• Follow on Facebook

  • air-tour-kauai
  • what-to-do-media
  • RSS W2DM

  • puako-general-store
  • Cheneviere Couture
  • PKF Document Shredding
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • Say When

    February 2017
    S M T W T F S
    « Jan    
     1234
    567891011
    12131415161718
    19202122232425
    262728  
  • When

  • RSS Pulpconnection

Hawaii Department of Health Cites Hawaiian Isles Water Company for HI-5 Violations

The Hawaii State Department of Health has issued a Notice of Violation and Order against Hawaiian Isles Water Company for failure to submit payments and reports required of beverage distributors by the state’s Deposit Beverage Container law. The department found Hawaiian Isles Water Company delinquent for the monthly reporting period of July 1 – 31, 2016 and a penalty fee of $3,600 was assessed.

Hawaiian Isles Water Company complied with the department’s enforcement order by submitting its required corrective action plan and paying in full the entire penalty and late distributor payment.

Hawaii Revised Statutes §342G-105 requires beverage distributors to submit monthly reports and payments to the Department of Health no later than the 15th calendar day of the month following the end of the payment period. Hawaiian Isles Water Company received multiple written notices reminding them of reporting requirements prior to being assessed a penalty.

Since January 2005, Hawaii’s Deposit Beverage Container (DBC) program has assisted residents to recycle more than 7 billion containers. Through recycling, consumers are helping to remove beverage containers from the waste stream and reduce litter in the community. The DBC program certifies independent recycling companies to operate Certified Redemption Centers (CRCs) statewide. CRCs provide Hawaii consumers with refunds of the five cent deposit fee that is paid for eligible containers. Beverage distributors submit payments and reports to the program each month for all HI-5 containers sold within the state.

Department of Health Cites Island Recycling, Inc. for Water Pollution Violations at Kapolei and Dillingham Facilities

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) has issued a Notice of Violation and Order against Island Recycling, Inc. at both its Kapolei and Dillingham facilities located at 91-140 Kaomi Loop in Kapolei and 1803 Dillingham Blvd in Honolulu respectively.

The company has been cited for failing to comply with Hawaii’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for industrial storm water discharges. DOH has ordered Island Recycling to pay a penalty of $25,400, clean the affected drainage ditch on its property in Kapolei, and take corrective actions at both its Kapolei and Dillingham facilities to prevent the facilities’ from discharging polluted storm water to nearby storm drains and state waters. The company may contest the order and request a hearing within 20 days.

Island Recycling has NPDES permit coverage for both its Kapolei and Dillingham facilities under Hawaii’s General Permit authorizing discharges of industrial storm water. However, during inspections performed in June 2014 and subsequent file reviews, DOH found the facilities were not implementing controls to properly prevent polluted storm water discharges. The company had also placed discarded materials and equipment in a drainage ditch that is recognized as a state water body and protected by state and federal regulations. In addition to inadequate storm water controls at the facilities, Island Recycling also failed to submit Discharge Monitoring Reports required by the NPDES General Permit that are vital to determining the safety and quality of the facilities’ storm water discharges.

The Clean Water Act prohibits discharging pollutants through a point source into state waters unless it is allowed by an NPDES permit. The permit contains limits on what can be safely discharged, monitoring and reporting requirements, and other provisions to ensure that the discharge does not hurt water quality or people’s health. The permit translates general requirements of the Clean Water Act into specific provisions tailored to the operations of facilities discharging pollutants. For information on the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System go to www.epa.gov/npdes/npdes-permit-basics.

The DOH Clean Water Branch regulates, permits, and inspects a variety of industrial facilities ranging from construction sites to landfills and recycling facilities to ensure that these facilities do not pollute Hawaii’s waters especially during rainfall and storm conditions. The Clean Water Branch protects and promotes the health of Hawaii’s residents, visitors, and environment through regulation of high-risk water pollution sources, and education of industrial sectors and the general public. More information about the DOH Clean Water Branch and access to water quality data and files for NPDES permitted facilities is available at http://health.hawaii.gov/cwb/.

