Tonight at the Akebono Theater – Willie K and YOZA

YOZA and WillieK

Rockfall Triggers Explosive Event at Halema’uma’u

Just after 10 AM this morning, the southeastern wall of the Overlook crater, in Halemaʻumaʻu, collapsed and fell into the summit lava lake.

This image is a still taken from the webcam positioned on the rim of Halemaʻumaʻu at that location, showing spatter in the air directly in front of the camera.

This image is a still taken from the webcam positioned on the rim of Halemaʻumaʻu at that location, showing spatter in the air directly in front of the camera.

This triggered a small explosive event that threw spatter bombs onto the rim of Halemaʻumaʻu at the site of the tourist overlook, closed since 2008.

The lava fragments ejected ranged in size from dust-sized particles up to spatter bombs about 70 cm (~30 inches) across.

The larger clasts – the bombs – dotted the ground around the tourist overlook and webcam, giving the area a look reminiscent of a cow pasture.

The larger clasts – the bombs – dotted the ground around the tourist overlook and webcam, giving the area a look reminiscent of a cow pasture.

As has been seen with almost all previous explosive events at Halemaʻumaʻu since 2008, the spatter that was ejected was coated in dust and filled with small lithic fragments – clear evidence of the involvement of lithic wall rock.

The knife is 12 cm (4.5 in) long.

The knife is 12 cm (4.5 in) long.

Spatter landed on wooden fencing laying on the ground at the closed tourist overlook, igniting it in a few places.

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The part of the Overlook crater wall that collapsed is evident in the center of this photo by its white color.

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Ni’ihau ‘Alilea Shell Workshops at Lyman Museum

For the very first time ever, men (and women too!) will have the opportunity to create a one-of-a-kind Ni’ihau shell lei that traditionally is made and worn by men for very special occasions such as a wedding, or a hula hālau performance.

Lei created from 'alilea shells.

Lei created from ‘alilea shells.

At the Lyman Museum, Kele Kanahele of the Island of Ni’ihau will teach the authentic creation of these rarely seen pieces of Ni’ihau heritage for the first time anywhere, twice in August on Friday, August 15 and Saturday, August 16, from 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.

On either day you may learn how to make an18-inch necklace/lei ($380 for Museum members, $410 for nonmembers), or a pair of earrings for ladies ($105 for members, $130 for nonmembers)—or more than one piece, as long as you sign up for specific pieces in advance.  All pieces will be created in the pikake style, using ‘alilea ke’oke ‘o shells (white).  The ‘alilea is known as the large dove shell because it closely resembles but is slightly larger (about ¾ inch long) than the better-known momi or dove shell.  Such lei are rarely made because piercing is very difficult due to the thickness of the shell.  For the earrings, much smaller shells will be used to create pieces appropriate for ladies.

Space is limited to 24 persons per day; only people who have registered can be permitted in the classroom.  Reservations must be made, pieces specified, and the workshop fee(s) paid by Friday, August 8, to ensure your place and the availability of shells.  Space is limited to 24 persons per day; only people who have registered can be permitted in the classroom.

Kane, follow in the footsteps of generations of Ni’ihau men by creating and wearing this classic lei on important occasions of your own!  And wahine, these pieces will look just as lovely on you … or you can give your special someone a treasure of Hawai’i that shows everyone he’s a treasure too!  For more information or to register, please call 935-5021 or stop by the Museum’s Admissions desk.  The Lyman Museum is located at 276 Haili St in Hilo and is open Monday through Saturday, 10 am – 4:30 pm.

Star-Advertiser Poll Confirms that Majority Oppose Federal Involvement in Native Hawaiian Recognition

A new online poll by the Honolulu Star-Advertiser confirms that despite continued support from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, a significant majority are opposed to the federal government’s involvement in the creation of a Native Hawaiian government.

Advertiser PollThe poll, which appeared on the Star-Advertiser website as a daily poll question for July 15, 2014, asked, “Should the U.S. Department of Interior keep open the process for federal recognition of Native Hawaiians?” An overwhelming 67% of those responding voted “No,” while only 33% supported the continuation of the DOI’s efforts.

In light of the strong opposition voiced at the recent DOI hearings, these results were not a surprise. Support for the nation-building process has waned over the years, but the recent efforts from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and the federal response from the Department of the Interior have met with increasing criticism. Many Hawaiian citizens are concerned to see the nation-building process pursued so vigorously despite the many questions that have been raised about it.

“The people of Hawaii have put up a giant flashing ‘Stop’ sign for OHA and the federal government to see” stated Keli’i Akina, Ph.D., President of the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii. “In every possible venue they are expressing opposition to the state’s race-based nation-building program.   The question shouldn’t be whether the people support a Native Hawaiian government. The question should be whether the State will finally listen to the voice of the people and abandon this wasteful and divisive effort.”

