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Coast Guard, Navy Coordinate Medevac for Man on Cruise Ship Off Maui

A 72-year-old man arrived safely to Maui Wednesday, after being medevaced 170 miles offshore.

A Navy MH-60 Seahawk helicopter aircrew from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 37 at Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, arrived on scene at 3:55, safely hoisted the man aboard and delivered him to awaiting emergency medical services at Kahului Medical Center in Maui.

“This case illustrates the importance of our partnership with the Navy”, said Lt. Duane Zitta, command duty officer, Coast Guard Joint Response Coordination Center Honolulu. “In the remote Pacific, long-range capable search and rescue assets are vital to getting people to a higher level of medical care as quickly and safely as possible.”

JRCC personnel in Honolulu received notification at 5:18 p.m. Tuesday from the master of the cruise ship Radiance of the Seas, of a passenger aboard suffering from symptoms of abdominal distress.

Watchstanders at JRCC contacted the duty flight surgeon who recommended the man be seen by a general surgeon within 24 hours. Watchstanders at JRCC then coordinated with HSM-37 to conduct the rescue.

UH Shines in 2018 U.S. News and World Report Rankings

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, UH West Oʻahu and UH Hilo once again made the U.S. News and World Report’s Best Colleges Rankings, along with UH Mānoa Shidler College of Business. The 2018 U.S. News and World Report rankings were released on September 12.

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa moved up 10 spots to 159 on the 2018 U.S. News and World Report’s Best Colleges Rankings. UH Manoa is also ranked 6 in Best Ethnic Diversity (National Universities), 83 in Top Public Schools, and 177 in High School Counselor Rankings.

“We continue to be gratified by the upward movement in recent academic and research rankings, both on national and international levels,” said Michael Bruno, UH Mānoa interim vice chancellor for academic affairs and vice chancellor for research. “They show that our faculty and staff are working hard, and working together, to give students the best and most accessible higher education experience.”

The announcement of UH Mānoa’s upward mobility on the U.S. News and World Report ranking follows the 2018 Times Higher Education World University Rankings that rated UH Mānoa 63 in the U.S., up from 69 last year—representing its best showing ever in the Times ranking.

UH West Oʻahu ranked 25 among Best Regional Colleges (West), placing it in the top 38 percent of schools in their respective category.

“The faculty, staff and students are thrilled to be recognized as it is an affirmation of the great work we do to prepare 21st Century leaders—career creators who are making a positive difference in our communities!” said UH West Oʻahu Maenette K. P. Ah Nee-Benham.

UH Hilo ranked 66 among Best Regional Universities West, placing it in the top 47 percent in their respective categorory.

“We are very pleased to see UH Hilo recognized for its excellence in providing a quality educational experience,” said UH Hilo Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai. “This ranking is a testament to the work of our faculty and staff, who are deeply committed to providing our students with the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed when they graduate and enter their chosen professions.”

The U.S. News and World Report rankings surveyed 1,600 colleges among more than 3,000 four-year institutions throughout the U.S. Its methodology considers, among various factors, endowment size, rate of alumni giving and student-to-faculty ratio, which tend to favor private institutions.

U.S. News and World Report profiles:
UH Mānoa
UH West Oʻahu
UH Hilo

Seniors 55+ Invited to Akamai Living Fairs in Hilo and Kona

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation is pleased to invite seniors 55 years and older to attend this year’s Akamai Living Fairs, to be held in Hilo and Kona.

These free events will feature health screenings, seminars, vendors, entertainment and door prizes.  The Akamai Living Fairs are co-sponsored by the County of Hawai‘i Department of Parks and Recreation’s Elderly Activities Division and HMSA.

  • Hilo: Edith Kanakaʻole Multipurpose Stadium on Friday, October 20, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
  • Kailua-Kona: West Hawaiʻi Civic Center on Friday, November 3, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

For more information, please call Margaret Yafuso at 966-5801.

Honolulu New Park Rules Crack Down on Sale or Distribution of Expressive Materials

I wish Hawaii County would adopt similar rules to get the kook James Borden out of Lincoln Park once and for all:

James Borden Facebook picture

Honolulu – New rules are now in effect concerning the sale or distribution of expressive materials in Honolulu city parks.  The new rules became effective September 8, 2017.

The prior “Rules and Regulations Governing the Sale of Message-bearing Merchandise by Nonprofit Organizations in City Parks and Facilities” has been repealed, and new rules under Honolulu Administrative Rules Title 19, Chapter 18 entitled “Sale or Distribution of Expressive Materials” have been adopted.