Hawaii Department of Health Cites Safeway, Inc. for HI-5 Violations

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) has issued a Notice of Violation and Order against SAFEWAY, INC. (Safeway) for failure to submit payments and reports required of beverage distributors by the state’s deposit beverage container law. Safeway was delinquent for the monthly reporting period of Aug. 1-31, 2016.

Hawaii Revised Statutes §342G-105 requires beverage distributors to submit monthly distributor reports and payments to DOH no later than the 15th calendar day of the month following the end of the payment period. Safeway received multiple written notices reminding them of reporting requirements prior to being assessed a penalty.

DOH has assessed an administrative penalty against Safeway of $2,800 for its failure to comply with deposit beverage container requirements.

Safeway may request a hearing to contest the alleged facts and penalty.

Martin Luther King Day… A Day of Service – Beach Cleanups

Plastic Free Hawaii and Kailua Beach Adventures are hosting beach cleanups on Martin Luther King Day at Kahuku Beach and Kailua Beach Park:

EPA Fines Weston Solutions for Violating Cleanup Requirements at Former Wood Treatment Facility on Oahu

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has assessed Weston Solutions, Inc. a $25,000 fine for violating an order issued in 2010, when Weston committed to clean up the former Chem-Wood wood treatment facility located in the Kapolei area of Oahu.

Between 1975 and 1988, Chem-Wood pressure-treated wood using hazardous chemicals containing chromium, arsenic and mineral spirits, some of which were released to the soil and impacted groundwater. EPA first took an enforcement action in 1988 and has overseen site investigations and cleanup activities.

Weston, a Pennsylvania-based environmental cleanup firm, has sold the property since 2010, but retains responsibility for carrying out the cleanup requirements. This includes maintaining the asphalt-concrete cap that provides a protective barrier from contaminated soil on the site. Weston violated the order when it failed to notify and obtain approval from EPA or the Hawaii Department of Health after learning the current property owner, Goodfellow Brothers, Inc., had partially removed the cap.

“Our order requires Weston to maintain the integrity of the protective cap covering this hazardous waste site,” said Jeff Scott, Director of the Land Division for U.S. EPA’s Pacific Southwest Region. “This penalty sends a clear message that EPA takes these requirements seriously.”

The facility’s cleanup plan requires EPA approval prior to altering the asphalt-concrete cap. Weston was aware that Goodfellow began work in December 2015 to install a concrete pad to support a new above-ground fuel tank, but failed to notify EPA or seek its approval until March 2016. The work involved removal of 776 square feet of the cap and a 360 square-foot layer of clean fill material. Weston and Goodfellow claim that no underlying contaminated soil was disturbed by the project. EPA has since approved the fuel tank installation plan and Weston is now back in compliance with the consent order.

The 2010 EPA order directed the Estate of James Campbell, a former property owner, and Weston to grade the site and consolidate contaminated soil under an asphalt-concrete cap, monitor and treat contaminated groundwater, and it included restrictions prohibiting residential reuse of the property.

For more information on hazardous waste, please visit: http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/hazard

Large Fishing Net Removed From Beach at Kapa’a

A large fishing net, estimated to weigh about two tons, was removed from the beach at Kapa‘a fronting the Coral Reef Resort, yesterday.

Staff from the Kaua‘i office of the Division of Boating and Ocean Recreation (DOBOR), Department of Land and Natural Resources first learned about the net mass very late Wednesday evening via a posting on social media. After an initial on-site assessment early Thursday morning by Kaua‘i DOBOR District Manager Joseph Borden, DOBOR staffers were dispatched to move and secure the net.

As far as staff could tell, no marine life was trapped in the next, and not even barnacles were evident.

Two sizable, heavy trucks with chains were required to roll the partially buried in sand net mass above the high wash of the waves and onto the property of the Coral Reef Resort hotel.

The net was staged there with the permission of the hotel for removal today. The net mass and any debris that came loose during the removal have been collected by Conserve Kauai and the net mass will be shipped to O‘ahu for recycling/disposal.

Reports of large nets or marine debris on shorelines may be made to dlnr.marine.debris@hawaii.gov.

