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Kona Job Fair Set for Displaced Island Air Employees

Island Air photo.

In addition to the upcoming Nov. 18 Honolulu Open House for former Island Air employees announced last week, Hawaiian Airlines has confirmed additional job fairs in Kona, Kahului and Līhu‘e.

These sessions are reserved for displaced Island Air workers.

Kona (KOA) interviews for Customer Service Agents and Ramp Agents
Friday, Nov. 17, 2017
8:20 a.m.–12:40 p.m. (20-minute interviews)
KOA HA Offices – Check-in at HA ticket counter
Bring two copies of your resume
Must register online at https://calendly.com/hacareers/kona

Līhu‘e (LIH) interviews for Customer Service Agents and Ramp Agents
Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017
8:20 a.m.–noon (20-minute interviews)
LIH State of Hawaii Mezzanine Conference Room
Bring two copies of your resume
Must register online at https://calendly.com/hacareers/lihue

Kahului (OGG) interviews for Customer Service Agents and Ramp Agents
Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017
8:20 a.m.–2:40 p.m. (20-minute interviews)
OGG WP Offices – check in at the WP ticket counter
Bring two copies of your resume
Must register online at https://calendly.com/hacareers/kahului

Name of Mauna Kea Changed to “Maunakea”

From the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy:

Why have we changed the spelling of Mauna Kea to Maunakea? While the name Mauna Kea (white mountain) is simply descriptive, “Maunakea” is a name that in Native Hawaiian tradition is short for “Mauna a Wākea,” the mountain of Wākea, one of the progenitors of the Hawaiian people. Maunakea is believed to connect the land to the heavens.

By Vadim Kurland – originally posted to Flickr as IMG_2673.JPG, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10580597

The UH Hilo School of Hawaiian Language recommends the one-word spelling, and recently the Office of Maunakea Management started using the one-word spelling (but their abbreviation remains OMKM). According to Stephanie Nagata, director of OMKM, the name Maunakea has been accepted by the official Hawai‘i Board on Geographic Names, and the federal government has also accepted the name change, so new maps will now use the one-word name.

Kamehameha Fall Musical: ‘Once On This Island’

The Kamehameha High School Hawaiʻi Island campus will hold it’s annual fall musical Thursday through Saturday, Nov. 16 through 18, 2017.

This year’s musical is Once On This Island, based on the novel My Love, My Love by Rosa Guy.

The musical portrays how a peasant girl from Haiti falls in love with a wealthy French boy from the other side of the island, but comes to the realization that love, just like life, can be complicated.

The shows will be held in William Charles Lunalilo Center and will begin at 7 p.m.

Tickets are $5 and will be available for purchase starting on Monday, Nov. 13, at the high school office from 3 to 4 p.m. or at the door right before each show.

The William Charles Lunalilo Center is located on the campus grounds located at 16-714 Volcano Road in Keaʻau.

For more information, call Eric Stack at (808) 982-0713.

Centennial Observance of Passing of Queen Liliʻuokalani

The public is invited to attend the centennial observance of the passing of Queen Liliʻuokalani on Saturday, Nov. 11, 2017, at the Hawaiʻi State Capitol at 8 a.m.

Centennial Observance for Lili‘uokalani, Nov. 11

The public is invited to gather with Royal Orders and societies, cultural practitioners, kānaka, leaders of Ali‘i Trusts and dignitaries at the Queen’s promenade and statue on the grounds of the Hawai‘i State Capitol on Saturday, November 11, 2017 at 8:00 a.m. for Aloha Lili‘u, a centennial observance of the life and legacy of Queen Lili‘uokalani.

Over 100 churches across the state will toll their church bells at 8:30 a.m. in honor of the last reigning monarch in Hawai‘i, replicating the moment of her passing on November 11, 1917. In addition to the bells, there will be 100 conch shell blowers (pū), as well as hula dancers (‘ōlapa), drums (pahu), and chanters (mea oli) from across the islands to pay homage to the Queen.

The program that morning will include pieces written by Queen Lili‘uokalani, performed by Hawaiian musicians Marlene Sai, Manu Boyd, Owana Salazar and the Aloha Lili‘u Choir led by Nola Nahulu.

“A century after her passing, she is still beloved by her people, many of whom have benefitted from her legacy,” said State Senator Kai Kahele, co-organizer of Aloha Lili‘u. “We hope through this observance, we can all be reminded of and emulate her spirit and character of grace, courage, strength and compassion.”

“More than just marking a milestone in history, this event is intended to provide an historical admonition for us today to act with intention which benefits the greater good and encourages the best in all of us,” said Senator Brickwood Galuteria, Vice Chair of the Senate Committee on Hawaiian Affairs and co-organizer of Aloha Lili‘u. “This also begins a year of discussion and reflection on how the Queen’s legacy continues to impact our lives today and how as a State, we can continue to improve the lives of the people of Hawai‘i.”

For more information on Aloha Lili‘u, please visit www.alohaliliu.org.