“After the expenditure of millions of dollars and considerable influence, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs has still failed to convince the People of the merit of its nation-building effort,” continued Dr. Akina. “How much more will they throw away on this process? These resources could be better spent helping the people of Hawaii in real and substantial ways such as improving educational achievement or job training. Let us hope that OHA finally hears what the citizens of Hawaii have been trying so hard to tell them–it’s time to get out of the nation-building business.”

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Offers Free Hawaiian Music Songwriting Retreat

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is offering a two-day Hawaiian music songwriting retreat for beginners on Saturday, August 16 and Sunday, August 17. Hawaiian music, language and haku mele (Hawaiian song) experts Kenneth Makuakāne and Kaliko Trapp-Beamer will lead the workshops.

Kenneth Makuakane teaching ukulele.

Kenneth Makuakane teaching ukulele.

Both workshops run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and will be held at the park’s Education Center. Advance registration is required. To register, call (808) 985-6166. Leave your name, email address, and best contact number no later than August 8. Space is limited. The park will contact you by email to confirm your reservation.

The retreat will be held in the park at the summit of Kīlauea. Budding songwriters will find inspiration in this wahi kapu (sacred place), among the towering koa and ‘ōhi‘a lehua trees, over fields of ropy pāhoehoe lava, and in the awe-inspiring eruptive glow from Halema‘uma‘u Crater.

Also inspirational are the retreat’s accomplished teachers. Kenneth Makuakāne is a multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano award winner, along with his group, The Pandanus Club. He’s a prolific songwriter (1,500-plus songs), producer of more than 100 albums, and collaborator who has worked with virtually all of the stars of Hawaiian music over the years.

Kaliko

Kaliko Trapp-Beamer

Kaliko was raised as the hānai son of Hawaiian cultural expert Aunty Nona Beamer (1923-2008), learning Hawaiian chant, storytelling, traditional protocol, family songs, and stories. He currently teaches Hawaiian language courses at the University of Hawai‘i in Hilo, and helps coordinate the Beamer Family Aloha Music Camp. He is the President of the Mohala Hou Foundation dedicated to “preserve and perpetuate Hawaiian culture through education and the arts.”

The two-day Hawaiian songwriting retreat is sponsored by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Park entrance fees apply.

Hawai‘i Island National Parks to Celebrate Hawaiian Flag Day

Four national parks on Hawai‘i Island will simultaneously celebrate the first national holiday in Hawai‘i, Lā ho‘iho‘i ea, or Hawaiian Flag Day, on Thursday, July 31. The event is free, but entrance fees apply at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park & Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park.

Hawaii Flag
Hawai‘i celebrated its first national holiday on July 31, 1843, when the Kingdom of Hawai‘i was restored by Great Britain. Kamehameha III, Kauikeaouli, proclaimed, “Ua mau ke ea o ka ‘āina i ka pono,” the life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness. That famous proclamation is perpetuated today as the state motto.

Join the unified celebration of Lā ho‘iho‘i ea on Thursday, July 31, 2014 at Pu‘ukoholā Heiau National Historic Site, Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park, Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park from 9 a.m. to noon. The ceremony at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park will be from 10 a.m. to noon.

On July 26, 1990 then-Governor John Waihe‘e signed a proclamation making every July 31 Hawaiian Flag Day, and urged Hawai‘i citizens ‘to observe due respect for the flag and the proud tradition for which it stands.’

The Hawaiian Flag Day ceremony schedule at the Hawai‘i Island national parks is as follows:

9 a.m.: Learn to make your own pū ‘ohe (bamboo trumpet) at the West Hawai‘i parks.

10 a.m.: Participate in presentations to learn the history of Lā ho‘iho‘i ea, Hawai‘i Pono‘ī, “Ua mau ke ea o ka ‘āina i ka pono, and ‘aha‘āina, the first lū‘au.

Noon: Honor the 1816 flag of Kamehameha I.

UH Hilo College of Hawaiian Language Announces Dean’s List Spring 2014

UH Hilo Moniker

Ke kūkala aku nei ko Ke Kulanui o Hawaiʻi ma Hilo Ka Haka Ula O Keelikōlani i nā inoa o nā haumāna kaha oi no ke kau Kupulau 2014 (<a href="http://hilo.hawaii.edu">University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo</a> Ka HakaUla O Ke`elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language announces its Dean’s List for the Spring 2014 semester):

Jai Ho Choi, Samuel Clubb, Dillon Dominguez, Brandi Dugo, Shari Frias, Philip Gamiao, Alexander Guerrero, Kayla Ing, Linda Ixtupe, Erika Jardin, Kamalani Johnson, Tiphani Kainoa, Kamaleiku`uipo Kalehuawehe-Valentine, Micah Kealaiki, Jacqueline Kinge, Maile Kipapa, Gail Klevens, Dylon Koehn, Ciera Lamb, Hannah Lockwood, Daniel McDonald, Candice Miner-Ching, Lilia Misheva, Samantha Pa, Christopher Ramos, Kapuaonaona Roback, Koa Rodrigues, Ronald Santos, Nelli Semenko, You Jin Shin, Eric Taaca, Gabriel Tebow, Lindsay Terkelsen, Randall Yamaoka, and Cheyne Yonemori.

