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Department of Health Launches New “Prevent Diabetes Hawaii” Campaign

It is estimated that one in every two adults in Hawaii has prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, and many have not been diagnosed and may be unaware that they have it. To increase prevention and awareness, the Hawaii Department of Health is launching a new innovative media campaign on March 27 to encourage Hawaii adults to take an online Diabetes Risk Test at PreventDiabetesHawaii.com and share the results with their doctor or health care provider. Actor and comedian Frank De Lima, who has type 2 diabetes, is the spokesperson for the campaign and will appear in television ads and in print ads in malls across the state.

“Prediabetes is a serious health condition that puts people at risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke, and the good news is you can reverse prediabetes with basic lifestyle changes,” said Health Director Dr. Virginia Pressler. “Type 2 diabetes can be prevented, so it’s very important for people to get screened early and take action.

Prediabetes refers to having a blood sugar that is above the normal level, but not high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Without effective intervention, 15 to 30 percent of adults with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. Native Hawaiians, Other Pacific Islanders, and Filipinos have the highest rates of type 2 diabetes, followed by Japanese. Furthermore, people of Asian descent tend to develop prediabetes at a lower body weight than other ethnicities, making them especially susceptible.

“Your risk for prediabetes is increased if you are overweight, 45 years or older, have a parent or sibling with type 2 diabetes, are not physically active, smoke, and ever had gestational diabetes,” said Lola Irvin, Administrator for the Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Division. “Obesity and diabetes are generally known as “twin” epidemics, and this is true also for Hawaii.”

The Prevent Diabetes Hawaii campaign asks everyone to participate in simple 30-second online Diabetes Risk Test and then email, print or download their Diabetes Risk Test results to a computer, smartphone, or tablet to facilitate a later conversation with a doctor or health care provider. The website also contains ideas and tips for individual lifestyle change, as well as information on nationally recognized lifestyle change programs that are available at local community health centers throughout the state, the YMCA, and some hospitals. A portal for health care providers contains links to download campaign materials for waiting rooms and doctors’ offices along with resources to facilitate patient follow-up, such as email templates and phone call scripts.

Focus group testing with adults on Oahu informed the campaign’s development. Prevent Diabetes Hawaii is funded by a combination of state general funds and a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For more information about the campaign or to view the television and print ads, go to www.PreventDiabetesHawaii.com.

Ka‘u Coffee Festival Perking May 19th – May 28th

The ninth annual Ka‘u Coffee Festival celebrates its award-winning brew with a host of events starting May 19 and continuing through the weekend of May 27-28 with a java-jumpin’ ho‘olaulea‘a on Saturday and the Ka‘u Coffee College educational series on Sunday.

Supported by the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority and a bevy of sponsors and volunteers, the Ka‘u Coffee Festival is designed to celebrate Ka‘u as a premium coffee growing origin and a unique visitor destination. Many events are free, while others require a nominal fee and reservations. All activities feature the exceptional flavor and aroma of Ka‘u coffee and the remarkable people and special place that produces it. Kindly note the 2017 festival schedule is subject to change; check www.kaucoffeefest.com for the latest information.

On Saturday, May 13, the annual Miss Ka‘u Coffee Pageant showcases the crowning of 2017 Miss Ka‘u Coffee and her court. 6 p.m. at the Ka‘u Coffee Mill. $10 admission. Contact 808-928-0606 or trinimarques@yahoo.com.

Friday, May 19 – Pa‘ina & Open House at historic Pahala Plantation House featuring music, hula, food and house tours 5:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. Corner of Maile and Pikake in Pahala. Hosted by Pahala Plantation Cottages, Ka‘u Chamber of Commerce and The Ka‘u Calendar newspaper. Free, donations accepted for Miss Ka‘u Coffee Scholarship Fund.  www.kaucoffeefest.com, www.pahalaplantationcottages.com. 808-928-9811.

Sunday May 21 – Ka‘u Coffee Recipe Contest offers a free, 2 p.m. cooking competition with cash prizes at Ka‘u Coffee Mill. Entries are accepted in pupu, entree and dessert categories and all recipes are made with Ka‘u coffee. Free coffee tasting and meet Miss Ka‘u Coffee. Find contest entry info at www.kaucoffeemill.com or call Lisa at 808-928-0550.

Monday, May 22 – Observe the heavens from the summit of Makanau at Ka‘u Star Gazing, 5:30-10 p.m. $35 with refreshments and shuttle transportation departing from Ka‘u Coffee Mill. Sign up at www.kaucoffeemill.com or call 808-928-0550.

During the week visit Ka‘u coffee farms. Enjoy the scenic and historic beauty of Ka‘u, Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach, Honu‘apo fishponds, the cliffs of Ka Lae—the southernmost place in the U.S.—and the nearby Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Stay in one of the many accommodations in Ka‘u. Visit www.kaucoffeefest.com for participating coffee farms and accommodations.

Wednesday, May 24 and Thursday, May 25 – Explore historic flume systems of the sugarcane era and development of hydroelectric power on a Ka‘u Mountain Water System Hike in the Wood Valley rainforest 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Limited to 30, $40 includes lunch.  Visit www.kaucoffeemill.com or phone 808-928-0550.

Saturday, May 27 – Festival fun bubbles over with the free Ka‘u Coffee Festival Ho‘olaule‘a—a full day of live music, hula, food booths, local crafts, keiki activities, educational displays, guided coffee tastings and farm/mill tours headquartered inside and out of the Pahala Community Center, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. It’s a great place to “talk story” with Ka‘u coffee growers.  The Ka‘u Coffee Experience offers Ka‘u coffees prepared using a variety of methods by professionals from 9:30 a.m.-noon and 1 p.m.-3:30 p.m. Farm tours with shuttle transport are 9:30 and 11 a.m., plus 12:30, 2 and 3:30 p.m., $20. Call 808-929-9550 or visit www.kaucoffeefest.com.