Governor Ige Celebrates Re-dedication of the Princess Victoria Kamāmalu Building

Gov. David Ige, cabinet members, state employees and representatives from the royal societies celebrated today the re-dedication of the Princess Victoria Kamāmalu Building on the 179th anniversary of the princess’ birth.

“I made it a priority to move our public servants back into this state-owned facility to improve efficiency, enhance collaboration and increase cost savings. I’m pleased that the state will see a lease cost savings of $2.2 million going forward” said Gov. Ige.

Employees of the departments of health and human services occupy the building. For the first time in decades, three of the four Department of Human Services’ division administrative offices are housed in one central location. Additionally, the attached agency, the Office of Youth Services (OYS) also moved to the Princess Victoria Kamāmalu Building.

“Having three of our four divisions and one attached agency in one building will help us achieve our collective department goals. I believe that our move into Kamāmalu building is a win-win – it brings the department closer as an ‘ohana so we can serve Hawai‘i more efficiently and effectively,” said DHS Director Pankaj Bhanot.

“I’m delighted to have our staff work in this historic building which is conveniently located near the Capitol, providing better access to the public, said Health Director Dr. Virginia Pressler. “Our Early Intervention Services, Disability and Communication Access Board, and State Council on Developmental Disabilities are excited to serve the public in their new location.”

Princess Victoria Kamāmalu Building Facts

  • The total cost to rehab the building was $27,203,900.
  • Lease cost savings to the state are approximately $2.2 million per year.
  • The contractor was Ralph Inouye Co. Ltd.
  • The project began in March 2015 and was accepted by the state on Feb. 28, 2017.
  • The building has nine floors, and there are offices in the basement.
  • Three divisions of the department of human services occupy floors 2-7:
    • Social Services Administrative Offices for Child Welfare Services and Adult Protective and Community Services
    • Benefit, Employment and Support Services for SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition and Assistance Program) and related aid to families, Child Care Program, and Homeless Program
    • Vocational Rehabilitation
    • Office of Youth Services (an attached agency)
  • The department of health occupies floors 8-9, and the Disability Communication Access Board is in the basement.

Hundreds Attend Annual Wayfinding Festival

Hundreds of people came out to ʻImiloa’s 10th Annual Wayfinding Festival held on Sunday, Oct. 29, at the ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai’i.

This year’s theme was “Bringing Home Lessons” of the Worldwide Voyage and featured a panel discussion with crewmembers from the recently completed Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, along with wa‘a (canoe) activities themed around Hawai‘i’s iconic double-hulled sailing canoe, Hōkūleʻa.

Tools used in Wayfinding made by Kona resident Gary Eoff.

“‘Imiloa’s Wayfinding Festival is our way of honoring our deep sea voyaging ancestors who sailed across the open ocean using the light of the stars to guide them to new lands,” said ‘Imiloa’s Executive Director Ka‘iu Kimura, “And at the same time it is a chance to celebrate our modern day navigators who are transmitting celestial navigation skills into the next generation.”

Attendees learned about the historic 3-year journey of Hōkūleʻa, which traveled 42,000 nautical miles, visiting 150 ports in more than 20 countries, while training a new generation of navigators, educators, scientists and community stewards.

Voyaging Canoe “Kiakahi” out of Keaukaha, Hawaiʻi Island.

This year, the festival also reprised the popular Waʻa Iron Chef Contest. In addition to keiki activities, special wayfinding planetarium programming were held in the theaters and planetarium. The public also had full free access to ʻImiloa’s interactive exhibit hall.

The 10th Annual Wayfinding Festival is sponsored by the Ama OluKai Foundation.

Hawaiian Immersion Schools Mural Project

A statewide campaign to commemorate a landmark anniversary for Hawaiian language education continued over the weekend by The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo’s Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

Students helped design and create ten Living Legacy Murals, inspired by the mo‘olelo (story) of Kalapana.

“The Ke Kanakolu (The 30th) project was created by 808 Urban’s Living Legacy Series to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Ka Papahana Kaiapuni – the Hawaiian Immersion Schools in Hawaiʻi,” said Kamalani Johnson, lecturer, KHʻUOK and the project’s Hawaiian Language Director. “The project’s goal is to use art as a medium to invigorate Native Hawaiian identity and perpetuate Hawaiian values, language and culture, while raising awareness of the 23 Hawaiian Language Immersion and Charter schools that form Ka Papahana Kaiapuni.”

Led by graffiti artist John Prime Hina, ʻĀuna Pāheona, a group of art-centric individuals, have been traveling the state since August. The group is engaging local artists and Hawaiian Immersion schools to design and create the murals, which are being painted one-by-one, culminating on May 25, 2018 in Hanapēpē, Kauaʻi.

The story of Kalapana involves his mother, Halepākī from Kauaʻi and his father, Kānepōiki from Kona, who dies when he loses a hoʻopāpā (battle of wits) challenge from Kaua‘i chief, Kalanialiʻiloa. When he matures, Kalapana travels to Kaua‘i and avenges Kānepōiki’s death by winning his hoʻopāpā challenge through his knowledge of the winds, rains, plants, songs, and ʻai (tools) that are unknown to Kalanialiʻiloa.