Department of Health Fines Hawaiian Commerical and Sugar Company for Over 400 Violations

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) Clean Air Branch has issued a Notice and Finding of Violation and Order (NFVO) to Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company (HC&S) for excess emission and reporting violations that occurred from 2009 to 2013 in Puunene, Maui.

Hawaii Sugar Fine

A penalty of $1,335,000 has been assessed for the alleged violations. HC&S may request a hearing to contest the violations within 20 days of receiving the NFVO.

More than 400 violations were documented by DOH’s extensive records reviews of HC&S’s semi-annual reports, deviation letters and additional information submitted by HC&S. A copy of the NFVO, which includes a complete list of the violations, may be viewed at http://health.hawaii.gov/cab/Issued Formal Notices of Violation and Order

Through the air permit process, the DOH ensures companies comply with state and federal emission standards to minimize air pollution impacts on the public. The DOH Clean Air Branch (CAB) protects the people and environment of Hawaii by monitoring air quality and regulating businesses that release pollutants into the air.

The CAB reviews and approves air permits, evaluates and enforces state and federal air standards, conducts inspections, and investigates reported incidents related to outdoor air quality.

At DOI Hearing, Grassroot Institute Disputes Department’s Authority to Recognize a Hawaiian Nation

Grassroot Institute offers comments questioning legality of and support for a Hawaiian government

Today, the Department of the Interior held the first of a series of public meetings intended to solicit comments on a proposed rule that would, “facilitate the reestablishment of a government-to-government relationship with the Native Hawaiian community.”

Hawaiian Sovereignty Sign

The Grassroot Institute of Hawaii was one of several groups to offer comments and testimony on the proposed rule. In its written comments, the organization urges the Department of the Interior not to pursue the proposed rule, pointing out that there is no historical basis for a Native Hawaiian government as envisioned by the rule; that there are serious questions as to the legality of the nation-building process; that there is a distinct lack of support among Native Hawaiians for the creation of a Hawaiian nation; and that the Department does not have the authority to recognize a Hawaiian government.

In commenting on the question of recognizing a Native Hawaiian government, Keli’i Akina, Ph.D., President of the Grassroot Institute, emphasizes that the only such historical relationship was with the Kingdom of Hawaii, a multi-ethnic state that would not qualify as a race-based tribe:

“[T]he Supreme Court has been clear that tribes are political and not racial entities. The procedure for recognizing a tribe does not include the creation of one where no such entity existed.  While the historical circumstances of the overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy may be cause for debate, it is undeniable that there has never been an exclusively Native Hawaiian tribe or government either at the time of the overthrow or in the 120 years since.”

In addition, Grassroot pointed out the lack of participation in the Native Hawaiian Roll process as evidence of a general lack of support among Native Hawaiians–especially given the fact that the majority of those enrolled were imported via other lists. Moreover, there remain serious questions about the constitutionality of the race-based Roll process and the concept of a race-based tribe or government in general.

Disputing the authority of the DOI to act in this matter, Dr. Akina commented that:

“The Department of the Interior does not have the authority to recognize a Hawaiian government because the Constitution gives Congress the power to ratify treaties and recognize tribes. Neither the Executive Branch nor the states have the power to create or recognize a tribal government, which thereby makes both the existing nation-building process and any action by the Department of the Interior vulnerable to legal challenge.”

Dr. Akina, who was present at today’s hearing for the purpose of reiterating the Grassroot Institute’s written comments, was optimistic about the outcome of the DOI hearings.

“Though we believe the Department’s proposed rule to be precipitous, unconstitutional, and unwise, there is a silver lining,” he stated. “To date, many of the questions about the formation of a Native Hawaiian government have been ignored. While we may be no closer to getting answers to our concerns, we do have a forum to voice them. The expensive, time-consuming effort to tribalize Native Hawaiians has done little to help the state or the Native Hawaiian community. This is an excellent opportunity for the average citizen to have their voice heard on a critical issue that threatens to divide and reshape our state.”

Grassroot Institute’s written comments on the proposed rule can be read in full here: http://new.grassrootinstitute.org/2014/06/grassroot-institute-comments-on-proposed-doi-rule/

Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia Arrive in Tahiti

Papeʻete, Tahiti: Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia—the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s voyaging canoes—were greeted in Tahiti with celebrations commemorating the special relationship between Hōkūleʻa and Tahiti that began with her maiden voyage to French Polynesia 38 years ago. President of French Polynesia, Gaston Flosse, and other dignitaries welcomed in the Polynesian Voyaging Society captains and crew.

The Hokule'a reaches landfall.

The Hokule’a reaches landfall.

The canoes made landfall at 4:00 p.m. on Sunday, June 22. Sarah Vaki, sister of Hikianalia crew member Herve Maraetaata, travelled from her home in the Marquesas to Tahiti to continue a tradition of singing an arrival song for the canoes once they are within sight of land. Heremoana Maatuaaihutapu gave the Tahitian greeting for Hōkūleʻa that his father, Maco, gave in 1976.