Temporary Residential Tire Amnesty Collection Program Now in Effect

County of Hawaii’s continues “Fight the Bite!” campaign efforts at the onset of wet season

The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration recently reported that this year’s wet season probabilities are favoring near to above average rainfall through next spring.  Because rain water can collect in spare tires and create mosquito breeding environments, the County of Hawaii is encouraging tire clean up in our communities. The County of Hawaii Department of Environmental Management is now accepting tires at full-service transfer stations (those that are open seven days of the week) for the month of November only.  For more information on the Wet Season Outlook, click on the following link: NOAA Media Advisory.

mosquito-biteThis temporary tire amnesty program is an addition to ongoing, proactive mosquito control efforts managed by the recently staffed County Vector Control team that sprays and conducts surveys at County facilities on a regular basis.

For this new program, Hawaii Island households may bring in up to four (4) passenger vehicle, motorcycle or ATV tires to any of the County of Hawai‘i Solid Waste Division’s Recycling & Transfer Stations which are open on a seven (7) day per week basis, during normal operating hours, see below.

Transfer Station Location Hours of Collection                   
Hāwī Daily 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Hilo Daily 6:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Honoka‘a Daily 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Kea‘au Daily 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Kealakehe Daily 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Keauhou Daily 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Pāhoa Daily 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Waimea Daily 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Wai‘ōhinu Daily 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

For directions to the locations listed above please click on the following link: Map and Directions to County of Hawaii Solid Waste Facilities

Customers should locate the Solid Waste Facility Attendant (SWFA) on duty (they will have a fluorescent safety vest on) and advise the SWFA that they have acceptable tires for recycling, the SWFA will instruct the customer where to properly place the tires.  Tires dropped off before or after normal operating hours will be considered illegal dumping.

In order to fairly serve the public and ensure that one customer doesn’t overload the site and unnecessarily prevent other customers from participating in the temporary collection, there is a 4 (acceptable) tire limit per day per vehicle. Tires should be empty of any liquids, dirt or any other foreign material before bringing them in for disposal.

Tires from businesses, commercial haulers, non-profits or farms; including industrial tires (e.g. backhoe, tractor, forklift & etc.) will not be accepted.  Businesses, commercial haulers, non-profits or farms can contact Hawai‘i County Civil Defense for options to dispose of their tires.

This Fight the Bite Temporary Residential Tire Amnesty Collection Program may be extended if conditions warrant.

For more information on ways you can “Fight the Bite” go to the State of Hawai‘i Department of Health information website: fightthebitehawaii.com

Hawaii Wildlife Fund Releases New Marine Debris Prevention Curriculum for Elementary School Students

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund (HWF) is excited to announce the release of our new marine debris prevention curriculum designed for elementary school students around Hawaiʻi.

hwf-kidsOver the past two school years, HWF mentors piloted this curriculum in 20 public schools working with over 52 different teachers and 1,140 students (grade kindergarten to 5th).  HWF mentors worked with students at schools around Hawaiʻi Island: in Kona, Kohala, Kaʻū, Hāmākua, Hilo, and Puna.

beach-clean-up-hwfThe “Marine Debris Keiki Education & Outreach” program teaches children about:

  • Understanding aquatic life and ecosystems (basic marine biology concepts)
  • Marine debris and how land-based litter sources find their way into the sea
  • Exploring what a “discard” really is and how our daily choices affect the amount of trash we produce
  • Vulnerability of island ecosystems and communities and the responsibility (kuleana) that we each have to protect them.

The curriculum was designed as a 3-visit program that challenged students to put forward innovative solutions to this global marine-debris problem.  The lessons are aligned with all Common Core and Next Generation Science and other benchmarks relevant to the elementary school level.

innovations-posterAll of the lessons and activities are available for free download from the HWF website or at the following link: http://wildhawaii.org/MDKEO/Su mmaryTeacherEdition.pdf

“It was a great pleasure guest teaching in the many different classrooms around the island.  We look forward to deepening our relationships with Hawaiʻi Island students and teachers in the coming years” said HWF mentor and Education Coordinator, Stacey Breining.

school-reached

In addition, nine cleanup events were conducted as an optional follow-up component of this program (6 beach cleanups, 2 stream cleanups, 1 campus cleanup).   During these nine cleanup events, 286 students participated in removing over 1,500 lbs. of marine and land-based debris items from the coastline, stream banks, or their campus.