“This mo‘olelo was selected for the tenacity and drive of the protagonist,” Johnson said. “The strife Kalapana experiences with the loss of Kānepōiki, that leads to avenging the will of his father is comparable to Hawaiian language revitalization efforts.”

ʻĀuna Pāheona worked with Ke Kula ʻo ʻEhunuikaimalino to complete the first mural in Keauhou, Kona. They are now nearing completion of the second painting in Nānākuli on Oʻahu, working with Ke Kula Kaiapuni o Nānākuli. The first two installments focus on Kalapana learning hoʻopāpā with his mother, Halepākī, and aunt, Kalaoa.

The Hilo mural, located at 51 Makaʻala Street, will depict Kalapana unofficially putting his hoʻopāpā skills into play after completing his schooling with Kalaoa, then going to Kauaʻi where he encounters a local of the area.

Painting participants will include teachers, students and ʻohana from Ka ʻUmeke Kāʻeo, along with Hawaiian language students from KHʻUOK and the Hawaiian medium laboratory school Ke Kula ʻo Nāwahīokalaniʻōpuʻu.

The Ka Papahana Kaiapuni celebration coincides with the 20th anniversary of KHʻUOK. Director Keiki Kawaiʻaeʻa says the murals commemorate the progress and revitalization efforts of the Hawaiian language through its Hawaiian medium-immersion educational pathway as Hawaiʻi prepares to mark next year’s 40th anniversary of ʻōlelo (language) Hawaiʻi as a state official language.

“KHʻUOK continues to support the renormalization of ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi through various initiatives, including new Hawaiian lexicon, an on-line dictionary at wehewehe.org and Hawaiian medium curriculum for grades K-12 supported by the college’s Hale Kuamoʻo Hawaiian Language Center. Additional contributions include the preparation of Hawaiian medium-immersion teachers through the Kahuawaiola Indigenous Teacher Education program and Hawaiian medium laboratory schools such as Nāwahīokalaniʻōpuʻu in Keaʻau,” Kawaiʻaeʻa said. “Through strong collaboration of P-12 and tertiary education working together with schools, families, government and community, Hawaiian language is showing a shift towards recovery of this precious cultural resource.”

Hawai‘i Ranks Third in Nation in U.S. News’ Best States for Aging Ranking

The State of Hawai‘i ranks third in the country when it comes to states that are best at serving their older population. U.S. News and World Report based its rankings on the cost of care, nursing home quality, primary care and life expectancy.The publication says that Hawai‘i’s residents have the longest life expectancy in the U.S., with its 65-and-older population expected to live 20 years longer than in other states. U.S. News has also found that Hawai‘i has the best nursing home quality in the country.

“It’s part of our culture in Hawai‘i to respect and honor our kupuna or elders. Our programs reflect these values and aim to keep our older population active and contributing members of society,” said Gov. David Ige.

Colorado ranked first, with one of the healthiest and most physically active older populations in the country. Maine is second, where a fifth of the population consists of residents 65 and older, a higher percentage than in any other state.

Rounding out the top 10 are: Iowa, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Vermont, New Hampshire and Florida.

In 2016, Americans 65 and older accounted for 15.2 percent of the total population, an increase of 2.8 percent from 2000. Not only are baby boomers aging, but advances in medicine and technology are resulting in a longer life expectancy.

The U.S. Census Bureau predicts that one in five Americans will be 65 years and older by 2030.

Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association Anniversary Celebration Set For Oct. 28-29

Since 1997, the Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association (NaHHA) has worked to promote Hawaiian culture, values and traditions in the visitor industry and beyond through consultation and workforce education, and to provide opportunities for the Hawaiian community to shape the future of tourism. Now in its 20th year, join NaHHA in celebrating two decades of service to Hawai‘i with two events in Waikīkī, October 28 and 29.

On Saturday, October 28 from 5 – 9 p.m., the community is invited to a free ‘Aha Mele: an evening of Hawaiian music at the Royal Hawaiian Center’s Royal Grove in the heart of Waikīkī. Presented by the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority in partnership with Hawaiian 105 KINE and NaHHA, this event will feature the Sons of Waikīkī, Hālau ‘O Kaululaua‘e, The Pandanus Club featuring Waikīkī legends Danny Kaleikini and Marlene Sai, and Amy Hānaiali‘i.

On the evening of Sunday, October 29, NaHHA celebrates two decades of service with an Anniversary Gala at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel. The gala will feature cuisine from the chefs at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, a silent auction, mo‘olelo (stories) from people involved with NaHHA and the visitor industry over the years, and a performance by Amy Hānaiali‘i sure to wow the crowd.

The gala will celebrate the vision and contributions of NaHHA’s founders, the late George Kanahele, Ph.D, and the late Senator Kenneth Brown. NaHHA will also honor the memebrs of its founding Board of Directors: Muriel Anderson, Peter Apo, Cy Bridges, Doug Chang, John DeFries, Albert Kanahele, Noelani Mahoe, Jace McQuivey, and Lori Sablas.

