Local Artist Commissioned to Create Posters Commemorating Sainthood of Mother Marianne Cope

Standing in front of Bishop Home where she ministered to girls and women suffering from Hansen’s disease, Saint Marianne Cope has been honored in a new work of art commissioned by Pacific Historic Parks (PHP).

The just-released 12” x 18” poster commemorates Saint Marianne’s canonization, which took place on October 21. It was designed by O‘ahu artist Nick Kuchar and uses a combination of rich hues, shapes and text to create a unique retro look.

“Saint Marianne’s canonization is an incredible event that holds so much meaning to our local community,” said Brad Wallis, President and CEO of Pacific Historic Parks. “We felt it was important to commission a local artist who would understand the historical significance of this event and be able to tell the story of Saint Marianne through the use of art.”

The poster is available exclusively at PHP’s Kalaupapa National Historical Park Bookstore and online at www.pacifichistoricparksbookstore.org. PHP, a cooperating association that assists the National Park Service (NPS), supports the education, preservation, development and interpretation of four historic sites throughout the Pacific. Proceeds from the sale of the Saint Marianne poster will support education and research at Kalaupapa NHP.

“The support we receive from Pacific Historic Parks plays an integral role in our ability to maintain the historical integrity of our national parks, including Kalaupapa National Historical Park,” said Steve Prokop, NPS Superintendent at Kalaupapa NHP. “Our partnership with PHP helps us to meet our mission of preserving the natural and cultural resources of our parks and to educate visitors on the historical significance of each site. Saint Marianne’s interpretive poster is a perfect example of how this partnership allows us to share her story with the world.”

In 1888, Saint Marianne established Bishop Home for women and girls in Kalaupapa, a small community located on Moloka‘i’s northern peninsula where Hansen’s disease patients were sent to live in isolation from 1866-1969. Saint Marianne spent 35 years helping these patients and lived on Moloka‘i until her death in 1918. The National Park Service and Hawai’i State Department of Health now manage the area.

Pacific Historic Parks also commissioned Kuchar to create a poster honoring Saint Damien, who was canonized in 2009. According to Kuchar, “I feel extremely honored and blessed to be able to create one-of-a kind tributes to these two great humanitarians in Hawai’i.”

For more information on the Saint Marianne poster, contact Sarah Safranski, Communications and Publications Manager, Pacific Historic Parks at ssafranski@pacifichistoricparks.org or visit www.pacifichistoricparksbookstore.org.

Hawaii Island’s Most Wanted for November

The most recent edition of the Crime Stoppers television program “Hawaiʻi Island’s Most Wanted” highlights a 42-year-old man suspected of three thefts from elderly victims and two men wanted on bench warrants.

The new episode begins airing Friday (November 2).

In it, police ask for the public’s help in locating 42-year-old Nicholas Stevens, who is suspected of contacting elderly women at their homes in Hilo and Kona, persuading them to hire him to repair their driveways, collecting money in advance and then failing to complete the jobs.

Nicholas Stevens

He is described as 5-foot-9, 166 pounds and balding, with a thin build and a tan complexion. He may be in Hilo or Kona.

The television program also asks for help in locating a 27-year-old man wanted on three bench warrants. Albert Aukai Manners is wanted on a $15,000 contempt of court warrant for failing to appear in court for a hearing on eight criminal charges, including driving under the influence and assaulting a police officer.

Albert Aukai Manners

He is also wanted on no-bail warrants for violating terms of release on bail in an assault case and a domestic abuse case. He is described as 5-foot-8, 155 pounds with brown eyes and short black hair. He has numerous tattoos on his neck and chest. His address is unknown.

In this latest edition of “Hawaiʻi Island’s Most Wanted,” Officer Patrick Menino also asks for help locating a Kaʻū man wanted on four bench warrants with bail totaling $200,000. Mario A. Espino is wanted for contempt of court and violating terms of probation relating to convictions for theft and auto theft.

