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Hōkūleʻa to Set Sail for Kauaʻi

Hōkūleʻa is scheduled to depart the Haleiwa Boat Harbor for Hanalei Bay, Kauaʻi as part of the Mahalo Hawaiʻi, Sail. Crewmembers are preparing to set sail tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 p.m. and arrive to Kauaʻi the following morning that will include a public arrival ceremony at 10 a.m..

During the 3-day Kauaʻi engagement, crewmembers will participate with the community in events and activities that will highlight the recent Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage as well as the work being done within Kauaʻi communities to care for Island Earth.

Events during the stop will include outreach opportunities, local school visits, cultural exchanges, and crew presentations. The following events have been scheduled to date. The public is encouraged to check hokulea.com and Facebook for daily updates:

Kauaʻi Engagement Schedule – (*All dates and times subject to change)

Saturday, September 23
• 2:30 p.m. Hōkūleʻa departure from Haleʻiwa Boat Harbor, Oʻahu – public welcome

Sunday, September 24
• 10 a.m. Hōkūleʻa arrival ceremony and community paʻina at Hanalei Bay Pier – public welcome

Monday, September 25
• A.M. Scheduled school tours and visits – by appointment only
• 2:30-5:30pm Dockside outreach at Hanalei Bay Pier – public welcome
• P.M. ʻOahi O Makana, a Hawaiian protocol event – public viewing from Hanalei Bay to Haʻena areas

Tuesday, September 25
• A.M. Scheduled dockside school tours and visits – by appointment only
• P.M. Hōkūleʻa tentative departure for Oahu – public welcome

Saturday, September 30 (post departure)
• 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mālama Hulēʻia workday at the fishpond at Nuimalu Park

Public Hearings Scheduled on Proposal to Increase Commercial Marine License Fees

The Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) has scheduled statewide public hearings on proposed administrative rule amendments that would increase the annual commercial marine license fees from the current $50/year to $100/year initially, then to $150/year on January 1, 2018. This date may be delayed until later in the year, depending on when the rules are approved. The proposed rules also would establish a reporting deadline for dealers who buy marine life directly from commercial fishers.

Click to view proposed amendments

Bruce Anderson, DAR administrator said, “Commercial license fees haven’t increased in nearly 20 years.  We’re updating the fee schedule to reflect current and future needs.  Increased revenues from these fees will offset losses in revenues from non-resident fees for on-going operational expenses and to add new on-line reporting and licensing options to our website to better serve the fishing public.”

The hearings will be held at the following times and locations:

Thursday, September 28, 2017
MOLOKA‘I – Mitchell Pau‘ole Center Conference Room, 90 Ainoa Street, Kaunakakai, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Friday, September 29, 2017
O‘AHU – Stevenson Middle School Cafeteria, 1202 Prospect Street, Honolulu, 6 to 9 p.m..
LANA‘I – Lana‘i High/Elementary School Cafeteria, 555 Fraser Avenue, Lana‘i City, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Tuesday, October 3, 2017
HILO – Hawai‘i County Aupuni Center Conference Room, 101 Pauahi Street, Suite 101, Hilo, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
KONA – Honokohau Harbor Big Game Fishing Clubhouse, Kailua-Kona, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Wednesday, October 4, 2017
MAUI – Maui Waena School Cafeteria, 795 Onehe‘e Street, Kahului, 6 to 8:30 p.m.

Thursday, October 5, 2017
KAUA‘I – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School Cafeteria, Lihue, 4431 Nuhou Street, 6 to 9 p.m.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017
KAUA‘I – Kapa‘a Elementary School, 4886 Kawaihau Road, Kapa‘a, 6 to 9 p.m.

All interested persons are urged to attend the public hearing to present relevant information and individual opinion for the DLNR to consider. Persons unable to attend or wishing to present additional comments, may mail written testimony by Friday, October 13, 2017 to the Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR), 1151 Punchbowl Street, Room 330, Honolulu, HI 96813.

Anyone with a hearing impairment who desires to attend the public hearing may request assistance of a sign language interpreter. The request may be made in writing (to the DAR address in the preceding paragraph), or by calling 587-0100 (voice or TDD) in Honolulu. The request will need to be received at least seven days before the hearing is scheduled to start. Additional information or a copy of the proposed rules will be mailed at no charge upon receipt of verbal or written request to the DAR address.

To view the draft rule, go to the Division of Aquatic Resources website at https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/dar/files/2017/08/HAR_13-74dr.pdf

Update On North Kona Emergency Water Restriction – Another Failure

The Emergency Water Restriction for North Kona remains in effect. ALL residents and customers in North Kona must continue to restrict water use to health and safety needs (drinking, cooking, and hygiene purposes).

This restriction also prohibits the draining and refilling of swimming pools, hot tubs, water fountains, etc. Customers should take appropriate measures to reduce the loss of existing water in swimming pools and hot tubs, such as checking the pool for leaks and consulting a pool supplier for appropriate pool covers. In addition, customer should ensure proper operation and maintenance of pool pump equipment.

Recent well failures at Kohala Ranch Water Company (private water system) has left their community without an operating potable water source. As such, it was essential for the Department’s pump contractor to relocate equipment and respond to their critical situation. This will push back the completion of the Department’s Hualālai and Palani well repairs by approximately a week and a half.

Updates on well repairs can be found at www.hawaiidws.org.