“This celebration will honor the rich history of the Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association and the many hands who have ensured our success in the years to come. We hope you can join us in celebrating the contributions and vision of our founders, and the mission we work toward every day,” said Pohai Ryan, Executive Director of NaHHA.

Individual seats and tables are available for the gala. To reserve your seat at the gala, visit nahha20gala.eventbrite.com or call NaHHA at (808) 628-6374. Individual seats and tables are available.

About the Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association (NaHHA)

In designating 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development, the United Nations General Assembly noted “the importance of international tourism in fostering better understanding among peoples everywhere, in leading to a greater awareness of the rich heritage of various civilizations, thereby contributing to the strengthening of peace in the world.” Twenty years ago, George Hu‘eu Sanford Kanahele, Ph.D. and Senator Kenneth Francis Kamu‘ookalani Brown had reached similar conclusions as those being expressed today by the United Nations.

Inspired by a shared vision of Hawai‘i where Hawaiian culture and the visitor industry can strengthen and enrich one another, Kanahele and Brown co-founded the Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association to shape the future of Hawai‘i tourism by utilizing Hawaiian cultural values as the foundation for business development and leadership. Intuitively, they knew that Hawai‘i’s rare gift to the world is the Aloha Spirit and by sharing this gift, the world would become a better place and the spiritual essence of Hawai‘i’s people would be recognized and respected globally.

Today, NaHHA fulfills the vision of its founders by delivering Hawaiian cultural training and consultation to the visitor industry workforce, as well as businesses and organizations that support the visitor industry. Learn more about NaHHA’s offerings at NaHHA.com.

Hawaiian Monk Seal “Kaimana” to go up for “Adoption,” Benefit to Support Marine Mammal Response and Rescue in Hawai‘i

For weeks, thousands flocked to Kaimana beach to get a glimpse of the Hawaiian monk seal “Rocky” and her new pup, “Kaimana.” The new pup, the first born in Waikīkī in decades, captured the hearts of millions across Hawai‘i and the world. Now, some lucky individual will have the opportunity to “adopt” the pup at an upcoming fundraiser for marine mammal conservation.

Photo by Jason O’Rourke

Kaimana and three other monk seal pups born this year will be up for “adoption” at the event. The “adoption” includes a large individual framed photo of the pup, a certificate of “adoption,” and an opportunity to visit your “adopted” pup with a monk seal volunteer team (conditions apply).

All of this and more will be part of an event Dolphin Quest Oahu and The Kahala Hotel & Resort are hosting to raise funds for Hawai’i Marine Animal Response and their extraordinary network of volunteers who help to preserve Hawaii’s protected marine species. The event takes place on Friday, October 20, 2017 at The Kahala Hotel & Resort (5000 Kahala Ave, Honolulu, HI) from 5 p.m. – 8 p.m.

The event will feature live Hawaiian music from five-time Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award winners Waipuna, delectable food and drinks from The Kahala, and a silent auction featuring local fashion and art.

Individual tickets are available for $125.00 and can be purchased at bit.ly/alohaformonkseals

Hawaiʻi Marine Animal Response (HMAR) is Hawaii’s largest non-profit marine species conservation and response organization. HMAR covers approximately 300 miles of coastline on the islands of Oʻahu and Molokaʻi with a support staff of volunteers, interns and employees. Members of this staff are deployed to the field in response to sightings and to perform surveys, outreach activity, and interventions nearly 9 times per day, on average. Their past annual activity includes over 2,400 protected marine species sightings, over 2,700 occasions of team members engaged in shoreline responses and surveys, and over 50 Hawaiian monk seal and sea turtle related escalations or emergency responses.

Proceeds from the event will go to much needed supplies and equipment for the organization. “We are a small organization with some mighty big responsibilities on our hands, but we have a team of passionate volunteers and staff who dedicate thousands of hours of their time caring for the animals they love. This event is both an opportunity to thank them and to raise money for our nonprofit,” explains Jon Gelman, founder of HMAR.

ADDITIONAL DETAILS:

E Ho‘onui i ke Aloha no ke Kai Ola (To increase our aloha for the living sea) is a benefit for Hawai‘i Marine Animal Response (HMAR) and their network of staff and volunteers who help to preserve Hawaii’s protected marine species every day. This public event will be held at The Kahala Hotel & Resort, and it is sponsored by Dolphin Quest Oahu.

The anticipated high point of the benefit will be the auction, which will feature art, photos, and crafts from throughout Hawai‘i. Also up for auction will be the symbolic “adoption” of each of the four Hawaiian monk seal pups born on Oahu this year, including Wailea, the monk seal born off Ka‘ōhao (Lanikai) and Kaimana, the now-famed pup born in Waikīkī. The symbolic “Adoption” will include:

• A large framed photo of the seal
• A certificate of adoption
• A unique opportunity to visit the seal with the volunteer network (conditions apply)

HMAR also conducts public outreach and education for schools, the public and Hawai’i organizations. Earlier this year, Dolphin Quest was recognized by HMAR as a Hawaii Marine Animal Steward in partnership with Hawai’i Tourism Authority.