Mario A. Espino

He is described as Hispanic, 5-foot-2, 130 pounds with brown hair, brown eyes and tattoos on his arms and back. He is most likely in the Ocean View area.

Police ask that anyone with information about any of these cases call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311 or Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential. Crime Stoppers does not tape record phone calls or subscribe to caller ID.

“Hawaiʻi Island’s Most Wanted” is a project of Crime Stoppers Hilo, Inc., which is a partnership of the business community, the media and the police. It was inspired by the national TV show, “America’s Most Wanted.” The program airs on Na Leo O Hawaiʻi Community Television Channel 54 on Sundays at 5 p.m. and Fridays at 5:30 p.m. It also airs intermittently on Channel 53.

Public Hearing on Bill No. 292 – Restricting Geothermal Hours

The Hawaii County Council is having a public hearing on Bill No. 292 which would restrict geothermal exploratory and production drilling to the hours of 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.  The public will be allowed up to 3-minutes to provide testimony.

Pahoa Neighborhood Facility

The public hearing is on Friday, November 2, 2012 at 5:30 pm in the Pāhoa Neighborhood Facility.  For more information, please call Chairman Yagong at 961-8538.

 

30-Year-Old Woman Dies in South Kona Vehicle/Pedestrian Collision

A 30-year-old woman from Honaunau died Tuesday (October 30) after being involved in a motor vehicle/pedestrian collision on Highway 11 in the area of the 107-mile marker in South Kona.

Jasmin Robertson

The woman was identified as Jasmin K. Robertson of a Honaunau address.

Responding to a 6:38 p.m. call, traffic investigators determined that the woman, who appeared to be intoxicated, had been sitting on the northbound lane of the highway when she was struck by a 2003 BMW two-door sedan that was traveling north and being operated by a 50-year-old Captain Cook man.

Fire Department rescue personnel took the woman to Kona Community Hospital, where she was pronounced dead at 7:15 p.m.

The driver of the vehicle was wearing seatbelt and was not injured.

It is unknown at this time if speed, alcohol or drugs were involved on part of the driver but the woman had been drinking.

Traffic Enforcement Unit officers have initiated a negligent homicide investigation and have ordered an autopsy to determine the exact cause of death.

Anyone with information regarding this crash is asked to call Officer Larry Flowers at 326-4646, extension 229.

This is the 36th traffic fatality on the Big Island this year compared to 18 at the same time last year.

Lance Armstrong Kicking It in Hawaii

Well TMZ is reporting that Lance Armstrong is in Hawaii and I just checked his twitter account and it does appear that he is here now:

Despite all the recent controversy, Lance Armstrong got back on his bike and pedaled around Hawaii while on vacation. His life just seems to keep getting worse and worse, right?

[youtube=http://youtu.be/ZkXJYGwJNWk]

I wonder if he’s staying on the Big Island like he normally does?

Raw, Fermented Foods Workshop Nov. 10

Probiotic, Lacto-fermented. What’s it all mean?

Find out how tasty fermented and raw foods can contribute to wellness at a three-hour, cutting-edge workshop Saturday, Nov. 10 at Island Naturals Market and Deli-Kailua.

Benjamin Cohn, fermented and raw food specialist at Honaunau’s Dragonfly Ranch, discusses “Raw and Ferment Foods: Their Role in Healing, Health and Well-being” 10 a.m.-1 p.m. The informative program includes a raw food lunch and admission is by donation. Registration is at 9:45 a.m.; coffee and tea will be served.

The workshop is presented by the Women’s Federation for World Peace-Hawaii. WFWP is a global organization that empowers women with knowledge, skills and supportive community to learn their unique value and bring lasting peace. It is co-sponsored by The Pacific Rim Education Foundation (PREF) and Hawaiian Queen Coffee Company.

