Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Programs for January

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing After Dark in the Park and Hawaiian cultural programs with the community and visitors throughout January – which is also Volcano Awareness Month, established by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. These programs are free, but park entrance fees may apply. Mark your calendars for these upcoming events:

Rift

Volcano Awareness Month: 30th Anniversary of Kīlauea’s Ongoing East Rift Zone Eruption.  Jan. 3, 2013, marks the 30th anniversary of Kīlauea’s ongoing East Rift Zone eruption.  During its first three years, spectacular lava fountains spewed episodically from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent. Since then, nearly continuous lava effusion has built a vast plain of pāhoehoe lava that stretches from the volcano’s rift zone to the sea.  Although the eruption has been relatively quiet during the past year, with mostly steady but unusually weak activity, it has produced some dramatic lava flows in past years.  Tim Orr, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist, will review highlights from the past 30 years and talk about recent developments on Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 8, 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Crater

Volcano Awareness Month: What’s Happening in Halema‘uma‘u Crater? In March 2008, a new volcanic vent opened in Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the summit of Kīlauea. Since then, the eruption has consisted of continuous degassing, occasional explosive events, and fluctuating lava lake activity in an open crater that has now grown to more than 520 feet wide.  While thousands of visitors flock to see the nighttime glow emitted by the lava lake, Kīlauea’s summit eruption also provides an abundance of data and insights for scientists. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Matt Patrick will present an overview of Kīlauea’s summit eruption, including a survey of the volcanic processes occurring within the vent. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 15, 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kai Ho'opi'i

Kai Hoopii, An Evening of Hawaiian Music. Listen to the sweet voice of Kai Ho‘opi‘i, sharing the music of his ohana from Kahakuloa, Maui. Kai Ho‘opi‘i is an Aloha Festivals Hawaiian falsetto contest winner. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.

When: Wed., Jan. 16, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where:
Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Volcano Plumbing

Volcano Awareness Month: A Below-the-Scenes Look at Kīlauea Volcano’s “Plumbing” System. The magma storage and transport system beneath a volcano can be envisioned like the plumbing system of a house. Magma “pipes” connect different reservoirs, and can feed magma toward the surface or transport it laterally beneath the surface. Thanks to over a century of research, volcanologists have a good idea of where magma is stored beneath Kīlauea and how magma moves between summit storage areas and eruption sites (which can be many miles away) along the volcano’s rift zones. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientist Michael Poland will present a picture of what Kīlauea’s subsurface might look like based on observations from eruptions, earthquake patterns, ground deformation, chemical changes, and geologic studies. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 22, 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Volcano Awareness Month: The Story Behind Monitoring Hawaiian Volcanoes & How HVO Gets the Data It Needs to Track Eruptions and Earthquakes. Have you ever wondered how scientists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory get the tilt, GPS, and seismic data they need to figure out what’s happening inside Hawai‘i’s active volcanoes? Or how the images of remote volcanic activity on HVO’s website get there? HVO’s chief technical support specialist Kevan Kamibayashi will explain the installation and operation of HVO’s various monitoring sensors and how their signals are sent back to the observatory from remote locations on the volcanoes. Don’t miss this opportunity to see some of the instruments used by HVO to monitor Hawaiian eruptions and earthquakes. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Jan. 29, 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kaohu Monfort

Lā‘au Lapa‘au (Healing Medicine) with Ka‘ohu Monfort. Learn how plants are used as medicine. Ka‘ohu Monfort shares her knowledge of how Hawai‘i’s native plants, including noni, kukui and ōlena, can heal and nourish. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Jan. 30 from 10 a.m. to noon
Where:
Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Coast Guard Crews to Enforce Kailua Bay Security Zone During President Obama Stay

Coast Guard law enforcement officers will enforce a temporary security zone in Kailua Bay beginning as early as Dec. 21, 2012. The temporary security zone is necessary to ensure the safety of the President of the United States and his official party.

Kailua Zone

The security zone will be in effect from 6 a.m. December 21, 2012 to 10 p.m. January 6, 2013, unless canceled earlier by the Captain of the Port Honolulu, Capt. Joanna Nunan.

The Coast Guard is coordinating with the Honolulu Police Department, Marine Corps Base Hawaii and other Federal, state, and county law enforcement agencies on patrols of the area under the direction of the U.S. Secret Service.