Dolphin Quest provides ongoing support and hands-on training for Hawai’i’s stranding network volunteers. In May of this year, Dolphin Quest hosted veterinarians from multiple Hawaiian islands providing valuable experience with healthy dolphins to aid their wild stranding response efforts.

Tickets to the event are available for purchase online for $125 per person as well as premium sponsorship packages for $1000. Availability is limited and the organizers are urging the public to secure tickets as soon as possible to attend this evening of music, food, festivities and marine animal conservation.

Tickets include a gift, heavy gourmet pūpū, and signature non-alcoholic drinks. $1000 Sponsorships include five tickets to the event and promotion of a business or organization in the program and leading up to the event.

Hawaii Tourism Authority Awarding $3.5 Million to Support 124 Hawaiian Culture, Natural Resources and Community Programs in 2018

In keeping with its commitment to foster sustainable tourism in the Hawaiian Islands, the Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA) is providing funding of more than $3.5 million to 124 programs that are perpetuating Hawaiian culture, protecting natural resources and showcasing community events in 2018.Recipients of the funding are nonprofit groups, community organizations and individuals statewide who have demonstrated through proposals submitted to HTA their dedication to strengthen the enduring qualities of Hawaii’s legacy that distinguish the islands as a place to live and visit.

“Sustainable tourism starts at the community level and that’s the focus of our support for initiatives by groups and individuals who have pledged to make Hawaii a better place for future generations,” said George D. Szigeti, HTA president and CEO. “Collectively, these community-based programs will help manage tourism’s impacts by preserving the quality of life we treasure as residents through culture, the environment and the sharing of festivals and events ingrained in the traditions of Hawaii’s people.”

Funding is being provided to recipients on all islands for usage in 2018 as part of three HTA program categories: Kukulu Ola, Aloha Aina and Community Enrichment. HTA issued a request for proposals on June 21 with submittals from qualified applicants received by August 4.

  • A total of $1,240,000 is being awarded to 33 recipients that are perpetuating Hawaiian culture through HTA’s Kukulu Ola program. Awardees include community groups, practitioners, craftsmen, musicians and artists committed to strengthening a broader understanding and appreciation of Hawaiian culture through place-based activity engagement. Founded on the value of ma ka hana ka ike (in working one learns), the Kukulu Ola program assists recipients steeped in ike Hawaii to share within communities the Hawaiian values inherent in each respective practice.
  • A total of $1,150,000 is being awarded to 26 recipients that are helping to protect Hawaii’s natural resources through HTA’s Aloha Aina program. Focused on the lasting value of stewardship by responsible community-based entities that emphasize aina-kanaka relationships and knowledge, the Aloha Aina program supports efforts to manage, conserve and revitalize Hawaii’s natural resources and environment.
  • A total of $1,153,300 is being awarded to 65 recipients through HTA’s Community Enrichment program, which supports quality experiences created by communities to be shared with residents and visitors for their enjoyment. The Community Enrichment program invests in a diverse array of festivals, events and year-round programs in support of culture, education, health and wellness, nature, agriculture, sports, technology and voluntourism.

Click here for the listing of awardees receiving funding from HTA.

Open Access for Broken Trust Book

Thanks to support from University of Hawaii Press and Kamehameha Schools, the public now has free access to the bestselling book Broken Trust: Greed, Mismanagement & Political Manipulation at America’s Largest Charitable Trust.

Broken Trust chronicles scandal at Kamehameha Schools/Bishop Estate during the late 1990s, which involved all three branches of Hawaii’s government and attracted front-page coverage in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal. CBS’s 60 Minutes called it, “the biggest story in Hawaii since Pearl Harbor.”

Local and national publications praised Broken Trust; Hawaii Book Publishers Association named it Book of the Year; and numerous high schools, colleges, and law schools have used Broken Trust in courses such as Modern Hawaiian History, Participation in Democracy, Trusts & Estates, Nonprofit Organizations, Federal Taxation, Fiduciary Administration, and Professional Responsibility.

The book’s surviving co-author, Randall Roth, explains in the open-access introduction that he and Judge Samuel P. King wrote Broken Trust to help protect the legacy of Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop. They assigned all royalties to local charities and donated thousands of copies to libraries and high schools. Source documents, legal issues, discussion questions, and lesson plans are available at www.BrokenTrustBook.com.

Roth added: “Judge King, would be delighted, as am I, that the current Kamehameha Schools trustees are supporting this open-access edition of Broken Trust.”

In Broken Trust’s open-access introduction, the Kamehameha Schools trustees express a desire to recognize and honor members of the Kamehameha Schools ohana who courageously stood up for the trust during the years of controversy. They also express pleasure that Broken Trust will be “openly available to students, today and in the future, so that the lessons learned might continue to make us healthier as an organization and as a community.”