Please contact HWF at marine.debris.KEO@gmail.com or 808-769-7629 for more information or visit the HWF website (www.wildhawaii.org).

Puako Boat Ramp Community Cleanup

The public is invited to participate in the Puako Boat Ramp Community Cleanup led by Keep Puako Beautiful here in Puako from 8-11 a.m. on Oct. 22.

puako-clean-upBeach cleanup tally sheets, buckets, pickers, gloves, a jug of water and snacks will be provided. Partners in marine conservation will be on site to talk story and share information.

Reservations to rent a donated tank, dive air or kayak for water cleanup are required in advance from Puako Dive company at 854-4114, Blue Wilderness Dive Adventures at 886-0980 or Hawaii Surf & Kayak at 741-7768.

RSVP for cleanup and potluck: kpb@hawaii.rr.com

Hawaii Department of Health Cites Companies for HI-5 Violations

The Hawai‘i State Department of Health (DOH) has issued Notices of Violation and Order against six companies for failure to submit payments and reports required of beverage distributors by the State’s Deposit Beverage Container law.

hi-5The companies were delinquent for the semi-annual reporting period of Jan. 1 to June 30, 2016 and each company was fined an administrative penalty fee of $400 for failure to comply with deposit container requirements. Each company may request a hearing to contest the alleged facts and penalty.

The companies cited were:

  • Arakaki Store, Inc.
  • Hawaiian Fresh Farm dba Culture Brew
  • La Hiki Ola
  • Williams-Sonoma
  • World of Aahs!
  • World Pac, Inc.

Hawai‘i Revised Statutes §342G-105 requires beverage distributors to submit semi-annual distributor reports and payments to DOH no later than the 15th calendar day of the month following the end of the payment period. DOH conducts regular inspections of beverage distributors and certified redemption centers to ensure compliance with Hawai‘i laws. The companies received multiple written notices informing them of reporting requirements prior to the issuance of a penalty.

Hawaii Department of Health Cites the Body Shop for Glass Advanced Disposal Fee Violations; Deposit Beverage Container Program Obtains Conviction for Fraud

The Hawaii State Department of Health has issued a Notice of Violation and Order against Buth-Na-Bodhaige, Inc. dba The Body Shop for failing to submit its annual report and payment required of glass container importers. The Body Shop was delinquent for the annual reporting period of Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2015.

Department of HealthThe State’s Glass Advanced Disposal Fee (ADF) law (Hawaii Revised Statutes Section §342G-85) requires glass container importers to submit container inventory reports and payments to the Department of Health no later than the 15th calendar day of the month following the end of the payment period. The Body Shop received an Informal Notice and Finding of Violation and Order on March 16, 2016, reminding them of reporting requirements prior to being assessed a penalty.

The Department of Health has assessed an administrative penalty against The Body Shop for the amount of $250 for failure to comply with ADF law. The Body Shop may request a hearing to contest the alleged facts and penalty. For more information on the Glass Advanced Disposal Fee Program go to http://health.hawaii.gov/shwb/sw-adf/

Maui Fraud Conviction
In other recycling news, the Department of Health’s Deposit Beverage Container (DBC) Program successfully prosecuted a Maui resident for fraud. Joel K. Liu, Jr. pleaded guilty to one count of first degree theft and four counts of forgery in the second degree for taking funds earmarked for the program.

Liu submitted false invoices to be paid from the state after being awarded a state contract to start a certified redemption center. Liu was ordered to a one-year prison term and to repay the DBC Program back $132,965. Liu’s sentence is part of his five-year probation.

EPA Enforces Ban on Cesspools on Big Island and Maui – Fines Levied

Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced separate agreements with the County of Hawaii, the County of Maui, and the State of Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR), to close illegal large capacity cesspools on Maui and the Big Island.

The County of Hawaii will pay a $105,000 fine for its two cesspools at the Hilo Drag Strip and one at the Hilo Trap & Skeet Range.

