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Fingerprint Processing Fee for Firearm Registration to be Reduced

hpd-badgeBeginning October 1, the fingerprint processing fee will be reduced for persons applying for a first-time firearm permit or a first-time importation of a firearm into the state.

The new fee will be $12, reduced from $14.75. Payment must be made by money order or cashier’s check only, payable to Hawaiʻi Criminal Justice Data Center.

For more information about how to register a firearm, please visit the Firearm Registration page at hawaiipolice.com under the “Services” tab.

8 New Cases of Hepatitis A – Confirmed Cases Rises to 284

Since the last update, HDOH has identified 8 new cases of hepatitis A.  All cases have been in adults, 71 have required hospitalization.

hepatitis-headerFindings of the investigation suggest that the source of the outbreak is focused on Oahu. Ten (10) individuals are residents of the islands of Hawaii, Kauai, or Maui, and five visitors have returned to the mainland or overseas.

CONFIRMED CASES OF HEPATITIS A
284

Onset of illness has ranged between 6/12/16 – 9/16/16.

Hawaii Gov. David Y. Ige Proclaims October 2016 as “Cyber Security Awareness Month”

Gov. David Y. Ige has proclaimed October 2016 as Cyber Security Awareness Month in Hawaii, highlighting the state’s vital role in identifying, protecting its citizens from, and responding to cyber threats that may have significant impact to individual and collective security and privacy.

Click to read proclamation

Click to read proclamation

Hawaii’s observance coincides with National Cyber Security Awareness Month, recognized by President Barack Obama, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the Multi-State Information Sharing and Analysis Center, the National Association of State Chief Information Officers, and the National Cyber Security Alliance. In addition, the annual national cybersecurity public awareness campaign “Stop.Think.Connect.” is implemented through a coalition of private companies, nonprofit and government organizations, as well as academic institutions working together to increase the understanding of cyber threats and empower the American public to be safer and more secure online.

“We have made great strides in recent years in securing the state government network and expanding our state employee-led cyber security program,” said Todd Nacapuy, state chief information officer. “However, cyber security remains a shared responsibility in which every citizen has a critical role to play. Awareness of computer security essentials will improve the security of cyberspace for all of us.”

Hawaii citizens are encouraged to visit the Stop.Think.Connect. website at https://stopthinkconnect.org for tips and resources. Additionally, throughout the month, ETS will be sending weekly cyber security tips to state personnel on issues such as the importance of using strong, unique passwords; applying two-factor authentication; being aware of phishing scans; and tips for staying safe this school year.

Cyber Tip: Use Strong, Unique Passwords

Cybersecurity experts recommend that everyone use strong, unique passwords because every day malicious cyber threat actors compromise websites and online accounts, and post lists of usernames, email addresses, and passwords online. This exposes individuals’ passwords and, worse yet, they are exposed with information that uniquely identifies the user, such as an email address. That means that a malicious actor can look for other accounts associated with that same person, such as work related, personal social media, or banking accounts. When the malicious actor finds those accounts they can try logging in with the exposed password and if the password is reused, they can gain access. This is why unique passwords matter.

Two-factor authentication is also an important layer of defense beyond your password. It decreases an individual’s risk of falling victim to a compromise because criminals need access to two separate items to compromise your account — for instance an individual’s password and smartphone (to receive the PIN code). Cyber criminals regularly “leak” login credentials from compromised websites. They then use these leaked login names, email addresses, and passwords to find other accounts using the same credentials. This allows them to easily impersonate individuals online, gain access to work and personal accounts, sign online service agreements or contracts, engage in financial transactions, or change account information. Enabling two-factor authentication makes it more difficult for criminals to use this technique because a password would not be sufficient to gain access.

Quarantine Order Issued on Maui Property Infested with Little Fire Ants

The Hawaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA) was granted a quarantine order by Maui Circuit Judge Peter T. Cahill that prohibits the movement of plant material and personal property in outdoor areas on a Maui property infested with little fire ants (LFA). Earlier this month, HDOA obtained a warrant to access the property at 82 Loomis St. in Haiku after the tenant continually refused to allow LFA eradication crews to survey and treat the area.

loomis

LFA were detected in the Haiku neighborhood in early 2015 and surrounding properties have been under treatment to eradicate the invasive stinging ants. Although the landowner has been cooperative, the tenant on the property has refused to cooperate for many months which forced the state to take legal action.