The workshop will explain the benefits of raw, “living” food and share why fermented foods can improve digestion through a balancing of bacteria and enzymes. Cole will detail the important connection between fermented foods and vitamin B12 and delve into sprouting food and the proper use of kitchen tools during food preparation. He will also demonstrate how to prepare raw and fermented foods in a tasty and appealing way so they can be easily integrated into your lifestyle.

Reservations are appreciated to Betsy, 808-987-6510 or wfwp.kona@gmail.com. Island Naturals is located at 74-5487 Kaiwi Street in the Old Industrial Area.

PREF: The Pacific Rim Education Foundation sponsors educational programs, funds charitable activities and supports practices that nurture love, wisdom and peace within individuals and families, which promote understanding and connectedness among communities, and which foster wise care for the Earth. PREF is funded by the Hawaiian Queen Coffee Company (HQC); the Unification Church, founded by the late Reverend Sun Myung Moon; and by individual donors. For information, visit www.prefpeace.org or email PrefPeace@gmail.com.

 

County of Hawai‘i Non-Profit Grants Informational Meetings

Councilmember Brittany Smart will host informational meetings for all non-profits (must be 501c3) interested in applying for a grant from the County of Hawai‘i to discuss recent Hawai‘i County Code changes and how it will affect the application process.

A representative from the Department of Finance will be available to assist in explaining the code changes from Bill 287, Draft 3 (passed October 2012). All completed applications must be submitted and received by the Department of Finance by 4:30pm on Thursday January 31, 2013.

The meetings will be November 15th at 10:00AM in Hilo at the County of Hawai‘i Council Chambers (25 Aupuni Street) and November 16th at 10:00AM in Kona at the West Hawai‘i Civic Center, Building G (74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy).

Any questions, please call Jenny at (808) 961-8536 or email district6@co.hawaii.hi.us.

 

Big Island Police Searching for Missing 47-Year-Old Puna Man

Big Island police are asking for the public’s help in locating a 47-year-old Puna man who was reported missing.

Robert Allen Park

Robert Allen Park is described as Hawaiian, about 5-foot-7, about 230 pounds with a stocky build, a bald head, brown eyes and a tan complexion. He may be in need of medical attention.

He was last seen around 2:30 p.m. on October 22 at a home on Pikake Street in Mountain View.

Police ask that anyone with information on his whereabouts contact Detective Norbert Serrao at 961-2383 or nserrao@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Commentary on Tsunami Sirens by Councilman Pete Hoffmann – “The Sounds of Silence”

Councilman Pete Hoffman

Councilman Pete Hoffmann

Last Saturday evening, we were visited once again by a frequent, if not welcomed, visitor, i.e. the threat of a tsunami. This was the third such event in the past 32 months and permitted island residents and agencies to participate in what is fast becoming an island staple, “the annual evacuation drill”. Fortunately, the threat remained exactly that. Some Saturday night festivities and events were cancelled or curtailed, many took to the roads seeking higher ground, others raced to the gas stations and local markets to ‘top off’ or stock-up (on what I’m not certain??), evacuation centers were opened, and in general residents displayed a growing non-chalance that is becoming part of the fabric of life on an island in the Pacific Ocean.

For the most part, our County first responders, Civil Defense, CERT volunteers and others performed with a degree of professionalism that comes from repeated ‘drills’. There will always be problems of some kind, and glitches will occur no matter how often the system is exercised. However, I agree with Mayor Kenoi when he notes that County personnel accomplished tasks in an outstanding fashion.

So am I the only one who remains concerned about our preparedness? In the rush to ‘pat ourselves on the back for a job well done’ I continue to question why considerable portions of our coastline with sizeable developments do not have any tsunami sirens. Why is it that after two previous tsunamis, some resort areas do not have a single siren in place? Didn’t we stress this danger last year and the year before?? Didn’t it take some legislative arm-wrestling to convince County officials that some zoning regulations need to be introduced to insure residents in those areas, most vulnerable to a tsunami have sufficient warning? Wasn’t the County supposed to follow-up with State officials to insure this situation doesn’t happen? Doesn’t this fall within the public health and safety mandates of our County government?? Despite the obvious dangers, Tsunami #3 came and there remain too many built up areas that lack a siren capability.

