Football-Sized Rocks Cause Several Traffic Accidents in Hilo

Hawaiʻi Island police responded to several traffic accidents in Hilo around 2 a.m. Thursday (July 17) involving damage to vehicles from striking football-size rocks on the roadway.

Fallin RockThree of the accidents were on Hawaiʻi Belt Highway (Route 19) near ʻAlae Cemetery and one was on Haihai Street.

Police are asking motorists to use caution when driving during the early morning hours especially with limited visibility due to rain.

The public is asked to report any suspicious activity by calling the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Eleven Highway Bridge Projects To Be Expedited With Innovative Federal/State Partnership

As part of the Hawaii Department of Transportation’s (HDOT) goal of improving the state’s highway infrastructure, HDOT is partnering with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Central Federal Lands Highways Division (CFLHD) to deliver 11 bridge projects throughout the state.This partnership will supplement the state’s current project delivery process and get additional projects shovel-ready.

Department of Transportation logo

“Central Federal Lands Highways Division has managed various construction phases of Saddle Road on Hawaii Island with great results,” said Ford Fuchigami, HDOT Interim Director. “Its enhanced role statewide will provide a valuable resource and allow us to complete more needed projects.”

“We have experienced great results because of the strong partnership we have with the HDOT and the incredible support of the Big Island communities. The success experienced reminds us all of the importance of partnerships and how all the right resources from local, State and Federal levels can join forces and make great things happen”, said Rick Suarez, CFLHD Division Engineer. “This represents good government in action. It represents the best interests of those we serve and enables us to be good stewards of limited resources entrusted to us.”

The projects include:

Oahu:

• Interstate H1 Bridge Rehabilitation, Kapalama Canal, (Halona Street Bridge)
• Kamehameha Highway, Kipapa Stream (Roosevelt) Bridge Rehabilitation
• Kamehameha Highway, Replacement of Hoolapa (Nanahau) Stream Bridge
• Kamehameha Highway, Replacement of Kawela Stream Bridge

Hawaii Island:

• Kawaihae Road, Waiaka Stream Bridge Replacement and Realignment of Approaches
• Mamalahoa Highway, Hilea Stream Bridge Replacement
• Mamalahoa Highway, Ninole Stream Bridge Replacement

Kauai:

• Kaumualii Highway, Hanapepe River Bridge Replacement and/or Rehabilitation
• Kaumualii Highway, Route 50, Bridge Rehabilitation, Bridge No. 7E
• Kuhio Highway, Route 56, Mailihuna Road Intersection and Kapaa Stream Bridge Rehabilitation
• Kuhio Highway, Route 560, Bridge Rehabilitation at Wainiha Stream Bridges #1, #2 and #3

The total program cost is estimated to be more than $137 million dollars. These projects are in the preliminary planning phases. There may be additional projects as the HDOT works collaboratively with CFLHD and as funds are available. More information on each project will be available in the coming months as the process continues.

CFLHD operates as part of the Federal Lands Highway Program, serving the needs of the central United States, Hawaii, and American Samoa. CFLHD actively administers the surveying, design and construction of forest highway system roads, parkways and park roads, Native American reservation roads, defense access roads, and other Federal lands roads. About 30 percent of the land in the United States falls under the jurisdiction of the Federal government.

Big Island Man Dies in Crash in Hawaiian Ocean View Estates

A 20-year-old Kaʻū man died Sunday (July 13) from injuries he sustained in a single-vehicle crash late Friday on Hawaiʻi Belt Road and the junction with Ginger Blossom Lane in Hawaiian Ocean View Estates.

Austin Yurong

Austin Yurong

He has been identified as Austin L. Yurong of Hawaiian Ocean View Estates.

Responding to a 11:10 p.m. call Friday (July 11), Kaʻū Patrol officers determined that Yurong, who was the operator and sole occupant of a 1986 Toyota pickup truck, was traveling east on Hawaiʻi Belt Road (Route 11) between the 80- and 81-mile markers approaching the junction with Ginger Blossom Lane when he lost control and veered off the right shoulder, colliding with a lava embankment. The vehicle veered back into the southbound traffic lane and then back into the lava embankment, rolled twice and came to rest upright, straddling the center lane markings.