Under the earlier warrant, department pest control personnel were able to survey the 1.75-acre property on Sept. 12th and found LFA infestations in potted plants, kalo patches and other vegetation. On Sept. 20th and 21st, HDOA crews returned to the property to treat the infested areas. On all three occasions, HDOA crews were accompanied by members of the Maui Police Department and the state Attorney General’s office due to persistent harassment and threats by the tenant.

Treatment of the property is expected to continue for about a year. Monitoring will continue after eradication is declared for three additional years. Judge Cahill’s order regarding quarantine of the property will remain in effect until further order by the court.

HDOA has not taken this type of legal action since 2000 during the eradication efforts for banana bunchy top virus on Hawaii Island. Usually, the department tries to work cooperatively with residents, farms and nurseries to eradicate invasive pests. Eradication efforts have been extremely successful on Oahu, in Mililani and Waimanalo, mainly due to the cooperation of residents and residential associations.

LFA was first detected on Maui in 2009 on an organic farm in Waihee. The infestation was under control in one year following the treatment protocol developed by Dr. Casper Vanderwoude of the Hawaii Ant Lab and the ongoing efforts of the Maui Invasive Species Committee (MISC). In late 2013, LFA was found on Maui and traced to infested hapu`u logs imported from Hawaii Island, where LFA is widely established. Eradication efforts continue at another infestation site in East Maui.

When LFA was first detected on Hawaii Island in 1999, there was no treatment protocol for eradication or control. The Hawaii Ant Lab was subsequently established and has developed proven methods that can eradicate infestations if detected early.

Originally from South America, LFA is considered among the world’s worst invasive species.  LFA are tiny ants, measuring 1/16th of an inch long, are pale orange in color and move slowly, unlike the tropical fire ant which moves quickly and are much larger with a larger head in proportion to its body. Tropical fire ants have been well established in Hawaii since before the 1870’s. LFA can produce painful stings and large red welts and may cause blindness in pets. They can build up very large colonies on the ground, in trees and other vegetation, buildings and homes and may completely overrun a property to the point of abandonment.

For more information on LFA in Hawaii, go to the HDOA website: http://hdoa.hawaii.gov/pi/main/lfainfo/

HPD Promotes Jefferson A. Grantz to Rank of Lieutenant

Chief Harry Kubojiri has promoted Jefferson A. Grantz to the rank of lieutenant.

Jefferson A. Grantz

Jefferson A. Grantz

Lieutenant Grantz is assigned to the North Hilo District in Laupāhoehoe.

Grantz joined the Hawaii Police Department in 1990. As a patrol officer, his assignments took him to the districts of Kaʻū, Puna, South Kohala, Hāmākua, and North Hilo.

He was promoted to detective/sergeant in 2006. He worked as a detective in the Area II Criminal Investigations Section and the Area I Juvenile Aid Section and as a sergeant in the districts of Hāmākua and, most recently, North Hilo.

His promotion to lieutenant took effect on September 16.

Hawaii State Law Enforcement Officials Association Officer of the Year: Detective Derek Morimoto

Detective Derek K. Morimoto was selected as the Hawaiʻi Police Department’s 2016 Hawaiʻi State Law Enforcement Officials Association (HSLEOA) Officer of the Year.

Chief Harry Kubojiri, Deputy Chief Paul Ferreira and Lieutenant Gregory Esteban pose with HSLEOA Officer of the Year Derek Morimoto.

Chief Harry Kubojiri, Deputy Chief Paul Ferreira and Lieutenant Gregory Esteban pose with HSLEOA Officer of the Year Derek Morimoto.

Morimoto, an 18-year veteran of the department, was honored for his exceptional investigative work as a detective assigned to the Area I Criminal Investigations Section.

According to Lieutenant Gregory Esteban, Morimoto’s strength is his ability to analyze investigative data, identifying strengths and weaknesses in his assignments, and finding the information or subjects he needs to build a strong and prosecutable case. For that reason, Esteban wrote in nomination papers, Morimoto was assigned to re-investigate cold cases and & has made excellent progress on several, including providing information that led to murder indictments against the parents of a notorious missing child case.