Under the new rules, expressive materials are permitted for sale and distribution. Expressive materials are defined as any written or printed material containing political, religious, philosophical or ideological messages. This includes, but is not limited to: books, pamphlets, handbills, cards, circulars, pictures, magazines, and leaflets.

Additionally, there are numerous items defined as merchandise whose sale is prohibited under the new rules. The items include, but are not limited to: food, drink, coffee mugs, beverage containers, sunglasses, flags, records, patches, maps, jewelry, handicraft, decals, audio or video tapes, shirts, hats, ties, shorts, footwear or any other clothing article.

Sales permits approved under the old rules for the month of September 2017, prior to the implementation of the new rules, will be honored.

Other rules for permitted sales within parks, such as those outlined by temporary concession permits and designated concessionaire agreements, are not affected by these new rules as they do not apply to the sale and distribution of expressive materials in conjunction with a First Amendment activity.

Under the new rules, a permit is necessary for use of a portable table, within a designated area, for the purposes of selling or distributing expressive materials. The designated areas are located where there will be minimal impact to other park functions and facilities. The portable tables and all materials must be removed from the site each day and nothing can be stored at the park location. Permit applications for these activities will not be accepted more than a year before the proposed request date and cannot be used for a period lasting longer than 14 days.

The Department of Parks and Recreation reserves the right to seize and dispose of any merchandise being sold or distributed on park land in violation of these rules.

A public hearing was held on these proposed changes on February 22, 2017 at the Mission Memorial Building, with public notice given beginning on January 20, 2017.

The new rules are available online at parks.honolulu.gov in the “Rules & Regulations” section.

House Passes Bipartisan Amendment to Appropriations Bill Cosponsored by Rep. Tulsi Gabbard to Protect Against Property Seizures

The U.S. House of Representatives yesterday passed a bipartisan amendment to the appropriations package cosponsored by Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02) preventing police forces from seizing private property for profit without due process.

Known as adoptive forfeiture, the practice allows the federal government to accept money and property that has been seized by state law enforcement agencies from people, in some cases, before individuals are formally charged or proven guilty of a crime. This practice creates a loophole for states that have adopted stringent, constitutionally sound asset forfeiture laws and allows them to continue practices that are otherwise deemed illegal at the state level.

Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard said: 

“Attorney General Sessions’ recent announcement to expand civil asset forfeiture allows local law enforcement to bypass state laws and seize property from people with the lowest possible burden of evidence without concern for whether the person is eventually charged or convicted. 

“While some will tell you this is necessary to go after big drug cartels, the reality is the median value of the adoptive forfeiture seizures is around $9,000. Not only is this median value not a sign of major drug trafficking operations, but seizures tend to be focused on poorer neighborhoods. Between 2012 and 2017, the median value of assets seized by Cook County police was just over $1,000; in Philadelphia in 2015, the median value was just $192.   

“This policy does not discriminate between the innocent and the guilty. Rather, this policy places the responsibility on private citizens to prove their innocence rather than put the appropriate burden on law enforcement to prove guilt. All too often, innocent people without legal representation never see their money or property again, and even those who are proven innocent have no promise their property will be returned. 

“The Fifth Amendment of the Constitution exists to protect the citizens of this country from being deprived of life, liberty or property without due process of law. In practice and in principle, adoptive forfeiture is a violation of that Fifth Amendment.”

Background: The practice of adoptive forfeiture was significantly drawn back during the Obama Administration and limited to exceptions related to public safety. However, Attorney General Sessions recently issued a policy directive reauthorizing adoptive forfeiture practices.  This decision marks a return to previous practices that run contrary to safeguarding civil liberties.

State Land Board to Consider Judge’s Recommendation in TMT Contested Case

The Hawai‘i State Board of Land and Natural Resources (BLNR) will hear oral arguments in the Contested Case Hearing for the Conservation District Use Application (CDUA) for the Thirty Meter Telescope at the Mauna Kea Science Reserve, on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017 beginning at 9:00 a.m. in the Crown Room of the Grand Naniloa Hotel in Hilo. This is not a public hearing and members of the public will not be allowed to testify, argue, or otherwise present to the BLNR.

Minute Order No. 107, posted on Sept. 7, 2017 provides that each party to the contested case will have fifteen (15) minutes to present oral arguments.  Up to five minutes of the fifteen minutes may be reserved by parties for responding/rebuttal argument. Those rebuttal arguments will take place after all parties have completed their initial arguments. There are twenty-three (23) parties to the contested case.

The DLNR is providing as much seating as possible for public observation, once space has been made for the parties. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Na Leo TV will provide live streaming of the oral arguments, but there will not be viewing available at the Grand Naniloa. Doors to the Crown Room will open at 8:30 a.m. for public entrance.  There will be no reserving of seats and any seat that’s empty for more than ten minutes may be given to the next person in line waiting outside.  Signs, posters, and other displays will not be allowed inside the Crown Room or on the hotel’s property. Food will not be allowed in the Crown Room.