In a gathering after the crew made landfall, a special declaration of “Mālama Honua” and pledge to care for the oceans was presented to President Gaston Flosse and master navigator Nainoa Thompson. Tahiti’s Mālama Honua declaration brought together a diverse group of organizations in a pledge of support. Thompson will take this declaration to the United Nations conference in Apia, Samoa, as well as all future ports during the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage sponsored by Hawaiian Airlines. “I was here in 1976, and the people of Tahiti gave us a great gift—they told us that we are family and to be proud of who we are as Pacific people,” said Thompson, amid applause. “Tahiti changed Hawaiʻi forever, and 38 years later, you hand me this Mālama Honua declaration to protect the ocean, and give us hope again.”

Media and the public are invited to attend events throughout the Worldwide Voyage’s time in Tahiti:

Monday, June 23, through Thursday, June 26 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.: Global Education Village with booths and displays about navigation and Mālama Honua efforts.

Tuesday, June 24, 2014, 6:00 p.m.: Nainoa Thompson presents on navigation techniques and the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage at the University.

Sunday, June 29, 2014, 2:00 p.m.: Ceremonial renaming of Paofai beach to Hōkūle‘a Beach by Gaston Flosse, President of French Polynesia.

Experts Cast Doubt on the Viability of Hawaiian Nation-Building

The feasibility of both the state and federal push to create a sovereign Native Hawaiian nation was brought into sharp question today as two authorities with very different perspectives on the issue expressed their doubts as to whether either plan would come to fruition.

Hawaiian Sovereignty Sign

At a panel on Native Hawaiian issues sponsored by the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii and moderated by the think tank’s president Keli’i Akina, Ph.D., OHA Trustee Oswald Stender and former State Attorney General Michael Lilly fielded questions about the need to help Native Hawaiians, the justifications for Hawaiian sovereignty, and the probable results of the nation-building efforts.

Trustee Stender stressed the importance of providing Native Hawaiians with the tools necessary to improve their quality of life–especially in education and economic advancement. Stressing his belief that it was important to allow the people to determine whether they wished to form a Hawaiian nation, he expressed his private doubts as to whether it was practical or even likely to happen.  Trustee Stender clarified that his comments on the panel were not on behalf of the OHA Trustee board, but as a private individual.

Former AG Lilly agreed with Mr. Stender that there is a real value to organizations like OHA in their potential to help Native Hawaiians, but found the millions spent pursuing the Akaka Bill and nation-building process to be, “wasteful.” In addition, Mr. Lilly questioned the historical grounds for a race-based Hawaiian nation, pointing out that his own background (his ancestors were citizens of the Kingdom of Hawaii and loyalists to the Queen) highlights the inherent contradiction in creating a tribe from what was formerly a multi-racial government.

In reference to the effort by the Department of the Interior to recognize a Native Hawaiian government via administrative rule, Mr. Lilly noted that, “There never was a Hawaiian tribe with whom the United States entered into a treaty relationship. If there was such a tribe, then all the multi-ethnic peoples who were citizens of the Hawaiian Monarchy would be members of that tribe.  For the U.S. Supreme Court has held that a ‘tribe’ is a political and not a racial entity. The current effort to recognize a separate ethnic tribe by the Dept. of the Interior is unconstitutional because, under the Constitution, it is the Congress that has the plenary power to recognize tribes and ratify treaties. That power does not reside in the Executive branch of the federal government or with the various states. So the current effort aimed at creating a tribe of Hawaiians has no legal basis.” He then went on to express doubt that there exists sufficient support even among Native Hawaiians for the DOI’s effort to succeed.

Trustee Stender agreed with Mr. Lilly that pursuit of a “another government” is a waste of valuable financial resources that could be better used to meet the needs of Hawaiians.  He also expressed frustration that the federal discussion of Hawaiians as a tribe unnecessarily confuses the basic issue of protecting entitlements for Native Hawaiians, an issue unrelated to creating a tribe or government.

“Time and again, we see evidence that the nation-building process reflects a fundamental misunderstanding of what both Native Hawaiians and the citizens of this state really want,” stated Keli’i Akina, President of the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii. “We look to recognize the contributions of Native Hawaiians and demonstrate our respect for that culture. And we wish to help Native Hawaiians succeed, as we do with all citizens of Hawaii. However, the support simply isn’t there for the creation of divisive, race-based government. It is unconstitutional and counter to the spirit and history of our islands.  The money, time and energy spent pursuing political sovereignty could be better spent improving education and economic opportunities for Native Hawaiians. It is time that the federal government and the state stop trying to strong-arm us into supporting an unconstitutional Hawaiian nation and accept that there are better ways to advance the interests of the people of Hawaii.”

