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Lyft Launches Rideshare Company on Hawaii Island

Today Lyft, the fastest growing rideshare company in the U.S., is launching on Hawaii Island bringing its affordable, reliable rides to communities across the state’s largest island. The Hawaii Island launch is part of the company’s nationwide expansion to 25 new markets, which include Maui and Kauai. Lyft has been operating on Oahu since 2014.

In the last three months, Lyft has launched in more than 100 new cities. The ridesharing platform is now available in over 300 markets nationwide and continues to distinguish itself through its positive in-car experience, for both passengers and drivers.

To celebrate the arrival of Lyft, new passengers can use a special code LYFTLOVE17 to receive $5 off their first ride.

More than 700,000 drivers make their own flexible schedules and earn either a primary or supplemental income with Lyft. As the only rideshare platform to allow tips, Lyft drivers across the country have received more than $200 million in tips. Interested drivers can view the “Drive with Lyft” page to learn more about becoming part of the Lyft community.

How Lyft Works:

  1. Request: Whether you’re riding solo or with friends, you’ve got options. Just tap request and a driver’s there.
  2. Ride: After just a few taps in the Lyft app, a carefully-screened driver will be on the way to you — just set your pickup point.
  3. Pay: When the ride ends, just pay and rate your driver through your phone.

Commentary – Concerns Over New County Police and Fire Radio Systems

I am a member of the (CERT) Community Emergency Response Team here in Ocean view, and a ham radio operator. Being part of CERT we work closely with other agencies such as Volunteer Fire Department,  Red Cross, Hawaii County Civil Defense, and the National Weather Service.

I have concerns about the county switching over to the new narrow band VHF P25 phase 2 trunked radio system. They spent 31 million on this radio upgrade, and it doesn’t even cover the entire Island. There are a number of “dead spots” in the Ka’u area, especially here in HOVE.

As far as I know the county is in the process of trying to set up another radio site at the HOVE Fire Station, but currently they don’t have sufficient coverage in this subdivision. This poses a public safety issue. This also means that the county will probably end up spending more money on radio sites, and upgrades to enhance radio coverage on the island. Not to mention until the upgrades happens, they are putting police, firefighters, and the public at risk if their radios don’t work on the new digital radio system because of “dead spots.”

The Honolulu Police Department had similar problems with “dead spots” back in 1998 when they switched to Pro-voice 800 megahertz digital radio system which initially they thought would only cost $20 million dollars, but after numerous upgrades and adding more towers they ended up spending $40 million.

After reading information posted on the Hawaii Volunteer Fire Captains Association website, Volunteers complain that their new handheld radios battery does not last more than four to six hours. Sometimes volunteer firefighters are at a fire scene for longer than that. This may cause problems in a disaster when batteries cannot be charged at the scene of a event. The county needs to address these issues before we have serious problems.

Blake Stene
Hawaiian Ocean View Estates

A 3D Tour of Kīlauea’s Summit Lava Lake

This 3D model of the lava lake at Kīlauea’s summit was constructed from a series of thermal images acquired during an overflight on Thursday, March 16. For scale, the lava lake is about 250 meters (820 ft) across. The lake is within the Overlook crater, which is within Halemaʻumaʻu Crater.

Click to view 3D Model

The model shows that a portion of the Overlook crater wall, along the southern wall of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater, is overhanging. If this portion of the crater wall collapses it could trigger a small explosive event, similar to those which occurred in November and December of 2016.

Hawaii Lava Stream Update – Two Plumes at Ocean Entrance

A firehose of lava continues to pour into the sea at the Kamokuna ocean entry, sending a plume of steam, hydrochloric acid, and glass particles into the air and drifting downwind.

Click on photos to enlarge

Offshore, lava entering the sea also produces plumes of hot, discolored water.

A closer view of the ocean entry and plumes of hot, discolored water.

The circular area of dark water in front of the entry is a region of cooler water between the split plumes of hotter water.