The maritime security zone includes a portion of Kailua Bay, beginning at Kapoho Point and extending westward to the shoreline near Kailuana Loop. The zone also includes the adjacent canal beginning near Kapoho Point to a point extending the canal way to approximately 150 yards south of the North Kalaheo Avenue road bridge.

A marker will be placed on Kailua Beach, a yellow buoy will be placed on the water and an orange boom will placed in the canal for visual references of the zone.

Under the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (33 CFR 165.33), the temporary law prohibits any unauthorized person or vessel from entering or remaining in this security zone. Any person entering the zone without the permission of the Coast Guard Captain of the Port is subject to a penalty of not more than $40,000 for each violation or a criminal penalty resulting in imprisonment of not more than 10 years.

For more information about the security zone, contact the Sector Honolulu command center at 808-842-2600.

Puna Murder Victim Died of Injury to Brain Caused by Blunt Force Trauma

An autopsy conducted Tuesday (December 18) determined that the victim of a Puna murder, 54-year-old James V. Johns Sr. of Nanawale Estates, died of injury to the brain caused by blunt force trauma.

Johns’ body was found in his home Sunday.

Jason Russell Jump

Jason Russell Jump

The suspect, 36-year-old Jason Russell Jump of Pāhoa, remains in the Hilo police cellblock on suspicion of second-degree murder. Detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section are continuing the investigation.

Police ask that anyone with information on this incident contact Detective Norbert Serrao at 961-2383 or nserrao@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Hilo Improvement Program’s Free Community Workshops for January 2013

Hilo Improvement Program’s FREE Tuesday Community Workshops offerings for January 2013!

Click to Enlarge

Click to Enlarge

Big Island Police Still Looking for 39-Year-Old Kau Woman

Big Island are renewing their request for information about a 39-year-old Kaʻū woman who is wanted for violating a court order.

Sharon Hui

Sharon Hui

Sharon Hui is described as 5-foot-3 to 5-foot-6, 130-160 pounds with brown eyes and brown hair. She may be in the Hawaiian Ocean View Estates or Kona areas.

Police ask that anyone with information on her whereabouts call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

 

3.1 Magnitude Earthquake Shakes Volcano Area of the Big Island Early in the Morning

earthquake

Magnitude 3.1
Date-Time
Location 19.294°N, 155.216°W
Depth 10.2 km (6.3 miles)
Region ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Distances
  • 17 km (11 miles) S (173°) from Volcano, HI
  • 22 km (14 miles) SSW (204°) from Fern Forest, HI
  • 25 km (16 miles) SSW (208°) from Eden Roc, HI
  • 43 km (27 miles) SW (229°) from Hawaiian Beaches, HI
  • 48 km (30 miles) SSW (197°) from Hilo, HI
  • 353 km (219 miles) SE (129°) from Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.6 km (0.4 miles); depth +/- 0.4 km (0.2 miles)
Parameters Nph= 48, Dmin=9 km, Rmss=0.12 sec, Gp=158°,
M-type=duration magnitude (Md), Version=2
Source
Event ID hv60442266

Organic Chemical Found in Kauai Water Tank – State Officials Taking Action to Protect Purity of Water

An oily sheen containing a chemical contaminant has been found in a drinking water reservoir in Princeville on Kauai. Results from extensive laboratory testing have determined water distributed from the drinking water system does not pose a health threat and continues to be safe. The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) and the Princeville Utilities Company Inc. (PUCI) are taking immediate action to protect the purity of the water and the health of residents who depend on it.

Princeville

On Oct. 16, following routine sampling of drinking water systems across the state, DOH found that minute trace amounts of the organic chemical Aroclor 1254, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), may have been present in a Princeville water system tank on Kauai. The water system tank serves a population of about 1,700 people.

The DOH directed PUCI, owner and operator of the Princeville water system, to conduct testing to determine if PCBs were present and to identify the possible source of contamination.

PUCI sent water samples collected on Oct. 23 and 24 to CalScience Laboratory in California for testing. PCBs were not detected at the tank’s compliance sampling point where water exits at the bottom of the tank, nor at the two wellheads that supply the tank. The DOH collected and tested weekly samples at the compliance sampling point and throughout the distribution system Nov. 14, 19 and 27 and Dec. 4. No PCBs were detected in the samples analyzed by the state Laboratories Division.