Due to a significant level of overall compliance, water levels in the tanks have remained stable. The Department appreciates the community’s efforts to restrict water use during this time. Therefore, limited hand watering of precious plants, on occasion, is still acceptable using the following best practices:

  • Water at night to reduce evaporation.
  • Use of County’s free mulch to preserve moisture around plants. Visit the County’s website at: http://www.hawaiizerowaste.org/recycle/gr eenwaste/ for more information.
  • Use of rainwater from downspouts for plants.
  • Do not over-water plants.
  • Use of sprinklers (manual or automatic) for lawns and grass areas is still prohibited.

For other unique situations, please contact the Department to discuss possible options. Without everyone’s continued cooperation, there will be areas that will experience periodic loss of water service or lower water pressures.

We also recommend that residents store a sufficient amount of water for basic household needs, such as drinking, cooking, and hygiene purposes, in the event of service disruptions.

For your use, potable water can be obtained from a water “buffalo” located on Hina Lani Street below Anini Street as well as water spigots along Ane Keohokalole Highway, between Kealakehe High School and Palani Road. Please bring your own drinking water containers to fill.

For more information visit our website at www.hawaiidws.org. To report any observed wasteful use of water, call 961-8060 during normal business hours or email dws@hawaiidws.org. For after hour emergencies call us at 961-8790.

2017 Jurist of the Year and Judiciary Employees Honored

First Circuit Court Judge Virginia Lea Crandall was presented with the 2017 Jurist of the Year award by Chief Justice Mark E. Recktenwald, at the Hawaii State Judiciary’s 2017 Statewide Incentive Awards Ceremony on September 22.

Supreme Court Chief Justice Mark E. Recktenwald (left) congratulates the Hawaii State Judiciary’s highest awardees of 2017: First Circuit Court Judge Virginia Lea Crandall, the Jurist of the Year, and Distinguished Service Award recipients Iris Murayama, Hawaii State Judiciary Deputy Administrative Director of the Courts; and Colin Rodrigues, Deputy Chief Court Administrator, Second Circuit (Maui, Molokai, Lanai).

The Jurist of the Year is selected annually by the Chief Justice from nominations submitted by Hawaii attorneys and Judiciary personnel. The Jurist of the Year recognizes a full-time trial judge who exhibits exceptional judicial competence, evidenced by decisional quality; significant extra-judicial contributions to the administration of justice; and active participation in public service to the community at large.

“Judge Crandall is an exceptional jurist, and a strong leader who works tirelessly to find ways to improve the Judiciary’s ability to serve the public,” said Chief Justice Recktenwald. “Her vast experience in handling both civil and criminal trials has enabled her to serve as a mentor and role model to countless judges.”

Judge Crandall joined the Judiciary as a Circuit Court Judge of the First Circuit Ninth Division on April 1, 1991. She served as the Administrative Judge of the Civil Division, First Circuit Court, from June 1995 to January 1999. Judge Crandall then presided over a criminal trial calendar until 2010, when she was assigned to the civil trial calendar where she currently serves. She also currently serves as Chair of the Judicial Education Committee.

In addition to the honoring of the Jurist of the Year, the Hawaii State Judiciary presented individual and group awards to employees who have distinguished themselves through exceptional service and accomplishments.

The awards presented at this year’s ceremony and the recipients of those awards are:

Distinguished Service Award (the Judiciary’s highest merit award): Iris Murayama, Hawaii State Judiciary Deputy Administrative Director of the Courts; and Colin Rodrigues, Deputy Chief Court Administrator, Second Circuit (Maui, Molokai, Lanai).

Meritorious Service Award: Dee Wakabayashi, Director of Human Resources, Hawaii State Judiciary; and Marilyn Hasegawa, Program Specialist, Juvenile Client and Family Services Branch, Fifth Circuit (Kauai).

Group Meritorious Service Award: Third Circuit (Hawaii Island) Drug Court Staff: Hilo Office – Pagan Devela, Gabrielle Chow, Marlyce Correira, Keri Kimura, and Dustin Cueva; Kona Office – Yvonne Keanaaina, Wendy Terada, Rodney Branco, and Daralyn Kimiye Villesca.

Spirit of the Judiciary Award: Sudarat Pindavanija, IT Specialist, Judiciary Information Management System (JIMS); and David Lam, Chief Court Administrator, Fifth Circuit (Kauai).

Certificate of Commendation: Nicole Morrison, Supervisor, Administrative Driver’s License Revocation Office; and Star Haleamau, Judicial Clerk, Traffic Violations Bureau, Third Circuit (Hawaii Island) Kona Office.

Group Certificate of Commendation: Administrative Fiscal Office: Tracy Chan, Accountant; Myrna Fong, Account Clerk; and Noreen Miyasato, Account Clerk; and Third Circuit Judicial Clerks, Client Services Division, Juvenile Services Branch, Clerical Section, Hilo Office – JoAnn Hirako, Supervisor; Katherine-Anne Schubert, Tammi Mansinon, Tiana Akiu; and Kona Office – Leah Anu Morimoto.

Hawaii Receives First Sentinel-Class Coast Guard Cutter

The Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry (WPC 1124) arrived in Honolulu Friday becoming the first of three 154-foot fast response cutters stationed in Hawaii.