A thermal image shows the two plumes of hot water extending out from the ocean entry point.

A circular area of cool water is directly in front of the entry point, between the two plumes. Several boats leave tracks of stirred-up cooler water cutting through the hot water on the surface.

A closer view of the lava firehose at the ocean entry.

The lava stream here is roughly 1-2 meters wide (3-6 ft), and plunges about 20 m (66 ft) into the water.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō started as a cinder and spatter cone in the 1980s, but over the past 30 years flank vents on the cone have produced stacks of lava flows, creating a broad shield around the cone.

This view looks north and shows the shield shape clearly. Mauna Kea Volcano can be seen in the distance.

A lava pond has been present in a small pit in the western portion of Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater for nearly two years.

Unusually clear views today revealed several areas of spattering, and some crustal foundering.

Hawaiian Airlines Welcomes Public High School Students to Inaugural Ka Ho‘okele Mentorship Program

Hawaiian Airlines is opening its doors to public high school students in a new mentorship program that provides hands-on learning about all aspects of the airline industry.

The carrier’s Ka Ho‘okele “The Navigator” Explorers Program, developed with the Aloha Council Boy Scouts, features more than 20 Hawaiian Airlines employees from diverse sectors of the company who volunteer to mentor high school students in aviation careers.

In a recent visit to Hawaiian Airlines’ maintenance facility, public high school students practiced sheet metal skills as part of the carrier’s Ka Ho’okeele mentorship program.

Earlier this week, the inaugural class of 19 students from nine O‘ahu public high schools, including Castle, Farrington, Kailua, Kalāheo, Kalani, Kapolei, Mililani, Moanalua, and Pearl City, took part in their first afterschool tour of Hawaiian’s maintenance operations. Students were given a safety briefing, practiced sheet metal skills such as cutting, bending and fitting, studied aircraft electronic systems and observed quality control checks.

“Ka Ho‘okele provides youngsters in our community a window into the multiple facets of the airline business, introduces them to a large array of skills and showcases exciting career options available for them to pursue,” said Debbie Nakanelua-Richards, Hawaiian’s director of community relations.

“Aloha Council, Boy Scouts of America is proud to partner with Hawaiian Airlines in providing a high-quality career-oriented Explorers program. The students will gain invaluable career skills through the mentoring provided by Hawaiian Airlines,” said Jeff Sulzbach, scout executive and CEO of Aloha Council.

Participants will spend the next 10 weeks immersed in Hawaiian’s operations as employees share their expertise in areas ranging from cargo to flight and airport operations, among many other fields. Throughout the program, the group will also be introduced to Hawaiian’s culture of Ho‘okipa (Hawaiian hospitality), learn about educational requirements to achieve successful aviation careers, and practice key job skills such as interviewing, presentation and teamwork.

Prior to an exam and graduation in May, the class will participate in a weekend community service activity alongside Hawaiian’s Team Kōkua volunteers.

The Ka Ho‘okele program is the latest addition to the airline’s growing education outreach efforts in the community. Over the past several years, Hawaiian has conducted popular Keiki Tours for preschool and elementary students at Honolulu International Airport and it recently launched a mechanic apprenticeship program with the Honolulu Community College’s Aeronautics Maintenance and Technology program and the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers union. Last year, the Hawaiian Airlines Foundation donated $50,000 to Maryknoll School’s new high school Mx Scholar Program for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) & Aerospace.

For more details about the Ka Ho‘okele program, please visit https://scoutingevent.com/104-ExProgramHawaiianAirlines.

Go Hunt, Hawaii: Hawaii’s Official Hunting Resource

Since 1979, more than 68,000 students have received their certifications through the Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Hunter Education Program. Annually, more than 2,000 students register and attend Hunter Education classes across the state. This experience is now about to get just a little easier for the public.

On March 1, 2017, the Hunter Education Program launched a new website designed to improve the overall registration and certification experience for Hunter Education students and graduates — and for just about anyone interested in hunting in Hawaii.