Do not misunderstand. A functioning siren system may not be the only or even the best warning capability. It takes, I believe, a combination of several components to provide our residents an effective early warning structure. My fear is that for some on our island, particularly along our coastlines, a siren is a critical ingredient that must be operational to provide the broad coverage so necessary for public safety. The silence along some portions of our coast is truly deafening.

Consider for a moment the timeframe involved: the February 2010 event allowed us 13+ hours lead time. The March 2011 event permitted us a seven hour warning. Last Saturday’s exercise cut that time to three hours. Does anyone see a pattern here?? My concern is that the next event may allow the County perhaps one hour or less to evacuate large numbers of people from our coastline. And knowing that our luck may finally run out, it will be in the dead of night when the visitor count is high and our snow-birds are here.

Before we “pat ourselves on the back” too much, we must return to basics. We are not as prepared as we think we are if sirens remain absent from many vulnerable areas. We are fooling ourselves if we think we are ready. We must make this deficiency a persistent and vocal objective of our County government now, not in the short-term, but immediately. Enough talk and promises. Solutions are required now and if sirens are lacking, some effective alternative must be put in place. This public health and safety shortfall cannot be permitted to exist when our next “annual tsunami drill” occurs. The sounds of silence must not continue.

Pete Hoffmann

22-Year-Old Man Arrested for Stealing Gas

A 22-year-old man has been arrested for stealing gasoline from a business.

Norton Castro

Gasoline was stolen from a warehouse in Pāpaʻikou at 5:30 p.m. Sunday (October 28). A video surveillance camera on the property caught the suspect returning at 11:37 p.m. and attempting to steal gasoline again.

Norton Castro of Pepeʻekeo was arrested Monday morning (October 29) and later charged with two counts of second-degree burglary and one count of third-degree theft. His bail was set at $4,500.

He was held at the Hilo police cellblock until his initial court appearance on Tuesday (October 30).

Police Investigating Break-Ins During Tsunami Evacuations

Big Island police are investigating several break-ins that took place in the Keaukaha area of Hilo during the tsunami evacuation Saturday night (October 27).

Eight residential burglaries were reported on Kalanianaʻole Avenue. Police are investigating each one as a “burglary of a dwelling during a civil defense emergency,” which is a Class A felony punishable by up to 20 years in prison.

Police ask that anyone with information about these burglaries (or anyone who didn’t evacuate and saw suspicious persons in the area) call Sergeant James Correa at 961-2289 or the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Big Island Arbor Day Events Feature Native, Non-Native Plants for Sale

Celebrate Arbor Day in Hawaii and “go green” by purchasing and planting a native plant from the Arbor Day plant sale on Friday, November 2 at Department of Land and Natural Resources’ Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) nurseries on the Big Island.

Planting a native plant celebrates the forests that are fundamental to our way of life. Hawaii’s native forests provide the islands’ water supply by absorbing large quantities of moisture from passing clouds and rainfall. These watershed forests reduce greenhouse gases and flooding, erosion, and siltation of reefs and fisheries. Native plants also have cultural significance, regarded as elders and ancestors, or used for medicines, offerings, or other material needs.

Learn more about these incredible and unique plants at the Big Island sale, held in two locations, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. In Hilo the plant sale is at the DOFAW baseyard at 19 E. Kawili St. (corner of Kawili St. and Kilauea Ave.). Phone 974-4221. In Kamuela, the sale is at the DOFAW Kamuela office at 66-1220A Lalamilo Road. Call 887-6061.

