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Hawaii International AgriTourism Symposium

Hawai‘i AgriTourism Association (HATA) will host the state’s first Hawai‘i International AgriTourism Symposium on October 15, 2016 at the College of Hawaiian Language: Ka Haka ‘Ulu O Ke‘elikōlani, in Hilo. Industry experts from Hawai‘i, New Zealand and Japan will share their forecasts, trends and tips on how they compete on a global stage. They will share what visitors from their regions are looking to experience in AgriTourism, as well as perspectives on how they have diversified agricultural operations in innovative ways to increase profitability, reduce risk, and protect rural communities.

agritourism symposium

This global symposium aims to help people get on trend with the connections between agriculture and travel/tourism. The industry is an “economic multiplier” that impacts restaurants, lodging, health, and education. For every dollar spent at an AgriTourism farm, an additional $2.25 is spent within the community in food, fuel, and retail.  The ripple effect continues with home based and small businesses that create value add products from the farm crop such as jams, baked goods, and beauty or health products.

As a popular and highly marketable segment of Hawai‘i’s $10-billion dollar visitor industry, AgriTourism is poised to take off in the next decade. It’s not only a viable part of the economy; it’s also an important way to preserve our island lifestyles and culture.

AgriTourism offers farmers and small businesses an incredible opportunity to expand their business using creative approaches, and innovative partnerships. This symposium will show how the state’s largest economic industries, tourism and agriculture, merge to create economic diversity and innovation that visitors will pay for.

Farmers who include an AgriTourism component in their marketing plan can see substantial financial benefits. AgriTourism can provide the difference between a profitable and an unprofitable farming operation, and between a sustainable and an unsustainable agricultural region. With the potential of this niche market expanding at such a fast pace, there has never been a better time to learn more about AgriTourism.

Online Registration for Hawai‘i’s International AgriTourism Symposium is open at www.hiagtourism.org.  Vendors who wish to sell products at the Hawai‘i Marketplace may also register online as well.  For more information, please contact Lani Weigert, lani@hiagtourism.org.  Space is limited, early registration encouraged.

Guiding Restoration of Hawaiian Fishponds

Loko i‘a, or traditional Hawaiian fishponds, are unique aquaculture systems that existed throughout ancient Hawai‘i. Although a 1990 statewide survey identified 488 loko i‘a sites, many were in degraded condition, and either completely beyond repair or unrecognizable.

fishponds2However, there is hope, as communities and stewardship groups continue to actively restore or have expressed interest in reviving the integrity and productivity of fishpond locations still in existence.

Suzanne Case, Department of Land and Natural Resources Chair says, “In 2012, a dedicated group of individuals and organizations came together to overcome difficulties in obtaining approvals from multiple agencies, to maintain and restore Hawaiian fishponds.”

fishpondsFishpond practitioners formed Hui Malama Loko I‘a to empower one another and leverage their skills, knowledge and resources, while working to feed and connect communities around the islands.  This network currently includes over 38 fishponds and complexes, with over 100 fishpond owners, workers, supporters and stakeholders.

Case adds, “Now the DLNR Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands is releasing a new guidebook on fishpond restoration in time for the IUCN World Conservation Congress 2016. This guidebook marks the beginning of what we hope will be a new day in Hawaiian fishpond revitalization,” she said.

Fishponds3The newly published, high-quality, full-color “Ho‘ala Loko I‘a Permit Application Guidebook” is intended to help cultural practitioners, landowners and community groups navigate a new streamlined application process for Hawaiian fishpond revitalization.

Historically, fishponds have been subject to an extensive permitting process that requires large amounts of resources and time to secure. So in 2015 the State of Hawai‘i completed streamlining the permitting process for the repair, restoration, maintenance and operation of traditional Hawaiian fishponds in Hawai‘i.

The DLNR Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands (OCCL) and collaborators have developed a master permit for traditional Hawaiian fishponds that encompasses the main permits currently required. This master permitting process and program is called “Ho‘ala Loko I‘a.” The program was designed to be in compliance with as many federal and state regulations as possible to make the permitting process easier for fishpond practitioners to navigate.

Practitioners can now use a simplified conservation district use permit to apply for permits under this programmatic permit.

A programmatic environmental assessment (EA) was also completed to comply with the Hawai’i Environmental Quality Act (HEPA). The CDUP and programmatic EA were designed to cover all existing traditional fishponds in the State.

fishponds4Another helpful step was the signing of Bill 230 by Governor Ige in July 2015, which waived the need to obtain a Department of Health 401 Water Quality Certification for fishpond restoration.  This waiver is only available to projects that obtain permits through the OCCL program.  While the program vastly reduces government red tape, projects are still required to have water quality monitoring, mitigation and best management practices in place to keep Hawaii’s waters clean and reefs healthy.