“Fortunately, our follow up testing indicates that PCBs are not found in the water that reaches people’s homes,” said Gary Gill, Deputy Director for Environmental Health. “Our Safe Drinking Water Branch is maintaining active surveillance of the distribution system and will continue to monitor and test the water being served to consumers to ensure that the public is protected.”

While PCBs were not detected in the two wellheads, at the tank’s compliance sampling point, nor within the distribution system, the DOH on Nov. 8 learned that PCBs were detected in an oily sheen sample skimmed from the surface of the tank water at 18 parts per billion (ppb). Since water exits from the bottom of the tank and PCBs do not dissolve well in water, this does not represent a health threat. As a precaution, additional water testing is continuing and PUCI is removing the oily sheen from the tank water surface. On Nov. 30, subsequent sampling and testing confirmed the presence of PCBs in the surface sheen at 1.38 ppb. Sampling on Dec. 6 revealed the concentration of PCBs in a skim sample was 1.4 ppb. For more information on PUCI’s mitigation measures, contact Mike Loo at (808) 826-6100.

The source of the oily sheen is still undetermined. Upon findings of PCBs in the oily sheen sample, PUCI immediately took Well #1, an oil-lubed well, out of service. PUCI tested previously used and currently used pre-lube oils used to lubricate Well #1. On Nov. 30, PUCI confirmed that neither of these oils contains PCBs. Well #2 is water-lubed and therefore was not at issue.

The federal and state Maximum Contaminant Level for PCBs is 0.5 ppb at the compliance sampling point. The standard is set to avoid health risks based on a lifetime of consuming water containing that level of contaminant. PCBs are a group of organic chemicals formerly used in the United States in hydraulic fluids, plasticizers, adhesives, fire retardants, and de-dusting agents. PCBs do not dissolve well in water. To date, the Princeville water system is in compliance with federal and state PCB standards for drinking water.

Mayor Kenoi Mourns the Passing of Senator Daniel K. Inouye

Mayor Billy Kenoi and the people of the County of Hawai‘i mourn the passing of United States Senator Daniel K. Inouye, a war hero, distinguished president pro-tempore of the United States Senate, and an effective advocate for the people of Hawai‘i for more than five decades.

Hawai‘i County Mass Transit Agency Director Tom Brown, left, and Mayor Billy Kenoi, accept a Federal Transit Agency check representing $7.2 million from U.S. Senator Daniel K. Inouye to fund mass transit improvements in the County of Hawai‘i.

Hawai‘i County Mass Transit Agency Director Tom Brown, left, and Mayor Billy Kenoi, accept a Federal Transit Agency check representing $7.2 million from U.S. Senator Daniel K. Inouye to fund mass transit improvements in the County of Hawai‘i.

“Beyond the titles, beyond the power and the influence, what most stands out is his thoughtfulness, his kindness and how he treated everyone with respect and aloha,” Mayor Kenoi said. “I will never forget that lesson.”

Many of Hawai‘i’s leaders walked through Senator Inouye’s office – including Mayor Kenoi, who worked as an intern in Inouye’s office in the summer of 1992. “He gave me opportunity, and he supported me every step of the way,” Mayor Kenoi said. “I look to him with the same respect, honor and love that I feel for my parents.”

“Senator Inouye was a friend and a mentor to generations of public servants. He always encouraged all of us to fight for what we believe in, to stand up for what is right, and most importantly, to give everything we have to serve the people of Hawai‘i,” Mayor Kenoi said. “He taught all of us how to conduct ourselves as public servants.”

Senator Inouye was a leader who embodied the best of yesterday, who served our community the best he could every day, and who was always mindful of tomorrow, of future generations, Mayor Kenoi said.

“He was a tireless advocate for the people of Hawai‘i. Takako and I, our family, and our community are honored and privileged to have had him as a part of our lives.”

 

Pahoa Man Arrested in Connection with Nanawale Estates Murder

Police arrested a 36-year-old Pāhoa man in connection with a murder in the Nanawale Estates Subdivision in Puna.