Announcement of Department of the Interior Hearings Raises Questions About Nation-Building Process

The United States Department of the Interior has announced its intention to hold hearings in Hawaii on a proposed rule that would establish a government-to-government relationship with the Native Hawaiian community. The hearings, which will begin on Monday in Honolulu are intended to solicit public comment on a number of questions surrounding the establishment of a Native Hawaiian government, including what role the federal government should take in organizing that government and drafting its constitution.

Hawaiian Sovereignty Sign
The move comes even as various groups have called for a delay in OHA’s proposed election and Constitutional convention, citing practical questions about the impact of a Hawaiian nation on the state and the Native Hawaiian people. Though the DOI announcement of the hearings referenced the support of the state government and Congressional delegation in its decision to move forward with its rulemaking process, observers continue to question the way in which the advocates of nation-building appear determined to ignore the widespread lack of support for the process.

Also in question is the agency’s authority to recognize a Native Hawaiian government via executive action–an unprecedented step that could result in a legal challenge. In 2013, four members of the US Commission on Civil Rights wrote a letter to President Obama, urging him not to attempt to create a Native Hawaiian tribe in this matter, calling it, “unwise and unconstitutional.”

“Such precipitous action from the federal government begs the question of who it is that benefits from this rush to create a Native Hawaiian tribe,” stated Keli’i Akina, Ph.D. President of the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii. “The low enrollment in the Native Hawaiian Roll and calls for delay from Native Hawaiians have shown that the Hawaiian community does not support these actions, a sentiment strongly echoed by the majority of those who live in our state.”

Dr. Akina continued: “The most astounding thing is that we are continuing with this process despite the fact that no one can or will explain so many key questions involved. Questions like: What shape would a Native Hawaiian government take? How would it affect all of those who live in the state? How would it change our legal process? Affect our economy? Change the face of Hawaii’s culture and society?”

“OHA and the Department of the Interior are treating the creation of an unconstitutional race-based nation as a done deal, despite all of the questions and objections that have been raised thus far. It appears that there is no real tribe to benefit from federal recognition of a native Hawaiian government — only narrow interests who stand to gain from potential land acquisition and power. I urge all Hawaiians who care about the future of our state to take the time to come to one of the DOI hearings and make their voice heard on this reckless and divisive proposal,” he concluded.

Interior Considers Procedures to Reestablish a Government-to-Government Relationship with the Native Hawaiian Community

In response to requests from the Native Hawaiian community, Hawaii’s congressional delegation and state leaders, the U.S. Department of the Interior announced today a first step to consider reestablishing a government-to-government relationship between the United States and the Native Hawaiian community.

Hawaiian Sovereignty Sign
The purpose of such a relationship would be to more effectively implement the special political and trust relationship that currently exists between the Federal government and the Native Hawaiian community. Today’s action, known as an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM), provides for an extensive series of public meetings and consultations in Hawaii and Indian Country to solicit comments that could help determine whether the Department develops a formal, administrative procedure for reestablishing an official government-to-government relationship with the Native Hawaiian community and if so, what that procedure should be.

“When I met with members of the Native Hawaiian community last year during my visit to the state, I learned first-hand about Hawaii’s unique history and the importance of the special trust relationship that exists between the Federal government and the Native Hawaiian community,” said Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell. “Through this step, the Department is responding to requests from not only the Native Hawaiian community but also state and local leaders and interested parties who recognize that we need to begin a conversation of diverse voices to help determine the best path forward for honoring the trust relationship that Congress has created specifically to benefit Native Hawaiians.”

Over many decades, Congress has enacted more than 150 statutes that specifically recognize and implement this trust relationship with the Native Hawaiian community, including the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act, the Native Hawaiian Education Act, and the Native Hawaiian Health Care Act. The Native Hawaiian community, however, has not had a formal governing entity since the overthrow of the Kingdom of Hawaii in 1893. In 1993, Congress enacted the Apology Resolution which offered an apology to Native Hawaiians on behalf of the United States for its role in the overthrow and committed the U.S. government to a process of reconciliation. In 2000, the Department of the Interior and the Department of Justice jointly issued a report on the reconciliation process that identified self-determination for Native Hawaiians under Federal law as their leading recommendation.

The ANPRM, available tomorrow on the Federal Register, outlines the following five threshold questions that will be the subject of the forthcoming public meetings regarding whether the Federal Government should reestablish a government-to-government relationship with the Native Hawaiian community:

  • Should the Secretary propose an administrative rule that would facilitate the reestablishment of a government-to-government relationship with the Native Hawaiian community?
  • Should the Secretary assist the Native Hawaiian community in reorganizing its government, with which the United States could reestablish a government-to-government relationship?
  • If so, what process should be established for drafting and ratifying a reorganized Native Hawaiian government’s constitution or other governing document?
  • Should the Secretary instead rely on the reorganization of a Native Hawaiian government through a process established by the Native Hawaiian community and facilitated by the State of Hawaii, to the extent such a process is consistent with Federal law?
  • If so, what conditions should the Secretary establish as prerequisites to Federal acknowledgment of a government-to-government relationship with the reorganized Native Hawaiian government?