The open-access introduction also includes this quote from the late Winona Beamer: “In Hawai‘i, we tend not to speak up, even when we know that something is wrong. Especially in the Hawaiian community, the common practice has long been to avoid confrontation at almost any cost. This approach does not serve us well in today’s world. We must learn to be good stewards of all that we have been given, and this sometimes requires that we take a stand. The way the Kamehameha ‘ohana rallied and worked together as a family to defend Princess Pauahi’s legacy says much about how to live effectively and righteously in a fast-changing world. It demonstrates the power of informed people unified by moral conviction, and should always be a source of pride and inspiration.”

Links to Broken Trust on popular platforms, and to download:

Amazon/Kindle: http://a.co/0tFjGaH
GooglePlay and GoogleBooks: https://books.google.com/books?id=z6Y2DwAAQBAJ
ScholarSpace PDF files: https://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10125/48548

“What makes Broken Trust so fascinating is that it works on multiple levels. It’s a well-researched book about Hawaii’s history and culture; a dramatic story of judicial, political, and corporate corruption; and a cautionary tale for acting or future charitable trust board members on everything you shouldn’t do if you want to respect your organization’s mission and ensure the public’s trust. The players in Broken Trust jump off the page.” —Christopher Quay, Exempt Organization Tax Review

“Broken Trust is rich in anthropological detail and spiced with characters and quotations that would comfortably populate a John Grisham novel. The authors are fearless and uncomplimentary when documenting the role and ethical quandaries of lawyers and judges.” —James Daw, Estates, Trusts & Pensions Journal

“Broken Trust reads like a political thriller with a whole assortment of characters straight out of a Tom Clancy novel and plot twists that are always unexpected. It was hard to put down. A great read!” —W. Scott Simon, author of The Prudent Investor

“I loved this book! It was like reading a thriller; I could not wait to find out what would happen next. Who would have thought that a book about a charitable trust could be so exciting? Some of the characters are truly unforgettable. I am still shaking my head at the fiduciary breaches and the conflicts of interest.”
—Professor Mary LaFrance, University of Nevada School of Law

Governor Ige’s Statement on Approval of TMT Permit

The Board’s decision today is the latest milestone in what has been a complex journey. I believe Hawai‘i can host a new telescope in the right way, with respect for the values, traditions and culture of the first Hawaiians, and that our island state can be Earth’s eyes into the universe to prepare for a brighter future.
— Governor David Ige

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, Bipartisan Coalition Reintroduce Native Hawaiian Housing Legislation

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02) today joined a bipartisan coalition of lawmakers in introducing the reauthorization of the Native American Housing Assistance and Self Determination Act (NAHASDA), which has empowered more than 1,400 low-income families in Hawaiʻi over the past two decades, along with native communities across the country. In addition to the introduction of the bill today in the House, U.S. Senator Tom Udall (D-NM) has also introduced companion language in the U.S. Senate.

“Reauthorizing NAHASDA is critical to fulfill our nation’s trust responsibility to Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. Safe, secure, and affordable housing is essential to the wellbeing of our country’s native people which leads to better health, education, and economic outcomes that strengthen native communities,” said Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard. “In Hawaiʻi, almost 30 percent of the homeless population is comprised of Native Hawaiiansa statistic that is far too high in the most prosperous country in the world. Reauthorizing NAHASDA provides needed financial support to native communities in Hawaiʻi and across the country. We must continue to fight for the programs that will improve housing and wellness resources for Native American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian communities throughout the country.”

Background: NAHASDA was first established in 1996 with the consolidation of several separate assistance programs, provided by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, into a single block grant program. In 2000, NAHASDA was amended to add Title VIII – Housing Assistance for Native Hawaiians. The amendment adds similar programs for Native Hawaiians who reside on Hawaiian Home Lands to the NAHASDA legislation.

In Hawaiʻi, the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands (DHHL) is the sole recipient of the Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant as provided for by the law. DHHL administers 203,000 acres of trust land; 99% of those lands are located in Hawai‘i’s Second Congressional District: from the southernmost tip of Hawai‘i Island to Kauaʻi and Niʻihau; it includes every Hawaiian Island, but excludes urban Honolulu.

Hawaiian Airlines and Japan Airlines Announce Comprehensive New Partnership

Two of the most popular airlines between Hawai’i and Japan yesterday signed a comprehensive new partnership agreement that will greatly enhance the ease and comfort of travel for passengers traveling between the two island chains. The agreement between Hawaiian Airlines and Japan Airlines, signed at a ceremony in Tokyo, takes effect March 25, 2018 (subject to government approval). The agreement provides for extensive code sharing, lounge access and frequent flyer program reciprocity.

(L-R): Theo Panagiotoulias, senior vice president of global sales and alliances, Hawaiian Airlines; Mark Dunkerley, president and CEO, Hawaiian Airlines; Yoshiharu Ueki, representative director and president, Japan Airlines; and Hideki Oshima, executive officer, Japan Airlines.