Yurong was ejected from the vehicle and found lying unconscious on the south shoulder. He was taken to Kona Community Hospital and later transferred to The Queen’s Medical Center on Oahu, where he was pronounced dead at 12:39 p.m. Sunday.

Hawaiʻi Belt Road was closed to all traffic from about 11:10 p.m. Friday to 1 a.m. Saturday.

Police believe that alcohol and speed may be contributing factors to this collision.

The Traffic Enforcement Unit has initiated a coroner’s inquest investigation and has ordered an autopsy to determine the exact cause of death.

Police ask anyone who witnessed the collision to call Officer Larry Flowers at 326-4646, extension 229.

This is the 8th fatality this year compared with 17 at this time last year.

Sailboat Runs Aground Off Lanai – Woman Medically Evacuated

The Coast Guard medically evacuated a 25-year-old woman from a sailing vessel after it ran aground outside of Ka’a Fishpond, Lanai, Saturday.

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

Watchstanders at the Sector Honolulu Command Center received notification via Channel 16 at 7:28 p.m. from 38-foot sailboat Raven that it was aground and taking on water on the east side of Lanai with three people aboard.

An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Air Station Barbers Point and a Response Boat-Medium crew from Station Maui launched enroute to the aground vessel.

When the RB-M crew arrived on scene at 9 p.m. they assessed the location of the vessel and determined that they were unable to maneuver close enough to take the vessel in tow.  The sailboat was hard aground but not in danger of sinking.

Two of the sailboat’s crew would remain overnight on the vessel.

Due to a preexisting medical condition of the third crewmember, watchstanders consulted a flight surgeon who made the recommendation for medical evacuation.

At 12:14 a.m., a rescue swimmer was lowered into the water to conduct a hoist of the patient and also supplied back-up VHF radios to the two remaining crewmembers.

The helicopter crew safely transported the patient to awaiting EMS at Kahului Airport.

Raven remains hard aground with one crewmember aboard until salvage arrangements can be made. The second crewmember kayaked into the beach at Ka’a Fishpond Sunday morning.

United 777 Diverts to Remote Pacific Island After Burning Smell Reported

A United Boeing 777 diverted to the tiny Pacific island of Midway last night after a burning smell filled the plane while it flew over one of the most remote places on earth.

Stranded Plane

The airline will only say it was a mechanical issue. But this may have been a fairly serious incident. No one was hurt but those on board had the scare of their lives, says Teresita Smith from Maryland, who was traveling on board with 25 family members.

“The smell was getting stronger…it smelled like something burning,” she told ABC News in a phone interview today from Honolulu.

The departure had originally been delayed in Honolulu because of the odor but was cleared for takeoff for the eight-hour flight to Guam after about three hours, she said.

And then five hours into the flight the smell returned. “In the back section of the plane alarms were going off,” Smith said. Then after the pilot announced the plane would be diverting to Midway, the power seemed to go out and the plane dropped precipitously. “It was very scary,” she said. “It shook a lot of people up.”

More here: United 777 Diverts to Remote Pacific Island After Burning Smell Reported

House Tourism Chair to Introduce Legislation Banning Aerial Advertising

Representative Tom Brower (Waikiki, Ala Moana) announced plans to introduce legislation banning aerial advertisement in the state of Hawaii. The proposed legislation will seek to clarify the ambiguities and jurisdiction of aerial advertising written in federal, state, and city law. The measure will specifically make it illegal for a pilot to fly a plane out of a state airport for the purpose of towing a banner for advertisement.
Aerial Banner
“I have had discussions with U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and state officials to identify what we can do. Due to the ambiguities of city, state and federal law, there is a need for legislation to add more clarity. Right now, we have federal and state laws that need further explanation,” said Brower. “Our skies are under federal and local jurisdiction, but state airport officials issue contracts and agreements with pilots and businesses. While the FAA has indicated that plane operators need to abide by state law and county ordinance, the contract signed by the particular pilot in question did not specifically allow or deny the operation of a tow banner business.”

The plane operator, Aerial Banners North (ABN), has received a federal waiver to conduct banner towing operations nationwide, but state and city officials have strongly asserted that aerial advertisement is illegal under local law. ABN has argued that the waiver allowing them to operate across the nation, and in Hawaii, supersedes any state or county prohibitions.