On the new, user-friendly website, gohunthawaii.ehawaii.gov, hunters will be able to manage their hunting profile, view their class history, request and print replacement certifications, and link directly over to other apps to purchase a hunting license, apply for a lottery hunt, or apply for a letter of exemption.  Additional features include: mobile friendly, responsive web design, Hawaiian keyboard, and technical support (including live help chat) through ehawaii.gov.

Click to Go Hunt

“Working with ehawaii.gov, we created a website that puts the public in the driver seat of the operation,” said Andrew Choy, Hunter Education Program manager. “This collaborative work has been over a year in the making and began with foundational upgrades to our program’s administrative database.” Subsequent phases of this project, which are currently in development, will include online registration for classes. “The bottom line is that we want to improve the quality of our classes, increase accessibility, and streamline access to information,” Choy said.

In line with the Governor’s Initiative to promote government efficiency and transparency, “This project, like many others within the DLNR, increases access and transparency by moving government services online. This is a tremendous win for the public and the department,” said Suzanne Case, DLNR Chairperson. “We are proud of the inter-division collaboration of our staff to move this project forward. The hunting community and public at large will be well-served by this application.”

For more information, please visit: gohunthawaii.ehawaii.gov or call the Hawaii Hunter Education Program at 1(866) 563-4868.

United Airlines Adding Denver/Kona Route

Flights from Kona/Denver to begin this summer

United Airlines is revitalizing its route network with more destinations, more flights and more convenient connections for customers in both domestic and international markets. Subject to government approval, the carrier will add a seasonal route between San Francisco and Munich for the first time ever, and one of the carrier’s daily flights between Newark, New Jersey and Tel Aviv, Israel will be upgauged with the new Boeing 777-300ER. The airline is also growing its domestic network, adding even more connections and additional service to 30 destinations across the U.S.

“Starting this summer we’re offering more flights, to more destinations at more convenient times than in recent memory,” said Scott Kirby, president of United Airlines. “And with bigger and more modern aircraft for many of our flights, we’ll be getting you to the moments that matter most – relaxed and ready to go.”

United is also introducing daily summer service in six markets. Flights to Salt Lake City, Fort Lauderdale, Tucson and New Orleans not previously offered in the summer, will now move to year round service.

New Works of Art By Distinguished Local Artist Displayed at Honolulu International Airport

The Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) Airport Division, in coordination with DFS and HMSHost, on behalf of the Airport Concessionaires Committee were presented with a piece of fine art by local artist Satoru Abe.

From left; Kahu Kordell Kekoa; Tobi Solidum; Mel and Pally Chiogioji; Satoru Abe; Gail Goto, Mr. Abe’s daughter; State Senator Ronald Kouchi, Senate President; Ross Higashi, HDOT Airports Division Deputy Director

The art piece is displayed at the Honolulu International Airport (HNL) main lobby terminal near the newly renovated cultural gardens.

Artist and sculptor Satoru Abe, 90, stands beside his work “Sunburst” located at the Honolulu International Airport.

Hawaii’s renowned sculptor and artist Satoru Abe will grace one of the walls at HNL with his work. Abe’s vision was to create a visceral sensory dynamic sharing 40 laser engraved wood etched paintings to tell his story in collaboration with his grandson Donovan Goto. This combination of grandfather and grandson brings the best of traditional artwork blended with high technology to depict themes from nature such as the sun and trees.

The Satoru Abe gallery is located on the second level of the Central Concourse overlooking the newly renovated cultural gardens.

As a capstone to this commission Abe is including a special metal sculpture named “Sunburst” presented to DFS and the residents and visitors of Hawaii. A ceremony at HNL this morning marked the occasion with a memorandum of understanding and a proclamation announcing Feb. 24, 2017 as Satoru Abe Day.

“Sunburst” by Satoru Abe is proudly displayed at Honolulu International Airport. Photos courtesy, Hawaii Department of Transportation or HDOT.