The Ho‘ala Loko I‘a Permit Application Guidebook further provides clear guidance on how to meet State water quality standard.

Although this streamlined permitting program covers many of the authorizations for restoring a loko i‘a, in some cases, additional permits or authorizations may still be required, such as:

  • A right of entry agreement from DLNR land division for a state-owned pond
  • A stream channel alteration permit from the Commission on Water Resource Management)
  • A special management area county permit for work mauka of the shoreline

Applications submitted to OCCL are reviewed and subject to best management practices and monitoring standards that help to protect Hawaii’s environmental and cultural resources while supporting the need for communities and practitioners to care for
loko i‘a.

Pearl Harbor Restaurant Using Celebrity Chef Sam Choy’s Name Without Permission

A restaurant located on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam is not what many folks may think it actually is and certainly isn’t what the United States Navy may have thought what they were getting when they allowed the restaurant to open up on the military base.

Island Grille2

Image from the Island Grille website

Sam Choy’s Island Style Seafood Grille” located on the base at 3465 Malama Bay Drive, Honolulu, Hawaii IS NOT AFFILIATED with the Celebrity Chef Sam Choy that we have all come to know and love here in Hawaii.

I asked the owner to respond to an email about the ownership of the restaurant… however, after 4 days he has not responded to my email.

Image from Island Grille website

Image from Island Grille website

After speaking with those associated with the “Real” Sam Choy, I learned that the restaurant is not even serving the same recipes; Sam does not cook there, and hasn’t ever even been compensated for his namesake on the restaurant.

Sam Choy stated:

“The Hickam / Pearl Harbor Restaurant was opened using my name.  To this day I have never seen a penny of royalty or any payment of any sort going towards using my name.  I just want the community to be aware of this fact.”

According to an August 19th Facebook post the Island Style Grille is accepting applications using Sam Choy’s name as a hiring point:

“Sam Choy’s Seafood Grille is hiring! Located conveniently on JBPHH right next to Hickam beach! Positions available for all back of house kitchen staff including Line Cooks as well as all front of house including Bartenders and Servers. Experience required for line cook, bartending and serving. Please inquire and/or apply in person or contact us with any questions!!!!!”

I have learned that Choy and his team have retained an attorney and are looking to get his name removed from the restaurant… so until then… just know that this restaurant is not affiliated with the “Real Sam Choy”.

Real Sam Choy

Click to see the REAL Sam Choy!

Hokulea Begins Travel to North American Great Lakes Using Complex Waterway Lock System

Precision, timing and patience: these meticulous elements are crucial to the success of Hokulea’s most current leg of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage, as the canoe and her crew are set to encounter lock after lock on their first-time sail to the Great Lakes of North America. A lock is a complex waterway system used for raising and lowering watercraft between bodies of water of different levels on rivers and waterways.

locks4The traditional voyaging canoe from Hawaii left Waterford, New York early this morning and docked at Riverlink Marina in Amsterdam, New York at around 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time. Crew members are now prepped to sail the Erie Canal locks and bridges, taking the Oswego detour to pass through 30 locks to reach Lake Ontario.

locksThe canoe first encountered the waterway lock system in March this year during her Florida sail. However, this current series of locks is the most extensive lock system that the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage has experienced, and the crew will take this time to learn the more intricate details about the physics of the lock system. On this leg of the voyage, the canoe has been elevated by the waterway locks by a collective total of 250 feet.

locks2The Hokulea crew plans to re-start sailing tomorrow morning at 7:30 a.m. ET. After completing the first ten 10 locks today, they are aiming to complete Locks 11-18, with Lock 17 having the highest water lift of 40 feet.

locks3This current leg will bring Hokulea the furthest north that she will travel on the Worldwide Voyage.

New Restaurants, Exhibitors Join Taste Hawaiian Range Sept. 9

Fresh and nutritious Hawai’i Island food and the people who produce it are the stars of Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range 6-8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9 at the Hilton Waikoloa Village.

Taste HaydenTasty culinary stations, food producer booths and agricultural-themed displays—totaling over 75 stations— will sprawl both inside and out at the resort’s conference center.

Pre-sale tickets are available online for $45 through midnight September 8 and at island wide locations until sold out; they are $60 at the door. Details: www.TasteoftheHawaiianRange.com.

Each Taste chef is assigned to prepare a whopping 100 pounds of a specific cut of pasture-raised beef—or locally sourced pork, lamb, mutton, goat or USDA-inspected wild boar—and the result is a festive adventure of tasting everything from tongue to tail. Most of the beef cuts are utilized so chefs and attendees can get acquainted with not-so-familiar cuts while having fun. The pasture-raised beef is sourced from local, humanely raised cattle that are free of antibiotics and hormones.