On Sunday, May 28 learn about the specialty coffee industry with presentations given by notable coffee experts at the Ka‘u Coffee College at Pahala Community Center. The Ka‘u Coffee College has become known for hosting some of the most renowned industry professionals from around the globe. Free, donations appreciated. Call 808-929-9550 or www.KauCoffeeFest.com.

Founded in coffee traditions dating to the 1800s—Ka‘u coffee burst onto the specialty coffee scene by winning numerous coffee quality awards. These accolades highlight the unique combination of people and place that makes Ka‘u coffee a favorite across the globe. The festival’s mission is to raise awareness of Ka‘u as a world-class, coffee-growing origin.

Ka‘u Coffee Festival vendor and sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information and festival updates, visit www.kaucoffeefest.com, follow Ka‘u Coffee Festival on Facebook and @kaucoffeefest on Twitter, or call 808-929-9550.

March “Tiki” Madness Event to Help The Food Basket, Hawaii Islands Food Bank

Renowned local artist Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker along with Kona Oceanfront Gallery is holding a “March Tiki Madness” event this Friday March 24 from 6PM to 9 PM.

Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker

Part of sales proceeds generated from this high profile event will be donated to The Food Basket, Hawai’i Island’s Food Bank, one of Parker’s favorite charities.  “The Food Basket is very excited to be working with Brad ‘Tiki Shark’ Parker for another gallery event,” said Jamilia Epping, Director of Public Relations and Events at The Food Basket. “We are appreciative of his efforts to aid in the elevation of hunger as an issue in our community. The Food Basket is unable to survive without the generous support of the community, including businesses and individuals such as Brad. Mahalo!”

Parker and Kona Oceanfront Gallery Owner Mark Hanna

“If you ever wanted to own a Brad Parker piece of art, this would be the time to get one” quoted the artist.  Mark Hanna the owner of Kona Oceanfront Gallery has agreed to consider “all and any offers on Brad artwork as long as a generous donation of canned food items are brought along that evening to be donated”.

All in the community are encouraged to come out and participate in a night filled with Art, Entertainment and Charity.  Brad will be in attendance to autograph, personalize and talk story with his patrons.  Kona Oceanfront Gallery is the premier gallery on the Big Island that carry’s all of Brad’s latest art.  The Gallery is centrally located on Ali’i Drive next to Bubba Gumps; free validated underground event parking will be available.  SEE YOU THERE!

Hawaii Food and Wine Festival – A Connoisseur’s Culinary Journey

Farms, food and fireworks headline the summer launch for the Hawaiʻi Food & Wine Festival (HFWF), the world class epicurean event that showcases local ingredients. The official countdown to HFWF17 will ramp up with the second annual Connoisseur’s Culinary Journey from May 29-June 2, 2017. The immersive five-day exploration of farming, food and cuisine in the Islands will be hosted by Hawai‘i’s top chefs and end with a bang: food and fireworks under the stars at The Kahala Hotel & Resort.

“It’s exciting to return to our roots with another culinary journey that honors our deep connection to everything that’s grown, raised, and caught locally” shares HFWF Chief Executive Officer Denise Yamaguchi. “This is an opportunity to show in a meaningful way our mission to Taste Our Love for the Land.”

Presented by The Kahala Hotel & Resort and Kamehameha Schools, the Connoisseur’s Culinary Journey is limited to five couples. “We’re delighted to be the host resort for the second consecutive year of the Festival’s Launch program” said Gerald Glennon, General Manager, The Kahala Hotel & Resort. “The Kahala offers the perfect setting for unique culinary experiences and will commence the 2017 HFWF Season with a spectacular fireworks show. We’re proud to support an amazing organization that contributes greatly to the Hawaiian culture, sustainability and educational programs.”

“This is a privilege for us to highlight the abundant and rich cultural and community resources on the Waiʻanae Coast,” said Kalei Kailihiwa, Regional Director for Waiʻanae, Kamehameha Schools. “We’ve witnessed the successful results of community coming together to share resources and promote sustainable practices, including food production. Community success and how it affects the well-being of those who live on this coast is an important story to tell.”

Culinary Journey highlights include:

Monday, May 29: Private Welcome Reception at The Kahala Hotel & Resort with Executive Chef Wayne Hirabayashi, Mark “Gooch” Noguchi, Lee Anne Wong, and Roy Yamaguchi.

Tuesday, May 30: Tour Hoa ‘Āina O Mākaha and taste local goods grown at The Farm, a nonprofit educational learning center. Take a culinary voyage with a visit to E Ala (“Awake”) a double-hulled voyaging canoe built to revive the art of canoe-building on the Wai‘anae Coast. We’ll sail the Waiʻanae Coast onboard the canoe Nā Kama Kai (“Child of the Sea”) and showcase the foods that ancient and modern navigators prepared on their voyages. Chef Mark Noguchi will be the guide.

Wednesday, May 31: Got Poke champagne brunch at The Kahala Hotel & Resort. Learn how to make poke with Chef Lee Anne Wong and enjoy brunch prepared by Chef Wayne Hirabayashi.

Thursday, June 1: Take a culinary journey to Kaua‘i’s North Shore with Chef Roy Yamaguchi for a once-in-a-lifetime visit to 100+ year old taro family farm, experience Poi Day at the ahupua‘a of Waipa, tour a rice mill museum, and enjoy a special dinner prepared by Chef Roy Yamaguchi at a surprise location.