In all Abe, 90, has created more than 8,000 art pieces, many of which have found their way to locations of distinction such as the Hawaii State Capitol, Honolulu Museum of Art, Hawaii State Art Museum, Aloha Stadium, Hawaii Convention Center, and his alma mater William McKinley High School.

New Breakout of Lava Mapped

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the active flow field as of January 12 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the active flow as of February 16 is shown in red. Older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2016) are shown in gray. The yellow line marks the trace of the active lava tube (dashed where uncertain).

At Puʻu ʻŌʻō, surface flows are occurring within about 2.4 km (1.5 mi) of the 61g vent and on the coastal plain. These flows pose no threat to nearby communities at this time.

The blue lines over the Puʻu ʻŌʻō flow field are steepest-descent paths calculated from a 2013 digital elevation model (DEM), while the blue lines on the rest of the map are steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 DEM (for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth’s surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The base map is a partly transparent 1:24,000-scale USGS digital topographic map draped over the 1983 10-m digital elevation model (DEM).

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field in relation to the southeastern part of the Island of Hawaiʻi. The area of the active flow field as of January 12 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the active flow as of February 16 is shown in red. Older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2016) are shown in gray.

The blue lines over the Puʻu ʻŌʻō flow field are steepest-descent paths calculated from a 2013 digital elevation model (DEM), while the blue lines on the rest of the map are steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 DEM (for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth’s surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The base map is a partly transparent 1:24,000-scale USGS digital topographic map draped over the 1983 10-m digital elevation model (DEM).

Island Air Announces Flight Expansion Plans

476 flights each week between O‘ahu, Maui, Kaua‘i and Hawai‘i Island, compared to the 266 flights per week it currently offers

With the addition of new Q400 aircraft to its fleet, Island Air has begun increasing the number of interisland flights to its schedule.

Island Air’s first new Q400 aircraft, named Ola Kūpono, which means “safety in everything we do,” began service on January 12, 2017. Photo courtesy of island Air

Over the next four months, Island Air plans to phase in new regularly scheduled flights that will significantly increase its roundtrip service between Oʻahu and the neighbor islands. The number of daily roundtrip flights between Honolulu and Kahului will double to 16; between Honolulu and Kona will increase from six to 10; and the number of daily roundtrip flights between Honolulu and Līhu‘e will grow from six to eight. The airline will also add flights to accommodate high travel days (Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and Mondays) and spring break travel demands.

By the beginning of May, Island Air expects to offer up to 476 flights each week between O‘ahu, Maui, Kaua‘i and Hawai‘i Island, compared to the 266 flights per week it currently offers.

“The added flight service is in response to growing demand from our customers and travel partners and also reflects the improved operational efficiencies of the new Q400 aircraft that are being phased into our fleet” said David Uchiyama, president and chief executive officer of Island Air. “The entire Island Air team remains focused on enhancing the interisland travel experience for residents and visitors, which includes providing more convenient options to island hop, either for business or to enjoy a weekend getaway or visit.”

Island Air’s first new Q400 began service on January 12. The aircraft is 30 percent faster than conventional turboprops, resulting in shorter flight times, which enables Island Air to operate more flights each day. The airline plans to add up to seven new Q400s by the end of the year and will transition its existing fleet of five ATR-72 aircraft out of service.

Island Air currently offers eight roundtrips daily between Honolulu and Kahului (one flight was added on Feb. 1), with three additional roundtrips on Fridays and Sundays; six roundtrips daily between Honolulu and Kona, with one additional roundtrip on Fridays and Sundays; and six roundtrips daily between Honolulu and Līhu‘e.

Island Air’s flight schedule can be viewed at: https://www.islandair.com/flight-schedules

 

Press and Media Invited to Attend Huge Announcement at Ala Moana Shopping Center Monday

Click to enlarge

It sounds like something big is going to be announced between Hawaii Island Creations and Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker as I received a media invite to attend the announcement of a major franchise deal!