Hilo Trap and Skeet RangeThe County of Maui will pay a $33,000 fine for one cesspool at the Maui Raceway Track. The DLNR will pay a $50,000 fine for its cesspools at Wainapanapa State Park on Maui and will close or convert smaller cesspools at seven state park and recreational areas on Maui, Oahu, and the Big Island.

Wainapanapa State Park

Wainapanapa State Park

“To make Hawaii’s coastal waters safe for both residents and visitors, we must stop the flow of pollutants and pathogens from large capacity cesspools,” said Alexis Strauss, EPA’s Acting Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “Public facilities have the same obligations as private ones to close them.”

EPA found continued use of the illegal cesspools despite a 2005 ban under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act’s Underground Injection Control program. Subsequent to the Agency’s investigations, the Hawaii County has closed the three illegal cesspools at the drag strip and skeet range, with plans to replace them with approved individual wastewater systems at each location. Maui County has closed the illegal cesspool at the raceway. DLNR closed the six illegal cesspools that served the park’s 12 rental cabins at the Waianapanapa State Park near Hana and converted them to approved septic systems.

Cesspools collect and discharge untreated raw sewage into the ground, where disease-causing pathogens and harmful chemicals can contaminate groundwater, streams and the ocean. They are used more widely in Hawaii than any other state. Throughout Hawaii, over 3,000 large capacity cesspools have been closed since the 2005 ban, many through voluntary compliance. The EPA regulations do not apply to single-family homes connected to their own individual cesspools.

All three cases are each subject to a 30-day public comment period. For more information on the cases please visit:

https://www.epa.gov/region9/enforcement/pubnotices/archive/

https://www.epa.gov/uic/hawaii-cesspools-administrative-orders For more information on the large capacity cesspool ban and definition of a large capacity cesspool, please visit: http://www2.epa.gov/uic/cesspools-hawaii

Re-use Hawaii Awarded Hawaiian Electric Grant

A $5,000 grant from the Hawaiian Electric Companies to Re-use Hawaii will help support the non-profit organization’s monthly Community Workshop Program designed to teach basic woodworking and safety skills needed when working with salvaged materials. The two-hour workshops are held on the first Saturday of each month at the Re-use Hawaii retail warehouse located in Kakaako. A registration fee of $20 covers the cost of materials needed for each project.

 Photo credit: Re-use Hawaii

Photo credit: Re-use Hawaii

“By reducing waste and preserving our islands’ natural resources, Re-use Hawaii shares our commitment to environmental sustainability,” said Lori Hoo, Hawaiian Electric community relations manager. “The community workshop program will give participants a safe, hands-on experience in building with salvaged materials, and equip the community with the skills and tools to be a part of Oahu’s waste reduction solution.”

Re-use Hawaii was founded in 2007 as a solution to the solid waste problem on Oahu. By diverting construction and demolition debris headed for landfills, Re-use Hawaii is able to make this reusable building material available to the public at affordable prices. The retail warehouse, located at 200 Keawe Street, is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. To learn more about the Community Workshop Program, please call 537-2228.

Hawaii Companies Cited for HI-5 Violations – Costco Fined Nearly $16,000

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) is reminding all beverage distributors in the state of reporting requirements for HI-5 beverage containers. Failure to properly meet reporting deadlines or improper reporting can result in penalty fines of up to $10,000 per violation per day. The next upcoming HI-5 beverage container reporting deadline is July 15, 2016.

HI-5Hawaii Revised Statutes §342G-105 requires beverage distributors to submit semi-annual distributor reports and payments to DOH no later than the 15th calendar day of the month following the end of the semi-annual payment period. DOH conducts regular inspections of beverage distributors and certified redemption centers to ensure compliance with Hawaii laws.

“The department issued notices to nine companies for violations during the last reporting period,” said Darren Park, manager of the Deposit Beverage Container Program. “Distributors and recyclers are reminded to comply with all upcoming deadlines and requirements to avoid penalty fees or suspension of certification.”