DLNR continues to utilize expanded media coverage rules used during the TMT Contested Case Hearing and only designated pool media; Na Leo (broadcast) and the Hawai‘i Tribune-Herald (print) will be allowed to videotape or photograph the proceedings. All other audio and photographic documentation of oral arguments is not allowed.

Mayor Kim’s Letter to HICOP Board – RE: Helicopter Tours

Dear Mr. Ernst & HICOP Board:
RE: Helicopter Tours

In our meeting, I clearly indicated how I will proceed.

  • Request a meeting with Helicopter Tour Industry to begin dialogue with industry.
  • Request organization of a program by industry to address concerns.
  • Plan working group meeting of community and industry to see if any anything can be addressed together.

Meeting of first two bullets have been completed and waiting for report.

I was not aware that at this time a definitive position was established by HICOP and believed that the desire was to see if the whole issue can be discussed to work out acceptable solutions. Your correspondence indicate otherwise. If I am incorrect, please correct me.

I truly feel that at this time an effort should be made to address the problem by coming together for open dialogue, regardless of past attempts. As you know, the authority of this issues is with the FAA.

Sincerely,
Harry Kim
Mayor

Hawaii Pacific University and Honokaa High Launch Virtual Classroom

Hawaii Pacific University (HPU) and Honokaa High School today kicked off their new partnership that gives Honokaa students access to HPU’s new, virtual college-credit program. The 17 Honokaa students who are enrolled in the program will connect with HPU professors using video technology that allows for real-time learning.

The 17 Honoka’a students who are enrolled in the program will connect with HPU professors using video technology that allows for real-time learning.  Photo Credit: HPU

“This innovative partnership with Hawaii Pacific University helps us equip students for success at the next level, empower them to explore their potential, and inspire them to reach their aspirations,” said Suzanne Mulcahy, Hawaii State Department of Education. “Together, as a community, we can meet and exceed our goal to successfully guide students to become leaders for Hawai’i’s future.”

“We are grateful to HPU for this partnership as it gives our students direct access to a post-secondary education trajectory,” said Rachelle Matsumura, principal of Honokaa High & Intermediate School. “Programs like this encourage our students to strive for their highest potential and provides a valuable head start on earning college credits that will potentially save them time and money.”

This program is the first of its kind for the private university, which provides real-time, distance learning for high school students. To increase access and opportunities for Honokaa students, HPU tuition has been waived so the high school students may earn college credits and experience the university’s rich curriculum.

“HPU is deeply committed to making higher education increasingly cost-efficient, attainable, and expedient for the students in our local communities,” said John Gotanda, HPU president.  “We recognize an opportunity to not only provide our keiki o ka aina with their best chance to attain their desired goals, but also attract and cultivate high achievers within our islands who will one day be leaders of our community making a profound impact on Hawai’i and beyond.”

L to R: Rachelle Matsumura, principal of Honoka’a High & Intermediate; Assistant Superintendent Suzanne Mulcahy; Complex Area Superintendent Art Souza; John Gotanda, president of HPU; Carol Mon Lee.  Photo Credit: HPU

Dual Credit allows Hawaii DOE high school students to take classes that satisfy requirements for both a Hawaii high school diploma and a University degree.

The Dual Credit program is also made possible through generous support from Carol Mon Lee, a retired lawyer and educator.  Ms. Lee’s investment makes higher education more attainable for local students. She noted, “President Gotanda’s vision for educating the youth of Hawaii, especially those in our public schools, is not just inspiring but vital to our state.”

Ms. Lee currently volunteers as executive-vice president and chief operating officer of ThinkTech Hawaii, a non-profit media company. She also sits on the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education and the Board of Governors, UC Hastings College of Law, San Francisco.

The partnership highlights HPU’s expertise as the state leader in online education and expands its services to support public high school students. The university has been providing online education for deployed students in the military and have provided dual-credit programs with high schools around the state. In 2016, HPU became the first school in Hawaii to be approved by a state agency to participate in NC-SARA, a national authorization program to reciprocate online education across state lines.

Finalists Announced for Dean of the College of Education at UH Mānoa

Three finalists have been identified for the position of Dean of the College of Education (COE).  The three finalists are scheduled to participate over a two day period of visits on the Mānoa campus.  The visits include department discussions; meetings with senior administrators, faculty, staff, students, and internal and external constituents; and a public presentation.

Campus and community members, as well as the general public, are encouraged to attend.