Posting this announcement with their permission since I can’t attend personally:

Hilo Community Supports State Efforts to Redevelop Banyan Drive and East Hawaii

Tonight at the Hilo Innovation Center in downtown Hilo business leaders, community leaders, tenants and lessees came together to listen to the Hilo Economic Development Plan presented by Jim McCully, spokesman of the Kanoelehua Industrial Area Association (KIAA).

Nearly 100 folks crowded the center and listened to presentations by McCully, HPM Senior Vice President & Chief Operating Officer Jason Fujmoto and later on Senator Kai Kahele dropped in to say a few words.

SB1292/HB1479RELATING TO THE HILO COMMUNITY ECONOMIC DISTRICT.

Establishes the Hilo Community Economic District located in East Hawai`i and places it under the jurisdiction of the Hawai`i Community Development Authority.

SB1184/HB1310RELATING TO THE WAIAKEA PENINSULA REDEVELOPMENT DISTRICT.

Establishes the Waiakea Peninsula Redevelopment District, Planning Committee and Revolving Fund.

Jason Fujimoto opened the meeting explaining why the meeting was called together. Fujimoto stated, “I know to some that the words economic revitalization may sound big and scary but in my mind it really boils down to the definition of community and community is a place where we live, where we work, where we learn and where we play and all of the components that make that happen.”

Fujimoto turned the microphone over to Jim McCully who explained some of the history of Banyan Drive and why economic development throughout all of Hilo, especially areas like KIAA are so important.

Senator Kai Kahele was able to make the end of the meeting and he stressed how important it was for the community to stand behind all the bills introduced this session and to contact our State legislators that will hear the bills in committee. He also thanked the broad range of community members that attended and also thanked his fellow Hawaii Island Legislators, Hawaii County Council members as well as the County of Hawaii Planning Department for their support and collaboration.

Kona Historical Society Welcomes Baby Donkey – Public Can Submit Names

Charlie, the approximately 30-year-old donkey at the Kona Coffee Living History Farm, got a late Christmas present. His new bestie, an estimated 6-month-old female donkey, arrived Jan. 31, 2017, at Kona Historical Society’s 5.5-acre historic farm in Captain Cook.

This new donkey is part of Kona Historical Society’s first-ever crowdfunding campaign, “Charlie Needs A Bestie,” which project aimed to get Charlie a friend and an upgraded home. At the Kona Coffee Living History Farm, these donkeys are ideal ambassadors for helping tell the story of Kona Nightingales.

“Donkeys were a crucial part of Kona coffee farm families in the early 20th century. Coffee farming was and is labor-intensive and would have been near-impossible without donkeys,” said Kona Coffee Living History Farm Museum Manager and Kona Historical Society Assistant Program Director Gavin Miculka. “I’m very excited about bringing a second donkey to the farm. Our campaign inspired interest from visitors from all over the world. I know that they will all be pleased to know that Charlie has a bestie!”

Yamagata Farms, a South Kona family farm started in 1898, donated the young donkey to Kona Historical Society on Dec. 27, 2016. Yamagata Farms has been paying for its feed, board and training with Kala’i Nobriga of K.N. Performance Horses at Mahealani Ranch. Nobriga is an established horse trainer in the state of Hawaii. Over the past couple of weeks, he has been teaching the baby donkey to lead, as well as to be comfortable when handled and when surrounded by crowds. He thinks the donkey is adjusting well and describes her as shy, but curious.

The baby donkey was brought this week to the Kona Coffee Living History Farm for some acclimation. Later in February, she will be receiving additional training with Nobriga at Mahealani Ranch. Following this training, she will make a permanent return to the farm. Kona Historical Society plans to eventually use her to demonstrate some of the jobs Kona Nightingales performed on coffee farms, such as hauling coffee and other farm goods. Until the donkey is deemed ready, she will mostly serve as Charlie’s companion and visitors to the farm will be able to observe the budding friendship from afar. Kona Historical Society staff believe the good-natured Charlie will befriend her and can serve as a mentor to the juvenile donkey as she grows into an adult.