A few of the native species that will be available are: koa, koai‘a, ohia, hame, kokio (hibiscus), alahe‘e, pohinahina, sandalwood, and loulu. A few of the non-native species that will be available are: puakenikeni, Sugi pines, ylang ylang, gardenia, shower tree, and Podocarpus.

The cost of plant species will range from $1 each for dibble tube seedlings to $15 each for 3-gallon pots. There are no limits on quantities purchased and all sales are on a cash only basis. Plant sales will feature both native and non-native plants raised at DOFAW nurseries that are popular with gardeners and landscapers. Proceeds will be used to support nursery operations and forest management.

Update on the Hawaii County Elections

VOTER REGISTRATION

104,323 Hawaii County residents are registered to vote in the 2012 General Election. This is the official voter registration count for the 2012 General Election and is not subject to change for this election.

ABSENTEE MAIL BALLOTS

On October 15th 22,200 absentee mail ballots were sent to Hawaii County voters.  As of October 29th, Hawaii County has received 14,584 voted absentee mail ballots.  New requests are processed and absentee mail ballots are sent to Hawaii County voters on a daily basis.

Hawaii County voters are advised that the deadline to submit an application for an absentee mail ballot is October 30, 2012 at 4:30 p.m. Applications for an absentee mail ballot that are received after this date will not be processed for the 2012 General Election.

ABSENTEE/EARLY WALK-IN VOTING

On October 23rd, Hawaii County opened absentee/early walk-in voting precincts in Hilo , Waimea and in Kona.  Absentee/early walk-in voting is open to all registered voters at any early walk-in voting precinct on the island, regardless of district or residency assignment.  Absentee/early walk-in voting will continue until November 3, 2012.

As of October 29th, 4,688 Hawaii County voters have voted absentee/early walk-in voting in Hawaii County .

According to Lehua Iopa, Hawaii County Acting Elections Program Administrator, “Let’s vote Hawaii County !  Hawaii County voters may walk-in and vote early before the November 6th, 2012 General Election in Hawaii County .  Early walk-in voting is happening every day until Saturday, November 3, 2012.  Each location will be open every day from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m.  All Hawaii County registered voters can walk-in and vote in any location in Hilo , Kona and Waimea, regardless of district or residency assignment. For more information regarding early walk-in voting, please contact the Hawaii County Elections Division (808) 961-8277.”

For more information please contact Lehua Iopa, Acting Elections Program Administrator, Hawaii County Elections Division (808) 961-8277 or by electronic mail to eiopa@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Makalei Fire Station in North Kona Blessed

For the people of Kona, it means faster emergency responses and lower insurance premiums. For future firefighters, it’s a modern classroom to learn the art of fire science. And for the fire fighters who keep our community safe, it’s home.

“Welcome to your home,” Hawai‘i County Fire Chief Darren Rosario told about 80 people in attendance as the County of Hawai‘i opened the doors to its newest and largest facility, the $7 million Makalei Fire Station.

Located on Māmalahoa Highway less than a mile north of its intersection with Ka‘iminani Drive, the 11,000 square foot Makalei station sits on more than two acres just south of the 32-mile marker on the mauka side of the highway.

The fire station, designed by KYA Design Group, includes three apparatus bays, hose tower, pump house, office, kitchen and training room, dormitory, exercise/work rooms, a dedicated classroom, laundry room, fuel tank and parking areas for staff and guests.  Parked outside one of the bays was a bright yellow pumper with “North Kona” emblazoned on the doors. The station will also feature a hazardous materials unit and a ladder truck.

About $4 million of the funding for the project came from a federal grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act through its Fire Station Construction Grant Program. Ground was broken in March 2011.

“This is a special day here in Kalaoa, in North Kona. This 11,000 square foot home will house those who run in when a lot of us are running out. Those who protect our community, protect our parents, our kūpuna, protect our children,” said Mayor Billy Kenoi.

Joining Mayor Kenoi and Chief Rosario in speaking at today’s blessing were former Fire Chief Darryl Oliveira, Kahu Kaniala Akaka, who performed the blessing, and Hannah Kihalani Springer, who gave a history of the area and the Makalei name.