“We are delighted to partner with Japan Airlines for our long-term future in Japan,” said Hawaiian Airlines President and CEO Mark Dunkerley. “Japan Airlines embodies the welcoming culture of Japan and is renowned for the quality of its services. Our partnership will greatly increase travel choices for those in Japan looking to travel to Hawaii as well as for those in Hawaii looking to travel to Japan.”

“Hawaiian Airlines is well known among Japanese travelers for its warm hospitality and its excellent record for punctuality and safety,” said Japan Airlines President Yoshiharu Ueki. “We look forward to providing our passengers with additional options of exceptional service and comfortable travel to and throughout the Hawaiian Islands.”

As part of this comprehensive partnership, the two carriers also intend to establish a joint venture designed to provide even more choices, convenience and enhancements to the traveling public to/from Japan and beyond to multiple Asian markets.

In the near-term:

• JAL guests will have unlimited access to Hawaiian’s vast neighbor island and Japan-Hawai’i network, including non-stop flights between Sapporo and Honolulu.

• Hawaiian Airlines will have full access to JAL’s domestic network, which includes Nagoya, Fukuoka, Sendai and Aomori.

• Hawaiian’s Japan-to-Hawai’i flights will be offered as new options within Japan Airlines’ wholly owned subsidiary, JALPAK, a highly reputable package tour operator in Japan.

• JAL Mileage Bank and HawaiianMiles members will be able to earn miles on the codeshare flights. Further opportunities for accrual and redemption of mileage will be expanded at a later date.

• Guests will have access to both airlines’ lounges, and when Hawaiian has completed its planned relocation to Terminal 2 at Tokyo Narita Airport, guests of each airline will be able to seamlessly transfer between each carrier’s networks.

Hōkūleʻa Greeted by Hundreds During Her Hanalei Arrival

Crewmembers aboard Hōkūleʻa and sister canoe Hikianalia arrived this morning to Kauaʻi greeted by scores of outrigger paddlers, ocean enthusiasts and a pod of dolphins as they entered Hanalei Bay. Hundreds of ʻohana and supporters lined the pier to near-capacity where the crew was greeted ashore by students, Hawaiian practitioners and a hula halau and other supporters from across the island.

Voyagers departed from Haleiwa, Oʻahu yesterday and reached their destination after 12 hours of sailing through the night amid clear skies and steady tradewinds. Hōkūleʻa was captained by Kamaki Worthington, North Shore resident, while navigation student Koral McCarthy provided direction via traditional Polynesian wayfinding techniques.

“Hōkūleʻa pulls people together. We prepare for her visit like we would for a visit from Tutu. She teaches us about respect and challenges us to rise up to our kuleana. She reminds us how we treat her is how we should treat our earth and each other,” said McCarthy who also coordinated arrival ceremonies and much of the week’s coming events.

The Kauaʻi port stop and outreach events were planned by the Polynesian Voyaging Society and coordinated by local community members and supporters as part of the Mahalo Hawaiʻi, Sail, an extension of the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage. The sail includes similar visits to every major Hawaiian island into 2018.

During the 3-day Kauaʻi engagement, crewmembers will participate with the community in events and activities that will highlight the recent Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage as well as the work being done within Kauaʻi communities to care for Island Earth.

Events during the stop will include outreach opportunities, local school visits, cultural exchanges, and crew presentations. The following events have been scheduled to date. The public is encouraged to check hokulea.com and Facebook for daily updates.

Kauaʻi Engagement Schedule (*All dates and times subject to change)

Monday, September 25
• A.M. Scheduled school tours and visits – by appointment only
• 2:30-5:30pm Dockside outreach at Hanalei Bay Pier – public welcome
• P.M. ʻOahi O Makana, a Hawaiian protocol event – public viewing from Hanalei Bay to Haʻena areas

Tuesday, September 25
• A.M. Scheduled dockside school tours and visits – by appointment only
• P.M. Hōkūleʻa tentative departure for Oahu – public welcome

Saturday, September 30 (post departure)
• 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mālama Hulēʻia workday at the fishpond at Niumalu Park

October through May port dates will be posted as they become available.

Hōkūleʻa to Set Sail for Kauaʻi

Hōkūleʻa is scheduled to depart the Haleiwa Boat Harbor for Hanalei Bay, Kauaʻi as part of the Mahalo Hawaiʻi, Sail. Crewmembers are preparing to set sail tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 p.m. and arrive to Kauaʻi the following morning that will include a public arrival ceremony at 10 a.m..

During the 3-day Kauaʻi engagement, crewmembers will participate with the community in events and activities that will highlight the recent Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage as well as the work being done within Kauaʻi communities to care for Island Earth.