The crew of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry (WPC 1124) arrives to their new Homeport in Honolulu, Sept. 22, 2017. The Oliver Berry is the first of three 154-foot fast response cutters to be stationed in Hawaii. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Levasseur/Released)

The cutters are designed to patrol coastal regions and feature advanced command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance equipment, including the ability to launch and recover standardized small boats from the stern. The Oliver Berry is the first of three Honolulu-based FRCs that will primarily serve the main Hawaiian Islands.

The cutter is named after Chief Petty Officer Oliver Fuller Berry, a South Carolina native and graduate of the Citadel. He was a highly skilled helicopter mechanic working on early Coast Guard aircraft. Berry was also one of the world’s first experts on the maintenance of helicopters and served as lead instructor at the first military helicopter training unit, the Rotary Wing Development Unit which was established at Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City, North Carolina, in 1946. He also helped develop the helicopter rescue hoist.

Lt. j.g. Peter Driscoll, executive officer of the Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry (WPC 1124) waves as the cutter arrives for the first time at Coast Guard Base Honolulu, Sept. 22, 2017. There will be three fast response cutters stationed at Base Honolulu by the spring of 2019. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Tara Molle/Released)

Berry had an extensive career spanning much of the globe. He was involved in a helicopter rescue out of Newfoundland that earned him a commendation and the Silver Medal of the Order of Leopold II. In this case, Berry was able to quickly disassemble a helicopter in Brooklyn, New York, which was then flown to Gander, Newfoundland, in a cargo plane where he then reassembled it in time to find and rescue 18 survivors of a crash aboard a Belgian Sabena DC-4 commercial airliner.

The Coast Guard is acquiring 58 FRCs to replace the 110-foot Island-class patrol boats. The FRCs are designed for missions including search and rescue; fisheries enforcement; drug and migrant interdiction; ports, waterways and coastal security; and national defense. The Coast Guard took delivery of Oliver Berry June 27 in Key West. The crew then transited more than 8,400 miles (7,300 nautical miles) to Hawaii.

There will be three fast response cutters stationed here at Base Honolulu by the spring of 2019. These cutters with their improved effectiveness in search and rescue will make the waters around the main Hawaiian Islands a much safer place for recreational boaters and users of the waterway. They greatly improve our on water presence with each providing over 7,500 operational hours, a 40 percent increase over the 110-foot patrol boats.

A commissioning, scheduled to be held Oct. 31, will be presided by Vice Adm. Fred M. Midgette, Coast Guard Pacific Area commander. Also in attendance will be the cutter’s sponsor Susan Hansen, distant cousin of Oliver Berry.

Hawaii Residents Can Spot the International Space Station Tonight

Hawaii residents can spot the International Space Station tonight (depending on clouds).


It will be visible beginning tonight, Friday, September 22, at 7:25 PM. It will be visible for approximately 5 minutes at a maximum height of 54 degrees. It will appear 11 degrees above the Southwest part of the sky and disappear 24 degrees above the North Northeast part of the sky.

You can view a livestream from the space station here: https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive

Preservation of Historical Sites at Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park Featured in Free Lecture

On Wednesday, September 27, Archaeologist MaryAnne Maigret, will be discussing the work of preserving historic and culturally significant stone structures at Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park as part of Kona Historical Society’s regular Hanohano `O Kona Lecture Series.

NPS Photo

MaryAnne will discuss preservation of the cultural landscape of the lands the park encompasses including Hawaiian stone architecture, historic vegetation, and other elements that contribute to the significance and of this sacred site.

MaryAnne is an historic preservation specialist with an academic background in geography and cartography, and nearly thirty years of experience in Hawaiian archeology. She has earned degrees at the University of California at Berkeley and the University of Hawaii, where she earned a Masters degree in Geography. She has devoted the last fifteen years to public service for State and Federal government and is currently the Acting Integrated Resources Manager at Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park.

This presentation is part of KHS’ community lecture series held at the West Hawai`i Civic Center, Kailua-Kona, every last Wednesday of the month from 5:30-7:00p.m., this series features local and state speakers sharing knowledge of a wide variety of cultural and historical subjects. Presented by Kona Historical Society, in cooperation with the County of Hawai’i, this lecture series is a gift from the Society to the community that has supported it for so long. Free of charge, it is open to all, residents and visitors alike.

Two 86-Year-Old Women Struck By Vehicle in Hilo Intersection

South Hilo Patrol officers are investigating a collision involving a motor vehicle and two pedestrians that occurred in Hilo.

On (September 21), at about 10:50 a.m., police and HFD medics responded to a report of two pedestrians that were struck by a vehicle while on Kinoʻole Street at the Mamo Street intersection in Downtown Hilo.

Arriving officers determined that an 86-year-old Hilo woman and an 86-year-old female visitor from Oahu were crossing Kinoʻole Street in a marked crosswalk when they were struck by a blue 2016 Toyota Corolla compact traveling south on Kinoʻole Street and being operated by an 88-year-old Hilo woman.

Medics took the victims to the Hilo Medical Center for treatment. They are in critical condition, and both will be transported via medi-vac to Oahu for further treatment.

The driver of the compact was uninjured.

Police have initiated a negligent injury investigation and ask that anyone who may have witnessed the collision to call Officer Debney Jaramillo at (808) 961-2213 or the Police Department’s non-emergency line at (808) 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers at (808) 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers does not record phone calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

House of Representatives Honored to Host French Legion of Honor Presentation to World War II 442nd Veterans

The Hawaii House of Representatives was honored today to host the presentation of the French Legion of Honor decoration to three Nisei veterans of US Army’s 100th Infantry Battalion, 442nd Regimental Combat Team for their service during World War II.