The campus visits of the three candidates have been scheduled as follows:

Dr. Michael Sampson

Dr. Michael Sampson, visiting September 21-22, 2017
Dean and Professor
School of Education
St. John’s University
Public Presentation:  Friday, September 22, 3:00-4:15 p.m./Art Building Auditorium 132

Dr. Nathan Murata

Dr. Nathan Murata, visiting September 28-29, 2017
Professor and Department and Graduate Chair
Department of Kinesiology
College of Education
University of Hawaii at Manoa
Public Presentation:  Friday, September 29, 3:00-4:15 p.m./Art Building Auditorium 132

Dr. DeLacy Ganley

Dr. DeLacy Ganley, visiting October 2-3, 2017
Professor and Director
Department of Teacher Education, School of Educational Studies
Claremont Graduate University
Public Presentation:  Tuesday, October 3, 3:00-4:15 p.m./Bilger Building Auditorium 150

“We were fortunate to have received a highly qualified pool of candidates.  The Search Advisory Committee did a terrific job in identifying these three finalists and I would like to thank them for their outstanding effort and commitment to the search,” said Interim Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Vice Chancellor for Research Michael Bruno.  “As always, we encourage UH faculty, staff, students and the public to come out and meet the candidates, and we look forward to receiving their input to assist in hiring the best person for the position.”

For more information about the search process, including a list of the members of the search advisory committee, the campus visit daily schedule and the candidate biographies, see the search website at http://www.manoa.hawaii.edu/executivesearch/educ.

For more information about the College of Education, please visit https://coe.hawaii.edu/.

Second Annual Zumbathon Benefitting West Hawaii Child & Family Service

More than a dozen Zumba instructors from around the island are joining in support of the West Hawaii Child & Family Service (WHC&FS) to help promote Domestic Violence Awareness, particularly towards children. “Shine the Light” Zumbathon, presented for the second year in a row by Dance 4 Action (local Zumba instructors Ronnie Claveran, Alex Mitchell, Renee Morinaka, and Rod Watai), will be held at the Kona Imin Center (76-5876 Hawaii 180, Old Government Road, Holualoa). It’s 6-9pm on Saturday, September 30th and tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door with net proceeds going to WHC&FS.“We want to let those who feel that they’re alone know that we stand beside them,” the Dance 4 Action ladies said. “Last year we raised more than $3,500 and over 130 people got a great dance workout while supporting our friends and family who need a safe and comfortable shelter when fleeing domestic violence. We hope to double those numbers this year!”

DJ EzE (Eric Ching) will keep the dance fitness party rocking with his spectacular sounds and lights. Guests should wear comfortable fitness clothing, and bring water and a towel. Each ticket includes an entry for prize giveaways.
Domestic Abuse Shelters are temporary shelters offering women and children up to 90 days of a safe haven when fleeing from domestic violence. The shelter offers basic needs (food, clothing etc.), counseling support and services for children. During this temporary stay, they learn dynamics of domestic violence and how to develop a safety plan.

For tickets and more information visit www.shinethelightzumbathon.eventbrite.com. Monetary donations also accepted online. Individuals or businesses interested in donating to the prize giveaway may email Dance4Action@gmail.com.

Hawai‘i Unveils First Cashless Payment System for Medical Cannabis

Gov. David Ige and state Financial Institutions Commissioner Iris Ikeda announced a “banking solution” that allows Hawai‘i’s medical cannabis dispensaries to access financial services and use a cashless payment system.

The solution makes Hawai‘i the first in the nation to have a cashless dispensary system.

The state has secured the services of Colorado-based Safe Harbor Private Banking that will provide limited and temporary financial services for Hawai‘i’s cannabis dispensaries. CanPay, a debit payment mobile application, will process sales transactions at retail dispensaries. Hawaii’s eight dispensary license holders have agreed to implement cashless operations by October 1, 2017.Financial services are currently unavailable in Hawai‘i because cannabis remains a federally prohibited substance.

“This new cashless system enables the state to focus on patient, public and product safety while we allow commerce to take place. This solution makes sense. It makes dispensary finances transparent and it makes it easier and safer for dispensaries to serve their patients and pay their employees and vendors,” said Gov. Ige.

While determining a banking solution, the Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs’ Division of Financial Institutions focused on safety—for patients, employees, dispensaries, as well as the wider community. The department sought a cashless solution to address concerns about increased crimes committed against cash-based operations.

“This solution for the dispensaries to conduct banking services in an entirely cashless method would directly address many concerns we have and problems encountered by the dispensaries,” said Iris Ikeda, Hawai‘i Financial Institutions Commissioner. “This will establish a safe environment for medical cannabis-using patients and businesses to operate. It is our hope that a Hawai‘i-based financial institution opens accounts in the future. For now, we are appreciative of the mainland credit union for stepping in,” added Ikeda.