Taste ShankIn addition to “grazing” on expertly prepared beef sirloin, lamb or Rocky Mountain Oysters—aka bull’s testicles—attendees can taste samples at local food product booths and view compelling educational displays on sustainability and agriculture.

New participating exhibitors include Beyond Organic Consulting, Waimea Butcher Shop, Paradise Hawaii Balsamics, Spicy Ninja Sauce, Rapid ‘Ohi‘a Death, Farm Works Hawaii, Orchid Isle Traders, Hawaii Lassi-Akmal Foods, USDA Farm Service Agency and UH-CTAHR Veterinary Extension.

Restaurants debuting at the 2016 Taste include Noodle Club, Waipio Cook House, 3 Fat Pigs, Daylight Mind Coffee Company Waikoloa, Monstera and The Fish Hopper.

Also new will be a streaming video shown at different event locations featuring seven Big Island ranchers and farmers talking story about why they produce food.

taste2015

Those wanting to learn first-hand how to use and prepare 100 percent pasture-raised beef can attend the event’s annual Cooking 101 culinary demonstration. This year’s team of guest presenters are chefs Kevin Hanney and J Schoonover of Oahu’s 12 Ave Grill and Kokohead Café. The 3 p.m. presentation includes sampling and is $10; tix available online or at the door. A 1 p.m. seminar, “Learn Where Beef Cuts Come From,” is free.

Islandwide tickets locations include Kuhio Grille in Hilo, Kamuela Liquors and Parker Ranch Store in Waimea, Kona Wine Market in Kailua-Kona and Kohala Essence Shop at Hilton Waikoloa Village.

Watch for ticket giveaways on Facebook at Taste of the Hawaiian Range and Twitter #TasteHI. For general event information, phone (808) 322-4892.

Hawai‘i residents eager to savor the flavors of the Taste can take advantage of Hilton Waikoloa Village’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range Package with rates starting at $239 + tax per room on Friday, Sept. 9, 2016. This Kama‘aina Special also includes two tickets to the Taste of the Hawaiian Range. Guests must show valid Hawai‘i state ID at checkin and must have Hawai‘i address in reservation. Pre- and post-event hotel room prices start at $149 plus tax per room, per night, based on availability. To book an overnight stay at Hilton Waikoloa Village under an exclusive Taste of the Hawaiian Range room package (code TSH), visit www.hiltonwaikoloavillage.com/kamaaina, or https://secure3.hilton.com/en_US/hi/reservation/book.htm?hotel=KOAHWHH&spec_plan=TSH&arrivaldate=20151009 or call 1-800-HILTONS.

 

Hokulea Heading to the Great Lakes

Hokulea departed Jersey City, New Jersey this morning to embark on a new journey that will take the iconic canoe to the Great Lakes for the first time in history. After sailing through New York via the Hudson River, Hokulea is slated to sail through the fresh water systems of the Erie Canal, Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence.

great lakesThe canoe will reach the farthest point north of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage when she arrives in Sorel, Canada in mid-September and is expected to return to New Jersey by October (weather-permitting).

Great Lakes1Leg 23 of the the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage gives the Hokulea crew an opportunity to learn about Canada’s parks, lakes, rivers and wetlands and what the country is doing to protect and conserve these resources. Canada has one fifth of the world’s freshwater.

great lakes2Another first in her sailing history, the traditional sailing vessel will travel through Canada’s locks and waterways exploring new territory for the canoe and her experienced crew. Hokulea’s crew will sail up New York’s Hudson River to the Erie Canal to reach Lake Ontario and plans to travel all the way to the Saint Lawrence River in Quebec to access Montreal. The canoe is expected to journey through 52 locks and under 160 bridges, crossing fresh water systems throughout inland Canada.

great lakes3“Exploration is core to what we do, which is why we are sailing Hokulea to waters where we never imagined she could go,” said Nainoa Thompson, president of the Polynesian Voyaging society and pwo (master) navigator. “Because of Canada’s lock system and other complexities, the voyaging team has spent months preparing for this leg by researching and studying these waterways,” he added.

great lakes4

President Barack Obama Announces the Expansion of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument

Today, President Barack Obama announced the expansion of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument (PMNM) by more than 442,000 square miles.  U.S. Senator Brian Schatz (D-Hawai‘i), who formally proposed the PMNM expansion in a letter to the president in June, applauded the decision. This action will create the world’s largest marine protected area by putting some of the world’s most important ocean ecosystems under conservation.

new area
“This is one of the most important actions an American president has ever taken for the health of the oceans,” said Senator Schatz. “Expanding Papahanaumokuakea will replenish stocks of ‘ahi, promote biodiversity, fight climate change, and give a greater voice to Native Hawaiians in managing this resource.  President Obama’s declaration is only the beginning.  To create continued success, we will need to follow through with management, research, educational opportunities, and enforcement.  This declaration sets us on a strong path forward for our irreplaceable environment and the generations to come.”