Friday, June 2: 2017 Hawaiʻi Food & Wine Festival Launch Event ‘Cuisines of the Sea’ at The Kahala Hotel & Resort with a fireworks finale.

The exclusive Connoisseur’s Culinary Journey is offered at $6,995.00 plus tax per couple. The journey includes a five-night stay in an ocean view room at The Kahala Hotel & Resort, chef guided tours, ground transportation and airfare to Kaua‘i, and memorable meals.  To view the complete itinerary and to purchase tickets, visit our website.

The journey will culminate in the 2017 Hawaiʻi Food & Wine Festival Launch ‘Cuisines of the Sea’– featuring ten of the state’s best chefs and fireworks at Kahala Beach to celebrate the talent lineup announcement for the seventh annual festival. HFWF17 will welcome more than 100 culinary masters, 50 wine makers, and a dozen mixologists to events on Maui, Hawai‘i Island and O‘ahu from October 20-November 5, 2017. The 2017 Hawaiʻi Food & Wine Festival Launch on Friday, June 2, 2017 is open to the public and tickets are priced at $175 per person. To purchase tickets, please visit our website.

In six years, HFWF has expanded from a 3-day festival with 30 chefs in Waikiki to a two week long culinary celebration spanning 3 Islands that attracts nearly 8,000 attendees. The festival has raised close to $1.7 million for community organizations that support sustainability, culinary programs and agriculture since its 2011 launch.

Benefits of Beekeeping Course to be Held at UH Hilo and Pahoa

The College of Continuing Education and Community Service (CCECS) at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo offers a course on basic beekeeping. Sessions will be held April 4, 11, 18, 25 and May 2 and 4 from 5:30-8:30 p.m. in UH Hilo’s College Hall Room 6, and April 22 and May 6 from 9 a.m.- 3 p.m. at Paradise Nectar Apiaries in Pahoa. Tuition is $120 and includes the text book.

Benefits of Beekeeping is designed for anyone new to bees as well as those who have bees and are interested in new ways to relate to and care for them. Participants will learn about treatment‐free beekeeping practices based on bee biology and how to develop a relationship and understanding of bees, their castes, and the roles each caste contributes to the hive.

Instructor Jen Rasmussen has been caring for honey bees on Hawaiʻi Island since 2008. She has developed various methods of maintaining her hives without the use of chemicals or treatments, and organized the beekeeping program at the Island Princess Macadamia Nut Farm.

Private and non-government employers/businesses may qualify for a 50% tuition waiver through the State’s Employment & Training Fund (ETF). For details, visit
http://labor.hawaii.gov/wdd/home/employers/etf/micro/ and apply at least 10 business days before the start of class.

For more information or to register, contact CCECS at 932-7830 or email ccecs@hawaii.edu.

Coffee Berry Borer Quarantine Expanded to Maui

The Hawaii Board of Agriculture yesterday expanded the coffee berry borer (CBB) quarantine to the island of Maui, effective May 1, 2017. The quarantine, which has been in effect on Hawaii Island and Oahu, restricts the interisland movement of coffee and other CBB hosts and requires treatment and other quarantine protocols. Although recent detections of CBB were located in Hana and Kipahulu, the board decided that an island-wide quarantine was necessary to prevent the further spread of CBB in the state.

Coffee Berry Borer (CBB)

One of the most devastating coffee pests, CBB was first detected in the state in September 2010 in Kona and discovered in Ka`u in May 2011. In December 2014, it was discovered on Oahu and in December 2016 was found on Maui. So far, CBB has not been detected on Kauai, Molokai and Lanai.

This small beetle bores into the coffee “cherry” to lay its eggs. The larvae feed on the coffee bean, reducing the yield and quality of the bean. Since its detection in Kona, Big Island coffee growers have developed methods to manage the pest, which include using an organic pesticide and field sanitation. Some farms with good management practices have been able to keep infestations down to about 20 percent of the coffee crop.

CBB is native to Central Africa and is also found in many coffee-growing regions of the world, including Central and South America.  It is still unknown how CBB made its way to Hawaii Island and how it arrived on Oahu and Maui. Hawaii has strict importation rules that require fumigation of all imported green coffee beans to rid the beans of pathogens and insect pests. Coffee plants and plant parts are also restricted from being imported to Hawaii under Plant Quarantine rules.

In addition, HDOA issued a quarantine order that requires a permit from HDOA to transport unroasted coffee beans, coffee plants and plant parts, used coffee bags and coffee harvesting equipment from Hawaii Island to other islands that are not infested with the coffee berry borer.  The rules also require certain treatments and inspection by HDOA Plant Quarantine inspectors prior to shipping. Inspectors will either attach a tag, label or stamp to indicate the shipment passed inspection requirements. For unroasted coffee beans, acceptable treatment protocols include fumigation, freezing and heat treatment.

To view the Notice of Designation of Island of Maui as Expanded Coffee Berry Borer Infested Area Subject to Quarantine, go to: https://hdoa.hawaii.gov/pi/files/2013/01/CBB-Quarantine-Maui.pdf

For more information on CBB in Hawaii go to the HDOA CBB webpage at: http://hdoa.hawaii.gov/pi/ppc/cbbinfo/ and the UH-CTAHR webpage at: http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/site/CBB.aspx

Record $394,000 Raised by Hawaii Food & Wine Festival

The Hawai‘i Food & Wine Festival (HFWF), the state’s premier culinary event, raised a record $394,000 for local beneficiaries following another successful year. Fourteen nonprofit organizations received checks during a Mahalo Reception for the 2016 festival held on March 7th at Neiman Marcus’ Mariposa Restaurant. The $394,000 contribution brings the total giving from HFWF to nearly $1.7 million in six years.