Hawai‘i’s cashless system will allow cannabis dispensaries to use traditional financial services to legally conduct financial transactions. In addition, dispensaries will be capable of setting up direct deposit for employee payroll, collect and remit taxes, and make payments to vendors.

All transactions will be transparent, as purchases at retail dispensaries occur through the mobile application and other transactions would be recorded by the financial institution.

Maui Wellness Group, LLC dba Maui Grown Therapies and Aloha Green LLC, the state’s two operational dispensaries, have opened accounts with the mainland credit union and have begun using the mobile debit payment application. The remaining six dispensaries are now at different stages of development and varying stages of the approval process.

More information on the Medical Cannabis Registry Program and the Medical Marijuana Dispensary Program is available at http://health.hawaii.gov/medicalmarijuana.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) on the banking solution can be found at https://cca.hawaii.gov/dfi/files/2017/09/MCD-FAQs.pdf.

Hōkūleʻa to Visit O’ahu’s North Shore – Mahalo, Hawaiʻi Sail

Hōkūleʻa is scheduled to depart the Marine Education Training Center (METC) at Sand Island on Thursday, September 14, and will sail to the next stop on the Mahalo, Hawaiʻi Sail: Haleʻiwa, Oʻahu. During the 10-day Haleʻiwa engagement, crew members will participate with the community in events and activities that will highlight the recent Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage as well as the work being done on Oʻahu’s North Shore to care for Island Earth.

Events during the stop in Haleʻiwa will include outreach events, local school visits, service projects, crew presentations, and canoe tours. The following events have been scheduled to date. The public is encouraged to check hokulea.com for daily updates:

Haleʻiwa Engagement Schedule (*All dates and times subject to change)
(Local contact email: hokuinhaleiwa@gmail.com. Updates on Wanana Paoa Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/wanana.paoa.7)

Friday, September 15

7:00 p.m.
Hōkūleʻa Crew Talk Story, Surfer, the Bar at Turtle Bay ResortPolynesian Voyaging Society president and navigator Nainoa Thompson along with crewmembers from the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage will share stories from the epic three-year journey around the globe. Free and open to the public.Participants (tentative): Nainoa Thompson, Kamaki Worthington, Kaimana Bacarse, Eric Co, Sam Kapoi, Kalepa Baybayan, http://www.turtlebayresort.com/Oahu-Restaurants/Surfer-The-Bar

Saturday, September 16

10:00 a.m.
Arrival ceremony at Haleʻiwa Harbor
Join the Hale’iwa community to ho’okipa Hōkūle’a to Hale’iwa.

1 – 5 p.m.
Public Canoe Tours, Haleʻiwa Harbor
Visit Hōkūle’a and take a tour of the wa’a

Sunday, September 17

1 – 5 p.m.
Public Canoe Tours, Haleʻiwa Harbor
Visit Hōkūle’a and take a tour of the wa’a

7:00 p.m.
Hōkūleʻa Crew Talk Story, Surfer, the Bar at Turtle Bay Resort
Polynesian Voyaging Society navigators will share how they apply ancestral wisdom and ʻike through storms, doldrums, and more in their experiences around the world. Free and open to the public. Participants (tentative) – Kamaki Worthington moderator, Austin Kino, Noelani Kamalu, Jason Patterson, Bryson Hoe, Kaleo Wong

Monday, September 18 & Tuesday, September 19

All Day Scheduled school tours and visits. (By appointment only)

Wednesday, September 20

All Day Scheduled school tours and visits. (By appointment only)

5 – 9 p.m.
Hōkūleʻa Crew and North Shore Community Talk Story at Waimea Valley
Special guests from Hōkūleʻa crew and local organizations will share inspirational stories about the Worldwide Voyage and discuss how it has catalyzed action in our North Shore, Oʻahu community. Celebrate progress and learn how you and your ʻohana can be involved. https://www.waimeavalley.net/

Thursday, September 21

All Day Scheduled school tours and visits. (By appointment only)

Friday, September 22

Morning Scheduled school tours and visits. (By appointment only)

6:30 – 9 p.m.
Hōkūleʻa Crew Talk Story at Patagonia Haleʻiwa
John Bilderback will present a photographerʻs view tracking brilliant moments and events throughout the epic three-year Mālama Honua journey around the globe alongside Worldwide Voyage crewmembers who sailed Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia. Free and open to the public.
http://www.patagonia.com/patagonia-north-shore-66-250-kamehameha-highway-haleiwa-hawaii-96712/store_924602999.html

Saturday, September 23

2 p.m. Hōkūleʻa departs for Hanalei

About the Mahalo, Hawaiʻi Sail
The Mahalo, Hawaiʻi Sail will give PVS an opportunity to thank Hawaiʻi’s people, bring Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia home to all of Hawaiʻi, share lessons learned from the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage and deepen the organization’s connection and understanding of the important work being done here in the islands to care for the earth. During the port visits, PVS will engage with schools and organizations through outreach events, service projects, crew presentations and canoe tours.