At 582,578 square miles, the declaration creates the world’s largest marine protected area by expanding the PMNM west of 163° West Longitude out to the full 200 nautical miles of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone, while preserving access for local fishermen on Kaua‘i and Ni‘ihau by maintaining the current boundaries of the PMNM east of 163° West Longitude.  President Obama will also grant Schatz’s request to make the Office of Hawaiian Affairs a Co-Trustee of the PMNM.

Hawaii Governor Signs Letter of Support for Expansion of Papahānaumokuakea Marine National Monument

Gov. David Ige sent a letter to President Barack Obama conveying his support for the expansion of the Papahānaumokuakea Marine National Monument.

Click to read letter

Click to read letter

The letter was signed and transmitted on the evening of Aug. 24.

Finger Flipper Not Showing “Aloha Spirit” Creates Resolution of Removal

(UPDATE) A resolution to remove Chelsea Kent, the woman from Texas that moved to Oahu and became part of the Hawaii delegation at the Democratic National Convention and decided to flip the cameras off while the Hawaii Democrats were reading their votes during a live broadcast… has been removed was created from the Hawaii Democratic Party based on a Hawaii Revised Statute that is to hold the Aloha Spirit in high regards.

Aloha Spirit removalThe Aloha Spirt Law (HRS 5-7.5):

[§5-7.5] “Aloha Spirit”. (a) “Aloha Spirit” is the coordination of mind and heart within each person. It brings each person to the self. Each person must think and emote good feelings to others. In the contemplation and presence of the life force, “Aloha”, the following unuhi laula loa may be used:
“Akahai”, meaning kindness to be expressed with tenderness;
“Lokahi”, meaning unity, to be expressed with harmony;
“Oluolu”, meaning agreeable, to be expressed with pleasantness;
“Haahaa”, meaning humility, to be expressed with modesty;
“Ahonui”, meaning patience, to be expressed with perseverance.
These are traits of character that express the charm, warmth and sincerity of Hawaii’s people. It was the working philosophy of native Hawaiians and was presented as a gift to the people of Hawaii. “Aloha” is more than a word of greeting or farewell or a salutation. “Aloha” means mutual regard and affection and extends warmth in caring with no obligation in return. “Aloha” is the essence of relationships in which each person is important to every other person for collective existence. “Aloha” means to hear what is not said, to see what cannot be seen and to know the unknowable.
(b) In exercising their power on behalf of the people and in fulfillment of their responsibilities, obligations and service to the people, the legislature, governor, lieutenant governor, executive officers of each department, the chief justice, associate justices, and judges of the appellate, circuit, and district courts may contemplate and reside with the life force and give consideration to the “Aloha Spirit”. [L 1986, c 202, §1]

Also a resolution was made to remove Bart Dame as the Hawaii Democratic Party National Committee District Chair for his role in not enforcing things it appears he failed to manage the behavior and expression of Kent and it appears he took no decisive action against Kent.

Bart Dame

Mayor-Elect Harry Kim On “Insights on PBS Hawaii”

On Thursday August 18th, Hawaii County Mayor-Elect Harry Kim was on PBS Hawaii’s television show “Insights on PBS Hawaii“.

Mayor Elect Kim at PBS
Mayor-Elect Kim talked about committing to the be the mayor of the Big Island for the next 4 years, some of the reasons why he ran for office, trust in government in general at all levels while even touching a bit on the Billy Kenoi p-Card legal predictions our current mayor is in.

He also spoke about this current election and the feedback he has been receiving since being re-elected as the Mayor of Hawaii County.  He spoke a little about the divide between East Hawaii and West Hawaii and part of the lack of communication that he had in his previous time in office.

The PBS Hawaii Replay is tomorrow at 2pm but you can watch it anytime here:

 

Hawaiian Stilt Returns Home

A little endangered Hawaiian Stilt chick is all grown up and ready to be on its own after a seven week stay at the Hawai‘i Wildlife Center (HWC).
The Stilt at 2 weeks

The Stilt at 2 weeks

The chick was rescued on O‘ahu and after an unsuccessful attempt to reunite the chick with its parents, it was decided that the young bird would need to be sent to HWC to be raised until it was old enough to be on its own. The successful rescue and release was a team effort by USDA Wildlife Services, Wheels for Wildlife volunteers, Feather and Fur Animal Hospital, the Hawai‘i Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW), and the Hawai‘i Wildlife Center.
The Stilt at 5 Weeks