“We’re proud that Hawai‘i Food & Wine Festival not only shines a spotlight on Hawai’i as a culinary destination, but pays it forward through contributions for nonprofit charitable organizations that support local food sustainability, cultural, and educational programs” says Denise Yamaguchi, HFWF Chief Executive Officer. “The tangible impact of the festival is far-reaching, with funds supporting local culinary colleges, grants for Hawai‘i chefs to learn in the kitchens of the world’s  culinary masters, programs to help small farms get their produce to consumers, and curriculum to teach children how to grow their own food in school and make healthy dishes at home.”
2016 HFWF beneficiaries include:
  • Culinary Institute of the Pacific- $80,000
  • Hawai‘i Agricultural Foundation- $70,000
  • Imua Family Services- $50,000
  • Kapi‘olani Community College Culinary Arts Program- $50,000
  • Ment’Or BKB Foundation- $29,000
  • Kapi‘olani Community College Hospitality and Tourism Program- $25,000
  • Leeward Community College Culinary Arts Program- $25,000
  • Maui County Farm Bureau- $20,000
  • Hawai‘i Island Community College Culinary Arts Program- $10,000
  • Paepae o He‘eia- $10,000
  • Papahana Kuaola- $10,000
  • Maui Culinary Academy- $7,500
  • Hawaii Seafood Council- $5,000
  • Hawaii Farm Bureau Federation- $2,500
In six years, HFWF has expanded from a 3-day festival with 30 chefs in Waikiki to more than 20 events spanning 3 Islands. HFWF16 welcomed 8,765 attendees from around the world to signature events on O’ahu, Maui and Hawai‘i Island featuring 114 top chefs, 50 wine makers, and 10 mixologists. That’s up 1,365 attendees from 2015. More than 200 Hawai‘i culinary students gained priceless experience working side-by-side with culinary masters.
“We wanted to make sure the chefs that we invited were going to be world class, at the same time have a real deep feeling about what Hawai‘i means to them” explains HFWF Co-Founder Roy Yamaguchi. “In that sense, we were looking for something to become big because we felt that we wanted to reach the entire world and we needed to have a quality festival and large enough festival to capture that.”
HFWF garnered nearly $11 million in publicity value from media coverage including Good Morning America, FOX News, USA Today, Fiji Times, Food and Wine, Eater San Francisco, Delta Sky Japan, The San Jose Mercury News, and Hawaii Chinese TV. Of the worldwide exposure, HFWF Co-Founder Alan Wong stresses, “The most important thing is, the spotlight has been put on Hawai‘i- on our tourism, our people, our culture, our food, what we grow here. It’s a win win win.”
The non-profit mission of the festival sets it apart from other notable food and wine events. “I think that really comes from the hearts of the chefs who got this going in the beginning” shares Dean Wong, Executive Director for Imua Family Services, a Maui beneficiary that received a check for $50,000. “They all wanted to give back to the community as well to support Hawai‘i and the tourism and the food industry in Hawai‘i. That speaks volumes of the Hawai‘i Food & Wine Festival.”
HFWF is a program of the nonprofit, Hawai‘i Ag and Culinary Alliance. Its mission is to attract national and international attention to the extraordinary culinary talent, as well as the diversity of quality locally grown products to ensure Hawai‘i maintains its competitive edge as a world-class destination.
HFWF co-chair Alan Wong was featured at the Mahalo reception, along with chefs Mark Freiberg of Neiman Marcus, Chef Alan Takasaki from Le Bistro, and Chef Vikram Garg.

Hawaii Department of Health Lifts Suspension of Meadow Gold Dairies Two-Percent Reduced Fat Milk

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) today lifted the suspension of Meadow Gold Dairies’ two-percent reduced fat milk products. The company may produce, sell and distribute two-percent reduced fat milk.

Samples of two-percent reduced fat milk taken from the Meadow Gold milk plant in Honolulu on March 1, 2, and 6 were tested and found in compliance with Coliform counts of less than 1/ml. The maximum allowed Coliform limit for pasteurized milk is 10/ml.

The Meadow Gold milk plant in Honolulu was also inspected on March 1 in response to the Feb. 27 suspension and was found to be in substantial compliance with Hawaii Administrative Rules and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Pasteurized Milk Ordinance.

All other milk products from Meadow Gold Dairies have met state and federal standards required for distribution and sale.

Wanted: Saloon Girls, Cowboys, Soup Cooks and Line Dancers for Honoka’a Western Week

Honoka‘a Western Week is coming around the bend May 21-29, 2017. The fun kicks off with the 2nd Annual Farm Festival at Hāmākua Harvest, and continues through the week, wrapping up with Friday night’s Paniolo Parade and Block Party, and the 61st Annual Hawai‘i Saddle Club Scholarship Rodeo over the weekend.

PHOTOS: Sarah Anderson for Honoka’a Western Week

The Western Week committee is now recruiting participants for all scheduled activities (see below) and urges the community to support the colorful celebration of Hāmākua’s paniolo heritage and unique cultural blend.

PHOTOS: Sarah Anderson for Honoka’a Western Week

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:
Subject to change.

May 20. Deadline to enter Saloon Girl and Cowboys Got Talent Contests. For information and applications, call Michelle Hartman, 775-9777.

All week, May 21-29. Celebrate Honokaʻa Western Week with Honokaʻa Business Association. Everyone is invited to dress up western-style, visit Honoka‘a town merchants, and enjoy different paniolo-themed activities every night.

