What is the Odor of Hawaii?

Earlier today I posted about the Glad Garbage Bags that were coined “Hawaiian Aloha – Aloha Hawaiana” and allegedly smelled like… well I guess Hawaii!

Now I’m seeing Secret Deodorant branded that has the Hawaii odor.  What is the odor of Hawaii?

Secret Hawaii

Secret Hawaii

What Does “Hawaiian Aloha – Aloha Hawaiana” Smell Like?

I’m curious what these smell like?  But really… “Hawaiian Aloha – Aloha Hawaiana”?

Hawaiian Aloha Glad Bags?

Hawaiian Aloha Glad Bags?

Taste of the Hawaiian Range Adds Extra Hour to Pig Out

Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range is Friday, Sept. 26 and expanding to offer three hours of tasting from 5-8 p.m. The 19th annual agricultural festival that showcases the use of pasture-raised, local beef sprawls both inside and out of the Hilton Waikoloa Village.

Doesn't this look good?

Doesn’t this look good?

“We want our guests to be able to enjoy a more leisurely experience and so added an extra hour,” says Jeri Moniz, event chairperson.  “The additional time will also give attendees more time to talk story with our local food producers and enjoy the exhibits.”

Tickets for Taste are $45 through Thursday, Sept. 25 and $60 on event day. They will be sold online and at a dozen islandwide locations starting July 1. They will also be available at the door.

Thirty of the state’s top chefs have already confirmed their participation to prepare delectable dishes using pasture-raised beef, pork, lamb, goat, mutton and wild boar—plus a cornucopia of fresh island fruit, veggies, honey, spices and beverages.

Culinary adventure seekers can taste and enjoy all the cuts of pasture-raised beef—everything from tongue to tail—prepared expertly by Hawai‘i chefs.  Enjoy familiar cuts like sirloin tip and ribs, plus beef cheek and the infamous “rocky mountain oysters” or bull testicles.

While “tasting,” attendees can meet Hawai‘i’s food producers at booths and talk story with the ranchers and farmers who make a living growing our food. They can also enjoy exhibits presenting topics related to local agriculture and healthy foods, including the University of Hawai’i’s Mealani Research Station.

Watch for ticket giveaways on Facebook at Taste of the Hawaiian Range and Twitter #TasteHI. For general event information, phone (808) 969-8228.

Anyone who requires an auxiliary aid or service for effective communication or a modification of policies and procedures to participate in this event should contact Jeri Moniz at 808-960-8411 no later than August 26.

Hawai’i residents can take advantage of Hilton Waikoloa Village’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range Package—details are being finalized. Phone 808-886-1234 or visit Hilton.com.

The Egg and I – Nake’u Awai’s Pre-Merrie Monarch Fundraiser

Springtime on Hawai‘i Island means Easter, Merrie Monarch, and Nake‘u Awai’s annual Fashion Show Fundraiser, happening Saturday, April 19, 2014 at the Kahilu Theatre. A benefit for the Theatre, the lively production features Awai’s iconic aloha designs, dozens and dozens of Easter Eggs, and beautiful songs that celebrate Waimea.

The Egg and I

Doors open at 11 a.m. to give guests a chance to shop for Awai’s signature aloha wear, rarely available away from his Honolulu studio. Handmade items by local crafters are also available for sale, as well as box lunches by Palani French Bakers to enjoy at tables on the lawn, before the show begins at 12:30 p.m.

A distinctive designer of island fashion for over thirty years, Nake‘u Awai is well-known for his unique prints and flattering silhouettes for every body size and shape. His annual spring productions have been described as part-Broadway, part runway—one-of-a-kind events that never fail to tell a story, using fashion, hula, history, music, both traditional and contemporary, and lots of surprises.

Models in Awai’s “company” include Pat Bergin, Kauanoe Chang, Sharon Goodman, Liana Aveiro, Aulii Kirsch, Margo Wray, Peter Souza, Wally Wong and other familiar faces. And, key performers from the community include John Wray, Alva Kamalani, Desiree Cruz, Everett Knowles and the Waimea Hawaiian Civic Club, who will present a medley of songs by Helen Desha Beamer.

“I always wanted to emphasize the music of Helen Desha Beamer, one of the Big Island’s best writers, who wrote the classic songs of Waimea,” said Awai. His production wraps the region’s paniolo heritage with songs from “Oklahoma,” with elements of spring, Easter stories like an island-style Peter Cottontail, and festive fashion for men and women. “We create the visual scene,” said Awai, “And the performers just happen to be wearing our fashions.”