The Stilt at 5 Weeks

While at HWC, the chick was monitored using a remote camera system and staff took great care to prevent the stilt from becoming accustomed to humans. In addition to minimizing physical contact, HWC staff used a mirror and photos of stilt habitat and Hawaiian Stilt adults in the incubator and aviary to provide some enrichment while the bird was in HWC care.
The Stilt at 7 Weeks before its release

The Stilt at 7 Weeks before its release

The bird’s growth was documented through weekly pictures taken from intake until it was transferred to O‘ahu DOFAW staff for release yesterday.
Stilt Growth
This release is the latest in a busy release week for HWC, including a Hawaiian Duck (Koloa Maoli) from O‘ahu, Wedge-tailed Shearwater (‘Ua‘u kani) from O‘ahu, and a White-tailed Tropicbird (Koa‘e kea) from O‘ahu.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Centennial Events for September 2016

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2016, and continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park (ADIP) programs with the public in September.

All ADIP and Hawaiian cultural programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Conservation in Hawai‘i: A Living Legacy. Join Bryan Harry, former superintendent of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and founding member of the Hawai‘i Conservation Alliance, as he talks about the state of conservation in Hawai‘i and what it means for Hawai‘i to host the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) in 2016.

Bryan HarryPart of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

  • When: Tues., Sept. 13 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Hawaiian ‘Ukulele Demonstration. Oral Abihai shares his passion for making ‘ukulele from discarded or naturally fallen pieces of wood.

Oral Abihai Ukulele

Learning only several years ago in Lahaina from Kenny Potts, he has since made more than 50 ‘ukulele. Oral currently lives on Hawai‘i Island, where he makes ‘ukulele by hand. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

  • When: Wed., Sept. 14 from 10 a.m. to noon
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Hula Performance by Hālau Hula Ulumamo o Hilo Palikū. Kumu hula Mamo Brown is a lifelong resident of Hilo, and was formally trained by Nālani Kanaka‘ole and Pualani Kanaka‘ole Kanahele of Hālau Kekuhi in the ‘ai ha‘a, or low bombastic style, of kahiko (traditional) hula.

Halau at volcanoAfter her ‘ūniki (graduation), Mamo started her own hālau and carries on the kahiko tradition. She and her hālau have performed at the park’s annual Hawaiian cultural festival several times. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.

  • When: Wed., Sept. 21 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Centennial Series After Dark in the Park: Hawaiian Adze Production and Lithic Block Quarries on Kīlauea. Park Archeologist Caleb Houck shares his knowledge about the lithic block quarries on Kīlauea volcano.

Basal Rock

Learn how Hawaiians crafted finely grained basalt rock into adze (stone tools) following the 1790 summit eruptions, why these particular rocks were prized by Hawaiians, and how archeologists discovered these abandoned quarries centuries later.

  • When: Tues., Sept. 27, 2016 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Make a Hawaiian Broom. Join park rangers and learn to make a useful pulumi nī‘au.

Hawaiian BroomFashioned from the midribs of coconut leaves, pulumi nī‘au are a kind of broom used to keep houses tidy and clean. The coconut tree is an incredibly useful species utilized by people throughout the Pacific, and pulumi are just one example of its myriad uses. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

  • When: Wed., Sept. 28 from 10 a.m. to noon
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Centennial Hike: Hawaiian Adze Production—Lithic Block Quarries on Kīlauea. Join Park Ranger Jay Robinson on an easy hour-long hike among the abandoned adze quarry at Kīlauea Overlook. Most visitors have no idea this area was showered by large basalt rocks erupted from Kīlauea during its summit eruptions of 1790, or that Hawaiians coveted the rocks for stone tools (adze). Sturdy footwear, water, raingear, sun protection, and a snack are recommended.

  • When: Sat., Oct. 1, 2016 at 11 a.m.
  • Where: Meet at Kīlauea Overlook

Lance Keawe Wilhelm Reappointed Kamehameha Schools Trustee

Probate Court Judge Derrick Chan today reappointed Kamehameha Schools Trustee Lance Wilhelm to serve a second term on the trustee board. Trustees Corbett Kalama, Micah Kāne and Robert Nobriga filed a response in court in support of the reappointment.

Newly reappointed Trustee Lance Wilhelm (left) considers it a blessing to work alongside his fellow trustees Corbett Kalama, Robert Nobriga and Micah Kāne. Wilhelm hopes to use his five-year 'window of opportunity' to make a positive impact on KS.

Newly reappointed Trustee Lance Wilhelm (left) considers it a blessing to work alongside his fellow trustees Corbett Kalama, Robert Nobriga and Micah Kāne. Wilhelm hopes to use his five-year ‘window of opportunity’ to make a positive impact on KS.