Sunday, May 21. 2nd Annual Farm Festival at Hāmākua Harvest, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. All-day entertainment, dozens of vendors and food booths, educational presentations, silent auction, keiki activities and more. Located at the intersection of Māmāne Street and Highway 19 in
Honoka‘a. No charge for admission.

Monday, May 22. Stick horse creation at Hāmākua Youth Center, 3-5 p.m.

Tuesday, May 23. Portuguese Bean Soup and Sweetbread Contest at NHERC Pavilion, 5-8 p.m. Hosted by Gramma’s Kitchen.

Wednesday, May 24. Line Dancing at Honoka‘a People’s Theatre, 6-9 p.m.

Thursday, May 25. Historic Honoka‘a Town Talk Story at Honoka‘a Library, 4 p.m., featuring Ross Stephenson, author of “Honoka’a Town,” and led by HWW Sheriff Larry Ignacio.
Also Thursday, a “Rowdy Rodeo” at The Landing restaurant.

Friday, May 26.
4 p.m., Paniolo Parade down Māmāne Street, with mounted and marching units, pā‘ū riders, gleaming vintage cars and more.
5 p.m., Stick Horse races
6 p.m., Saloon Girls and Cowboys Got Talent Contest
7-10 p.m., Great music and dancing in the Streets. Plus, a free “Keiki Corral” for the kids from 5-7 p.m., with carnival-style games, silent auction and more. Vendors interested in booth space for the Block Party may email westernweekhonokaa@gmail.com, or download forms from the website.

Sunday-Monday, May 28-29. 61st Annual Hawai‘i Saddle Club Scholarship Rodeo.  For more information, contact hawaiisaddleclub@ymail.com.

Honoka‘a Western Week is a volunteer-driven project supported by the Honoka‘a Business Association, the Hāmākua Farm Bureau, Councilwoman Valerie Poindexter, Steinlager, and others. Checks payable to “Honokaʻa Business Association” can be sent to P.O. Box 474, Honokaʻa HI 96727, attention: Honoka‘a Western Week. For more information, follow Honoka‘a Western Week on Facebook or visit www.honokaawesternweek.org.

Sponsors Sought for Summer Food Service Program to Provide Meals for Children During Summer Break

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) is seeking sponsor organizations on all islands to help provide children in low-income communities with reduced-price meals during the summer months.  The SFSP provides nutritious meals that help children to learn, play and grow during the summer break when many schools are not in session.

Schools, public agencies, and private nonprofit organizations may apply to be SFSP sponsors. Sponsoring organizations receive reimbursements for serving healthy meals and snacks at approved sites to children and teenagers, 18 years and younger. Photo Credit: Department of Education

Schools, public agencies, and private nonprofit organizations may apply to be SFSP sponsors.  Sponsoring organizations receive reimbursements for serving healthy meals and snacks at approved sites to children and teenagers, 18 years and younger.  Sponsors are encouraged to provide educational or recreational activities.

In 2016, a daily average of 12,829 children, 18 years and younger, participated in Summer Meals Programs. This average increased by 1,125 children per day from the previous year. Photo Credit: Department of Education

“Summer food service programs are vital to many of our keiki who normally rely on school meals for most of their daily intake,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi.  “Well-rounded, nutritious meals are a priority for children who need regular fuel for learning, physical activities and growth.”

In 2016, a daily average of 12,829 children, 18 years and younger, participated in Summer Meals Programs.  This average increased by 1,125 children per day from the previous year.  SFSP sites are often located at nonprofit organizations, preschools, churches, parks and housing facilities and the Hawaii State Department of Education’s Seamless Summer Option provides meals at select school locations.

The Hawaii Child Nutrition Programs (HCNP) will conduct workshops for new and returning sponsors on Maui, Hawaii, Kauai and Oahu from March 14 to 24.  Personnel responsible for administering the SFSP will be required to attend.

For more information about SFSP, contact Jennifer Dang at Hawaii Child Nutrition Programs at 587-3600.

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Call for Entries: 47th Kona Coffee Cultural Festival Seeks Signature Art

Kona Coffee Cultural Festival, Hawaii’s oldest food festival, announces its Call for Art Entries for the official image of the 2017 Kona Coffee Cultural Festival. Local artists are invited to submit original Kona coffee art in all art forms including fine art, graphic design and photography. Artwork should reflect the Festival’s mission to preserve, perpetuate and promote Kona’s unique nearly 200-year coffee heritage.

The winning design will become the official image of the 2017 Kona Coffee Cultural Festival and will be featured on all official Festival merchandise including the Festival button, event poster and retail merchandise. The winning design will also be featured on the Festival’s magazine cover, website and other promotional materials.

Artists of traditional media including oil, acrylic, tempera, watercolor, illustrations as well as computer graphics and photographers are invited to participate. Artists are encouraged to be inspired by Kona’s nearly 200-year coffee heritage. Typography should not be included within the art. There is no entry fee to participate and the competition is open to all Hawaii Island residents 18 and older.

Ownership of entry copyright: By submitting artwork into this contest, the winning artist agrees to assign all ownership rights and copyright of the art to the Kona Coffee Cultural Festival for the 2017 Festival.

Artwork submissions are due by Friday, April 14, 2017 and should be delivered to Malia Bolton at the Kona Coffee & Tea Company located at 74-5588 Palani Rd, or entries can be submitted electronically via email to maliabolton@gmail.com. Be sure to include “Festival Submission” in the subject line with electronic entries.

Hawaii Department of Health Orders Meadow Gold Dairies to Stop Distribution and Sale of 2% Reduced Fat Milk

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) has ordered Meadow Gold Dairies to stop its distribution and sale of two-percent reduced fat milk. DOH issued a Cease and Desist Order to the company today after laboratory results from routine milk samples exceeded standard limits for Coliform bacteria.