Detective Morimoto has found his calling and continues to excel in the investigative arena, Esteban said.

The award was presented September 9 at the Grand Hyatt Kauai Resort in Poipu.

Officer Jeremy Kubojiri Named East Hawaii “Officer of the Month”

The Aloha Exchange Club of East Hawaiʻi recognized Officer Jeremy Kubojiri on Thursday (September 22) as the East Hawaiʻi “Officer of the Month” for September.

Officer Jeremy Kubojiri

Officer Jeremy Kubojiri

Kubojiri was honored for saving the life of a 71-year-old man who had fallen off a balcony several days earlier.

On August 23, Officer Jeremy Kubojiri and another Community Policing officer were conducting presence patrols in the Fern Acres subdivision when, around noon, Dispatch assigned patrol officers to check on the welfare of a 71-year-old man. A friend from Oregon had not heard from him in several days and was concerned about his welfare.

The two Community Policing officers were in the general vicinity and volunteered to take the call. At the man’s house, they announced their presence outside a locked gate and, after receiving no response, maneuvered through thick foliage and trees and made their way to the house. When the officers received no response from anyone inside, they entered the house through an open door and continued to call out while they checked the interior.

Officer Kubojiri noticed a paint can on a second-floor balcony that had no railing. He then looked over the balcony and spotted a man lying motionless on the ground.

Officer Kubojiri immediately made his way down to the man, who was conscious but unable to move and barely able to speak. The man had been painting his house 3-5 days earlier when he fell from off the balcony and landed on the rocks below, suffering serious injuries. He was flown to Queens Medical Center on Oahu for treatment.

“Officer Kubojiri’s  willingness to volunteer to handle a call he was not assigned and then to make a diligent thorough check of the victim’s property undoubtedly saved the life of the 71-year-old victim who would have otherwise succumbed to his injuries and exposure to the elements,” said Captain Samuel Jelsma, who added that Kubojiri provided the friend in Oregon with regular updates on the man’s condition.

As “Officer of the Month,” Kubojiri is eligible for “Officer of the Year.”

The East Hawaiʻi “Officer of the Month” award is a project of the Aloha Exchange Club of East Hawaiʻi.

Siren Testing On Maui Wednesday

Hawaii Emergency Management Agency (HI-EMA), together with the Maui County Civil Defense Agency, will conduct siren testing in Maui County at the following location during the respective date and time listed below:

Wednesday, September 28 (9 a.m. – 12 p.m.)

  • New Development Siren at Mahana Estates in Kapalua

Residents nearby may hear the siren sound six to eight times for 30-second to one-minute intervals during the identified timeframe.

sirenTesting will include short blasts known as “burps.” During the tests, emergency management officials and technicians will check that installation work on this siren has been completed properly.

Residents can direct questions about this siren testing to the Maui County Civil Defense Agency at (808) 270-7285.

Hawaii EMA encourages the public to make use of other supplemental methods of warning including, but not limited to, Maui County’s mass text notification system, Makaala Alerts, and NOAA Weather Radio.

Hawaii Governor to Request Presidential Disaster Declaration for Public Assistance After Surveying Storm Damage

Gov. David Ige today toured Maui’s Iao Stream area, which suffered severe damage during last week’s storm. The governor was joined by Maui Mayor Alan Arakawa, State Adjutant General, Major General Arthur Logan, Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency Administrator Vern Miyagi and other government and emergency management officials for aerial and ground tours of the disaster site.

maui-storm1The tours follow initial assessments of the disaster area by the National Guard and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

On Thursday, Gov. Ige took a 30-minute aerial tour of the site aboard a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter before surveying the disaster site on the ground where he met with residents directly affected by the storm.

maui-storm4“It truly is a sobering reminder of the power of nature and to see the impact on the stream and the change of the flows that had a devastating effect on families, the state and county. I will be sending a letter to President Obama requesting a Presidential Disaster Declaration for Public Assistance,” said Gov. Ige.

maui-storm3The governor also met with some of the 30 Hawai‘i Air and Army National Guard members who have been activated to clear out debris and boulders which have diverted the stream flow into residential areas along the stream.