Events during the stop will include outreach opportunities, local school visits, cultural exchanges, and crew presentations. The following events have been scheduled to date. The public is encouraged to check hokulea.com and Facebook for daily updates:

Kauaʻi Engagement Schedule – (*All dates and times subject to change)

Saturday, September 23
• 2:30 p.m. Hōkūleʻa departure from Haleʻiwa Boat Harbor, Oʻahu – public welcome

Sunday, September 24
• 10 a.m. Hōkūleʻa arrival ceremony and community paʻina at Hanalei Bay Pier – public welcome

Monday, September 25
• A.M. Scheduled school tours and visits – by appointment only
• 2:30-5:30pm Dockside outreach at Hanalei Bay Pier – public welcome
• P.M. ʻOahi O Makana, a Hawaiian protocol event – public viewing from Hanalei Bay to Haʻena areas

Tuesday, September 25
• A.M. Scheduled dockside school tours and visits – by appointment only
• P.M. Hōkūleʻa tentative departure for Oahu – public welcome

Saturday, September 30 (post departure)
• 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mālama Hulēʻia workday at the fishpond at Nuimalu Park

Preservation of Historical Sites at Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park Featured in Free Lecture

On Wednesday, September 27, Archaeologist MaryAnne Maigret, will be discussing the work of preserving historic and culturally significant stone structures at Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park as part of Kona Historical Society’s regular Hanohano `O Kona Lecture Series.

NPS Photo

MaryAnne will discuss preservation of the cultural landscape of the lands the park encompasses including Hawaiian stone architecture, historic vegetation, and other elements that contribute to the significance and of this sacred site.

MaryAnne is an historic preservation specialist with an academic background in geography and cartography, and nearly thirty years of experience in Hawaiian archeology. She has earned degrees at the University of California at Berkeley and the University of Hawaii, where she earned a Masters degree in Geography. She has devoted the last fifteen years to public service for State and Federal government and is currently the Acting Integrated Resources Manager at Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park.

This presentation is part of KHS’ community lecture series held at the West Hawai`i Civic Center, Kailua-Kona, every last Wednesday of the month from 5:30-7:00p.m., this series features local and state speakers sharing knowledge of a wide variety of cultural and historical subjects. Presented by Kona Historical Society, in cooperation with the County of Hawai’i, this lecture series is a gift from the Society to the community that has supported it for so long. Free of charge, it is open to all, residents and visitors alike.

‘I‘iwi Receives Protection Under the Endangered Species Act

Once one of the most common forest birds in the Hawaiian Islands, the ‘i‘iwi, also known as the scarlet honeycreeper, will be protected as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service determined that listing was warranted based on a review of the best information available for the ‘i‘iwi, gained through exhaustive research, public comments and independent scientific peer reviews.

In the past, ‘i‘iwi could be found from the coastal lowlands where they foraged for food to the high mountain forests where they nested. Today, ninety percent of the ‘i‘iwi population is confined to a narrow band of forest on East Maui and the windward slopes of the island of Hawaii, between 4,265 and 6,234 feet (1,300 and 1,900 meters) in elevation. The birds are virtually gone from the islands of Lanai, Oahu, Molokai and west Maui, while the population on Kauai is in steep decline.

“In recent years, the ‘i‘iwi population has been in sharp decline, due to threats from habitat loss, invasive species and avian diseases, particularly avian malaria,” said Mary Abrams, project leader for the Service’s Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office. “These threats have affected all forest birds, not just the ‘i‘iwi. Conservation that benefits the ‘i‘iwi will undoubtedly benefit other Hawaiian forest birds.”

Avian malaria, carried by invasive mosquitos, is the primary driver in the decline in of the ‘i‘iwi population, and has already caused the decimation of dozens of other Hawaiian forest birds. The disease kills approximately ninety-five percent of infected ‘i‘iwi. Mosquitos, which are not native to the Hawaiian Islands, breed and thrive at lower and warmer elevations where they infect birds like the ‘i’iwi with avian malaria and pox.

“‘I‘iwi have virtually disappeared from any habitat where mosquitoes are found,” said Abrams. “This has caused their range to shrink dramatically – they are almost entirely limited to higher elevation ‘ohi‘a forests for their habitat, dietary, and nesting needs.

Higher and cooler elevation ‘ohi‘a forests, where mosquitoes do not thrive, remain the only habitat for the ‘i‘iwi, but even those areas are under threat. As temperatures rise, mosquitoes, and the avian diseases they carry, are able to survive at higher elevations and spread upwards into the mountains, further constricting the ‘i‘iwi’s range.

‘I‘iwi are dependent for their survival on forests of native ‘ohi‘a. On the island of Hawaii, home to 90 percent of the remaining ‘i‘iwi population, those ‘ohi‘a forests have been under attack from rapid ‘ohi‘a death, an invasive tree pathogen.

“Working with the state, our conservation partners and the public will be crucial as we work to recover the ‘i‘iwi, said Abrams. “The Service is committed to building on our record of collaborative conservation to protect Hawaii’s native species.”

The Service’s final listing rule will be published in the Federal Register on Sept 20, 2017, and will become effective on Sept 20, 2017. Next steps include development of a recovery plan, which will be bolstered by input from other federal and state agencies, other conservation partners and the public.

More information, including the final listing, can be found at http://www.fws.gov/pacificislands/.