On Monday, the Federal Aviation Administration clarified that the waiver granted to Aerial Banners North which authorizes the company to conduct banner towing operations nationwide, “does not waive any state law or local ordinance. Should the proposed operations conflict with any state law or local ordinance, or require permission of local authorities or property owners, it is the operator’s responsibility to resolve the matter.”

“I care about the threat of aerial banners flying over Hawaii’s tourist destinations, ruining the natural beauty, interfering with outdoor recreation and enjoyment of residents and tourists. Most importantly, if we don’t act, this will set a bad precedent, opening the flood gates for more aerial advertising in Hawaii’s skies,” added Brower, Chair of the House Tourism Committee.

New Summer Program for Teens at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor

Teens will have an opportunity to soar at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor’s new cross-cultural Aviation Adventure program scheduled to launch this July. The three-day/two-night program will provide a sweeping view of aviation, from ancient Hawaii up to the present day. Two dates are available to choose from: July 15~17 and July 22~24, Tuesdays through Thursdays, 9am to 4pm.

Teen Aviation Program

Aviation Adventure is designed to immerse teens in the rich history of Ford Island and Pearl Harbor, as well as the science, technology, engineering and math concepts of aviation. Hands-on, practical experiences bring these principles to life in the Museum’s historic hangars and aboard the Battleship Missouri Memorial. This cross-cultural program is open to teens who have completed the basic Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor Flight School program, or those who are at least 13 years of age. They will be joined by teens of the same age, from China. Overnight accommodations are provided onboard the Battleship Missouri.

Cost of the three-day program is $300, which includes all materials, meals, snacks, overnight accommodations, and an Aviation Adventure logo tee shirt.

For more information and to register for Aviation Adventure go to www.PacificAviationMuseum.org/Education/AviationAdventure or email Education@PacificAviationMuseum.org.

Big Island Police Conducting DUI Checkpoints This Weekend

With the approach of the long Fourth of July weekend and the continuation of graduation parties, Hawaiʻi Island police will be on alert to help prevent tragedy on our roads.

HPDBadgeOfficers will conduct DUI checkpoints and roving patrols beginning Thursday, July 3, and continuing through Sunday, July 6. The effort is part of a national and statewide campaign called “Drunk Driving: Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.”

Driving under the influence of alcohol presents a potential danger to every motorist, passenger and pedestrian the driver encounters. Already this year, Hawaiʻi Island police have made more than 600 DUI arrests, and seven people have died in traffic fatalities.

The Hawaiʻi Police Department wishes everyone a happy and safe Fourth of July weekend.

Road Closures Announced for 4th of July Festivities

HPDBadgeThe Hawaiʻi police Department would like to inform all motorists of the July 4th festivity road closures:

Bayfront Highway (Route 19) from Waianuenue Ave, to Pauahi St.
Closed 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. July 4. Alternate route is on Kamehameha Ave.

Lihiwai Place
Closed 2 a.m. July 4 to 10 a.m. July 5.

Kumu Street and Bishop Street
Closed 3 a.m. July 3 to 10 p.m. July 4.

The Road Closure information phone number is 961-2350.

Thank you for your patience and understanding during this celebration.

2014 RIMPAC Exercises Begin – Bloggers Invited Previously

Well the ships are coming in for the 2014 RIMPAC Exercises.  I don’t have a sponsorship with Go!Airlines anymore, so if I do get selected to go on some embarks… I’ll have to be selective about the ones I get chosen for as I know I’ll be paying my own flights this time!

Here are some of the previous embarks and adventures I have gone on in the past.

I always try to get something to remember my embarks from!

I always try to get something to remember my embarks from!

Mokulele Airlines Announces Grand Opening Celebration For Kalaeloa Airport – Adds Flights

Mokulele Airlines has announced that it will host a grand opening celebration on July 1 at the airline’s newest service location, Kalaeloa Airport on west Oahu, marking the successful conclusion of a year of preparations. Kalaeloa is located at the former Barber’s Point Naval Air Base John Rogers Field, and the grand opening and inaugural flight will take place 15 years to the day that the former base was closed and turned over to the State of Hawaii.

mokulelejet

The celebration, which is open to the public, will begin with a facility tour and entertainment by Kainani & Friends. Jenn Boneza, TV personality for Oceanic Cable 16 and Hawaii Five-0 actress will serve as the Mistress of Ceremonies.  Ron Hansen, president & CEO of Mokulele Airlines will welcome guests and special guest speakers will include Evelyn Souza, Chairperson of Neighborhood Board #24; Senator Mike Gabbard, Representative Karen Awana, Ross Higashi Deputy Director Airports Hawaii DOT,  and Shan S. Tsutsui, Lieutenant Governor of the State of Hawaii. Dignitaries from the Hawaii Department of Transportation will also be in attendance and Kahu Daniel “Kaniela” Akaka, Jr. will offer a traditional Hawaiian blessing of the airport and the plane that will make the inaugural flight.