Initial assessments put the state and county’s damage estimate at $15 million. About 20 families were directly impacted by the storm.

maui-storm2While the county and National Guard continue to clear out an estimated 9,000 truckloads of debris, the state and county are working to ensure the safety of the community.

maui-storm5“This is going to be a large project. Very expensive. It’s going to take months and months to try and secure this area, but it’s going to be worth it,” said Maui Mayor Alan Arakawa.

Click here for video of the governor’s aerial tour.

Hawaii Hepatitis Outbreak Increases to 276 Confirmed Cases

Since the last update, HDOH has identified 5 new cases of hepatitis A.  All cases have been in adults, 68 have required hospitalization.

hepatitis-header

Findings of the investigation suggest that the source of the outbreak is focused on Oahu. Ten (10) individuals are residents of the islands of Hawaii, Kauai, or Maui, and four visitors have returned to the mainland.

CONFIRMED CASES OF HEPATITIS A
276

Onset of illness has ranged between 6/12/16 – 9/15/16.

Walk a Mile in Her Shoes 2016

YWCA Hawaii Island hosts the sixth annual “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” fundraiser Saturday, October 22. The one-mile march begins at 7:30 a.m. at the YWCA Ululani Street campus.
walk-a-mile-2016Hawaii County Prosecuting Attorney Mitch Roth and radio personality Darrin “DC” Carlson will lead the march.

The goal is to raise $25,000 for the YWCA Hawaii Island Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS) program, the only 24-hour, 7-days a week rape crisis center for the island. SASS services are free and include crisis counseling, therapy for assault survivors and their families, forensic evidence collection and violence prevention education for schools and the community.

“October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, so ‘Walk a Mile’ is a chance for men to literally walk in women’s shoes. It’s also an opportunity to call for an end to sex assault, rape and gender violence in our community,” said Kathleen McGilvray, CEO of YWCA Hawaii Island. “Sadly, nearly 50 percent of our SASS clients are 18 and under. Every dollar raised will be used to help survivors address and move through the trauma of sex assault.”

In 2015, SASS responded to more than 2,441 crisis and support calls from survivors and their families, opened 329 cases, provided 1,929 hours of therapy and performed 50 sexual assault forensic medical exams.

March participants are asked to report to the kick-off site (145 Ululani Street in Hilo) by 7:30 a.m. to register, select shoes and warm up for the walk. Walkers can wear decorated shoes for the judges’ choice contest. All participants must complete an entry form and submit a $25 registration fee.

Those interested in participating in the walk – individually or as a team – or being an event sponsor should contact Events@YWCAHawaiiIsland.org or call the YWCA office at 935-7141 ext 111.

Hawaii Celebrates National Child Passenger Safety Week with Free Car Seat Checks Statewide

The Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) is teaming up with the four county police departments and child passenger safety advocates to promote National Child Passenger Safety Week, September 18-24.

During Child Passenger Safety Week and throughout the year, Hawaii’s child passenger safety technicians are dedicated to helping parents and caregivers learn how to correctly install child safety seats and properly buckle up their keiki, whether it’s in child safety seats, booster seats or when using the vehicle’s seat belts.

“Hawaii’s keiki are our most precious asset, we can and need to do better to give them the future they deserve,” said Ford Fuchigami, Hawaii Department of Transportation Director. “Parents and caregivers can improve their child’s safety by simply using child safety seats, booster seats and seat belts properly.”

In Hawaii, children under 4 years old are required to ride in a child safety seat; children 4 through 7 years old must ride in a child passenger restraint or booster seat. Violators are required to appear in court, and if convicted, must attend a four-hour class. They may also be assessed a penalty of up to $500.

According to 2014 data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), nearly 24 percent of children ages 4 through 7 years old were prematurely moved to seat belts, and 9 percent were unrestrained. Children should remain in booster seats until they are 4 feet 9 inches tall and can use seat belts correctly without the booster seat.

Before a child can be moved from a child safety seat to a booster seat, parents and caregivers should check for the following:

  • The lap belt fits across the child’s upper thigh;
  • The shoulder belt fits across the child’s shoulder and chest;
  • The child’s knees bend comfortably at the edge of the seat when his or her back and bottom are against the vehicle seat back; and
  • The child can stay seated properly during the entire trip.