September Port Dates (tentative and subject to change):
• September 15 – 22, 2017: Haleʻiwa
• September 24 – 26, 2017: Hanalei

October through May port dates will be posted as they become available.

Student Debate Competition to Highlight Opening Day of Global Tourism Summit

Perpetuating sustainable tourism and encouraging young people to become more involved in determining the travel industry’s future, both in Hawaii and internationally, is a key objective of the Global Tourism Summit, September 19-21, at the Hawaii Convention Center.

The 2017 Global Tourism Summit Student Debate is a highlight event fulfilling that need. Featuring 18 debate teams, 10 teams from outside Hawaii and eight within the State, the round-robin tournament is taking place on the Summit’s opening day, September 19. The central topic for the debate program is “Resolved: Tourism Helps to Preserve Culture.”

Presented by the Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA), the Global Tourism Summit offers a diversity of sessions covering topics and trends vital to Hawaii’s future, including Hawaiian culture, eco-tourism, innovation and technology. According to George D. Szigeti, HTA president and CEO, the Student Debate is an essential program because of how it brings teens into the discussion on tourism’s future.

“We need to provide our young people with the incentive and opportunity to express their views on how to make tourism better for all of society” said Szigeti. “The future is theirs and they need to help chart its course for all of us. The Student Debate tournament is intended to seed their interest in tourism and inspire them to be future leaders.”

The 10 teams from outside Hawaii consist of two teams from both Japan and Hong Kong, and one team each from China, Taiwan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Canada and the U.S. mainland. Some teams won local competitions to earn the right to participate in the Global Tourism Summit Student Debate.

The eight Hawaii teams in the Student Debate tournament include three teams from Parker School, two teams each from Kamehameha Schools and the Home School League, and one team from Hilo High School.

Among the international debate teams is The Forensics Society from the Taipei American School representing Taiwan. In May, The Forensics Society won the International Division of the U.S. National Tournament of Champions in Public Forum Debate at the University of Kentucky. The team’s coach, Dr. Nick Coburn-Palo, said the students are thrilled to be in Honolulu for the debate tournament.

“We are tremendously excited to embrace this incredibly generous opportunity to match wits with debate teams from some of the top schools in the world, as well as experience the hospitality for which Hawaii is internationally famous,” said Dr. Coburn-Palo. “Furthermore, our debaters are excited to dip their toes into professional waters by learning more about the rapidly evolving international travel industry at the conference.”

On the morning of September 19, the 18 teams will be paired off in rounds of timed competition with a multi-tiered format that challenges the debate members to present and defend their case through the following process.

  • Presentation of the team’s case.
  • Crossfire with opposing speakers asking and answering questions of each other.
  • Rebuttal to refute the opposing team’s arguments.
  • Summary highlighting the main points of the debate.
  • Final focus with each team explaining why they won the round.

All of the teams participate in three rounds of debates, with the scores tabulated for each one. The two teams that emerge with the top scores will compete in the 2017 Global Tourism Summit Student Debate Finale from 2:00-2:45 p.m. in the Liliu Theater.

PATA Hawaii Student Forum: Planning for a Career in the Global Tourism Environment

Following the debate finals is the PATA Hawaii Student Forum on the topic of Planning for a Career in the Global Tourism Environment. Presented by the Hawaii Chapter of the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA) the forum features prominent tourism industry leaders providing students majoring in hospitality, tourism or transportation management with valuable career advice. The PATA Hawaii Student Forum takes place from 3:00-4:55 p.m. in the Liliu Theater.

Registering for the Global Tourism Summit, September 19-21
Interested attendees can participate in the Global Tourism Summit by registering online at www.GlobalTourismSummitHawaii.com. Registration also includes lunch on the days registered for and participation in the Aloha Reception, featuring entrées from 20 restaurants, on September 20.

Several options are available for registration:

  • Individuals: Full Summit, September 19-21: $395
  • Groups of Eight or More: Full Summit, September 19-21: $365 per person (Groups can mix and match different attendees during the summit)
  • Student and Faculty Members: Full Summit, September 19-21: $150
  • Individuals, Partial Summit, September 19-20: $275
  • Individuals, Partial Summit, September 20-21: $265

Previously known as the Hawaii Tourism Conference, HTA changed the name of the annual event this year to the Global Tourism Summit to more accurately reflect Hawaii’s emergence as a leader in international travel and tourism.