In addition, Awai invites the community to enter a special Egg Decorating Contest, with prizes presented by the judges in several categories. There is no entry fee, and all are welcome to use their imagination.

Sweetest Egg – Big Island Candies
Best Waimea Egg – Native Books/ Na Mea Hawaii
Best Ka Lei Egg – Roen Hufford
Trippiest Egg – Nake‘u Awai (a “trippy” tee shirt, designed by Nake‘u )
Most Stylish Egg – Nake‘u Awai (a beautiful bear made from Nake‘u fabric in moire)

A very special and entertaining occasion on the Saturday before Easter, “The Egg and I” invites groups of friends join in, support the Theatre and celebrate Spring. Tickets $45 with box lunch, $30 show only. Please call 885-6868 or visit www.KahiluTheatre.org

Kailua Kanikapila Community Picnic with Darlene Ahuna and John Cruz

It’s time to bring the community back Hawaiian style to Hale Halawai with a Kailua Kanikapila Community Picnic and it’s free.

Relax. Kick back. Bring your own chairs and mats. Enjoy the sunset. Pack a picnic and bring the whole family down to Hale Halawai from 4 pm until sunset on Saturday, April 19.

Enjoying myself with John Cruz jamming in the back

Enjoying myself with John Cruz jamming in the back

Bring your pupus and enjoy a picnic along the ocean while listening to the great Hawaiian music sounds of Darlene Ahuna and John Cruz. There will be games for the keiki and a taco truck available for those who prefer to purchase food.

Hilo’s Darlene Ahuna is a multiple Na Hoku Hanohano award winner including Female Vocalist of the Year. John Cruz’s Artistic Soul album won Contemporary Album of the Year and Cruz was named Most Promising Artist. Cruz is also a Grammy winner with his song Jo Bo’s Night featured on CD Slack Key Guitar Volume 2, the first Grammy awarded for Hawaiian music.

The Kailua Kanikapila Community Picnic event is sponsored by the Kailua Village Business Improvement District, Hawaii Tourism Authority, and the County of Hawaii. Contact HKVevents@yahoo.com a minimum of 5 days in advance to request an auxiliary aid or reasonable modification.

Kīholo State Park Master Plan Released

Get your copy of the Kīholo State Park Final Master Plan and Final Environmental Assessment! Kiholo State Park

Land board submittal: 04/11/14

Approval of the Kīholo State Park Master Plan, Acceptance of the Final Environmental Assessment, and Issuance of a Finding of No Significant Impact for the Proposed Project, TMK: (3) 7-1-02: 02, 08; 7-1-03: 02, 07, Kīholo, North Kona, Hawai‘i.

Palila Mural in Downtown Hilo Featured in First Friday Event

Hilo’s newest artistic treasure, a mural showcasing the palila (a rare native Hawaiian forest bird), will be showcased in a mini-parade featuring the larger-than-life, gigantic palila this First Friday, April 4. Local artist, Kathleen Kam, teamed up with the Mauna Kea Forest Restoration Project, a project of DLNR and the Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, to create the 9 by 12-foot mural.

Local artist Kathleen Kam mural showcasing the palila (a rare native Hawaiian forest bird). Photo by Jackson Bauer.

Local artist Kathleen Kam mural showcasing the palila (a rare native Hawaiian forest bird). Photo by Jackson Bauer.

The painting is on the Hilo Loan Shop building in downtown Hilo adjacent to the KTA Super Store and the bustling Hilo Farmers’ Market. The public is invited to celebrate the mural’s completion on Friday at 6:30 p.m. at 64 Mamo St.

The Mauna Kea Forest Restoration Project (MKFRP) commissioned the mural with funds provided by the American Bird Conservancy. Local photographer Jack Jeffrey donated the image that the mural references. The Hilo Loan Shop, Sherwin Williams, HPM Building Supply, and KTA Super Stores also provided generous support that enabled this dream to become a reality.

“We are proud to support Kathleen’s gorgeous mural of this beautiful but highly endangered Hawaiian bird as well as the work DLNR is doing to conserve it,” said Chris Farmer, American Bird Conservancy’s science coordinator for Hawai‘i. “It has been exciting to already have people walking by the mural, stop and talk with us about the artwork and learn about the conservation of palila.”