Additionally, the American Academy of Pediatrics is now advising that children ride rear-facing until at least the age of 2. To educate the public about this recommendation and Hawaii’s child restraint law, the HDOT is airing public service announcements on television and in movie theaters statewide. Hawaii’s child passenger safety media campaign is 100-percent federally funded.

Hawaii has more than 340 certified child passenger safety technicians, including firefighters, law enforcement officers, medical professionals and parents. All technicians have been trained to provide instruction on choosing the right car seat, installing it and using it correctly.

“Each county has child restraint inspection stations and community car seat checks to ensure that all children return home safe,” said Fuchigami. “Parents and caregivers should utilize these free resources to better protect their children.”

seat-checksFree public car seat check events will be held on National Seat Check Saturday, September 24, at the following locations and times:  

Oahu
Waipio Shopping Center, Waipahu
94-1040 Waipio Uka St.
10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Hawaii
Target, Hilo
391 E. Makaala St., 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Target, Kailua-Kona
74-5455 Makala Blvd., 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Kauai

Walmart, Lihue, 3-3300 Kuhio Highway 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

A community seat check event will also be held on Saturday,

September 17, at:  Maui

Maui Marketplace, Kahului, 270 Dairy Road,  10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Child Passenger Safety Week is sponsored by NHTSA. For more on child safety, as well as a list of child restraint inspection stations and community car seat check, visit:  www.kipchawaii.org or www.safercar.gov/parents

Hawaii Governor Signs Emergency Proclamation in Wake of Heavy Rains and Flooding

Gov. David Ige signed an emergency proclamation in the wake of heavy rains and flooding that caused extensive damage throughout the state especially the counties of Maui and Kalawao. The counties are expected to need rehabilitative assistance from the state to respond to the damage caused by the severe, sudden and extraordinary rains.

“The severe weather that struck the state this week caused heavy damage, and the state stands ready to support the counties in the recovery effort,” said Gov. Ige.

The disaster emergency relief period began on September 13, 2016 and will be in place for 60 days.

flood-proclamation

Click to read full proclamation

Flooding Closes Famous ‘Iao Valley State Monument Indefinitely

‘Iao Valley State Monument, Maui, will remain closed indefinitely due to extensive damage from heavy rain and flooding the night of September 13 and early morning on September 14, 2016.  Notice of the park closure is posted at http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/dsp/.

iao-valley-damage

Photos courtesy of DLNR

The flooding of ‘Iao stream also significantly damaged the Kepaniwai County park downstream and road to the park, which are also closed, as well as a number of residences.  Due to hazardous conditions, access to ‘Iao Valley is currently restricted to residents only. 

“Our inspections show that ‘Iao Stream course has changed and is significantly wider, cutting into state park land that contained public access features. The stream is heavily silted and cobbled with new material and landslides on both sides of the stream are evident,” said Curt Cottrell, Department of Land and Natural Resources State Parks division administrator.

iao-valley-damage2Within the lower portion of ‘Iao state park, sections of the two popular loop trails along the stream have washed away, and there is no longer any remaining land to rebuild them where they originally were.

On Wednesday, clear water in Kinihapai Stream, the smaller stream that passes under the park’s iconic pedestrian bridge, did not seem to indicate any landslides upstream. It seems not to have widened or changed course.  However, during inspections, the stream level remained quite high, covering the base of the foundations for each end of the bridge, preventing inspection of the bridge supports.

iao-valley-damage3

The turning area that tour buses take to get to their parking area is just above an area of significant erosion that may have affected the stability of the lower parking lot.

“We are planning to hire an engineering consultant to evaluate the stability of the lower parking lot where tour buses park. An examination is also planned for the footings of the pedestrian bridge,” said Cottrell.

“If the parking lot and bridge both are shown to be intact and stable, State Parks will proceed to remove debris, and allow limited access to portions of the trail, while needed repairs can be started. Access is predicated on Maui County effort to restore safe vehicular use of the lower roadway,” he said.

iao-valley-damage4Park areas not adjacent to either of the streams do not appear to have suffered any significant damage.

Maui State Parks staff have been notifying tour companies of the park closure.

‘Iao Valley is rich in cultural and spiritual values and is the site of the battle of Kepaniwai where the forces of Kamehameha I conquered the Maui army in 1790. (6.2 acres). The park is most famous for a scenic viewpoint of Kuka‘emoku (ʻIao Needle), an erosional feature which abruptly rises 1,200 feet from the valley floor.