The station will positively impact the Kalaoa area of North Kona with quicker emergency response times and lower homeowner insurance rates. Before Makalei Fire Station was built, the next closest unit was seven miles to the south at the intersection of Palani Road and Queen Ka‘ahumanu Highway. Response time from the Kailua Kona Station to Makalei is about 15 minutes.

Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the station is the hose tower, which doubles as a training facility for building fires and cliff rescues. Materials used to manufacture modern hoses make hose towers optional features on fire stations, but the one at Makalei has a catwalk on the inside that will be used to train a firefighter how to pick up a victim and get him out of a building. The tower will also be used to train recruits how to rappel down the side of a building or a cliff during an emergency. Also included in the facility is a dedicated classroom.

Survey Shows Support for Aina Koa Pono

Media Release:

Aina Koa Pono (AKP) received support from Hawaii Island residents in a recent survey, but a larger number revealed that many are still unaware of the company and its Kau project.

The survey results were released today to coincide with the Hawaii Public Utilities’s Commission hearings on Hawaii Electric Light Company’s request for approval of the biofuels contract.

Aina Koa Pono is proposing a biorefinery in Kau which would produce 24 million gallons of biofuel annually—16 million gallons will be used at HELCO’s Keahole power plant and eight million gallons will be distributed by Mansfield Oil for transportation, with preference to Hawaii. When completed, AKP can supply 18 percent of the island’s power needs from renewable resources.

“Hawaii Island residents were surveyed because we wanted to get a sense of the level of acceptance and support for the Kau project,” said Chris Eldridge, partner of AKP. “What we learned was that while there’s support, we need to do more education and outreach.”

AKP engaged SMS Research and Marketing of Honolulu to conduct the survey. The survey, taken in September and October, found that 85 percent support “developing more renewable energy sources for the Island of Hawai‘i.”

The Kau project would provide “base load” electricity, which is essentially steady electricity, as opposed to other alternatives such as wind or solar, which are intermittent and depend on weather conditions.

Aina Koa Pono’s operation would initially convert invasive plant species, coconut husks and macadamia nut hulls to biofuel using Microwave Catalytic Deploymerization (Micro Dee). Microwave technology has been successfully and safely used in the herbal extraction and pharmaceutical industries for decades.

SMS Research has served organizations in Hawaii for more than 50 years.

The research also indicated that a large minority Hawaii Island residents do not know enough about Aina Koa Pono or its project.

SMS Research found that only 10 percent of those interviewed knew about the Aina Koa Pono project when asked on an unaided basis. Of the residents who knew of the project, 65 percent support the project compared to 16 percent who do not.

A description of the project was provided to all respondents and when asked whether they favor or oppose the project, 56 percent stated they were in favor of the project as compared to 11 percent opposed— a 5-to-1 ratio. 33 percent stated they did not know enough about the project.

“We have been meeting with folks in Kau and will be increasing our outreach to the community so they are aware of our project,” Eldridge said.

Excluding those who do not know enough, the support for Aina Koa Pono development is strong in the areas of safety, keeping money in the State, additional jobs, revitalization of Hawaii’s agricultural industry, reduction of electric bills for Island residents, and more.

Again, excluding those who do not know enough, some of the concerns with the project include the perception that Aina Koa Pono will be run by outsiders, may have some impact on traffic, biofuel will cost more to produce than imported oil, and the plant will be too expensive to build.

“Serious misinformation is circulating throughout the community. Aina Koa Pono is locally owned and the $450 million project is privately funded,” Eldridge said. “Eight to 12 trucks a week will deliver biofuel to Keahole. The project poses no financial risk to ratepayers, who pay nothing until the biofuel is produced and accepted by HELCO.”

The Aina Koa Pono project would increase electricity bills for HECO and HELCO customers by 84 cents to $1 a month for typical 500 to 600 kWh usage.