The department’s Deposit Beverage Container Program issued Notices of Violation and Order (NOVO) against nine companies in the past year for failure to submit payments and reports required of beverage distributors by the State’s Deposit Beverage Container law. All of the companies were delinquent for the semi-annual reporting period of July 1 to Dec. 31, 2015 and each company was fined an administrative penalty fee of $400 for failure to comply with deposit container requirements. Each company was provided the opportunity to request a hearing to contest the alleged facts and penalty.

The companies cited were:

  • BEM, Inc. dba Kona Kombucha located at 32-2032 Old Mamalahoa Highway in Papaaloa on Hawaii Island;
  • Celestial Natural Foods, Inc. located at 66-443 Kamehameha Highway in Haleiwa on Oahu;
  • Gauranga Live LLC located at 200 Kanoelehua Ave. in Hilo on Hawaii Island
  • Genesis Today located at 6800 Burleson Road in Austin, Texas;
  • Instapressed located at 856 Ilaniwai St. in Honolulu on Oahu;
  • Jeonju Makeolli USA Company located at P.O. Box 1313 in Honolulu on Oahu;
  • Kauai Natural Waters LLC located at 5694 Ohelo Road in Kapaa on Kauai;
  • Nalo Juice LLC located at 402 Opihikao Place in Honolulu on Oahu, and
  • Pacific Hi-Tak, Inc. located at P.O. Box 701 in Honolulu on Oahu.

DOH also cited a number of companies in 2015 and 2014 for other violations of the Deposit Beverage Container Law.

Costco Wholesale Corporation located at 525 Alakawa Street in Honolulu on Oahu was cited for failing to properly label deposit beverage containers for Kirkland brand water during compliance inspections in 2015 on Oct. 9 and Nov. 10. Costco paid a penalty of $15,998.

Garden Isle Disposal, Inc. located in Lihue on Kauai was cited for multiple violations within the period of March 18, 2014 to June 27, 2015 that included failing to inspect deposit containers for redemption labels, failing to pay only on eligible containers, and failing to inspect deposit containers for contamination. Garden Isle Disposal (GID) was fined an administrative penalty fee of $12,000. A settlement reached between DOH and GID through a consent order requires GID to pay $3,000 and submit a corrective action plan to avoid future violations. GID will forfeit the $9,000 in suspended penalty fees if there are additional Deposit Beverage Container Law violation(s) within one year of the consent order.

Wow Wow Lemonade, LLC located in Kahului on Maui was cited for late payments and reports that were delinquent for the semi-annual reporting period of Jan. 1 to June 30, 2015. The company paid a penalty fee of $400.

Kale’s Natural Foods located in Honolulu on Oahu was cited and fined a penalty fee of $400 for failure to submit their semi-annual report for Jan. 1 to June 30, 2014.

FRS located in Chantilly, VA was cited for late payments and reports that were delinquent for the semi-annual reporting period of Jan. 1 to June 30, 2014 and paid a penalty fee of $400.

Kukuiula Store located in Koloa on Kauai was cited for late payments and reports that were delinquent for the semi-annual reporting period of Jan. 1 to June 30, 2014 and paid a penalty fee of $440.

HaHa Hawaiian Organics, Inc. located in Honolulu on Oahu was cited and paid a penalty fee of $400 for late payments and reports that were delinquent for the semi-annual reporting period of July 1 to Dec. 31, 2014. The company was cited again and fined a penalty of $400 for non-payments and delinquent reporting for Jan. 1 to June 30, 2015. DOH withdrew the penalty after the dissolution of the company.

DOH issued a total of 17 Notices of Violations and Orders for fiscal years 2015 and 2016 to deposit beverage container distributors for failing to submit their reports and payments and to certified redemption centers for various redemption violations. Despite the DOH’s compliance assistance attempts, these companies continued demonstrating non-compliance with the deposit beverage container program.

Big Island Police Searching for Parties Responsible for Dumping Abandoned & Derelict Vehicles

Hawaiʻi Island police are asking the public for help in identifying individuals or businesses who are responsible for the dumping of abandoned and derelict vehicles.
Abandoned
Since January 1, approximately 280 abandoned or derelict vehicles have been reported in the Kona District alone, compared with 106 reported during the same period in 2015.

