional signs will be placed on both ends of the designated area near Waimea Bay to notify drivers of the parking restriction.

We ask those travelling to the North Shore to be patient, drive safely, and expect delays. As with past Eddie’s, we expect the number of cars on the road to significantly exceed the capacity. HDOT has been in coordination with the Honolulu Police Department, City & County of Honolulu Parks and Recreation Department, and Department of Transportation Services to mitigate impacts to the best extent possible.

To view a complete list of the scheduled roadwork around the state visit the Hawaii Department of Transportation website by clicking here.