HDOA Serves Warrant to Gain Access to Maui Property Infested with Little Fire Ants

The Hawaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA) obtained a court-ordered warrant and entered the property of a Maui resident who has continuously denied access to the property that was suspected of being infested with little fire ants (LFA).

lfa

LFA were detected in the Huelo neighborhood in early 2015 and surrounding properties have been under treatment to eradicate the stinging ants. With the warrant, HDOA Chairperson Scott Enright and department pest control personnel were able to survey the 1.75-acre property on Monday, Sept. 12 and found LFA infestations in potted plants and kalo patches.

“After months of unsuccessful discussions with the resident, the department was forced to take legal action in order to have any chance of eradicating this serious threat to the state,” said Scott Enright, chairperson of the Hawaii Board of Agriculture.

HDOA has not taken this type of legal action since 2000 during the eradication efforts for banana bunchy top virus on Hawaii Island. Usually, the department tries to work cooperatively with residents, farms and nurseries to eradicate invasive pests. Eradication efforts have been extremely successful on Oahu, in Mililani and Waimanalo, mainly due to the cooperation of residents and residential associations.

HDOA crews will return to the Huelo property to begin treatment of the infestation. Treatment of the Huelo property will include appropriate treatment for the kalo, because it is an edible crop.

LFA was first detected on Maui in 2009 on an organic farm in Waihee. The infestation was successfully eradicated in one year following the eradication protocol developed by Dr. Casper Vanderwoude of the Hawaii Ant Lab and the ongoing efforts of the Maui Invasive Species Committee (MISC). In late 2013, LFA was found on Maui and traced to infested hapu`u logs imported from Hawaii Island, where LFA is widely established.

Originally from South America, LFA is considered among the world’s worst invasive species.  LFA are tiny ants, measuring 1/16th of an inch long, are pale orange in color and move slowly, unlike the tropical fire ant which moves quickly and are much larger with a larger head in proportion to its body. Tropical fire ants have been well established in Hawaii since before the 1870’s. LFA can produce painful stings and large red welts and may cause blindness in pets. They can build up very large colonies on the ground, in trees and other vegetation, buildings and homes and may completely overrun a property to the point of abandonment.

For more information on LFA in Hawaii, go to the HDOA website: http://hdoa.hawaii.gov/pi/main/lfainfo/

Hepatitis A Infection in Food Service Worker at Ohana Seafood in Sam’s Club Pearl City

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) today confirmed an additional case of hepatitis A in an Oahu food service worker.

sams-club

The infected case is an employee at Ohana Seafood, the seafood vendor located within the Sam’s Club warehouse store at 1000 Kamehameha Highway, Pearl City. Food handled by the employee may have been sold from August 29 to September 11, 2016.

“We expect to continue seeing new cases of hepatitis A infection through at least early October because of the long incubation period for this illness, even though the source of the outbreak has been identified as contaminated scallops,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park. “While this case involves a food handler working with raw seafood, the food handler is another victim, and none of the products sold by Ohana Seafood at Sam’s Club have been identified as a source of the ongoing outbreak.”

As with previous cases of food handlers who have tested positive for hepatitis A, DOH is providing this information to the public as a precaution in an attempt to prevent any new cases. The likelihood that patrons of this business will become infected is very low. To date, DOH has confirmed a total of 271 cases of hepatitis A as part of this outbreak investigation. Updated case counts and information are provided each Wednesday along with a complete list of food service establishments, which have had employees diagnosed with hepatitis infection within the past 50 days at the following link: http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/hepatitis-a-outbreak-2016.

Vaccination provides the best protection from hepatitis A, so any person who consumed food or beverage products prepared or served at this business during the identified periods may want to contact their healthcare providers about receiving a vaccine or immune globulin (IG). This may provide some protection against the disease if administered within two weeks after exposure. A statewide list of vaccinating pharmacies can be found at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/files/2013/07/IMM_Adult_Resource_List.pdf or by calling the Aloha United Way information and referral line at 2-1-1.

Help prevent the spread of hepatitis A by washing your hands often and thoroughly, especially after using the bathroom and before preparing food. For more information on proper handwashing, please go to the following site: http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/dib/infectious-disease-surveillance/handwashing.