“Milk production is regulated with routine testing both at the farm and after packaging to ensure a safe product,” said Peter Oshiro, program manager of the DOH Sanitation Branch. “Department of Health inspectors will work with Meadow Gold Dairies to investigate the possible source of contamination, approve a plan of correction, and conduct further testing to confirm the company meets the standards to resume two-percent reduced fat milk distribution and sale.”

Samples of two-percent reduced fat milk taken from Meadow Gold Dairies on Jan. 19, Feb. 6 and 22, 2017, revealed excessive Coliform counts of more than 150/ml, 130/ml and more than 150/ml respectively. The maximum allowed Coliform limit for pasteurized milk is 10/ml. Coliform is used an indicator of post-pasteurization contamination.

DOH conducts monthly testing of samples of all Grade A raw and pasteurized milk produced at dairy farms and milk plants in Hawaii. State and Federal regulations require that samples be taken a minimum of four out of every six months, though most jurisdictions in the nation, like Hawaii, conduct sampling every month. DOH may also accelerate routine sampling of a specific product whenever product samples do not meet required standards.

Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 11 Chapter15 states that the DOH may suspend the distribution and sale of a particular milk product produced by a milk plant, whenever the product is in violation three times out of the last five consecutive samples for the first three Critical Control Point (CCP) standards listed below.

Critical Control Point/Critical Limits:

  • Temperature – 45°F or less
  • Bacterial Limits -1 0,000/ml or less
  • Coliform – 10/ml or less
  • Phosphatase – 1mcg/ml or less
  • Antibiotics – No Positive results on drug residue detection

To resume distribution and sale of two-percent reduced fat milk, Meadow Gold Dairies must pass health inspections and undergo additional testing of product samples. All other milk products from Meadow Gold Dairies meet state and federal standards required for distribution and sale.

EPA Conducting Pesticide Poisoning Training in Hawaii

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced upcoming trainings for health care workers on how to recognize and treat pesticide poisonings. The classes will be conducted by the Migrant Clinicians Network, with co-sponsors Hawaii Department of Health, the Hawaii Chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians and Hawaii Emergency Physicians Associated, with funding from the EPA.

“Quick and accurate identification of pesticide poisoning is important to provide immediate patient care,” said Alexis Strauss, EPA’s Acting Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “These workshops will provide health care workers with the tools they need in such critical situations.”

The trainings are accredited courses that will focus on key decision points in the diagnosis of pesticide exposures and will highlight the usefulness of the EPA publication, “Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisoning, 6th edition”. Copies will be provided to all participants. Through interactive case studies, this training will illustrate effective recognition and treatment of patients who may have been exposed to pesticides.

“The Department of Health is grateful for the partnerships that came together to bring this specialized medical training to the healthcare communities on Kauai and Oahu,” said Dr. Virginia Pressler, Director of the Hawaii Department of Health. “We urge health care professionals to take advantage of this important learning opportunity, and expect to see more offered in this area.”

The classes will be held:

Kauai – March 6, at 9:30 am and 1 pm at the Kauai Veterans Memorial Hospital, 4643 Waimea Canyon Drive, Waimea, HI, Conference Room AB. For more information and registration on the Kauai classes please contact Julie Sommers, (808) 338-9474 – jsommers@hhsc.org or Cheryl Tennberg, ctennberg@hhsc.org

Oahu – March 7, at 9:30 am at the AFFES Building, 919 Ala Moana Blvd., Honolulu, HI, 5th floor Conference Room. For more information and registration on the Oahu class please contact Amy K. Liebman, (512) 579-4535, aliebman@migrantclinician.org or Fenix Grange, (808) 586-4248, fenix.grange@doh.hawaii.gov

DLNR Announces Opening of 2017 Big Island Spring Bearded Turkey Season

The Department of Land and Natural Resources announces the opening of the 2017 Spring Bearded Turkey Hunting Season on Wednesday, March 1, 2017.

The spring season will run for 46 consecutive days through Saturday, April 15, 2017 (with the exception of Unit E – Kipuka Ainahou that will run for 31 days). The spring season will be for bearded turkeys only, in locations identified below. The season length, bag limits, and hunting areas are those established in Title 13, Chapter 122, “Rules Regulating Game Bird Hunting, Field Trials and Commercial Shooting Preserves.

Open Turkey Hunting Areas Special Conditions Season Dates Hunting Hours
Unit A – Mauna Kea Forest Reserve and GMA Mammal hunting will also be open above tree line for rifle, muzzleloader, handgun, and shotgun. March 1 – April 15, 2017        (46 consecutive days) One-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset
Unit G – Kaohe GMA Also open daily to mammal hunting for archery.
Unit F – Puu Waawaa Forest Reserve N/A
Private Lands Hunters required to have valid hunting license, current turkey tags and landowner permission.
Unit E – Kipuka Ainahou Also open to mammal hunting on weekends and holidays only. Archery only.

* Hunting is not allowed in DHHL lands in this unit.

March 1 – March 31, 2017 (31 consecutive days)

Bag Limits and Tags

The daily bag limit will be three bearded turkeys per hunter with a season bag limit of three.  All hunters are required to have a current unused turkey tag in their possession while hunting.  Tags are currently $5/tag for residents and $20/tag for non-residents.  Turkey tags are nontransferable and must be fastened with snaps and secured tightly around the neck or tarsus of any bird taken immediately after the kill.  Tags may be obtained from any Hawaii Island Division of Forestry & Wildlife office and a number of commercial vendors.  Hunters must present current State of Hawaii Hunting License with a current Game Bird Stamp when obtaining tags.  Turkey tags are also required to hunt on private land.