July 1 will mark the beginning of Mokulele’s daily nonstop service to Kahului, Maui from Kalaeloa, with six scheduled daily flights, three each way. The inaugural flight to Kahului will depart at 1:00 pm. After the plane departs, closing remarks will be offered by Mokulele’s executive vice president and COO Dave Berry and a reception will follow with entertainment by award-winning slack key master Kawika Kahiapo and refreshments provided by Chef Paul Onishi, of the Culinary Art Academy and Young Life Oahu High School Students.

Kalaeloa will be the ninth airport Mokulele serves. As with most of the other airports Mokulele operates from, parking is hassle-free and TSA screenings are not required. Travelers will also save time by eliminating the need to drive to and from Honolulu on the H1. Mokulele is offering a special introductory webfare of $99 roundtrip including taxes and fees for the new Kalaeloa-Kahului route for reservations booked through July 31th for travel through August 30.

Mokulele Airlines said it has announced the expansion of its service between Kamuela-Waimea on the Big Island and Kahului, Maui by adding a third daily roundtrip flight to meet growing demand.

Mokulele began offering service form Kamuela in September 2013 after being awarded the Essential Air Service (EAS) contract from the Hawaii Department of Transportation. EAS is a government program designed to help ensure that smaller communities have access to commercial air service.

Mokulele will now offer 42 weekly flights between the two destinations, only 24 of which are subsidized by the EAS program.

More information is available at www.mokuleleairlines.com.

Statement By Admiral Harry Harris Jr., On Opening of RIMPAC

Aloha! Welcome everyone to the Rim of the Pacific exercise. It’s a great day to look across Pearl Harbor and see so many international ships berthed here for RIMPAC 2014. I want to personally welcome every Sailor, Marine, Airman, Soldier and Coastguardsman from all 22 participating nations and from the six observer nations – not only here in Hawaii, but also to the joint forces operating together in Southern California. You may not realize this, but the Southern California RIMPAC phase includes more than 1,000 personnel and seven ships from nine countries.

RIMPAC Line Up

As the world’s largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps our armed forces increase transparency and foster the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring security on the world’s oceans. Everyone standing here with me today recognizes how valuable a cooperative approach can be to sharing the workload and leveraging unique national capabilities.

Today, maritime cooperation is more vital than ever before. For centuries, the world’s oceans kept us apart, but in this increasingly globalized world, they are the pathways that bring us together.

Freedom of the seas is the minimum condition necessary for global prosperity and trade to flourish. This applies to the United States, a maritime nation and a Pacific nation, and it applies to each of the countries participating in RIMPAC.

As the world’s economic center of gravity shifts rapidly toward the Indo-Asia-Pacific, we also note the increasing risks in the region – some man-made, some natural – but all capable of disrupting stability and impacting our collective prosperity. We can all appreciate that conflict and crisis are bad for business. I think it’s important to note that by simply attending RIMPAC, every nation here is making the bold statement that we must improve multinational military cooperation despite disagreements. We can agree to disagree without being disagreeable.

Capable maritime forces enhance stability, security, prosperity and peace around the world, especially in an ocean as vast as the Pacific. The 22 nations who sent forces to RIMPAC have interests in the Pacific, and they know that this exercise will help them improve their capability to operate with each other and contribute to multilateral efforts when needed.

Mutual trust and open lines of communication are critical, but are very challenging to build. That’s why multilateral exercises like RIMPAC are so important. It helps us work together effectively in real world events like the recent search for Malaysia Airliner MH370, or in responding to the devastating typhoon that hit our friends in the Philippines last November. Friends help friends, and often, the fastest response to crisis comes from the sea.