At the conclusion of the survey, participants were asked again the level of support or opposition to the development of the biofuel plant at Kau, a majority of 63 percent support versus 12 percent who oppose with 25 percent having no opinion.

The final report will be released by SMS Research shortly.

(Research Methodology: 303 interviews conducted between September 20 to October 3, 2012, margin of error is +/– 5.6 percentage points.)

Saturday’s Arts Market to Host Sign-Up Drive for Hawai’i Island Network of Artists

Waimea Artists’ Guild, working with the Hawai‘i Island Network of Artists (HINA), a project of Volcano Art Center, invites all Island artists to register with HINA’s new data base.  Free registration and information will be available at the Waimea Artists’ Guild Holiday Arts Market on Saturday, November 3, at Kanu o ka ‘Āina New Century Public Charter School, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.  For info call 808-887-2289.

Ledward Kaapana

Slack-key master Ledward Ka‘apana & Friends appear live in concert from 4-6 p.m. on Saturday, November 3 at Kanu o ka ‘Āina School in Waimea. The family-friendly concert includes chili and rice dinner, salad bar, and beverages. Tickets $15 adult, $9 youth 4-12, keiki 3 and under free, available at Kanu or Mama’s House Thrift Shop, or call 887-2289. This drug and alcohol free event is a fundraiser to support the partnership between WAG and KALO’s ‘Ohana in the Arts Program.

John Dumas at Volcano Art Center

John Dumas, the internationally renowned Kauai artist, musician, inspirational teacher, shamanic astrologer and pioneer in sound healing, will be offering his unique “Dreamtime Concert” experience at Volcano Art Center on Saturday, November 10, 2012.

Join John Dumas for a musical shamanic journey November 10th at Volcano Art Center

Described as mystical and magical, John’s rare enthusiasm enthralls and elevates the Soul. He travels the world bringing joyful shamanic journeys into the lives of his concert-goers through the use of his handcrafted instruments and has performed at sacred sites such as the Egyptian pyramids and Mayan temples.

Through his use of didgeridoo, flutes, rattles, drum and chanting, John aims to stir the Soul into a divine bliss. He shares his rare gift to combine musical precision with an intuitive response to the heart’s calling of his audience.

“Dreamtime Concert” with John Dumas will be held Saturday, November 10 starting at 7:00pm at VAC’s Niaulani Campus located at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road in Volcano Village. Doors open at 6:30pm. Cost is $12 or $10 for VAC members.

Tickets may be purchased in person or over the phone at (808) 967-8222. For more information, visit  www.volcanoartcenter.org or www.johndumas.com.

Volcano Art Center (VAC) is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization founded in 1974 to develop, promote and perpetuate the artistic, cultural and environmental heritage of Hawaii’s people through the arts and education.

Pahoa Facilities Get Fenced In

The Pahoa Senior Center which was the former fire station here in Pahoa, had been having a problem with homeless people sleeping at the facilities during the evenings and the Pahoa Neighborhood Facility (Pahoa Community Center) has long been a problem for the parks workers.

Last week fencing went up around the facilities:

The new gate to the Pahoa Senior Center

A lot of fencing was used in this project as it looked like they tried to encircle the entire park.

This fencing will really assist in keeping the troubled elements out of the community center at night.

County Parks Maintenance worker Alfred Pestrello mentioned how the folks that work at the park, take great pride in the park and that this will really make there job easier.

County worker Alfred Pestrello puts on some finishing touches to the fencing as a security guard looks over the facilities.

Hawaii County Police Increasing DUI Checkpoints This Week in Conjunction With Halloween

Children of all ages look forward to Halloween but police want to keep them safe to enjoy the fun. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly four times as many children ages 5-14, are killed while walking on Halloween evening than other times of the year.