This new donkey will soon reach one of her most important milestones yet — getting her name. She will be named on March 1, 2017. From now until Feb. 5, 2017, the public is invited to submit names on Kona Historical Society’s Facebook Page. A Kona Historical Society committee will select the top three to five names, which will be announced on the Society’s Facebook Page, website and at the farm. Fans worldwide will have the opportunity to vote for their favorite name by making a $1 donation at the farm or on Kona Historical Society’s website. All donations will be used for the support and care of animals at the farm. Voting opens Feb. 7, 2017, and closes Feb. 27, 2017.

Kona Historical Society, a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii, launched the “Charlie Needs A Bestie” campaign Dec. 9, 2015, on Razoo.com. By January 31, 2016, Kona Historical Society raised roughly $9,658.16 for the project from more than 90 donors.

Over the course of a year, the farm’s pasture was transformed, thanks to community collaboration and partnerships. During the summer of 2016, Steven Equipment cleared the farm’s pasture areas that were once overgrown with invasive plants while Affordable Tree Care trimmed overgrown trees and removed unwanted trees. A group of teens and their leaders from Wilderness Adventures spent a couple of hours removing weeds around the hitching post and in the farm’s front entrance pasture that Charlie likes to spend time in. This fall, Paradise Lawn & Garden Care installed the new fencing and utilized the 70 kiawe posts, which were donated by The Nature Conservancy from its Kiholo Preserve and delivered to Kona Historical Society by volunteers. Kona residents Aaron Mitchell and Kai Auld, updated the plumbing and installed a self-watering trough. A crew of volunteers from Ali’i Woodtailors cleaned up the stall area and built the hitching rails. Hardwoods Hawaii donated wood for rails, which Kona Historical Society volunteers Jack Nessen, Ted Quist and Stephen Ratcliff installed to enclose the pen.

In the future, Kona Historical Society hopes to make improvements to stone walls in the pasture area and expand the stall for feed and equipment storage. The Society will likely start planting grass, particularly suitable for the donkeys’ diets, in the lower pasture later this spring.

“The community was a crucial component in making improvements to our pasture and bringing the second donkey to the farm,” Miculka said. “We’re excited to now have the community play an active role in naming her.”

The award-winning Kona Coffee Living History Farm tells the stories of Kona’s coffee pioneers during 1920-45. It is the only living history coffee museum in the U.S. Located at 82-6199 Mamalahoa Highway in Captain Cook, near mile marker 110, this historic farm is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Hawaii Circuit Court Criminal and Family Court Criminal Cases Now Available Online

The Hawaii State Judiciary now has more court documents available for online viewing.  Circuit and family court criminal case documents filed January 23, 2017 and thereafter will be available for download and purchase online through eCourt Kokua.  This will supplement the current traffic, district court criminal, and appellate cases presently available on eCourt Kokua.  Civil case information will continue to be available through Ho’ohiki.

Because of this successful transition, improved services will be available internally as well as to the public: documents can be shared electronically and instantaneously between court locations; more court records will be accessible to the public for online viewing and purchase;  attorneys will be able to take advantage of e-filing these case types anytime of the day; and law enforcement will be able to get felony bench warrants electronically, eliminating data entry and filing of hard copies with new electronic warrants.

There is a transition team standing by to answer any questions about e-filing or any other technical questions.  Please call (808) 534-6644.  For all other public inquiries, please call the Communications & Community Relations Office at (808) 539-4909.

Delta Announces New Daily Nonstop Flights Between Seattle and Kauai

George D. Szigeti, president and CEO of the Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA), issued the following statement regarding the announcement that Delta Air Lines will be launching daily nonstop flights between Seattle and Kauai beginning this December.

“Delta’s expansion of service to Kauai from its Pacific Northwest hub speaks to the confidence the airline has in the Garden Isle to drive demand from travelers in the greater Seattle area and nationally.