The Department will be engaging in an extensive series of public meetings throughout the State of Hawaii and in Indian Country to solicit comments and feedback on whether and how the process of reestablishing a government-to-government relationship should move forward. These meetings will be held in Hawaii and the continental United States as follows:

Public Meetings in Hawaii – June 23 through July 8

Oahu

Monday, June 23 — Honolulu – 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Hawaii State Capitol Auditorium

Monday, June 23 — Waimanalo – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Waimanalo Elementary and Intermediate School

Tuesday, June 24 — Waianae Coast – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Nanaikapono Elementary School

Wednesday, June 25 — Kaneohe – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Heeia Elementary School

Thursday, June 26 — Kapolei – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Makakilo Elementary School

Lanai

Friday, June 27 — Lanai City – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Lanai Senior Center

Molokai

Saturday, June 28 — Kaunakakai – 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Kaunakakai Elementary School

Kauai

Monday, June 30 — Waimea – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Waimea Neighborhood Center

Tuesday, July 1 — Kapaa – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Kapaa Elementary School

Hawaii Island

Wednesday, July 2 — Hilo – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Keaukaha Elementary School

Thursday, July 3 — Waimea – 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Waimea Community Center

Thursday, July 3 — Kona – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Kealakehe High School

Maui

Saturday, July 5 — Hana – 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Hana High and Elementary School

Monday, July 7 — Lahaina – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
King Kamehameha III Elementary School

Tuesday, July 8 — Kahului – 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Pomaikai Elementary School

Governor’s Statement on U.S. Interior Department’s Proposal to Reestablish Government-to-Government Relationship with Native Hawaiian Community

Hawaiian Sovereignty Sign

Gov. Neil Abercrombie today released the following statement regarding the U.S. Department of the Interior’s procedures to reestablish a government-to-government relationship with the Native Hawaiian community:

“We look forward to welcoming representatives of the U.S. Departments of the Interior and Justice to discuss ideas for updating federal policy on Native Hawaiian self-determination.

“I commend the Obama Administration for recognizing and supporting Native Hawaiians as it works to reconcile its relationship with Native Hawaiians at the federal level.”

Hawaiian Cultural & After Dark in the Park Events for July

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in July. All programs are free, but park entrance fees may apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Making lei at last year's Hawaiian Cultural Festival. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson

Making lei at last year’s Hawaiian Cultural Festival. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson

Ulana Lauhala. Learn to weave a decorative star from leaves of the pandanus tree. Lau hala are used to create a wide array of attractive, useful, and traditional Hawaiian arts and crafts. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., July 9, from 10 a.m. to noon
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Cultural Festival in Kahuku. The 34th annual Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Cultural Festival will be held in Kahuku this year.  Enjoy hula kāhiko and music, watch skilled practitioners demonstrate their art, and try your hand at Hawaiian crafts. Taste traditional, ono Hawaiian foods. Bring water, rain jacket, and ground mat or chair, plus sunscreen and a hat. No pets. Lunch and beverages will be available for sale.  This is a family-friendly, drug- and alcohol-free event. The Kahuku unit is the southernmost section of the national park, and is located on the mauka (uphill) side of Highway 11 at mile marker 70.5. Free entry and free parking. Sponsors include Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, the Ka‘ū Hawaiian Civic Club, Kīlauea Military Camp, and our sister parks in West Hawai‘i. Call 808-985-6011 or email havo_interpretation@nps.gov for more information.
When: Sat., July 12, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Where: Kahuku

Hula Performance. Visiting from Honolulu, the ladies of Hālau Hula Kamamolikolehua, under the direction of kumu hula Pōhai Souza, share hula ‘auana (modern hula) at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Also sharing the stage are Hālau Hula Kalehuapuakea, with kumu hula Keu Ostrem, and Hālau Hula Kamaluokukui, under the direction of kumu hula Malina Kaulukukui. Music performed by Kualoa, featuring Kula Abiva and Pokiʻi Vaughan. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, and your $2 donation helps support After Dark programs.
When: Tues., July 15, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Untold Story

The Untold Story: Internment of Japanese Americans in Hawai‘i. While the story of the 1942 mass round-up, eviction and imprisonment of Japanese Americans in California, Oregon and Washington has been well documented, very little is known about the Hawai‘i internees and their unique experience during World War II. This is the first full-length documentary to chronicle this untold story in Hawai‘i’s history. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, and your $2 donation helps support After Dark programs.
When: Tues., July 29, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

New Findings Show Hawaii High and Middle School Students Improve Health Behaviors

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH), Department of Education (DOE), and University of Hawaii (UH) have released new findings from the 2013 Hawaii Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) for the state and all four counties.

Department of Health

Administered to public non-charter school students in grades 6-12 throughout the state every two years, the YRBS is the only survey that monitors youth health risk behaviors on a regular basis. The next administration of the Hawaii YRBS will be conducted in spring 2015.