“Be on the lookout for private or business vehicles that may be dumping vehicles on the sides of our roadways,” said Sergeant Roylen Valera of the Kona Community Policing Section. Dumping a vehicle is a criminal offense punishable by up to a $1,000 fine. Additionally, offenders could face a criminal littering charge, which is a petty misdemeanor and carries a fine of up to $1,000 and community service.

“We would like to remind vehicle owners to complete the necessary paperwork if they dispose or transfer their vehicle to another person or entity, to ensure that they will not be liable for the vehicle if it is found abandoned on the side of the road,” Sergeant Valera said. If the paperwork is not completed, you will be responsible for any fines or towing charges. Our goal is to preserve the beauty of Hawaiʻi Island. ”

Police ask anyone who knows the identity of those who dump abandoned or derelict vehicles to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311 or Sergeant Roylen Valera at 326-4646, extension 259.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Waikiki Beach Clean-Up and Scavenger Hunt

Join Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii and Partners as they aim to cleanup Waikiki on Saturday, June 25th beginning at 9:00 AM.

Waikiki Beach Clean Up

The epicenter of our tourism economy and home to the states busiest beaches, Waikiki is visited by thousands daily. Although a beach sweeper comes through to clean the beaches, much is still missed and we plan to help out by bringing a small army of people as we sweep across Waikiki along with a team at Ala Wai Harbor to clean.

Plan is to meet at Kapiolani Park where we will check in starting at 9AM and visit the educational booths. Buses will begin departing at 9:30AM to multiple locations with pick up locations for the tired or time short volunteers. The most beastly of beastly volunteers will walk the duration of Waikiki.

Currently in the planning stages, more will be added to this event. Please save the date for Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii’s Waikiki Summer Cleanup Festival.

Hawaii County Department of Environmental Management Understaffed and Overworked – Appliances Stack Up

The recent Dengue Fever outbreak on the Big Island of Hawaii has had everyone on edge the last few months and both State and County officials have had their hands full dealing with this outbreak.  Thousands and thousands of tires have been disposed of since the county started accepting tires at the transfer stations.

Folks have been noticing that the Hilo Transfer station in general has had a lot of e-waste and appliances stacking up.

Appliances at the Hilo Landfill on 4/30/2016.

Appliances at the Hilo Landfill on 4/30/2016.

Recently Doug Arnott, from Arnott’s Lodge in Hilo, asked the following question in the Facebook Group Opala in Paradise to Bobby Jean Leithead-Todd, Head of the County of Hawaii’s Department of Environmental Management:

Bobby Jean Leithead Todd can you give us an update on the ever growing pile of refrigerators and stoves at the Hilo Station…it seems that a good economy is causing old units to be dumped faster than they can be removed….or is this related to refrigerant removal or a slowdown in scrap metal buying by China…can we get an update please

Leithead-Todd responded:

We’ve had to pull manpower and equipment away to deal with tires and other dengue related clean ups. Earlier we had it pile up as we had a contract dispute and we could not move them until the contract issue was resolved at the state level. Now we are moving the white goods out but they seem to be coming back in as fast as we dispose of them. We hope to get ahead of it after we stop accepting tires.

Island Schools Launch Recycling Drive and Environmental Awareness Campaign – Phone Book Recycling Drive

The Berry Company, LLC, proud publisher of the Hawaiian Telcom Directory, is partnering with schools on the islands of Hawaii, Kauai, Lanai, Maui and Molokai to launch the #SmallBizBigOutcome recycling drive and environmental awareness campaign. The campaign runs through May 15, and is in conjunction with the 2016 Hawaiian Telcom Directory delivery on the neighbor islands.

Phone books can still be seen scattered through out Hilo.

Phone books can still be seen scattered through out Hilo.

Local schools on each island will compete to collect the most outdated telephone directories, which will keep the directories out of landfills through recycling. For the first time, all participating schools will receive a cash prize for their involvement in the program, and one school will win a grand prize. The grand prize winner will be selected based on book collection totals and efforts to engage and educate students about recycling and protecting the local environment.