“Reliable air access extending throughout the Hawaiian Islands is instrumental to our tourism industry’s continued viability to support businesses and residents statewide. Delta’s new Seattle-Lihue service strengthens Hawaii’s ties to one of our major gateway cities, and will make it easier for travelers anywhere in the mainland U.S. to make daily flight connections to Kauai.

“It’s gratifying that Delta has factored Kauai into its nationwide expansion plans considering the options available to the airline. HTA meets with Delta’s route planners on a regular basis, which included the Airline Summit we hosted last September at the Hawaii Tourism Conference. As HTA does with all carriers, we provided information on the advantages of increasing flights to Hawaii, especially to the neighbor islands.

“Kauai’s economy will benefit significantly from this new service. Delta’s Seattle-Lihue flights on Boeing 757 aircraft will add 63,510 air seats annually to Kauai, generating an estimated $77.9 million in direct visitor spending for the island, and $9.1 million in tax revenue for the State.”
Continue reading

Update Map of Lava Flow Field

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the active flow field as of December 14 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the active flow as of January 12 is shown in red. Older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2016) are shown in gray. Surface flows are focused on a branch of the flow east of Puʻu ʻŌʻō that has been active since late last year. The front of that flow branch has stalled, but there are weak scattered breakouts upslope along its length.

Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth’s surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The base map is a partly transparent 1:24,000-scale USGS digital topographic map draped over the 1983 10-m digital elevation model (DEM).

Disregard the area around the Kamokuna ocean entry, where the Kamokuna lava delta collapsed on New Year’s Eve. The lava flow polygons in these maps are layered to show additions to flow. As such, they do not show where material has been removed, such as by lava delta collapse.

The blue lines over the Puʻu ʻŌʻō flow field are steepest-descent paths calculated from a 2013 digital elevation model (DEM), while the blue lines on the rest of the map are steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 DEM (for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/).

First Annual Global Tea Innovation Symposium

The launch of a Hawaii tea co-op, the first not for profit consumer cooperative tea business in the world will happen on February 1st, 2017 at 10am – 4pm at the Akatsuka Orchid Gardens, in Volcano, Hawaii.

Presenters scheduled:

  • Nigel Melican, Chairman,TeaCraft Ltd. (U.K): A global business development consultant to the leading world tea businesses.
  • Chairman, Kawasaki Kiko Ltd. (Japan): leading manufacturer of automated tea farming and tea processing equipment.
  • Jason McDonald, Founder of The Great Mississippi Tea Company and Co-Founder/Vice President of The Hawaii Medicinal Tea and Herb Cooperative (HawaiiTea.Coop).
  • Grif Frost: Co-Founder/President of The Hawaii Medicinal Tea and Herb Cooperative (HawaiiTea.Coop).  Expert in not for profit consumer cooperative development.
  • Takeshi Akatsuka, Vice President, Akatsuka Orchid Gardens, the site of the Hawaii Tea Co-op.

Purpose: Provide A-Z, tea business development services, for Hawaii Tea enthusiasts.

Mission: Develop a model, which can be replicated, to help other tea enthusiasts worldwide, work together, to sustainably grow their tea businesses.

Services to be offered:

  • Propagation services: contract growing of the ideal tea plants, for specific geographical locales in Hawaii.
  • Farm Design services: contract selection and design of tea farm sites, suitable for automated equipment use.
  • Minimum tea farm acreage: 1 acre. There must a minimum of 10 acres of Co-op contracted tea farms, within a 5-minute driving radius.
  • Farm Site Preparation services: contract preparation of sites for automated tea planting services.
  • Planting Services: contracted automated tea planting services.
  • Growing Services: contracted automated pruning, pest control and fertilization services.
  • Harvesting Services: contracted automated tea plant harvesting services.
  • Processing Services: contracted processing services to prepare harvested tea for consumption
  • Sales Services: contracted sales of packaged tea
  • Research and Development Services: contracted research and development related to Hawaii tea community development.