Rep. Mark M. Nakashima (from left), Futao Terashima, Vice Speaker Della Au Belatti, Dale Tateishi holding a photo of his father Tetsuo Tateishi, Harold Zenyei Afuso, and Rep. Scott Y. Nishimoto.

The veterans: Harold Aenyei Afuso, 442nd RCT, 2nd Battalion, H Company; Tetsuo Tateishi (posthumously) 442nd RCT, 100th Battalion, A Company; and Futao Terashima, 442nd RCT, 3rd Battalion, I Company; were presented their medals by Guillaume Manan, Honorary Consul of France in Hawaii.

“The House of Representatives and Speaker Scott K. Saiki are so happy that our chamber could serve as the venue to honor these brave men,” said Vice Speaker Della Au Belatti. “The Legion of Honor is France’s highest award and it recognizes the bravery and sacrifice that these men made to protect the freedoms that we enjoy today.”

The 100th Infantry Battalion, 442nd Regimental Combat Team was comprised of Japanese Americans, most of them from Hawaii. The men volunteered and fought in Europe during the war, becoming the most highly decorated unit in the history of the United States for its size and length of service.

Representatives Scott Y. Nishimoto and Mark M. Nakashima also attended the event and presented lei to the honorees.

“Stranger Danger” – Department of Education Reports 3 Cases at Separate Schools

The Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) encourages parents to talk to their children about “stranger danger” and highlight measures that students can take to stay safe.

A letter to parents was sent home from all schools in the Campbell-Kapolei Complex Area after similar “stranger danger”reports were made at three elementary schools in the past week.  In all three cases, students walking to or from school reported being approached by a male in a black or dark-colored truck who offered them a ride.  In one case, a student reported being grabbed the male in an attempted abduction.  In all cases, no students were injured and the incidents were reported to parents and/or school officials.  The Honolulu Police Department is investigating.

Parents are encouraged to reinforce the following safety measures with their children: 

  • Stay away from strangers.  Do not talk to or take anything from them.
  • Don’t go anywhere with someone you don’t know.  Never accept a ride from a stranger.
  • Stay more than an arm’s reach from strangers.  If a stranger approaches you, seek help immediately from a trusted adult.
  • Use the buddy system.  Avoid walking anywhere alone.
  • If a stranger grabs you, do whatever it takes to stop the stranger and yell for help.
  • Report any suspicious activity to a trusted adult.
  • Be alert of your surroundings and let others know where you will be and what time you will be back.

HIDOE appreciates the assistance and vigilance of parents, law enforcement and the community in working together to keep all of our students safe.  Visit HIDOE’s website for more information on Safety at School.  

Another letter sent out previously:

Class of 2021 to Recite Pharmacist Oath at UH Hilo White Coat Ceremony

Eighty-two student pharmacists will hear words of inspiration from the president of one of Hawaiʻi’s few remaining independent pharmacies at this year’s University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (DKICP) White Coat Ceremony on October 8 in the UH Hilo Performing Arts Center. The event, which takes place from 2-4 p.m., is open to the public.

Kimberly Mikami Svetin, the third president in the 82-year history of family-run Moloka`i Drugs, will be the keynote speaker. Svetin will give the student pharmacists her view of “how to get the most out of life.” She also plans to talk about how the pharmacy staff at Hawaiʻi’s oldest independent pharmacy focuses on the community and how that benefits their personal and professional lives.

The ceremony, where new student pharmacists recite the Oath of a Pharmacist, signifies a rite of passage for individuals entering their first year in the professional program. Students will be cloaked with a white coat symbolizing their student status and the values of the profession.

Three pharmacy residents who are continuing their training with DKICP faculty on Kaua`i and O`ahu, as well as a new Ph.D. student at DKICP, also will take part in the ceremony.

Ka Haka ʻUla O Ke`elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language will perform the mele ho`okipa, or welcoming chant, Ua Ao Hawaiʻi.

The students will also be addressed by UH Hilo Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai and DKICP Dean Carolyn Ma.

The event is sponsored exclusively by Walgreens. Erin Samura, Pharmacy Manager from Hilo, will speak on behalf of Walgreens.

New CD “Fresh Produce” By HHS Jazz Band

For nearly 40 years, Honoka‘a High School Jazz Band has delivered great music to eager audiences across Hawai‘i Island and state. Now, the Grammy-winning school’s musical legacy, under the direction of Gary Washburn, will release its sixteenth CD, “Fresh Produce.”

The CD is an annual fundraising project to support the Band’s travel and other costs. Fresh Produce” emphasizes the locally grown talent of Honoka‘a High School, and includes a wide variety of music ranging from the 1930’s to the present.

Featuring the vocals of Kaylynn Iona, Kacy Sanchez and Kaleb Yamasaki, the new album also showcases instrumental soloists, Zhanalyn Cacho, Dwayne Murakane, Kamaehu Duldalao, Terri Connors and Jeanne Altura. Musical selections range in tempo, stye and genre from Count Basie to Lester Bowie, Amy Winehouse, Etta James, The Big Bad Voodoo Daddies and many more.