Kona Crime Prevention Committee Recognizes Officer Foxworthy as “Officer of the Year”

The Kona Crime Prevention Committee recognized Officer Jason Foxworthy as “Officer of the Year” in a luncheon ceremony Wednesday (September 14) at King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel in Kailua-Kona.

Officer Jason Foxworthy

Officer Jason Foxworthy

Foxworthy was honored for an investigation into an auto theft. On January 16, Foxworthy and a recruit he was training, Officer Dayson Taniguchi, were assigned to a vehicle theft at a shopping center in Kona. Through interviews of possible witnesses, they identified a suspect. When they located the suspect, he had drug paraphernalia and brass knuckles in his possession. After his arrest, detectives recovered the stolen vehicle, along with 2.4 grams of crystal methamphetamine.

Also in January, Foxworthy and Taniguchi investigated 36 incidents, three traffic accidents and 50 miscellaneous public complaints. They made 14 adult arrests and issued 57 traffic citations.

Foxworthy received an “Officer of the Month” award in March for the same investigation.

Also honored at Friday’s ceremony were the other “Officer of the Month” recipients over the past year, who stood on the stage when the “Officer of the Year” was announced: Officer Darren Cho, Officer Marco Segobia, Officer Kaea Sugata, Officer Brandon Mansur, Officer Bradden Kimura, Officer Peter Tourigny, Officer Nicholas McDaniel, Officer Officer Brian Beckwith, Officer Mike Thompson and Officer Wyattlane Nahale.

“I’m extremely shocked and surprised,” Foxworthy said when accepting his award. “Everyone up here deserves this.”

The Kona Crime Prevention Committee is an organization that encourages community involvement in aiding and supporting police in West Hawaiʻi.

Hawaii Hepatitis A Outbreak Rises to 271 Cases – New Restaurant Identified

Since the last update, HDOH has identified 19 new cases of hepatitis A.  All cases have been in adults, 68 have required hospitalization.

Findings of the investigation suggest that the source of the outbreak is focused on Oahu. Ten (10) individuals are residents of the islands of Hawaii, Kauai, or Maui, and four visitors have returned to the mainland.

CONFIRMED CASES OF HEPATITIS A
271

Onset of illness has ranged between 6/12/16 – 9/4/16.

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) confirmed an additional case of hepatitis A in an Oahu food service worker. The infected case is an employee at Harbor Restaurant at Pier 38, located at 1133 North Nimitz Highway, Honolulu. Affected dates of service are Aug. 26 through Sept. 12, 2016.

harbor-bar

“Because of the long incubation period for hepatitis A, we are continuing to see new cases of this illness even after identifying and removing contaminated scallops from Hawaii restaurants, and individuals exposed in July and August may become ill as late as September or October,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park. “We want the public to understand that this does not represent a new outbreak, nor is this restaurant considered a source of the ongoing outbreak.”

DOH is providing this information to the public as a precaution in an attempt to prevent any new cases. The likelihood that patrons of this business will become infected is very low. To date, DOH has confirmed a total of 252 cases of hepatitis A as part of this outbreak investigation.

Updated case counts and information are provided each Wednesday along with a complete list of food service establishments who have had employees diagnosed with hepatitis infection within the past 50 days at the following link: http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/hepatitis-a-outbreak-2016.

Vaccination provides the best protection from hepatitis A, so any person who consumed food or beverage products prepared or served at this business during the identified periods may want to contact their healthcare providers about receiving a vaccine or immune globulin (IG). This may provide some protection against the disease if administered within two weeks after exposure. A statewide list of vaccinating pharmacies can be found at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/files/2013/07/IMM_Adult_Resource_List.pdf or by calling the Aloha United Way information and referral line at 2-1-1.  Help prevent the spread of hepatitis A by washing your hands often and thoroughly, especially after using the bathroom and before preparing food. For more information on proper  handwashing, please go to the following site:  http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/dib/infectious-disease-surveillance/handwashing.

 

Zika Video Released by University of Hawaii’s National Disaster Preparedness Training Center

The National Disaster Preparedness Training Center (NDPTC) at the University of Hawaiʻi focuses on natural hazards like climate change and other threats to coastal and island communities.