“Lance has brought a lot of knowledge and wisdom to our group,” says Kalama, Trustee chair. “He also brings to our organization a deep respect for the Hawaiian culture – especially in his ability to speak Hawaiian in a very humble, sensitive and meaningful manor.

“As trustees, we strive to be good representatives of Pauahi. Lance carries himself well. His behavior reinforces what we expect of our students and staff members, making him an excellent role model.”

KS trustees are appointed by the Probate Court in accordance with a process approved by the court in 2000. They may serve up to 10 years and are eligible to petition for reappointment at the end of their initial five-year term. Wilhelm hopes to make the most of his remaining time as trustee.

“I am deeply humbled by the support of my colleagues,” says Wilhelm. “I have the greatest respect for my fellow trustees and consider it one of the great blessings of my life to work alongside these remarkable individuals.

“As trustees of Kamehameha Schools, we come to our responsibilities knowing that our window of opportunity to make positive impacts to our organization is limited. I hope that within my window I can help to move us into our Strategic Plan with high energy and high confidence.”

Joining the KS trustees at Probate Court to witness the hearing was KS Chief Executive Officer Jack Wong.

“Judge Chan’s reappointment of Trustee Wilhelm today reflects the court’s acknowledgement that he has served KS well and has earned his second term as trustee,” says Wong. “I look forward to our continued work with Lance and the trustees as we build momentum around our Strategic Plan and strengthen our commitment to cultivating a thriving lāhui.”

Wilhelm is the managing principal for Irongate Capital, overseeing its current and future development operations in Hawai‘i including Ritz-Carlton Residences, Waikīkī Beach. He is also a board member for several nonprofit organizations including the YMCA of Honolulu, Island Pacific Academy, Hawai‘i Pacific University and the University of Hawai‘i Foundation.

After graduating from Kamehameha Schools Kapālama in 1983, he went on to earn a bachelor of arts degree in communications from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

Hawaii’s Hokulea Crew Encounters New Sailing Conditions

Hokulea, Hawaii’s iconic voyaging canoe, encountered new sailing conditions on Thursday morning: thick fog that hovered above the ocean during the crew’s early morning sail from Salem, Massachusetts to Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts.

hokulea morning fog

The Hokulea crew had little to no visibility of the horizon during the first couple of hours of the sail – a rare weather situation for the worldwide voyage. Eventually, the fog cleared up at around 10:00 a.m. ET and Hokulea was back on track to her next destination: the Massachusetts Maritime Academy.

hokulea morning fog2

From there, the Hokulea crew will sail to Rhode Island early Friday morning, where the canoe will be docked for a few days. In line with delivering the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage’s message of taking care of Island Earth by engaging with new communities they meet throughout the voyage, crew members will be conducting canoe tours for the public at Rhode Island this Saturday, from 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. ET.

Hokulea Morning fog3

The crew plans to continue educational engagements in the US New England states as Hokulea sails back down to New York.

Governor Appoints Samuel Gon III to Board of Land and Natural Resources

Gov. David Ige announced the appointment of Samuel M. Gon III to the Board of Land and Natural Resources (BLNR). Gon’s appointment follows the departure of Ulalia Woodside.

sam gon

Gon is a senior scientist and cultural advisor at the Hawai‘i Nature Conservancy of Hawai‘i, where he has worked for nearly 30 years. He previously served as the director of science, and program coordinator for the Hawai‘i Nature Heritage Program.

In addition, Gon is an affiliate faculty member at the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

A graduate of McKinley High School, Gon earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Zoology from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa in 1978. He earned his M.A. and Ph.D. in Animal Behavior from the University of California, Davis in 1985.

“Sam has extensive knowledge of the Hawaiian culture and history, as well as research, teaching and administrative experience that will serve the board well as it works to manage, protect, conserve and manage our state’s unique resources. Sam will be a valuable member of the team,” said Gov. Ige.

“After two stimulating and satisfying terms on the Land Board, I learned so much, and I very much look forward to serving again in support of the protection and preservation of Hawai‘i’s unique and precious natural and cultural resources,” Gon said.

Gon has served two terms on the BLNR, from 2006 until 2014. He will serve the remainder of Woodside’s term which expires in June 2017. The Senate will decide whether to confirm Gon’s appointment to a full term when the Hawai‘i State Legislature reconvenes in early 2017.

Hawaiian Petroglyphs Revealed By Shifting Sands – Experts Believe 400+ Years Old

On a warm July evening, visitors Lonnie Watson and Mark Louviere from the Ft. Worth, Texas metro area did what they normally do during their frequent visits to Hawaii.  They wandered out to the coastline to watch the setting sun. On this particular day they spotted something that they say has humbled and blessed them. Watson explained, “For some reason there was a beam of light…just a beam…it landed right on one of them and for some reason I just turned my head. I said, look, it was just a stroke of luck.”