Capable maritime forces matter to all nations.

And they matter to the United States, which is conducting a whole-of-government strategic rebalance to the Pacific. The rebalance is based on a strategy of cooperation and collaboration, and that’s why it is imperative that we work together to build trust and confidence to solve our collective maritime challenges. When great nations work together, we can accomplish great things.

Collaboration and cooperation, that’s why we are here to learn together, operate together and sail together.

There are three great ships that sail on the high seas – friendship, partnership and leadership – all three are exemplified at RIMPAC. Great leadership is also something I get every day from our U.S. Third Fleet commander, Vice Adm. Kenny Floyd, who will serve as the Combined Task Force commander during this exercise.

Adm. Harris is commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet.

VIDEO: NASA’s Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator Successfully Launched From Kauai

NASA’s Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) was successfully launched on a helium balloon today at the U.S. Navy’s Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii later the LDSD will be released at 120,000 feet and fire a Star 48B rocket motor to boost it to Mach 4.0 and 180,000 feet.

NASA IFO

This height and speed simulates a spacecraft flying through the Martian atmosphere and is where the air breaking systems will be tested on the LDSD vehicle.

LDSD is fitted with what is called SIAD-R, a giant dounaut air bag that will increase the diameter of the vehicle and help slow it down to Mach 2.5 where a supersonic parachute will deploy ahead of a safe landing in the Pacific Ocean for recovery.

Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia Arrive in Tahiti

Papeʻete, Tahiti: Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia—the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s voyaging canoes—were greeted in Tahiti with celebrations commemorating the special relationship between Hōkūleʻa and Tahiti that began with her maiden voyage to French Polynesia 38 years ago. President of French Polynesia, Gaston Flosse, and other dignitaries welcomed in the Polynesian Voyaging Society captains and crew.

The Hokule'a reaches landfall.

The Hokule’a reaches landfall.

The canoes made landfall at 4:00 p.m. on Sunday, June 22. Sarah Vaki, sister of Hikianalia crew member Herve Maraetaata, travelled from her home in the Marquesas to Tahiti to continue a tradition of singing an arrival song for the canoes once they are within sight of land. Heremoana Maatuaaihutapu gave the Tahitian greeting for Hōkūleʻa that his father, Maco, gave in 1976.

In a gathering after the crew made landfall, a special declaration of “Mālama Honua” and pledge to care for the oceans was presented to President Gaston Flosse and master navigator Nainoa Thompson. Tahiti’s Mālama Honua declaration brought together a diverse group of organizations in a pledge of support. Thompson will take this declaration to the United Nations conference in Apia, Samoa, as well as all future ports during the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage sponsored by Hawaiian Airlines. “I was here in 1976, and the people of Tahiti gave us a great gift—they told us that we are family and to be proud of who we are as Pacific people,” said Thompson, amid applause. “Tahiti changed Hawaiʻi forever, and 38 years later, you hand me this Mālama Honua declaration to protect the ocean, and give us hope again.”

Media and the public are invited to attend events throughout the Worldwide Voyage’s time in Tahiti:

Monday, June 23, through Thursday, June 26 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.: Global Education Village with booths and displays about navigation and Mālama Honua efforts.

Tuesday, June 24, 2014, 6:00 p.m.: Nainoa Thompson presents on navigation techniques and the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage at the University.

Sunday, June 29, 2014, 2:00 p.m.: Ceremonial renaming of Paofai beach to Hōkūle‘a Beach by Gaston Flosse, President of French Polynesia.

Great Pacific Race Turns Bad – Four Rescued on Attempt to Row to Hawaii

The Coast Guard rescued four rowers Saturday, who were participating in the Great Pacific Race from Monterey, Calif., to Honolulu, when their rowboat began taking on water Friday evening.

Coast Guard Rescue

At 9 p.m., the Coast Guard command center in Alameda received a call from the Marine Rescue Coordination Center in Falmouth, England about a 24-foot rowboat that was taking on water. MRCC Falmouth received the initial distress notification because the emergency position-indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) for the rowboat was registered in England.

A sailboat, functioning as a safeboat for the Great Pacific Race, was first on scene, but could not complete the transfer of the rowers due to high winds and rough seas. The Coast Guard launched a helicopter from Air Station San Francisco and a C-130 plane from Air Station Sacramento, locating the rowers at 1 a.m. pacific time and approximately 75 miles west of San Luis Obispo, Calif.