Innovative, energetic and talented, the Jazz Band has set a standard for the performance of jazz music on Hawai‘i Island since it originated in 1978. In addition to its annual Oahu concert tour celebrating National Jazz Appreciation Month, the band has performed for four national conventions, National Public Radio’s “From the Top,” and the Big Island Jazz Festival, featured on CNN’s “Jazz Alley.” Early next year, a select ensemble, Dragon Jazz, will go on a multi-island tour with renown blues artist Johnny Nichols.

In 2008, Honoka‘a High School was recognized by the National Association of Music Merchants Foundation for outstanding music education; in 2011, they received a Grammy Signature Schools Award in 2011. That same year, Washburn was named a Claes Nobel Educator of Distinction, and he has been recognized as a Living Treasure of Hawai‘i by the Honpa Hongwanji Mission of Hawai‘i.

The CD is available at all performances as well as through the school (775-8800) or by emailing Gary_Washburn@notes.k12.hi.us. The band will be performing at the Peace Day Festival in Honoka‘a on Sept. 23, Pumpkin Patch in Waimea October 14, October Fest in Waimea October 21 and the Queen’s Shops November 18.

Man Achieves Goal to Visit ALL 59 National Parks

When Dave Parker entered Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Tuesday night, he accomplished his lifelong dream to visit the 59 iconic national parks in the U.S.

Chief Ranger John Broward shakes hands with Dave Parker of McLean, VA who completed his quest to visit all 59 National Parks on Wednesday. (All photos NPS Photos by Janice Wei)

“To see Kīlauea erupt is indescribable and it’s just spectacular to see,” Parker said. “It’s the reason we came here,” he said.

On Wednesday, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park surprised Parker with a “59ers” Certificate of Achievement, signed by National Park Service Acting Director, Mike Reynolds. The certificate was presented by Acting Superintendent and Chief Ranger John Broward, who congratulated Parker in front of visitors and staff at the Kīlauea Visitor Center.

Dave Parker poses for a photo in front of an interpretive display in the Kīlauea Visitor Center of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

“It’s uplifting that Mr. Parker made it a priority to see all 59 of the iconic national parks,” Broward said. “Park visitors help steward our public lands, and by appreciating them, they protect them. And Dave Parker, you couldn’t have a better last name,” he said.

Parker’s love for national parks blossomed at the tender age of 14, when his parents took him to his first parks, Yellowstone and Grand Teton. His family camped, rode horses, hiked the trails and watched Yellowstone’s famous geyser, Old Faithful, erupt.

Now 77, Parker, his wife Carol, and friends Red and Sheri Cavaney, will spend a few nights at Volcano House and explore the eruptions of Kīlauea and Mauna Loa. They enjoyed a ranger talk about the volcanic origins of the Hawaiian Islands, and a guided tour with the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park (FHVNP).

Left to right: Elizabeth Fien, Executive Director of the Friends of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park; Dave Parker “59er”; , Margot Griffith, Executive Director of the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association; and Hawaii Volcanoes’ Acting Superintendent and Chief Ranger John Broward smile for a photo in the Kīlauea Visitor Center.

The park’s non-profit supporting partners, the FHVNP and the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, presented the Parkers and friends with commemorative items including ball caps, T shirts, pins, a gift certificate for The Rim restaurant, and other mementos and educational items to help them enjoy and discover the park.

“There are many ways to support your parks,” Parker said. “All parks have organizations that support them that you can donate to. You can volunteer and give back with your time. It’s an important investment to make for the survival of public lands and our future generations,” he said.

The auspicious visit was Parker’s fifth time to Hawai‘i, and his first to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. During his early career working for the Dept. of Commerce in Wash., D.C., he helped promote travel to the U.S., and had close ties to the Hawai‘i visitor industry. He and his wife live in McLean, VA.

Left to right: Sheri Cavaney, Dave Parker, Carol Parker and Red Cavaney, smile for photos in the Kīlauea Visitor Center on Wednesday. Dave is wearing an NPS Centennial T-shirt listing all 59 national parks.

The National Park Service has more than 20,000 National Park Service employees who care for America’s 417 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.

Buckets for Books Charity Basketball Tournament

On October 7th from 9am-3pm come out to the new Ka’u gym and support Volcano athletics as Friends of Volcano Schools of Arts and Science (FVSAS) is hosting their first ever 3 on 3 Charity Basketball tournament fundraiser.

Sign up your own 3 person squad or come out and support your local students and parents as they play basketball against the big Islands best. Open to all ages. Also, test your skills in a 3 point shootout contest for an amazing cash prize. All tournament fees are fully tax deductible.

For more information or to volunteer please contact Will Holland at gotwill@gmail.com or 808-626-5130.

Governor Ige Announces Hawai‘i Among 14 States and Puerto Rico to be on Track to Meet Paris Climate Targets

Gov. David Ige attended Climate Week NYC 2017 this week, where he joined fellow state governors to meet with national and international government and business leaders for discussions on climate change and efforts to reduce carbon emissions.

Hawai‘i is among 14 states and Puerto Rico who are members of the U.S. Climate Alliance, a bi-partisan coalition that was formed in response to President Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement.

On Wednesday, the alliance released its 2017 Annual Report: Alliance States Take the Lead which finds:

  • The alliance states are collectively on track to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 24 to 29 percent — below 2005 levels — over the next eight years (by 2025).
  • Between 2005 and 2015, alliance states reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 15 percent, compared to a 10 percent reduction by the rest of the country.
  • Between 2005 and 2015 – the combined economic output of alliance states grew by 14 percent (the rest of the country grew by 12 percent). On a per capita basis, economic output in alliance states expanded twice as fast as the rest of the country.