Hawaii Files Supreme Court Brief on the Merits in the Travel Ban Case

Today Hawaii filed its brief on the merits before the United States Supreme Court in Hawaii v. Trump. The Trump Administration filed its opening Supreme Court brief on the merits on August 10, 2017.

Click to read brief

Hawaii’s brief states in part:

On March 6, 2017, the President issued an executive order that exceeds his authority under the immigration laws and transgresses the boundaries of the Establishment Clause. In defending that order, the President claims authority “parallel to Congress’s” to make “federal law” with respect to immigration, insists that the courts owe him complete “deference [as] the Executive,” and declares his decisions wholly “immune from judicial control.”

That breathtaking assertion of presidential power is irreconcilable with our constitutional framework. Our Framers crafted a Constitution predicated on the understanding that the “accumulation of all powers legislative, executive and judiciary in the same hands, * * * may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny.” The Federalist No. 47, p. 324 (James Madison) (Jacob Cooke ed., 1961). In issuing Executive Order No. 13,780 and then defending it in the courts, the President has named himself legislator, executive, and judge. The result is precisely the encroachment on individual liberties the Framers feared: The Order has sown chaos in our immigration system, separated our families, and infringed on the sovereignty of our States. It has also impeded the operations of our universities, our charities, and the tourism industry on which so many livelihoods depend.

In short, “this wolf comes as a wolf.” Morrison v. Olson, 487 U.S. 654, 699 (1988) (Scalia, J., dissenting). It falls to this Court to reestablish our constitutional separation of powers, and to reassert the bulwarks that protect our most sacred liberties.

Oral arguments before the United States Supreme Court will occur on October 10, 2017 in Washington, D.C.

A copy of Hawaii’s Supreme Court brief on the merits is attached.

Additional Open Application Period Begins Today for Preschool Open Doors Program

The Department of Human Services (DHS) has opened an additional application period for its Preschool Open Doors (POD) program and encourages families to apply between September 11, 2017 and October 31, 2017.  Applications received during this period will be considered for preschool participation during January 1, 2018 and June 30, 2018.

This program, which currently serves more than 1,400 children statewide, provides child care subsidies to eligible low- and moderate-income families to pay preschool tuition. POD aims to provide children whose families might otherwise not be able to afford preschool the opportunity to gain essential skills to be successful in school and in life.

To qualify for the program, children must be eligible to enter kindergarten in the 2018-2019 school year (born between August 1, 2012 and July 31, 2013). Families are reminded that a child must be five years old on or before July 31 to enter kindergarten. Families may choose any one of the 426 state-licensed preschools. Underserved or at-risk children receive priority consideration for the POD program, and funds are limited.

Interested families may request an application beginning Monday, September 11, 2017 from the Department’s POD contractor, PATCH, by visiting patchhawaii.org or calling 791-2130 or toll free 1-800-746-5620.  PATCH can also help families locate a preschool convenient for them.

Applications must be received by Tuesday, October 31, 2017 to be considered during the January 1, 2018-June 30, 2018 program period. Applications should be dropped off, mailed, faxed, or emailed to the following:

PATCH – POD

560 N. Nimitz Hwy, Suite 218

Honolulu, HI 96817

Fax: (808) 694-3066

Email: PODAdmin@patch-hi.org

Eligibility and priorities for POD program selection are detailed online in HAR §17-799, which is available online at humanservices.hawaii.gov/admin-rules-2/admin-rules-for-programs.  For more information about other DHS programs and services, visit humanservices.hawaii.gov.

Volcano Fire Injures One

A fire in the Volcano area of the Big Island last night injured one person and sent two others to the Hilo Medical Center:

Situation Found at Scene: Found Single story single family residential structure fully involved in fire upon arrival of first responding units. All occupants at home at the time were able to exit the structure and all accounted for.

Cause: Under investigation.

Remarks: There were 3 people home at the time the fire started. 1 adult male who sustained burns while trying to put the fire out, who was transported to Hilo Medical Center in Serious condition; and 2 minors, 1 male and 1 female who didn’t have any noticeable injuries but were also transported to Hilo Medical Center for precautionary measures and further evaluation.

8 Injured in Pepe’ekeo Apartment Complex Fire

8 people were injured and taken to the Hilo Medical Center after a fire caused by unattended cooking damaged an apartment complex in Pepe’ekeo:

Location: Kauhale’olu Apt, J Building, Kumula St, Pepe’ekeo, HI 96783

Situation Found at Scene: 2 story, 4 apartment building of type 5 construction, upper floors fully involved. Additional apartment building threatened. All occupants confirmed out of building. 8 total patients treated and transported to Hilo Medical Center.