Once on scene, the Coast Guard helicopter crew lowered a rescue swimmer to the rowboat, who hoisted three rowers into the helicopter.

The rescue swimmer remained on scene with the fourth rower. The helicopter crew took the three rowers to San Luis Obispo County Regional Airport to awaiting EMT crews. The helicopter crew refueled and returned to the rowboat, where the fourth rower and rescue swimmer were hoisted into the aircraft. At approximately 4 a.m., the fourth rower was taken to Monterey Regional Airport.

All four rowers are reportedly in good condition and did not require further medical attention.

“This was the most challenging rescue I’ve ever had,” said Petty Officer 3rd Class Christopher Leon, an Air Station San Francisco rescue swimmer. “It was unique because there was no light, seas were incredibly rough and waves were crashing over the top of the boat, which was already filled with water. I’m glad we were able to get on scene and rescue the rowers because surviving the night in those conditions would have been difficult.”

Biggest Little Airshow in Hawaii is Back

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor’s popular Remote-Control Biggest Little Airshow in Hawaii is back and it’s bigger than ever, Saturday and Sunday, August 16 and 17, 10am to 4pm. Guests will be able to drive on to Ford Island for this event, or take the free shuttle from the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center. There will be music, food, drinks, retail and entertainment booths and exhibits, and lots and lots of airplanes.

biggest 4For two days, Ford Island will come alive with remote-control flying and static aircraft and full size aircraft on display, “candy bombings” over historic Ford Island Runway for the keiki, hands-on modeling stations, and open access to Hangar 79 to see the Museum’s many aircraft exhibits and Restoration Shop.

Biggest

Talented local performers, Mainland pilots from the Academy of Model Aeronautics, and remote control flyers from Japan will perform remote-control aviation feats for two days. Airshow pilots will fly their massive, 1-to-5 scale planes in the skies above the Museum. Specialty acts to be performed include: Pattern, 3-D fixed wing and helicopter aerobatic flights, South Pacific battles, “Candy Bomber” drops, and Skycam drone helicopters. There will be remote control aircraft in the air and on static display, including jets, helicopters, F-22s, warbirds, B-17s, P-38s, Corsairs, OV-10s and more.

Biggest 2

Visitors can also enjoy free tours of Hangar 79, which still bears the bullet holes of the December 7, 1941attack. Inside, guests will see helicopters, fighter planes, and the Lt. Ted Shealy Restoration Shop–the 1941 machine shop that is busy restoring the Museum’s aircraft. They’ll also get up close and personal with an F-14 Tomcat, F-15 Eagle, F-86s, P-40, MiG-15, F-111, and the Museum’s “MiG Alley” and Flying Tigers Exhibits.

biggest 3Admission to the Airshow is $5 per person (including entry to Hangar 79), $15 per family (limit 6 entries per family). It’s free with Museum general admission and free to Museum Members. Tickets for the Airshow only and tickets for the entire Museum visit that day are available online at www.PacificAviationMuseum.org. Museum admissions may also be purchased at the Museum and at the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center ticketing desk. Shuttles depart every 15 minutes, 7:30am to 5:00pm from the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center, round trip to the Museum. Call 808/441-1007 for more information or visit www.PacificAviationMuseum.org, Facebook, Flickr, Instagram, and @PacificAviation on Twitter, for updates.

This is a City & County of Honolulu and Hawaii Tourism Authority sponsored event. Sponsored in part by Clear Channel Media + Entertainment, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Yelp, Pearlridge Center, Mokulele Airlines, Pizza Hut, Aqua Hospitality, and Hawaii Gas. Sponsors and vendors are invited to participate by calling 808-441-1013.

Kona International Airport Dedicates New Aircraft Rescue & Fire-Fighting Station

The state Department of Transportation (HDOT) celebrated the dedication of a new Aircraft Rescue and Fire-Fighting (ARFF) station at the Kona International Airport last week. The new 24,000 square-foot facility includes five truck bays and a fueling area, along with improved work and living areas for firefighters, office space, dorm rooms and a workout area.