“I’m encouraged by our meetings with leaders here at Climate Week. Collaboration is a critical part of how we move forward as a state, a nation, and as global leaders in addressing climate issues affecting our island state and communities around the world. The U.S. Climate Alliance report shows that alliance states are setting clear targets for greenhouse gas reductions and increasing clean energy. This is mobilizing the market to innovate and create new, well-paying green jobs,” said Gov. Ige.

In addition to minimizing emissions that cause climate change, alliance states are also focusing on investing in vulnerability assessments, and planning new innovative technologies, infrastructure and nature-based solutions that can help people adapt to climate change and its impacts.

During Climate Week, Gov. Ige spoke at the opening ceremony and participated in international discussions on a sustainable ocean economy and Hawaiʻi’s 100 percent renewable energy goal. The governor also took part in discussions on how businesses are implementing their own policies on renewable energy and investing in states that are taking steps to adapt to climate change. Gov. Ige also had the opportunity to meet with the governors of Washington and California to discuss enhancing cooperation to address climate change issues.

Online Bachelor of Social Work Option Extends Education Opportunities Statewide

A new Distance Education (DE) Option for the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree delivered by the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa will launch in Fall 2018, providing increased accessibility for students statewide to pursue the degree.

Developed by the Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work in partnership with Outreach College, the online degree is designed for eligible students who have completed the General Education Core Requirements and BSW prerequisites.

Courses are offered in a five-week, asynchronous format that allows for flexibility and busy schedules. Students take the online courses sequentially as a cohort, and practice real world skills under the supervision of social work professionals in community agencies.

Students and community members are invited to attend informational sessions regarding the BSW-DE Option:

• Maui. UH Maui College, 9/20/17, 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Transfer and College Fair, Ka Lama Building. Also, 2 to 3 p.m.: Outreach College on Maui hosted session in HITS (for Moloka‘i, Lāna‘i, Hāna and Lahaina).

• Hawaiʻi Island. Hawaiʻi Community College Manono Campus (Hilo), 10/03/17, noon to 1 p.m., Building 379A, Room 6B. Hawai‘i Community College – Palamanui (Kona)10/03/17, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., Koali 101.

• Kauaʻi. Kaua‘i Community College, 10/06/17, noon to 1 p.m., Learning Resource Center, LRC-124B.

For more information, contact the Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work at (808) 956-9470 or by email sent to sswde@hawaii.edu.

For more information, visit: www.hawaii.edu/sswork/

2016-17 Strive HI Performance System Results

The Hawaii State Department of Education shared its 2016-17 Strive HI Performance System results this evening during the Board of Education community meeting. The school accountability system focuses on state and schools’ progress on Strategic Plan Student Success Objectives and provides educators and communities with information to take action for student learning.

“The results are encouraging and show our focus moving in the right direction with college and career readiness measures remaining steady, including some growth in Science,” said Superintendent Dr. Christina Kishimoto. “As we move forward, we will be very specific and purposeful in our approach to address the achievement gap and chronic absenteeism. We will take what we have learned about effective student-centered practices since 2005 and raise our implementation work to another level.”

While statewide overall results in English Language Arts, Math and Science have shown growth over the past three years; the results have been mixed compared to 2016:

  • Science – up 4 percentage points from 2016
    (2015: 41%; 2016: 42%; 2017: 46%)
  • Mathematics – no change from 2016
    (2015: 41%; 2016: 42%; 2017: 42%)
  • English Language Arts/Literacy – down 1 percentage point from 2016
    (2015: 48%; 2016: 51%; 2017: 50%)

While overall state results were stable, the following schools showed the most growth in English Language Arts and Math over the past three years (scroll to the bottom of the release for an extended list of top performing schools):

  • English Language Arts/Literacy – Three-year average gains in percentage of students meeting/exceeding standards:
    • Kauai High – up 17 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 25%; 2016: 59%; 2017: 59%)
    • Kapaa High – up 17 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 33%; 2016: 58%; 2017: 66%)
    • Kahuku High & Intermediate – up 15 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 20%; 2016: 54%; 2017: 50%)
    • Kaiser High: up 14 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 51%; 2016: 74%; 2017: 79%)
    • Pauoa Elementary – up 11 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 56%; 2016: 78%; 2017: 77%)
  • Math – Three-year average gains in percentage of students meeting/exceeding standards:
    • Pauoa Elementary – up 17 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 47%; 2016: 72%; 2017: 81%)
    • Kohala High – up 16 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 15%; 2016: 22%; 2017: 47%)
    • Kapolei Elementary – up 13 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 30%; 2016: 52%; 2017: 56%)
    • Kealakehe High – up 13 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 19%; 2016: 39%; 2017: 44%)
    • Haleiwa Elementary – up 11 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 49%; 2016: 49%; 2017: 71%)

Strive HI was launched in school year 2012-13 as the state’s locally designed performance system that was a waiver from the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law. The accountability system includes multiple measures of school performance including proficiency in Science, Math and Language Arts/Literacy; chronic absenteeism; school climate; graduation rates; and achievement gaps. The system was modified earlier this year to address the federal requirements under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and the revised DOE/BOE Strategic Plan. The law replaces both NCLB and the state’s waiver. ESSA requires full implementation including the provisions related to school accountability this school year.