“The YRBS is an important tool to identify focus areas for prevention and treatment efforts,” said Health Director Linda Rosen. “The longstanding collaboration between the DOH, DOE, and UH provides an excellent data tracking system to monitor student health risk behaviors and target interventions where they are most needed,”

“Not all student health risk behaviors are obvious,” stated Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “This data provides information that our educators can use to reinforce and advise our students in making positive choices.”

Findings from the Hawaii YRBS indicate that since 2011, there have been positive changes in many student health behaviors; however, there is still room for improvement.

Physical fighting has declined, with 17 percent of high school and 22 percent of middle school students reporting that they were in a fight at least once during the past 12 months.
Marijuana use remains steady with 19 percent of high school and 8 percent of middle school students reporting use in the past 30 days.
Fewer students are binge drinking, but 25 percent of high school and 10 percent of middle school students report drinking some alcohol in the past 30 days.
The percentage of high school students who report attempting suicide in the past 12 months remains at 11 percent, while the percentage of middle school students who report attempting suicide increased to 12 percent.

For the first time, the Hawaii High School YRBS gathered information on texting and emailing by adolescents while driving. Findings indicate that the use of technology while driving continues to put youth at risk.

Among students who drove a car, 43 percent reported texting or emailing while driving during the past 30 days.

The Hawaii YRBS 2013 data also indicate varied trends in obesity-related behaviors, such as excessive screen time, physical activity, diet, and sleep.

The percentage of high school (42 percent) and middle school (41 percent) students who report using a computer for something that was not school work for three or more hours per day on an average school day has been increasing since 2007.
The percentage of high schools students who met the national recommendation for physical activity (at least 60 minutes per day on each of the past seven days) remains steady at 22 percent and the percentage of middle school students meeting this goal increased to 32 percent.
Only 27 percent of high school and 55 percent of middle school students indicate that they are getting eight or more hours of sleep on an average school night.
Soda consumption continues to decrease, with 30 percent of high school students reporting that they did not drink any sugar-sweetened soda in the past seven days.

Survey procedures were designed to protect students’ privacy by allowing for anonymous and voluntary participation. Before survey administration, active parental permission was obtained. Students completed the self-administered questionnaire during one class period and recorded their responses directly on a computer-scannable answer sheet.

The Hawaii YRBS is part of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). For a comparison of Hawai‘i data to the nation, visit http://nccd.cdc.gov/youthonline/App/Default.aspx.

For more information on the Hawaii YRBS visit http://health.hawaii.gov/school-health/health-survey/ or http://apps.hidoe.k12.hi.us/research/Pages/YRBS.aspx.

The full survey report, more detailed data reports by county, gender, grade and race/ethnicity, and the survey questionnaires are available at the Hawaii Health Data Warehouse website at www.hhdw.org.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Annual Cultural Festival is July 12

Save the date and participate in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s 34th annual Cultural Festival, Saturday, July 12, 2014 at the park’s Kahuku Unit in Ka‘ū, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free!

Keiki enjoying performance by Hula Hālau Ulumamo o Hilo Palikū.  NPS photo by Jay Robinson

Keiki enjoying performance by Hula Hālau Ulumamo o Hilo Palikū. NPS photo by Jay Robinson

Enjoy hula kāhiko and music, watch skilled practitioners demonstrate their art, and try your hand at Hawaiian crafts. Taste traditional, ono Hawaiian foods. Performers this year will include Nā Hōkū Hanohano award-winning singer and ‘ukulele artist Diana Aki (the “Songbird of Miloli‘i”), Kumu Hula Mamo Brown and Hālau Ulumamo o Hilo Palikū, noted falsetto singer, Kai Ho‘opi‘i, kupuna hula by Haunani Medeiros, and more.

“The park’s annual cultural festival brings our communities together, and offers a wide range of authentic Hawaiian experiences for residents and visitors,” said Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Superintendent, Cindy Orlando. “Our park staff also look forward to this yearly opportunity to connect with our communities and share their aloha for the ‘āina,” she said.

This year’s theme is Ka‘ū hiehie i ka makani which means Ka‘ū regal in the gales, referring to the multi-directional winds that cool the land in Kahuku.

Keiki learn ‘ohe kapala (Hawaiian bamboo stamping) with Ranger Rebecca Carvalho.  NPS Photo by Jay Robinson

Keiki learn ‘ohe kapala (Hawaiian bamboo stamping) with Ranger Rebecca Carvalho. NPS Photo by Jay Robinson

Make sure to wear sunscreen and a hat. Bring water, rain jacket, and ground mat or chair. No pets. Lunch and beverages will be available for sale.  This wonderful family experience is a drug- and alcohol-free event.

The Kahuku unit is the southernmost section of the national park, and is located on the mauka (uphill) side of Highway 11 at mile marker 70.5, approximately 42 miles south of the main park entrance at Kīlauea. Free parking available.

Call 808-985-6011 or email havo_interpretation@nps.gov for more information.