Waiana PetroglyphWhat they saw was a large petroglyph, etched into the sandstone. Upon further investigation, they discovered at least 10 figures, stretching over roughly 60 feet of beach. While it’s likely this series of petroglyphs, created by aboriginal inhabitants of the Waianae coast, have revealed themselves in the past, this is the first time they’ve come to the attention of the DLNR State Historic Preservation Division (SHPD) and the U.S. Army. Both agencies have been working together to record and document the petroglyphs; which now number at least 17 figures.

Army archaeologist and Waianae native Alton Exzabe was one of the first officials to arrive at the site. He said, “What’s interesting is the Army in Hawaiʻi manages several thousand archaeological sites, but this is the first one with petroglyphs directly on the shoreline.

What’s exciting for me, is I grew up coming to this beach and now as an archaeologist working for the Army, helping to manage this site, we discovered these petroglyphs that have never been recorded. Some people have said they’ve seen them before, but this is quite a significant find.”

Waianae PetroglyphsGlen Kila is a lineal descendent of the aboriginal families who first settled in Nene’u on the Waianae Coast. His family home is a short ways from the petroglyph field, and he says until now he was unaware of these particular figures. “They record our genealogy and religion. It’s very important to know about the lineal descendants of the area and their understanding of these petroglyphs. The interpretation of these petroglyphs can only be interpreted by the lineal descendants who are familiar with its history and culture,” Kila said.

Several days after the Texas families first saw the petroglyphs, a small group of people stood atop the rocks as sand was washing back in to recover them. Exzabe and fellow archaeologists from the SHPD encourage people to look and not touch. Even the process of scraping sand away by hand or with brushes can damage the integrity of the figures.

Exzabe added, “We can now come up with a plan to further protect and preserve this site.  The ones with the fingers, for me, are pretty unique. I believe there are some elsewhere with fingers, but fingers and hands are pretty distinct, as well as the size of them.  We find a lot of petroglyphs that are a foot or so tall, but this one measures 4-5 feet from head to toe. It’s pretty impressive.”

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The petroglyphs were only viewable for a short time. Since the Texans’ initial reporting, the sand has moved back in to cover them; however, the Army and SHPD are committed to protecting the “new” discovery whether visible or not.

Dr. Alan Downer, the administrator for the SHPD said, “We’re eager to join the Army in developing a protection and preservation plan for these petroglyphs. They are an important part of Hawaii’s culture and while sands have covered them again, in time they will reappear and we want to make sure people know that they are fragile and culturally sensitive and should only be viewed; not touched.”

Hokulea Crew Members Witness Dramatic Tidal Shifts at Bay of Fundy

As the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage that launched from Hawaii in 2014 continues, crew members of Hokulea found themselves this week at one of the most amazing natural sites in North America – the Bay of Fundy.

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Nestled between the Canadian maritime provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, the Bay of Fundy is approximately 170 miles of rugged cliffs, booming ocean waves, and other awe-inspiring ecological elements. In 2014, an international panel of experts named the Bay of Fundy one of the natural wonders of the world due to the location having the highest tides on earth, attracting the rarest species of whales in the world, and housing semi-precious minerals and dinosaur fossils.

hokulea 8616aThe visit to the Bay of Fundy supports one of the objectives of the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage to seek out environmental stories of hope and highlight the importance of caring for Island Earth.

The Hokulea crew visited the area during a new moon cycle, a time when the tidal shifts are more spectacular. Kalepa Baybayan, pwo (master navigator) and captain of Hokulea’s current leg of the voyage, described their location. “It’s the geography of the bay that really accentuates the tidal currents here. It’s very wide at the mouth and very narrow at the end. There’s also this thing called tidal resonance, where the water flows in from the mouth of the bay to the inland shore, matching the tidal period and that accentuates the tide.”

hokulea 8616cGreg Turner, a tour guide and expert for the Bay of Fundy, further explained the natural activities in the area. “I think one of the most spectacular parts of that (natural) formation and many others around the Bay of Fundy is the fact that if you are standing on the ocean floor, you can imagine six hours from now being completely covered in water and all of (the area) being totally underwater.”

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Hokulea crew members were in the Nova Scotia area for about a week, engaging with the area’s First Nations, learning about Canada’s natural resources and conservation efforts and offering canoe tours to the community. The legendary voyaging canoe departed Yarmouth, Nova Scotia on Thursday, Aug. 4, and has returned to Mt. Desert, Maine. The crew plans to continue engagements in the US New England states as she sails back down to New York.