50 seats available to people interested in participating in the development of the Hawaii Tea Co-op.  Price $250 ($200 may be applied to the purchase of Hawaii Tea Co-op shares). A tea and food pairing lunch will be served.

How to order: visit www.HawaiiTea.Coop to reserve your seat.

Apple Mapping Car Being Spotted Around the Big Island

This afternoon as I was driving in Hilo, I noticed a weird car drive by me with all these cameras on top of it.  At first I thought it was the Google Car that I had seen a few years ago on Bayfront but learned it wasn’t.
I was driving down the Mohouli extension road and the car turned on to Loko Place.  Knowing that Loko Place was a dead end street that was just recently built… I flipped a U-Turn and pulled over on the side of Loko Place and positioned myself to take a picture of the car.
It turned out it was an “Apple” car that was doing mapping for it’s “Maps” application http://maps.apple.com.

Apple Maps states:

Offering an all-new design and a host of innovative features, Maps makes finding and getting to your destination faster and easier than ever. With turn-by-turn spoken directions, interactive 3D views, proactive suggestions, and the ability to use third-party apps right inside Maps, there’s so much to explore.

Maps now predicts the places you’re most likely to go and suggests the fastest way to get there based on traffic, your current location, the time of day, and events on your schedule. So in the morning, Maps can provide a proactive suggestion for the best route to work that avoids traffic. And any upcoming meetings on your calendar are presented with suggested routes. Simply tap the suggestion to display the directions and start navigation.

It looks as though they are trying to compete with Google for customers.  The last time that I can recall the Google car being on the Island was in 2011 but I could be wrong.

The Google car in Wailoa Park

The Google Car works in connection with the Google Bike as the bike can take folks on even narrower roads and trails where the car can’t go.

Update HVO Lava Map Shows Revised Coastline

This map updates the preliminary ocean entry map below, based on mapping conducted on January 3, 2017. The map of the coastline at the lava flow ocean entry at Kamokuna shows the areas of the lava delta and adjacent coastline that collapsed into the ocean on December 31, 2016.

The collapsed areas are shown with an ‘x’ pattern and a blue background and are now part of the ocean. The shape of the eastern Kamokuna lava delta was revised based on satellite imagery acquired on December 25, 2016. The remaining sections of the lava delta, including the inactive western Kamokuna delta, are shown as a stippled pattern with a pink background. The active lava tube is shown with a yellow line and is dashed where its location is uncertain.

This image is from a research camera positioned on Holei Pali, looking east towards Lava Flow 61G and Kalapana.

The current ocean entry point, where lava cascades into the water, is located where the lava tube intersects the sea cliff. The NPS ropeline is shown as a dashed black line. The western extent of the ropeline was not mapped and is therefore not show; the eastern extent of the ropeline was moved on January 3, and has been approximated on this map between the emergency road and the coast. The dotted black line inland from the coast marks the location of the sea cliff before the Puʻu ʻŌʻō eruption began in 1983. The background is a Digital Globe satellite image acquired January 9, 2016; the episode 61g lava flow is the partly transparent area that overlies the background image.

New Map Shows Collapsed Section of Lava Viewing Area

This map shows the coastline at the Kamokuna lava entry on Kīlauea Volcano, with labels denoting areas impacted by the large, progressive lava-delta collapse on December 31, 2016. Nearly all the Kamokuna lava delta collapsed into the sea, along with a large section of the older sea cliff east of the delta.

Click to enlarge

The red line denotes the current (post-collapse) sea cliff; the land seaward of this line collapsed into the ocean. The blue line refers to the rope line that marks the boundary of the area closed by the National Park Service; a section of this rope line was taken out by the collapse on Saturday. These mapped lines, based on handheld GPS points captured on January 1, 2017, are preliminary and subject to change (HVO geologists are in the field again today). For up-to-date information about access to the new ocean entry viewing area, please consult the Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and Hawaiʻi County websites.