Aircraft Rescue and Fire-Fighting (ARFF) station at the Kona International Airport

“The new ARFF station will enhance our readiness capabilities and help to ensure that our fire-fighters are prepared should emergencies occur at Kona International Airport,” said Ross Higashi, Deputy Director of the Airports Division. “This vital facility will help us to continue to provide a safe environment for our air travelers.”

Nearly 88-percent of the project funding for design and construction was provided by an Airport Improvements Program grant for $17 million, issued by the Federal Aviation Administration. State funds covered the remaining $2.3 million. The new station replaces the existing ARFF station which was originally built in 1980.

“In conjunction with the Kona FAA Air Traffic Control Tower, which recently opened one year ago, this new station reflects our commitment towards making our state airports safer and more efficient,” said Ford Fuchigami, HDOT Interim Director. “These projects pave the way for future improvements at Kona International as part of Governor Neil Abercrombie’s New Day Work Projects.”

Battle of Midway Commemoration Happened at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor

To mark the 72nd Anniversary of the turning point of WWII—The Battle of Midway—Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor presented “FORTRESS OVER MIDWAY” featuring Curator and Author Burl Burlingame and Restoration Manager Jim Martinelli, yesterday.

Author Burl Burlingame talks to folks at the Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor.

Author Burl Burlingame talks to folks at the Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor.

Mr. Burlingame presented a talk entitled “Flying Fortresses Over Midway.” The Boeing B-17 played an important roll in The Battle of Midway. Following the Q & A session, the audience moved on to Hangar 79 for a special presentation and behind-the scenes look at the restoration progress of the Museum’s Boeing B-17E Flying Fortress—the famous “Swamp Ghost,” by Mr. Martinelli.

Burl 2

On display in Hangar 79 was an 8 x 12 foot mural painted by Victor Nels Solander, 123rd U.S. Naval Construction Battalion, whose Seabee unit was stationed on Midway from June 1, 1944 to December 16, 1945. The mural was one of six donated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “They murals are a valuable insight as to what existed during Midway and examples of popular folk art of WWII,” stated Mr. Burlingame.

Bus Service to Waikoloa Village Resorts and Waimea Begin

Aloha,

Mass Transit has just informed us that the new Waikoloa Village Bus Routes to the Resorts and Waimea have started.

HPP Bus Picture

So now in the morning you can catch the bus from Waikoloa Village down to the Waikoloa Resorts, use a transfer to go the other Resorts and return in the afternoon.

Also you can use it to go to Waimea at 8:15 in the morning and return to Waikoloa village at 1:05 in the afternoon.

We apologize for any inconvenience the delayed start might have caused,

Council Member Margaret Wille

Yes… That Was Me in Today’s Wreck at Malama Market Intersection

Today at about 10:30 my cousin and I were driving back home after dropping my wife’s car off at Kolohe Auto Repair when we got in an accident at the Malama Market intersection on Highway 130 here in Pahoa.

View from inside the car right after the wreck.

View from inside the car right after the wreck.  I tried to get out of the car but was too stunned to even move and my neck and back hurt so felt it was best to just stay put.

I was the passenger in a 2009 Scion that took the brunt of the impact.  Simply put… what happened shouldn’t have happened had the driver we hit was paying attention.

We were driving towards Kalapana on Highway 130 and the driver of a Jeep Wrangler was driving towards town direction.  He moved into the left turn lane at the Malama Market intersection and came to a stop.

As we were going at the speed limit recommended for the area of 45 MPH… right as we got to the intersection… the Jeep Wrangler decided that he was going to take a left turn in to the Malama Market area.

The driver of the car I was in… slammed on her brakes but it was too late and we slammed into the car.

I spent all day in the hospital getting everything from Cat Scans to X-Rays while the whole day my neck was in some sort of collar to keep me from moving it.

I’m now happy to report that I’m back home with the diagnosis of serious whiplash and I have a nice gash down the shin of my left leg.

Highway 130 and this Malama Market intersection have been one of the most dangerous ones in the State and today it proved itself to me personally.

The State KNOWS there is a problem with this intersection yet accidents continue to happen there almost daily.  People have lost limbs, lost cars, broken bones and still yet nothing has been done.

There is plans to install a round-a-bout at this intersection in the next few months… I’m not sure how that will work in the long run.
pahoa roundMore posts related to accidents on Highway 130 can be found here:  Highway 130