Cause: Per Prevention 1, fire was unintentional, caused by unattended cooking.

Remarks: Fire suppressed with multiple hand lines and master stream device. Fire fought from exterior until conditions were tenable for entry. Upon entry, primary search and suppression took place using thermal imager. Power lines to building were down, breaker shut down as a precaution. Building with severe fire and water damage. HFD assisted lower apartment occupants with salvage of personal items. Red Cross and building representative assisting displaced occupants. Fire cause determination as above.

Coast Guard Saves 6 People Off Maui

The Coast Guard rescued six people from a 27-foot vessel taking on water off Maui, Saturday.
Coast Guard Station Maui launched a 45-foot Response Boat-Medium and arrived on scene at 3:10 p.m. took the Makali’i in a stern tow and the crew aboard. They were safely towed to Kihei boat ramp where a post search and rescue boarding revealed no violations.

The Coast Guard rescued six people from taking on water in their 27-foot pleasure craft off Maui, September 9, 2017. Coast Guard Station Maui launched a 45-foot Response Boat-Medium safely towing the vessel to Kihei boat ramp where a post search and rescue boarding revealed no violations. (U.S. Coast Guard Photo/Released)

“This crew did everything right to be prepared and assist responders.” said, Petty Officer 1st Class William Cusic, search and rescue coordinator at Coast Guard Sector Honolulu. “They called in as soon as they began taking on water, donned their lifejackets and deployed their anchor. We also recommend anytime you are on the water you take provisions and you leave word with family or friends about your voyage.”

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector Honolulu command center received a report via VHF radio channel 16 from the master of the vessel around 1:30 p.m. The master reported they were taking on water at an unknown rate and the Makali’i’s crew was bailing water by hand in addition to the on board dewatering pumps. The water level was neither increasing nor decreasing.

Sector Honolulu issued an urgent marine information broadcast notice to mariners and directed the launch of the Station Maui RB-M.

On scene weather was reported as east winds approximately 11 mph with waves less than one-foot .

Kīlau Stream Bridge Work – Temporary Bridge Closure 8:30 A.M. to 12:30 P.M. Monday Through Fridays

The Department of Public Works will begin work on the Kīlau Stream Bridge, located on Manowai‘ōpae Homestead Road in Laupāhoehoe on Monday, September 11, 2017 through about October 31, 2017, weather and construction conditions permitting.

The bridge will be closed from 8:30 A.M. to 12:30 P.M., Monday through Friday, in which no pedestrians or vehicles will be allowed to use the bridge with the exception of emergency response teams during an emergency event. The bridge will be open during non-working hours, on weekends and holidays.

The repair work involves the rehabilitation of the existing bridge structure which includes replacing the old timber members with new timber members and hardware.

Motorist and residents are advised to exercise caution when traveling in the vicinity of the construction zone.

The County of Hawai‘i Department of Public Works apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause and thanks the community for their patience and understanding. If there are any questions or concerns, please call Barett Otani, Information and Education Specialist, at 961-8787.

Come One, Come All to Prince Dance Theatre’s Carnival of Exotic Mayhem

Saturday, September 30 from 7:00 PM to 10:00 PM, local non-profit dance company Prince Dance Theatre is hosting its annual fundraiser The Carnival of Exotic Mayhem at The People’s Theatre in Honoka‘a.

Even bigger than the past two years, The Carnival of Exotic Mayhemfeatures crazy costumes, video projections, magic, fire dancers, go-go dancers, aerialists, dance and cabaret performances from members of the company, and more. DJ Danny Waddell serves up the best in body rocking dance grooves all night long in a wild and carnival like setting.

Prince Dance Theatre is raising funds to aid in the creation of its newest work Dark Matter, a collaborative effort between Prince Dance Theatre Artistic Director Angel Prince and Canada France Hawaii Telescope astronomer Dr.Jean-Charles Cuillandre. Dark Matter aims to be both an informative and an entertaining dance theatre piece on the topic of space and dark matter and has an outreach component to it in which the company and astronomer will go into local schools to present the work imaginatively and educationallyfor students.

The Carnival of Exotic Mayhem is an all ages event and attendees are encouraged to dress up in fun carnival gear and join in on the mayhem. Get ready for an unforgettable night with Prince Dance Theatre at The People’s Theatre!

Tickets are $25 pre-sale for adults, $30 day of the event. Children twelve under are $10. Tickets are available at http://www.princedance.orgor by calling 808.217.3008.