HPDBadgeMonday morning (December 17) at 10:35 a.m., Jason Russell Jump was arrested without incident in Pāhoa. He is being held in the Hilo police cellblock on suspicion of second-degree murder.

Detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section are continuing the investigation.

Police have not released the identity of the victim pending notification of next of kin.

An autopsy is scheduled for Tuesday morning (December 18) to determine the exact cause of death.

Police ask that anyone with information on this incident contact Detective Norbert Serrao at 961-2383 or nserrao@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

 

RIP Senator Daniel Inouye

Senator Daniel Inouye has passed away at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, his office confirms.

Senator Daniel Inouye passed away this morning

Senator Daniel Inouye passed away this morning

United States Senator Daniel K. Inouye, World War II veteran, Medal of Honor recipient and Hawaii’s senior Senator, passed away from respiratory complications at 5:01 p.m. Eastern Standard Time today at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

His wife Irene and his son Ken were at his side. Last rites were performed by Senate Chaplain Dr. Barry Black.

He is survived by his wife, Irene Hirano Inouye, his son Daniel Ken Inouye Jr., Ken’s wife Jessica, and granddaughter Maggie and step-daughter Jennifer Hirano. He was preceded in death his first wife, Maggie Awamura.

Senator Inouye’s family would like to thank the doctors, nurses and staff at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for the extraordinary care he received.

The story of Dan Inouye is the story of modern Hawaii. During his eight decades of public service, Dan Inouye helped build and shape Hawaii.

Senator Inouye began his career in public service at the age of 17 when he enlisted in the U.S. Army shortly after Imperial Japan attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. He served with ‘E’ company of the 442 Regimental Combat Team, a group consisting entirely of Americans of Japanese ancestry. Senator Inouye lost his arm charging a series of machine gun nests on a hill in San Terenzo, Italy on April 21, 1945. His actions during that battle earned him the Medal of Honor.

Following the war he returned to Hawaii and married Margaret “Maggie” Awamura, and graduated from the University of Hawaii and the George Washington University School of Law.

After receiving his law degree, Dan Inouye, returned to Hawaii and worked as a Deputy Prosecuting Attorney for the City and County of Honolulu. He recognized the social and racial inequities of post-war Hawaii, and in 1954 was part of a Democratic revolution that took control of the Territorial Legislature.

Following statehood in 1959, Dan Inouye was privileged to serve as Hawaii’s first Congressman. He ran for the Senate in 1962 where he served for nearly nine consecutive terms.

Dan Inouye spent his career building an enduring federal presence in Hawaii to ensure that the state would receive its fair share of federal resources. He worked to expand the military’s presence on all major islands, stabilizing Pearl Harbor, building up the Pacific Missile Range and constructing a headquarters for the United States Pacific Command.

He has worked to build critical roads, expanded bus services statewide and secured the federal funds for the Honolulu Rail Transit project. He championed the indigenous rights of Native Hawaiians and the return of Kahoolawe.

He fought for the rights and benefits for veterans. Senator Inouye has left an indelible mark at the University of Hawaii, including support for major facilities and research assets. He has long supported local agriculture and alternative energy initiatives.

Dan Inouye was always among the first to speak out against injustice whether interned Japanese Americans, Filipino World War II veterans, Native Americans and Native Hawaiians.

A prominent player on the national stage, Senator Inouye served as Chairman of the Senate Committee on Appropriations, the Senate Commerce Committee and was the first Chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.

After developing a reputation as a bipartisan workhorse, who always would put country above party, he was asked by the Senate leadership to chair the special committee investigating the Iran Contra Affair. This was after a successful tenure as a member of the Watergate Committee.

When asked in recent days how he wanted to be remembered, Dan said, very simply, “I represented the people of Hawaii and this nation honestly and to the best of my ability. I think I did OK.”

His last words were, “Aloha.”

Big Island Police Searching for 17-Year-Old Hilo Boy Missing Since October

Hawaiʻi County police are searching for a 17-year-old Hilo boy reported as missing from Hilo since October 13.

Pat Enos

Pat Enos

Pat Enos is described as Hispanic, 5-foot-6, 150 pounds with short black hair and brown eyes.

Police ask that anyone with information on his whereabouts call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311. Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona.