English Language Arts and Math scores are derived from the Smarter Balanced Assessment, and Science scores are from the Hawaii State Assessment in Science.

Click here to view the 2016-17 State Snapshot of Strive HI indicators. For more information about the Strive HI performance system, click here.

Below are lists of top performers across indicators in the Strive HI System. Results for schools with small student populations are suppressed to protect student privacy.

 

​Highest Achieving Schools in Meeting English Language Arts/Literacy Standards
Statewide: 50%
Lanikai El 88%
Kaelepulu El 84%
Mililani Ike El 82%
Momilani El 81%
de Silva El 80%
Mililani Uka El 79%
Hickam El 79%
Kaiser High 79%
Koko Head El 78%
Pauoa El 77%
Manoa El 77%
Aina Haina El 77%
Roosevelt High 77%
Waikiki El 76%
Noelani El 75%
Highest Achieving Schools in Meeting Math Standards

Statewide: 42%

Lanikai El 89%
Momilani El 87%
Pauoa El 81%
Noelani El 79%
Waikiki El 79%
Mililani Ike El 78%
Maemae El 76%
Wilson El 76%
Kaelepulu El 75%
Aliiolani El 75%
Mililani Mauka El 75%
Mililani Uka El 75%
Palisades El 74%
Laie El 73%
Pearl Ridge El 73%
Highest Achieving Schools in Meeting Science Standards

Statewide: 46%

Lanikai El 98%
Maunawili El 96%
Haleiwa El 96%
Kaelepulu El 92%
Mililani Ike El 92%
Manoa El 91%
Maemae El 91%
Kamalii El 91%
Pearl City El 91%
Waikiki El 90%
Mililani Mauka El 89%
Hickam El 88%
Aikahi El 88%
Waiau El 88%
Koko Head El 87%

 

​Highest Achieving Schools in English Language Arts/Literacy Growth (3-Year Average Gains)
Kauai High +17 percentage points
Kapaa High +17 percentage points
Kahuku High & Intermediate +15 percentage points
Kaiser High +14 percentage points
Pauoa El +11 percentage points
Kaewai El +11 percentage points
SEEQS +10 percentage points
Waialua High & Intermediate +9 percentage points
Waiakea High +9 percentage points
Makawao El +9 percentage points
Kapolei El +9 percentage points
Kalihi Uka El +8 percentage points
Kalaheo High +8 percentage points
Aliamanu Middle +8 percentage points
Na Wai Ola +7 percentage points
Kealakehe High +7 percentage points
​Highest Achieving Schools in Math Growth (3-Year Average Gains)
Pauoa El +17 percentage points
Kohala High +16 percentage points
Kapolei El +13 percentage points
Kealakehe High +13 percentage points
Haleiwa El +11 percentage points
Aliiolani El +11 percentage points
Kauai High +11 percentage points
Kaewai El +11 percentage points
Waiau El +9 percentage points
Kekaulike High +9 percentage points
Palolo El +9 percentage points
Waiahole El +8 percentage points
Kalihi Uka El +8 percentage points
Wheeler Middle +8 percentage points
Highest Achieving Elementary Schools in Reducing Chronic Absenteeism
Maunaloa El -21 percentage points
Mountain View El -6 percentage points
Keonepoko El -6 percentage points
Na Wai Ola -6 percentage points
Lincoln El -5 percentage points
Naalehu El -5 percentage points
Maunawili El -5 percentage points
Sunset Beach El -5 percentage points
Kamalii El -5 percentage points
Kamehameha III El -5 percentage points
Likelike El -4 percentage points
Konawaena El -4 percentage points
Waimalu El -4 percentage points
Waiahole El -4 percentage points
Royal El -4 percentage points
​Kalihi Waena El ​-4 percentage points
​Kaunakakai El ​-4 percentage points
Highest Achieving Middle Schools in Reducing Chronic Absenteeism
Ilima Intermediate -5 percentage points
Wahiawa Middle -4 percentage points
Waiakea Intermediate -4 percentage points
Kapaa Middle -4 percentage points
Lahaina Intermediate -3 percentage points
Stevenson Middle -3 percentage points
Aliamanu Middle -3 percentage points
Iao Intermediate -3 percentage points
Highlands Intermediate -3 percentage points
Washington Middle -2 percentage points
Waimea Canyon Middle -1 percentage point
Waipahu Intermediate -1 percentage point
Kalakaua Middle -1 percentage point
Ka Umeke Kaeo -1 percentage point
Moanalua Middle -1 percentage point
 
Highest Achieving High Schools in Reducing Chronic Absenteeism
Niihau O Kekaha -12 percentage points
KANAKA -8 percentage points
Kanu o ka Aina -7 percentage points
Laupahoehoe Community PCS -4 percentage points
Lahainaluna High -4 percentage points
Kekaulike High -4 percentage points
Kailua High -3 percentage points
Molokai High -3 percentage points
Anuenue -3 percentage points
Thompson Academy -3 percentage points
Kauai High -3 percentage points
Waialua High & Intermediate -2 percentage points
Mililani High -2 percentage points
Moanalua High -2 percentage points
Highest Achieving Schools in Graduation Rate (Four-Year Rate)
University Laboratory 100%
Thompson Academy 97%
Anuenue 97%
Moanalua High 95%
Ehunuikaimalino 95%
Mililani High 94%
Radford High 94%
Kauai High 90%
Kalani High 90%
Kapaa High 90%
​Highest Achieving Schools in College-Going Rate
16-month enrollment rate
University Laboratory 86%
Kalani High 81%
Roosevelt High 75%
Kaiser High 74%
Mililani High 72%
McKinley High 67%
Kalaheo High 66%
Moanalua High 64%
Radford High 61%
Pearl City High 60%
Waimea High 58%
​Hawaii Academy ​58%
​Kapaa High ​57%
​Kauai High ​57%
Molokai High 56%

73 Hawaii Companies Represented at the 2017 Tokyo International Gift Show

Seventy-three companies represented Hawaii at the 2017 Tokyo International Gift Show (TIGS).