Palila are a member of the Hawaiian honeycreeper family and are dependent upon native māmane trees for 90 percent of their diet. They were listed as endangered in 1973 under the Endangered Species Act as a result of a drastic population decline due to habitat destruction.

“Palila live in a remote and rugged area of the island that not many people ever visit,” said Robert Stephens, MKFRP coordinator. “The goal of this mural is to inspire and educate the community about palila and how the DLNR is preserving this special, native bird and the māmane-naio forest they depend upon.”

Threats to the palila’s existence have included over-browsing by non-native feral sheep, goats and cattle on māmane seedlings and trees over the past 200 years. In addition to predation by non-native feral cats, the introduction invasive insects and plants, drought, fire and disease.

Currently, palila only occupy a small area on Mauna Kea but used to also live on Mauna Loa, Hualālai, and much more of Mauna Kea. Today, the population is estimated to be between only 1,300 and 1,700 individuals remaining on the planet.

“DLNR’s Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) has built 45 miles of sheep-proof fence on Mauna Kea to prevent sheep from entering Palila critical habitat, and removing sheep in those areas, as part of its compliance with a federal court order,” said William J. Aila, Jr., DLNR chairperson. As part of the reforestation project, volunteers have planted more than 80,000 native seedlings on Mauna Kea since 2010.

Kam’s numerous murals on Hawai‘i island and O‘ahu have focused on Hawai‘i’s native plants and animals. She was inspired to do this project because, “This mural’s visual information, which is fueled by a singular message to save a native species, will endure beyond its intrinsic value,” she said.

Kam depicted the mural in the style of a 1940s-era fruit crate label. She said, “It was the perfect fit in its simplicity and aesthetics, and familiar to Hilo’s agricultural community.”

To learn more about palila and how DLNR is protecting Hawai‘i for generations to come, visit: www.RestoreMaunaKea.org

Kamehameha Schools CEO Search Update

Aloha kākou:

On behalf of the Board of Trustees, I would like to share with you an update on our CEO search.

Dee Jay Mailer’s last day as CEO of Kamehameha Schools was Tuesday, April 1. As we announced earlier, Jack Wong, current Vice President of Legal Services and General Counsel, has assumed the role of interim CEO. Jack will serve in both roles until the next CEO assumes office. During the past few months, Jack has worked closely with Dee Jay and her staff to prepare for a smooth transition without unnecessary disruption to our work. This partnership has enabled the Board of Trustees to focus our full attention on a successful conclusion to the CEO search.

Jack has served Kamehameha Schools since 1997 in several key roles, initially as a Senior Counsel and most recently as Director of the Endowment Legal Division. He knows our people, our mission and the way we do things. Jack will focus on moving all of our key initiatives forward – on schedule – with the strong support of the executive leadership team he oversees.  We are all gratified that Jack has agreed to accept this critical role and we’re confident that he will provide continuity and strong leadership on an interim basis.

We continue to have conversations with a wide-range of outstanding leaders in our search for a new CEO, our commitment to selecting an individual of the highest caliber is unwavering, and we are grateful for the incredibly high quality of interest this opportunity has attracted. It is our expectation to have a new CEO identified before the end of the year. We will continue to provide updates throughout the search process. As always, if you have any questions or concerns about the process, please feel free to provide your thoughts at: KSCEO@spencerstuart.com.

This past week we all experienced the joys and memories that flood our senses as we bid a fond aloha to one of our most admired leaders. As Dee Jay transitions from being the CEO of Kamehameha Schools to begin her life’s next chapter, we are all enriched from her thoughtful guidance and leadership. She has nurtured us, and renewed us, and from here, we will continue to flourish.

And, now we begin the next chapter, dedicated to delivering the highest quality education and doing the good work that has always been the measure of Kamehameha Schools. Mahalo for your continued dedication and execution of our mission. The work you do every day is so valued, and we are very grateful.

As the Easter Season approaches we wish you and your families a happy and safe Easter. We are most appreciative of your continuing support of Kamehameha Schools.

Me ka ha‘a ha‘a,

Janeen-Ann A. Olds, Chairman
Board of Trustees

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan Praises Hawaii’s Education Leadership

Hawaii’s public schools can be a model for the nation, according to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, who visited two schools today before returning to Washington, D.C. Secretary Duncan, Governor Neil Abercrombie and Schools Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi spoke with media in reflecting on the progress made during the last three years based on the Race to the Top (RTTT) federal education reform grant.