“Berry’s recycling drive helps to protect the local environment, but also raises funds for neighbor island schools, and we’re grateful for the support from our local community partners that help bring this campaign to life,” said John Lambert, branch manager of The Berry Company in Hawaii. “We love seeing how students of all ages get involved and learn first-hand the difference recycling can make.”

Hawaiian Telcom Directories are 100-percent recyclable. After the close of the contest, the telephone directories are shipped off-island for recycling. On Hawaii, Kauai, Lanai and Maui the materials are converted into an array of new products, including building insulation, writing and copier papers, newsprint and paper towels. The directories from Molokai are processed at a waste-to-energy facility where they are used to generate a valuable source of renewable energy for Oahu. Recycling and environmental sustainability are important initiatives year round, so residences and businesses throughout Hawaii should check with their local recycling department for more information on recycling programs offered in their area.

Berry is also partnering with local food banks, including Hawaii Foodbank, Hawaii Foodbank – Kauai Branch, The Food Basket and the Maui Foodbank, to host a community food drive. By using the recyclable directory delivery bags, Berry encourages the community to fill the bags with nonperishable food items and donate them to local food banks.

For more information about reusing, repurposing and recycling, visit Berry’s online hub dedicated to spotlighting business and residents working to create positive change, SmallBizBigOutcome.com. There you can also find more information about the recycling drive, drop-off locations and hours, as well as a list of the participating schools and food banks.

UH Hilo Hosts Marine Noise Pollution Documentary Screening

A public screening and state premiere of the newly released film Sonic Sea will be shown at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo on Friday, April 8, at 3 p.m. in the Science and Technology Building Room 108.
Sonic Sea

The 60-minute documentary about marine noise pollution is narrated by Rachel McAdams and based on the true story of a former U.S. Navy officer. Ken Balcomb is credited with solving the tragic mystery involving a mass whale stranding in the Bahamas, forever changing how we understand man’s impact on the ocean.

Sonic Sea was produced by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Imaginary Forces in association with the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and Diamond Docs. The film, directed and produced by Michelle Dougherty and Daniel Hinerfeld, features musician, human rights and environmental activist Sting along with renowned ocean experts Dr. Sylvia Earle, Dr. Paul Spong, Dr. Christopher Clark and Jean-Michel Cousteau.

The screening is hosted by UH Hilo’s Marine Science (MARE) and Tropical Conservation Biology and Environmental Science (TCBES) programs.

For more information, call 932-7592.

Volunteers Invited to “Huki” Algae for Invasive Species Awareness Week

February 21 to 27 is Invasive Species Awareness Week both nationally and in the state of Hawai‘i. Mālama Maunalua, a non-profit stewardship organization, is inviting volunteers to participate in a community huki (“pull”) of invasive algae  on Saturday, Feb. 27 to help remove three types of invasive alien algae in Maunalua Bay.
Great Huki2
The event will be held from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Paiko Beach in East Oahu. Volunteers will meet and depart from Kuli‘ou‘ou Beach Park located at 100 Bay Street. Parking is available at the beach park lot and on Summer Street. Contact volunteer@malamamaunalua.org or visit http://www.malamamaunalua.org/volunteer/sign-up/ to RSVP.

Great Huki1

The three types of invasive algae affecting the marine ecosystem in the Bay include Gorilla Ogo, Leather Mudweed, and Prickly Seaweed, scientifically known as Gracileria salicornia, Avrainvilea amadelpha, and Acanthophora spicifera. Known to be some of the greatest threats to Hawai‘i’s coral reefs and nearshore marine ecosystems, these  species flourish off of an environment created by sediment and runoff from the land. As the invasive alien algae spreads, it smothers coral reefs and native algal communities, killing extensive areas of native habitat.

Before and After the Great Huki

Before and After the Great Huki

One of Mālama Maunalua’s key initiatives in restoring the health of Maunalua Bay has involved removing the invasive alien algae through regular volunteer-based hukis. Since its founding in 2005, the organization has removed over 3.5 million pounds of invasive alien algae, and cleared 250,000 square meters of invasive species from Paiko Beach, thanks to the help of over 15,000 volunteers of students, community members, partner organizations, and businesses. Mālama Maunalua donates pulled algae to area farmers to be used as fertilizer.