Information may be obtained by contacting Division of Forestry & Wildlife offices at the following phone numbers:  Hilo: (808) 974-4221; Kamuela: (808) 887-6063 or the main office at (808) 587-0166.

Hawaii Delegation Introduces Legislation to Protect Drinking Water and Improve Red Hill Fuel Storage Facility

The Hawai‘i congressional delegation introduced legislation to ensure the Navy, Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) meet their obligations to the State of Hawai‘i to protect drinking water and improve the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility on Oahu.

Inside one of the Red Hill fuel tanks.

“The EPA, the Navy, and the State agree that protecting the aquifer that supplies Oahu’s drinking water is essential,” said U.S. Senator Brian Schatz (D-Hawai‘i). “Our bill firms up that commitment into federal law by making sure the agencies responsible for improving Red Hill have the federal funding they need to implement the actions that are agreed to.”

“Red Hill is critical military infrastructure and we want the Navy to succeed in successfully remediating environmental concerns associated with past fuel leaks above Oahu’s aquifers,” said U.S. Representative Colleen Hanabusa (HI-01). “Working together, this will be a win-win for military readiness and Oahu residents.”

“Completing the necessary infrastructure upgrades at Red Hill Fuel Facility will safeguard our water and environment, while also protecting a critical asset to our national security,” said U.S. Senator Mazie K. Hirono (D-Hawai‘i). “Providing budget flexibility and conducting strict oversight of EPA and DOD’s progress towards meeting their commitments is an appropriate way to stretch a short supply of critical federal dollars.”

“These fuel storage tanks sit above aquifers that provide drinking water for up to 30% of Oahu’s residents,” said U.S. Representative Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02). “It’s essential the Department of Defense commit the necessary resources to eliminate any threat these tanks pose to our most precious resource – water.”

The legislation, written and introduced by U.S. Senator Brian Schatz, ensures the Navy, DLA, and other federal agencies charged with protecting Oahu’s drinking water from fuel leaks follow a set of actions the agencies agreed to take following the January 2014 leak of jet fuel from the Red Hill facility. The Navy’s investigation of the January 2014 leak determined that it was the result of contractor error. In September 2015, the Navy, DLA, and EPA entered into an Administrative Order on Consent/Statement of Work (AOC/SOW) with the State of Hawai‘i’s Department of Health (DOH). That agreement establishes a roadmap for how the Navy and DLA will protect Oahu’s drinking water from future fuel leaks by making improvements to Red Hill, including the fuel tanks. The bill requires the Department of Defense, which includes the Navy and DLA, and the EPA to include the necessary funding in their respective budgets to make the improvements identified in the agreement.

U.S. Representative Colleen Hanabusa (HI-01) introduced companion legislation in the House of Representatives.

Kona Historical Society Offers A Tasty Tradition

Kona Historical Society will make its famous Portuguese cinnamon bread to celebrate Shrove Tuesday. This special bake will happen on February 28 at Kona Historical Society’s stone oven, or forno, located in the pasture below its main office and its historic general store museum in Kealakekua.

From 10 a.m. to noon, the public is invited to watch Kona Historical Society staff and volunteers create these sticky, sweet loaves of cinnamon bread. Attendees will also learn about the traditional art of Portuguese bread making and the contributions of the Portuguese, who arrived in Hawaii in the 1880s. While many of these immigrants worked in the sugar plantations, a fair number did find their way to Kona dairies and are credited for helping develop this industry.

Kona Historical Society makes cinnamon bread on Shrove Tuesday to pay homage to the days of the sugar plantations of the 1800s, when resident Catholic Portuguese would mark the day by eating richer, fatty foods and desserts before the ritual fasting of the Lent season, which lasts 40 days. They would often use up butter and sugar prior to Lent by making large batches of malasadas, the well-known and beloved Portuguese doughnut without a hole. Shrove Tuesday is also known as Fat Tuesday.

Cinnamon bread loaves, each costing $8, can be purchased starting at 12:30 p.m. Bread sales are on a first come, first served basis and go until 4 p.m. or everything is sold out. Proceeds go toward supporting the Kona Historical Society, a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii.

For those who can’t make it to this special bake, consider joining Kona Historical Society staff and volunteers every Thursday at the forno for its weekly Portuguese bread baking program. During this free program, the crew bakes close to 100 loaves of white, wheat and sweet bread and the public is invited to lend a hand by helping roll the dough.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Aloha Grown 2017 Malama Honua Fund to Give Away Five (5) $500 Awards

The Aloha Grown Malama Honua Fund is once again giving away five (5) $500 awards to local non-profits, schools, organizations or initiatives on the Big Island that embody Aloha Grown’s philosophy to Support Local. Sustain the Aina. Share the Aloha.

Interested groups must complete an application form and write a one-page essay explaining how their organization follows Aloha Grown’s philosophy. Essays must include the organization’s mission and vision, along with the specific project, program and/or effort that the $500 award would be used to fund.

“Aloha Grown is committed to supporting efforts to care for our island, our people and our culture. That is why 2% of every Aloha Grown sale goes to the Malama Honua Fund, which awards local nonprofits, schools, organizations and initiatives that embody our philosophy.”­­

Previous award winners have included Kohala Elementary School, Punana Leo o Waimea, Hawaii Institute of Pacific Agriculture, Honpa Hongwanji Hilo Betsuin, Laupahoehoe Community Public Charter School, and many more. Their sustainability programs and efforts have included community gardens, aquaponics systems, keiki farm stands, culinary programs, and outdoor educational “classrooms”.