Hawaiʻi County police will increase DUI checkpoints and roving patrols this week in conjunction with Halloween. The effort is part of a national and statewide campaign called “Drive sober or get pulled over.”

Sergeant Robert P. Pauole, head of the Hawaiʻi Police Department’s Traffic Services Section, pointed out that drugs, alcohol or both have been factors in at least 63 percent of the 35 traffic fatalities we’ve experienced so far this year. He urges all motorists to be extra cautious in the next few days, when a large number of pedestrians may be out for Halloween festivities.

“Be especially careful in residential areas by slowing down and looking for children on roadways, medians and curbs,” Pauole said. “If you plan to drink, please don’t drive. Make arrangements to ride with a designated, sober and licensed driver before you start drinking. If you can’t find one, don’t take a chance—take a taxi.”

Police offer the following additional tips for Halloween safety:

Motorists:

-Drive below the posted speed limit during trick-or-treating hours.
-Watch for keiki darting out from between parked cars.
-Enter and exit driveways and alleys carefully.

Parents:

-Accompany your keiki when they go trick-or-treating or make sure they are supervised by a responsible adult.
-Have your keiki trick-or-treat in a safe location (consider a local mall or community event).
-Make sure keiki are supervised as they cross the street.
-Have keiki get out of cars on the curb side, not on the traffic side.
-Carry flashlights and use reflective tape or stickers on bags and costumes for keiki to see and be seen.
-Avoid masks or costumes that limit a keiki’s vision or movement.
-Check all treats before letting your keiki eat them.

The Police Department wishes everyone a fun and safe Halloween.

Hawai’i Executive to Chair National Leadership Network for Nonprofits

Independent Sector, a leadership network for nonprofit organizations, foundations and corporate giving programs, recently appointed Hawai’i-native Kelvin Taketa, president and CEO of Hawai’i Community Foundation, as its board chair. As an organization striving to advance the common good in America, Independent Sector works towards promoting public policies and serves as an advocate for the philanthropic community.

Kelvin Taketa, Hawai’i Community Foundation president and CEO.

“Though we are thousands of miles from the mainland, it is important to stay connected with the public policies and changes occurring in our sector across the nation,” said Taketa. “Ultimately, these are the changes that will also affect us here in Hawai’i. It’s essential that we keep an open dialogue by sharing the challenges and successes we’ve experienced locally, while learning about the trends and issues nationally. In this way, I believe we can make an even greater impact in our community.”

Independent Sector is located in Washington D.C. and works nationally to create opportunities through its partnerships with approximately 600 organizations to lead, strengthen, and mobilize the nonprofit and philanthropic community. Together the coalition seeks to foster a just and inclusive society where citizens and institutions can work together to develop healthy and vibrant communities. Since the organization was founded in 1980, Independent Sector has sponsored revolutionary research, supported public policies within the independent sector, and created invaluable resources for organizations to achieve these goals.

“We are honored to have Kelvin as our new chairman and know that he will provide invaluable counsel and leadership to the board and the Independent Sector network,” said Diana Aviv, president of Independent Sector. “As an organization determined to make an impact in as many communities across the nation as possible, we believe having the unique perspectives of highly-respected leaders, such as Kelvin, is absolutely vital to our growth and success.”

Taketa brings more than 30 years of experience in the nonprofit sector and joined Independent Sector’s Board in 2007 as an opportunity to be a part of the network and advocate for nonprofit organizations, foundations, and corporate giving programs nationwide. Hawai’i Community Foundation is also a member of Independent Sector, joining in 2006. Since then, the Foundation has gained a better understanding of the current trends and issues in the nonprofit sector nationally, which provides valuable context for Hawai’i Community Foundation, as well as for the local community.

Hawai’i Community Foundation is a public, statewide, charitable services, and grant-making organization supported by donor contributions for the benefit of Hawai’i’s people. For more information about the Foundation, please visit www.HawaiiCommunityFoundation.org .

CLick here to view a PDF of this news release