 

Big Island Police Looking for Man With “Jesus” Tattoo Across Forehead

Police are asking for the public’s assistance in locating a 36-year-old Puna man wanted for questioning following the discovery of a body in a residence in Nanawale Estates.
HPDBadge
Jason Russell Jump is described as an African American, about 6-foot-1 to 6-foot-2 with brown eyes, shoulder-length black dreadlocks, and a tattoo saying “Jesus” across his forehead.

Detectives would like to speak with Jump in connection with this incident.

Police have not released the identity of the victim pending positive identification and notification of next of kin.

Detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section are continuing the investigation, which is classified as a second-degree murder, and have not identified Jump as a suspect at this time.

An autopsy is scheduled for Monday morning (December 17) to determine the exact cause of death.

Police ask that anyone with information on this incident contact Detective Norbert Serrao at 961-2383 or nserrao@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

 

Big Island Police Open Murder Investigation Following Body Found in Puna

Police have opened a murder investigation following the discovery of a body in Puna.

HPDBadge

Sunday (December 16) at about 5:08 p.m., police responded to a call of a male victim with an apparent head injury in the Nanawale Estates subdivision. Officers discovered the deceased victim in his residence and secured the scene for detectives.

Police have not released the identity of the victim pending positive identification and notification of next of kin.

Detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section are continuing the investigation, which is classified as a second-degree murder.

An autopsy is scheduled for Monday morning (December 17) to determine the exact cause of death.

Police ask that anyone with information about this incident contact Detective Norbert Serrao at 961-2383 or nserrao@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

 

USS Greeneville Returns to Pearl Harbor

USS Greeneville (SSN 772) returned to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing a six-month deployment to the Western Pacific region, Dec. 14.

USS Greeneville (SSN 772) moors to the pier at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Dec. 14 as she returns from a six-month deployment to the Western Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor)

USS Greeneville (SSN 772) moors to the pier at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Dec. 14 as she returns from a six-month deployment to the Western Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor)

“Greeneville is proud to return to Pearl Harbor after an extremely successful six month deployment having not only achieved the national goals assigned to her, but also having served as ambassadors of American goodwill in three countries, “said Cmdr. Martin Muckian, Greeneville’s commanding officer.

The Los Angeles-class submarine completed a variety of operations and several training exercises throughout the deployment, contributing to the nation’s strategic posture in the region. Greeneville also strengthened relationships between the United States and the Republic of Korea during a multinational exercise with the Korean Naval Forces.

With about 60 percent of the crew making their first Western Pacific deployment, the crew had the opportunity for invaluable training and unique experiences. During the deployment, 26 enlisted Sailors became submarine qualified and are now entitled to wear the enlisted submarine warfare insignia. A large number of the crew also completed advanced qualifications, including Engineering Watch Supervisor, Diving Officer of the Watch, and Chief of the Watch. These qualifications will ensure that Greeneville’s performance will remain strong following deployment.

“For many of the crew this will be one of the few times in their life to experience foreign cultures first hand,” said Master Chief Electronics Technician Marcus Hensley, Greeneville’s chief of the boat.

With more than 34,000 nautical miles steamed and multiple challenging operations completed, the crew had the opportunity to enjoy several ports visits including Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines, Saipan and Singapore, during their six month months away from Pearl Harbor. While in Singapore, the Sailors assisted the Riding for the Disabled Association, a non-profit organization that offers free horse rides to those with disabilities. The Sailors helped clean and performed maintenance on the association’s facilities.

Videos From The 2012 Hawaii Digital Government Summit

The 2012 Hawaii Digital Government Summit was held on Tuesday, December 11, 2012 at the Hilton Hawaiian Village in Waikiki on Oahu.

Hawaii Digital Government Summit

Here are some videos from the summit:

Alan Cox, Center for Digital Government, kicks off the Hawaii Digital Government Summit that took place at Honolulu, Hawaii on December 11, 2012:

[youtube=http://youtu.be/gPLCpA-jhw4]

Opening remarks given by the Sanjeev “Sonny” Bhagowalia, Chief Information Officer, State of Hawaii:

[youtube=http://youtu.be/ZhYeQLRgDpA]

Governor Neil Abercrombie, State of Hawaii, delivers the opening keynote: Transforming Government in the New Day:

[youtube=http://youtu.be/UW2DJAnOEP4]

Sanjeev “Sonny” Bhagowalia, Chief Information Officer, State of Hawaii, presents during the general session: Top 10 Projects of the State of Hawaii Business and IT/IRM Transformation Plan:

[youtube=http://youtu.be/r233499Yb8g]

Waikiki-Diamond Head Shoreline Fisheries Management Area to Close for One Year

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) will close the Waikiki-Diamond Head Shoreline Fisheries Management Area (FMA) to fishing for one year, from Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2013, through Dec. 31, 2013, to allow fish population to replenish itself.