Steps Taken to Ensure Koloa’s Future

To address the koloa’s future, the Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) is collaborating with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the University of Hawaii Pacific Studies Cooperative Unit on The Koloa Project.

Koloa Research Explainer from Hawaii DLNR on Vimeo.

Even wildlife biologists have a tough time telling the difference between the endangered Hawaiian Duck, Koloa Maoli, and the common mallard. Cross-breeding or hybridization between the two species is the primary reason the endemic Koloa duck is endangered. A new collaborative program is addressing the future of the Koloa. The project attempts to provide steps which will ensure its ultimate survival as one three remaining native waterfowl species in Hawaii (Koloa, Hawaiian Goose-Nene, and Laysan Duck).

The Koloa is a small duck, similar in appearance to the mallard. It is more secretive and behaves differently than the mallard. Present in the Hawaiian Islands for at least 100,000 years the Koloa ranges from sea level to an elevation of 10,000 feet. Cross-breeding with mallards began sometime in the late 1800’s when the more common mallard was imported to Hawaii for ornamental ponds, hunting and farming.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have recommended that removing feral mallard ducks is a critical step toward saving the Koloa from extinction. “The problem becomes distinguishing between Koloa, feral mallards and hybrids in the field,” according to Stephen Turnbull, Koloa Communications and Outreach Coordinator for DOFAW. “Though they look very similar to female mallards, with a trained eye you can detect some of their unique characteristics, and we’re working toward an identification key based upon genetic markers to further our conservation efforts,” Turnbull explained.

Applicants Sought For Hawaii Island Na Ala Hele Trails Advisory Council

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) is inviting applications from interested person for vacant seats on the Na Ala Hele Trails and Access Program Advisory Council on Hawaii Island.

DLNR

Na Ala Hele Advisory Council members are asked to advise the program on trail and access concerns and issues, discuss and make recommendations on legal issues, and promote communication and cooperation between government and community representatives.  Advisory council members receive public comments/recommendations and consult with their constituencies when needed.

The Na Ala Hele Advisory Council consists of nine members representing each of the following categories: Hawaiian culture, trail/mountain clubs, mountain bikers, hikers, equestrians, hunters, fishers, environmentalists, landowners and trail/access advocates.

Applicants are now being sought to fill two open seats in the following categories: Hawaiian culture and fishermen. At the same time, DOFAW is also creating a qualified list of those interested in any of the listed categories. All applicants should have an appropriate background in the category area as well as an interest in representing community stakeholders related to their respected categories.

Individuals who are interested in serving on the Na Ala Hele Advisory Council may submit an application. Forms are available online at dlnr.hawaii.gov/recreation/nah. Applications should be mailed to: Na Ala Hele Program Manager, Division of Forestry and Wildlife, 19 E. Kawili St., Hilo, HI 96720, attention Clement Chang. Applications will be reviewed by the DOFAW and members of the Council. Final selections will be made by the DLNR chairperson. Applications must be received by July 6, 2014.

Hawaii Lava Flow Update

Breakouts remain active on the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow

The farthest active surface flows today were 6.5 km (4.0 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen in the upper left of the visual photograph.

The farthest active surface flows today were 6.5 km (4.0 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen in the upper left of the visual photograph.

Summit deflation in May resulted in a decrease in lava supply to the Kahaualeʻa 2 flow, with the flow front becoming inactive and stalling. Breakouts behind the flow front, however, remain active. The thermal image on the right shows these breakouts clearly as the yellow and white regions.

Today the pond was gently gas pistoning - a process that involves the cyclic rise and fall of the lava level due to gas buildup and release.

Today the pond was gently gas pistoning – a process that involves the cyclic rise and fall of the lava level due to gas buildup and release.

The lava pond in the northeast portion of Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater remains active, and has built up a slightly elevated rim following several overflows over the past week.

Gas bubbles rising through the lava pond create small blisters in the thin flexible crust near the pond margin.

Gas bubbles rising through the lava pond create small blisters in the thin flexible crust near the pond margin.

An HVO geologist shields his face from intense heat as he dips a rock hammer into an active pāhoehoe toe. After scooping out the lava it is placed in the water to quench it.

HVO routinely collects lava samples for chemical analysis, which can give insight into changes in the magmatic system.

HVO routinely collects lava samples for chemical analysis, which can give insight into changes in the magmatic system.

Good views of the lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater

The lake is roughly 150 meters (490 ft) wide by 200 meters (700 ft) long.

The lake is roughly 150 meters (490 ft) wide by 200 meters (700 ft) long.

Thin fume allowed good views of the lava lake in the Overlook crater, which is set within Halemaʻumaʻu Crater at the summit of Kīlauea.

The lake surface is constantly moving, normally from north to south (roughly from the upper-right portion of the image towards the lower-left).

The lake surface is constantly moving, normally from north to south (roughly from the upper-right portion of the image towards the lower-left).

A view of the summit lava lake from above, using a thermal camera. The thermal images clearly show the thin crustal plates that make up the surface of the lake. The plates are separated by hot incandescent cracks.