9th Circuit Upholds Dismissal of Challenge to Marriage Equality Act

On August 4, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals issued an opinion upholding the dismissal of a challenge to the state’s Marriage Equality Act by plaintiff Kaui Amsterdam.

Click to view

Click to view

In its opinion, the court found that Hawai‘i District Court Judge Susan Mollway “properly dismissed Amsterdam’s action because Amsterdam’s moral and cultural objections to same-sex marriages are generalized grievances and are insufficient to confer Article III standing.” Judge Mollway found that Amsterdam lacked standing because he failed to show he suffered any injury as a result of the Marriage Equality Act.

Nasdaq Welcomes First Hawaiian, Inc. to Stock Market

First Hawaiian, Inc. (Nasdaq:FHB), parent of First Hawaiian Bank, visited the Nasdaq MarketSite in Times Square today in celebration of its initial public offering (IPO) on The Nasdaq Stock Market.  This marks the first IPO from the Aloha State since 2012.

First Hawaiian Bank rings The Nasdaq Stock Market Closing Bell

First Hawaiian Bank rings The Nasdaq Stock Market Closing Bell

Founded in 1858 as Bishop & Co., First Hawaiian Bank is Hawaii’s oldest and largest bank. Consistently ranked in the top tier of all U.S. banks, First Hawaiian is a full-service bank providing personal, private and business banking services including equipment leasing, automobile financing, mortgage and commercial lending, merchant services, trust, insurance, wealth management and retirement planning.

“With today’s event, we return to our roots as a public company traded on Nasdaq, where First Hawaiian’s predecessor holding company was previously listed from 1974 until 1998,” said First Hawaiian Chairman and CEO Robert Harrison.  “Our senior management team knows that we stand on the shoulders of our employees past and present. Our mahalos go out to our 2,100 employees, as well as to our customers in Hawaii, Guam and Saipan who trust us with their business every day.”

“Since their founding over 150 years ago, the people of First Hawaiian Bank have firmly dedicated themselves to the service of their clients – delivering great ideas and banking solutions,” said Nelson Griggs, Executive Vice President, Listing Services, Nasdaq. “As a company that also values ambition, Nasdaq is proud that First Hawaiian Bank has chosen to join our family of the world’s most admired companies. We look forward to their continued growth and success following today’s initial public offering.”

Hokulea Arrives in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia

Hokulea, Hawaii’s iconic traditional canoe, took the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage north of the United States as it arrived at Canada’s Port of Yarmouth early this morning.

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Crew members were welcomed by the Nova Scotia community, dignitaries and members of the Mi’kmaw (pronounced “Meeg Maw”) Nation on the Yarmouth dock, some who attended the occasion in traditional garb. The Mi’kmaw are part of the Wabanaki that Hokulea and her crew honored during the voyage’s recent Portsmouth and Mt. Desert stops.

nova scotia headsThe celebratory arrival ceremony featured cultural dances and the rhythmic beating of drums. Feathers were presented by a representative of the Mi’kmaw to each Hokulea crew member as a symbol of peace and unity.

nova scotia exchangeCanadian legislators were also in attendance: the Honourable Zach Churchill, Yarmouth Mayor Pam Mood, Warden Murray Goodwin from the Municipality of Yarmouth, and Warden Aldric d’Entremont from the Municipality of Argyle.

“This makes me believe that we’re more alike than we’re different. When we come here and you tell us to come to your place, and thank us for being here, and for being happy – that’s aloha,” said Nainoa Thompson, pwo (master) navigator and president of the Polynesian Voyaging Society, during the arrival ceremony. “The Worldwide Voyage is trying to take this little canoe and aloha around the world, and we came to Yarmouth for that purpose,” he added.

nova scotia nainoaChief Deborah Robinson of the Acadia First Nations (Mi’kmaw Nation) also spoke at the event. “The Mi’kmaw as part of the indigenous community of Canada, has always struggled and continue to strive to protect Mother Earth and all the natural resources for the future. The preservation of our environment and conservation of the resource is of utmost importance to us as the Mi’kmaw. We all have the same goal – in ensuring a future for our children, and for children for generations to come.”

nova scotia indianWhile in Canada, Hokulea crew members hope to learn more about cultural and environmental sustainability practices from the Bay of Fundy and the Southwest Nova Biosphere Reserve-a UNESCO-designated area that serves as a model for demonstrating a balanced relationship between humans and the environment.

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The Hokulea crew hopes to document and share what they learn from the visit with students in classrooms throughout Hawaii. They will stay for about six days to engage with the area’s First Nations, learn about Nova Scotia’s natural resources and conservation efforts and offer canoe tours to the community.