Waikiki-Diamond Head Shoreline Fisheries Management Area

“Periodically closing areas to fishing was a practice used by early Hawaiians; it helped fish populations replenish themselves,” said William J. Aila, Jr., DLNR chairperson. “We use a variation of that at Waikiki-Diamond Head for the same purpose. Closed years give fish a break from fishing pressure, and allow their populations to increase. Fishing experiences are then improved during open years.”

The fisheries management area encompasses the nearshore waters between the ‘Ewa wall of the Waikiki War Memorial Natatorium and the Diamond Head Lighthouse, and from the high-water mark on shore to a minimum seaward distance of 500 yards (or to the edge of the fringing reef if one occurs beyond 500 yards).

The FMA is regulated by the department’s administrative rule, Chapter 13-48. It is prohibited to fish for, take or injure any marine life (including eggs) or to possess in the water any fishing gear during the “closed to fishing” period.

Fishing is also not allowed at any time in the adjoining Waikiki Marine Life Conservation District (MLCD) between the ‘Ewa edge of the Natatorium and the ‘Ewa edge of the Kapahulu groin (seawall).

Anyone who violates the provisions of this rule may be guilty of a petty misdemeanor, and /or subject to an administrative fine.

Copies of the administrative rule, Chapter 13-48, are available at the Division of Aquatic Resources office, 1151 Punchbowl St., Rm. 330; in the Hawai‘i Fishing Regulations booklet (available at most sporting goods stores); or on the DLNR website: www.hawaii.gov/dlnr/dar.

 

Second Annual New Year’s Sunrise Hike and Oli at Makapuu

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) invites the public to the second annual New Year’s Day hike on Sunday, Jan. 1, 2013, along the scenic Makapuu lighthouse trail at the Ka Iwi State Scenic Shoreline, located in East Oahu.

The Makapuu trail is an old and paved lighthouse management road that leads to the summit of Makapuu ridge. On this day only, Division of State Parks staff will open the gate along Kalanianaole highway for vehicle parking in the trail parking lot at 5:30 a.m. (parking is first-come, first-served).

Photo by Kelvin Lu

Photo by Kelvin Lu

Last year the parking lot was full by 5:45 a.m., with the balance of cars parking along the highway. Approximately 500 people attended last year’s event and enjoyed a spectacular sunrise. Curt Cottrell, assistant State Parks administrator, will once again go to bed early on New Year’s Eve in order to open the gate early for parking and then be at the top to also see the sunrise. Everyone is invited to gather at the trail’s end and along the side on Makapuu ridge to watch the sun rise at 7:09 a.m. As the sun comes up on the horizon between sea and sky, like last year a chanter will offer a traditional Hawaiian oli to greet the first sunrise of the 2013.

The morning hike is just one of about 550 “First Day” hikes being observed in all U.S. states, an initiative of the America’s State Parks organization to promote healthy lifestyles and encourage year-round recreation at state parks. For more information go to www.americasstateparks.org.

Due to the lack of comfort stations at this location, Division of State Parks is providing a modest amount of portable toilets for the event. The 1.5-mile round trip on the access road is considered of moderate difficulty and suited for children of any age (strollers are welcome). Pets must remain on leash at all times and any droppings removed by owner and properly disposed of. Bring windbreakers, supportive shoes, warm beverages and cameras! Pack out all of your rubbish.

For more information about the First Day – Makapuu Lighthouse Trail hike, call the Division of State Parks at 587-0300.

 

Jesse Sapolu Left His Heart in San Francisco – Comes to the Big Island for a Book Signing

Last week on Tuesday, December 4th, former San Francisco 49er’s star Jesse Sapolu spent the day on the Big Island and ended the evening with a public book signing and auction to benefit the Hawaii Island United Way at Cronies Bar & Grill in downtown Hilo, Hawaii.