This year marks the sixth consecutive year that the Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) organized a Hawaii Pavilion at TIGS, which was held September 6-8, 2017, at the Tokyo International Exhibition Center (Tokyo Big Sight).

This year, the Hawaii pavilion filled 32 booths, and featured a café section. Last year’s gift show resulted in $11 million in export sales by Hawaii’s participating vendors. This year’s exhibitors are expected to top $13 million in export sales.

“The Tokyo International Gift Show is huge and it’s the perfect opportunity to showcase small and medium-sized businesses from Hawaii to the rest of the world,” said DBEDT Director Luis P. Salaveria.  “Each exhibitor walks away with new exposure to the international market and a global perspective on how to do business outside of Hawaii.”

“The Hawaii Pavilion grows each year in size and number of local companies exhibiting,” said Dennis T. Ling, administrator for DBEDT’s Business Development and Support Division.  “The Hawaii brand is established and recognized for quality and authenticity, which is reflected in the dramatic increase in our sales in the Japan market.”

As a result of dollar amount of exports achieved at TIGS, the U.S. Small Business Administration announced this week an award of $400,000 to continue the Hawaii State Trade Export Program.  Under the tag “Buy Hawaii, Give Aloha”, this program provides training, grants and tradeshows for companies looking to start exporting or increase their exports.

Angie Higa, owner of Sky Dreams LLC explained: “The Tokyo International Gift Fair is an important show that I look forward to each year.  As a designer and having the opportunity to expand my collection to Japan, where they love Hawaii and Hawaii-made products, is absolutely amazing.”

Keoki Tavares, owner of Aloha Elixir said: “This was a great experience. The Tokyo International Gift Show has really opened the door for us to make important business connections in Japan. Our products were well-received and it was exciting to participate for the first time this year.”
Erin Kanno Uehara, owner of Choco lea noted: “Our mission is ‘bringing peace to our world one chocolate at a time’ – so this is the perfect opportunity for us to fulfill that mission and spread our love and aloha from Hawaii.”

TIGS is the largest international trade show in Japan, drawing 200,000 buyers, distributors, wholesalers and retailers to meet exhibitors at more than 4,500 booths spread out over Tokyo Big Sight exhibition area.

29th Annual Christmas with the Chefs

Sugarplums will dance in your head Saturday, Dec. 2 at the festive Christmas with the Chefs. The annual holiday gala returns to the seaside grounds of Courtyard King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel from 5:30-8 p.m.

Over 20 members of the American Culinary Federation (ACF) Kona Kohala Chefs Association will delight attendees with plates of expertly prepared savory cuisine and delectable holiday treats—all accompanied by handcrafted ales, choice wines and 100 percent Kona coffee.

The Bill Noble Trio jazzes up the evening for dancing under the stars fronting historic Kamakahonu Bay. A silent auction will tempt would-be Santas with an array of holiday gift ideas while supporting local businesses.

In its 29th year, the annual fundraiser benefits local culinary students attending Hawai‘i Community College—Palamanui and members of the Kona Kohala Chefs wanting to further their education.

Tickets are $90 presale, $95 at the door and available online at www.konakohalachefs.org. Tickets are available at Westside Wines, Kona Coffee & Tea, The Spoon Shop and Courtyard King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel. Tables of 10 are $1200—which includes reserved seating, table-side service and select bottles of wine—and can be purchased online.

The host hotel is offering a special event room rate starting at $159. Phone 808-331-6330 and ask for the “Christmas with the Chefs” room rate.

American Culinary Federation Kona Kohala Chefs Association: ACF is the largest, professional, non-profit organization for chefs and cooks in the nation. Founded in 1980, the Kona Kohala chapter is comprised of food service professionals, vendors, growers and culinary enthusiasts; www.konakohalachefs.org.

Hawaii Senate Holds Special Session to Confirm Judiciary Appointments

A Special Session of the Hawai‘i State Senate is scheduled for September 25 – 26, 2017 to consider two judicial appointments for the Circuit Court of the Third Circuit – Hawai‘i Island.

On Wednesday, August 30, 2017, the Senate received two letters of appointment from Governor Ige naming current District Family Court Judge of the Third Circuit, Henry T. Nakamoto, to the Third Circuit Court (Hilo) and attorney Robert D. S. Kim to the Third Circuit Court (Kona). Both appointees were chosen by Governor Ige from a list of candidates selected by the Judicial Selection Committee.

Pursuant to Article VI, Section 3 of the Hawai‘i State Constitution, the Senate has 30 days from the date of the appointment to advise and consent on the two appointees. Therefore, the Senate will convene a two-day Special Session at 10:00 a.m. on Monday, September 25, 2017 to consider both appointments.