All submissions are due by March 31, 2017. The five (5) selected recipients of the 2017 Aloha Grown Malama Honua Fund Awards will be contacted by April 28, 2017.

For more information on Aloha Grown or to see previous year’s Malama Honua Fund award winners, visit www.alohagrown.com.

Hawaii Department of Health Cites Hawaiian Isles Water Company for HI-5 Violations

The Hawaii State Department of Health has issued a Notice of Violation and Order against Hawaiian Isles Water Company for failure to submit payments and reports required of beverage distributors by the state’s Deposit Beverage Container law. The department found Hawaiian Isles Water Company delinquent for the monthly reporting period of July 1 – 31, 2016 and a penalty fee of $3,600 was assessed.

Hawaiian Isles Water Company complied with the department’s enforcement order by submitting its required corrective action plan and paying in full the entire penalty and late distributor payment.

Hawaii Revised Statutes §342G-105 requires beverage distributors to submit monthly reports and payments to the Department of Health no later than the 15th calendar day of the month following the end of the payment period. Hawaiian Isles Water Company received multiple written notices reminding them of reporting requirements prior to being assessed a penalty.

Since January 2005, Hawaii’s Deposit Beverage Container (DBC) program has assisted residents to recycle more than 7 billion containers. Through recycling, consumers are helping to remove beverage containers from the waste stream and reduce litter in the community. The DBC program certifies independent recycling companies to operate Certified Redemption Centers (CRCs) statewide. CRCs provide Hawaii consumers with refunds of the five cent deposit fee that is paid for eligible containers. Beverage distributors submit payments and reports to the program each month for all HI-5 containers sold within the state.

Mayoral Luncheon March 2 Featuring Mayor Harry Kim, County of Hawaii Leadership and Business Expo

Mayor Harry Kim and select cabinet members discuss opportunities and challenges to West Hawai‘i’s economy at the Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce (KKCC) 2017 Luncheon 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Thurs., March 2 at the Sheraton Kona Resort & Spa at Keauhou Bay.

Sponsored by the Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union, Hawaii Water Service and Pacific Media Group, the annual luncheon offers a unique opportunity for the local community to meet with county department representatives in a casual setting.

Attendees will have the opportunity to have lunch with a specific county department, as well as pose questions to the mayor and cabinet heads. Issues discussed may include update on county priorities, roads and infrastructure, affordable housing, mass transit and opportunities for economic development in West Hawai‘i.

In addition, attendees can also learn about new and existing KKCC businesses at the Chamber’s annual Business Expo, which precedes and follows the banquet. Times are 10 -11:30 a.m. and 1:30-2 p.m.

General admission is $68; Chamber and Rotary members $58. RSVP by Monday, February 27; no walk-ins are allowed. For more information and/or to register, visit www.kona-kohala.com or call the Chamber office, 808-329-1758.

HDOA Quarantines Coffee Plants on Kauai That May Have Been Shipped from Oahu

The Hawaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA) is investigating the source of coffee plants found at a Home Depot on Kauai earlier this week. Coffee plants from islands infested with the coffee berry borer (CBB) are restricted from being transported to uninfested islands, such as Kauai. Hawaii Island, Oahu and Maui have established populations of CBB.

coffee berry borer (CBB)

Eight coffee plants were found at the Kauai store by HDOA Plant Pest Control specialists conducting pest surveillance on Monday. Since then, HDOA personnel have been working to determine where the plants came from and, at this point, it appears that the plants were transported from Oahu. Coffee berries on those plants have been examined by HDOA entomologists in Honolulu and no CBB have been found. Those plants have been quarantined and will be destroyed as a precaution. HDOA has asked the retailer to provide information on recent plant shipments. Also as a precaution, anyone who purchased coffee plants from that store is encouraged to contact HDOA on Kauai at (808) 241-7132 or the State’s toll-free Pest Hotline at 643-PEST (7378).

“The department is taking this matter very seriously and is working with the store and nurseries to determine the exact source of the coffee plants,” Scott Enright, chairperson of the Hawaii Board of Agriculture, said while attending a conference on the Mainland.

One of the most devastating coffee pests, CBB was first detected in the state in Sept. 2010 in Kona and discovered in Ka`u in May 2011. In Dec. 2014, it was discovered on Oahu and was reported on Maui in Dec. 2016.

This small beetle bores into the coffee “cherry” to lay its eggs. The larvae feed on the coffee bean, reducing the yield and quality of the bean. Since its detection in Kona, Big Island coffee growers have developed methods to manage the pest, which include using an organic pesticide and field sanitation. Some farms with good management practices have been able to keep infestations down and minimizing yield loss to about five percent of the average coffee crop yield.

CBB is native to Central Africa and is also found in many coffee-growing regions of the world, including Central and South America. It is still unknown how CBB made its way to Hawaii Island and how it got to Oahu and Maui.

Hawaii has strict importation rules that require fumigation of all green coffee beans imported into the state to rid the beans of pathogens and insect pests. Coffee plants and plant parts are also restricted from being imported into Hawaii under Plant Quarantine rules.

After the discovery of CBB in Hawaii, HDOA issued a quarantine order that requires certain treatments and inspection by HDOA Plant Quarantine inspectors prior to shipping interisland. Inspectors will either attach a tag, label or stamp to indicate the shipment passed inspection requirements. For unroasted coffee beans, acceptable treatment protocols include fumigation, freezing and heat treatment.

For more information on CBB in Hawaii go to the HDOA CBB webpage at: http://hdoa.hawaii.gov/pi/ppc/cbbinfo/ and the UH-CTAHR webpage at: http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/site/CBB.aspx