Jesse Sapolu signs a book for me!

Jesse Sapolu signs a book for me!

More then 100 folks turned out for the event and it was a huge success.

Jesse spent more then 2 hours signing books for fans.

Jesse spent more then 2 hours signing books for fans.

His book is entitled “I Gave My Heart to San Francisco” and in the book he talks about growing up in Hawaii amongst other things.  Check out this video created by Camille Keawekane-Stafford:

[youtube=http://youtu.be/WsU_IujhXDw]

You can just see how happy fans were to meet the future Hall of Famer as the guy is the only player from Hawaii to have FOUR Superbowl rings!

Fans are stoked to meet the four time super bowl champion!

Fans are stoked to meet the four time super bowl champion!

I asked Jesse if he could answer a few questions and answers I had for him and this is what he told me:

Q: What was your favorite NFL team growing up?

A: Los Angeles Rams

Q: What inspired you to write a book?

A: My son Roman had a teammate die last year just playing recreational basketball at Oregon St, they found out he had an enlarged heart. I’ve been asked for a while to share my story but sitting there at my friend Jr Seau’s funeral made me realize how very fragile and short life is and if my story can save a life of a kid with an enlarged heart by getting early treatment then I owe it to them to share it.

Q: What are your favorite food(s)?

A: All Polynesian foods especially poke and bbq turkey tails (lol)

Q: Why did you choose the number 61?

A: It was available and it was my birth year.

Q: Who do you think will win the Superbowl this year?

A: 49ers versus Texans, Niners win it all

Q:  What would you like to say to kids here on the Big Island in General?

A: Believe in yourself, don’t be afraid to dream then work on a plan to accomplish it.

I felt very honored and humbled to meet the legend himself as well as his lovely wife Lisa that he met on a flight when she was working.  They are currently doing more book signings to benefit the United Way and you can see the schedule of his tour on his website.

Jesse and wife

You can check out Jesse’s website if you weren’t able to make the book signing if you are interested in purchasing a book: http://www.jessesapolu.com

Police Charge Second Escapee With Several Offenses Stemming from Prison Escape

Police have charged the second suspect with several offenses stemming from his escape from Hawaiʻi Community Correctional Center in Hilo.

Ryan Jeffries-Hamar

Ryan Jeffries-Hamar

After conferring with prosecutors, detectives charged 31-year-old Ryan James Jeffries-Hamar with first-degree escape, second-degree assault, second-degree robbery, kidnapping, second-degree unlawful imprisonment, unauthorized control of a propelled vehicle, and third-degree criminal property damage. He is being held without bail at the Hilo police cellblock pending his initial appearance Monday afternoon.

Jeffries-Hamar is the second and last suspect charged after he and 35-year-old Jarvis Naoki Higa escaped from the Hilo jail on December 5. Higa was captured two days later and is being held at Halawa Correctional Facility on Oahu.

Thirty- year-old Tyler John Tzovarras, also known as Tyler O’Neil, of Pāhoa was charged with first-degree hindering prosecution for his role in allegedly harboring and assisting Jeffries-Hamar while he was on the lam. He was also charged with contempt of court in connection with an outstanding warrant. His bail was set at $10,800.

Detectives are considering additional charges against other individuals who assisted both Higa and Jeffries-Hamar.

40-Year-Old Big Island Woman Charged in Helping Escapee and Hindering Prosecution

A 40-year-old Captain Cook woman has been charged with hindering prosecution in connection with an inmate from Hawaiʻi Community Correctional Center who was being sought for escape.

Elizabeth Maile Medeiros also known as Maile Medeiros

Elizabeth Maile Medeiros also known as Maile Medeiros

While police were searching for Ryan Jeffries-Hamar, they developed information that Elizabeth Maile Medeiros, also known as Maile Medeiros, had provided transportation and clothing for him while he was still at large.

At 1:34 p.m. Thursday, officers arrested Medeiros while she was at Circuit Court in Kealakekua on an unrelated matter. She was taken to the Kona police cellblock while police continued the investigation.

Friday afternoon, Medeiros was charged with first-degree hindering prosecution, a Class C felony. She remains at the cellblock in lieu of $2,000 bail pending her initial court appearance scheduled for Monday.