Under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency, NDPTC has developed a short video in partnership with the State of Hawaiʻi Department of Health and the University of Hawaiʻi as part of its Just-in-Time Training initiative to promote awareness and deliver basic information about the Zika virus. The center has developed other Just-in-Time Training on tsunamis, volcanoes, and other emerging threats and hazards.

In this video, Sarah Park, state epidemiologist and chief of the Hawaiʻi Department of Health’s Disease Outbreak Control Division, provides key information about the virus including its potential for spreading from an infected pregnant woman to her fetus causing birth defects and transmission via mosquitoes and through sexual contact.

Zika has been found in the Americas, Oceania/Pacific Islands, Africa and Asia. According to the Center for Disease Control, travel-associated cases of the Zika virus have been found in every U.S. state except Alaska and Wyoming, and in every U.S. territory except Guam and American Samoa. Locally acquired cases have been found in only Florida, American Samoa, Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands. It is spread by the bite of an infected Aedes species of mosquito (Aedes aegypti and Aedis albopictus). With the impact of climate change there has been a growth in regions that support mosquito habitats worldwide, increasing the world’s vulnerability to mosquito-borne diseases.

Aedes species of mosquito

Aedes species of mosquito

“We are particularly concerned about Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases because of their potential impacts on vulnerable, at-risk populations,” said Karl Kim, professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and executive director of the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center. “We need to increase awareness of the disease but also work towards effective strategies for monitoring as well as combating Zika. As a global visitor destination, Hawaiʻi needs a multi-pronged approach involving health care providers, urban planners, emergency responders, as well as households and businesses is needed to manage this health threat.”

Homeowners and businesses need to protect themselves against mosquitoes and implement effective programs for mosquito control. Training and education is needed to increase preparedness as well as response and mitigation capabilities.

NDPTC is committed to provide relevant and up-to-date training and education on the latest threats to our society.

Tips for Safe and Easy Lava Lake Viewing in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Visitors and local residents gather nightly at the Jaggar Museum observation deck in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park to watch the lava lake spatter and glow within the summit crater of Kīlauea volcano, vying for the best parking spot and vantage point.

Daytime viewing of the lava lake activity has been exceptional. Photo taken from Jaggar Museum observation deck on Friday, 9/9/16. NPS Photo/J.Ferracane

Daytime viewing of the lava lake activity has been exceptional. Photo taken from Jaggar Museum observation deck on Friday, 9/9/16. NPS Photo/J.Ferracane

The lava within Halema‘uma‘u Crater recently became visible for the first time since May 2015, and rangers have been busy directing vehicles at Jaggar Museum from 5 p.m. until well after dark, often sending people to park at Kīlauea Overlook, about 1/3 of a mile away.

Park rangers share the following tips for an optimal viewing experience:

  • Avoid the busy times, and visit the lava lake during the day. Or come after 9 p.m. The park is open 24 hours a day.
  • Be mindful of air quality. Hazardous volcanic gas and particulates can drift over the summit area in light or southerly winds. These gases are a danger to all, especially people with heart or respiratory problems,      young children and pregnant women. Kīlauea Visitor Center offers updates on air quality 24 hours a day, and visitors can monitor the Hawai‘i SO2 network website.
  • Be prepared to hike a 1/3 of a mile each way between Kīlauea Overlook and Jaggar Museum on Crater Rim Trail. Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes, bring rain gear, water, binoculars, a flashlight, and extra batteries.
  • Carpool if possible to reduce the number of vehicles in the parking areas.
  • Monitor the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) webcams. The KI camera provides a panoramic view of Halema‘uma‘u Crater from HVO, near Jaggar Museum.

In addition, air quality is poor at the coast where another eruption from Kīlauea enters the ocean at the Kamokuna site. Park rangers have roped off sections downwind of the ocean entry and have placed signs warning about toxic fume clouds which contain sulfur dioxide, volcanic particulates, and hydrochloric acid near the coast.

To stay upwind of the fumes, it is currently best to hike in from the County of Hawai‘i lava viewing area on the Kalapana side to access the ocean entry in the park. The Kalapana access is open daily from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. It’s about a 4.2-mile hike from the Kalapana boundary to the ocean entry viewing point, one way, along the gravel emergency access road.