 Secretary Duncan with Keith Hayashi, Supt, Matayoshi, Gov. Abercrombie in Waipahu HS aquaponics lab


Secretary Duncan with Keith Hayashi, Supt, Matayoshi, Gov. Abercrombie in Waipahu HS aquaponics lab.

“When we first did the RTTT grant, there was a huge amount of skepticism in the outside world, and frankly, internally,” stated Secretary Duncan. “Hawaii initially had its challenges; they’ve shown amazing leadership, courage and vision. I can’t overstate how important the Governor’s leadership has been…the leadership of the State Superintendent…they are a profile in courage. The only way you get better is to challenge the status quo. The only way to accelerate the rate of change is to do something different. The progress has been extraordinary. Hawaii by any objective measure – is one of the fastest improving states in the nation – top five states, that’s top 10 percent in the nation.”

Ka Waihona student (newly accepted to Kamehameha) explains kalo to Secretary Duncan

Ka Waihona student (newly accepted to Kamehameha) explains kalo to Secretary Duncan

Secretary Duncan began the day at Ka Waihona o ka Naauao, a public charter school in Nanakuli, where he learned how to pound taro (paiai) and participated in a discussion about culture-based education with stakeholders and Kirin Ahuja, the U.S. DOE’s executive director of the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.

Secretary Duncan pounds kalo

Secretary Duncan pounds kalo

Secretary Duncan then visited Waipahu High where he participated in a Hawaii DOE and Hawaii State Teachers Association joint-committee meeting followed by a tour of the school with Gov. Abercrombie and Supt. Matayoshi.

Supt. Matayoshi and WHS students greet Secretary Duncan.

Supt. Matayoshi and WHS students greet Secretary Duncan.

Waipahu High is the second-largest high school in Hawaii with 2,450 students. About 70 percent of its students are of Filipino ancestry, while nearly 6 out of 10 students come from economically disadvantage backgrounds. Waipahu High Principal Keith Hayashi, who was appointed in 2009, has led a tremendous academic turnaround at the school. Reading proficiency among 10th graders rose to 69 percent in 2013 from 58 percent in 2011, while math proficiency jumped to 47 percent from 26 percent. College-going rate increased to 58 percent from 49 percent during the same period.

“We are proud to share the passion of what we do here at Waipahu with Secretary Duncan,” Principal Hayashi said.

Secretary Duncan with Andrea Gurado, WHS student with full ride to Columbia University, looking at her science project exploring synthesizing molecules.

Secretary Duncan with Andrea Gurado, WHS student with full ride to Columbia University, looking at her science project exploring synthesizing molecules.

One of the students who enjoyed lunch with Secretary Duncan at Waipahu was Andrea Jurado, who recently accepted a full scholarship from Columbia University. She arrived to the islands just four years ago from her native Philippines, and since then, she has taken advantage of opportunities that have helped her excel during her four years at Waipahu. She’s participated in internships with the University of Hawaii Cancer Research Center and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratories in Livermore, Calif. She will also represent Hawaii at the Intel Science and Engineering Fair in Los Angeles, Calif., which is the largest science and engineering fair for high school students from around the globe.

“Waipahu is very focused on students succeeding in post-secondary life,” said Supt. Matayoshi. “The school has a great early college program, and great opportunities for students to succeed. We’re very happy that Secretary Duncan can see the fantastic work being done here by our faculty, teachers, and students.”

“I ask anybody in the state, before you make a judgment about the public schools, see what’s been accomplished in the last three years. By any outside observation, Hawaii public schools are rising, and we’re going to keep on rising,” added Governor Abercrombie.

Principal Sheena Alaiasa of Castle High in Kaneohe was one of the educators selected to meet with Secretary Duncan during his visit. As head of King Intermediate last year, Alaiasa was named the 2014 National Middle Level Principal of the Year by MetLife and the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP).

“It’s great for Hawaii as a whole for the U.S. DOE to see what we’re doing,” said Principal Alaiasa. “It means a lot to our students for them to meet and greet someone of such importance.”

Hawaii is the 50th and final state to welcome Secretary Duncan during his tenure. Prior to this visit, the last U.S. education secretary to visit the islands was Richard W. Riley in 1994 under President Bill Clinton. The last federal education official to visit Hawaii was Martha Kanter, U.S. Department of Education under secretary of education, who spoke at a September 2010 higher education summit in Waikiki. Also, in December 2009, Peter Cunningham, assistant secretary for communications and outreach for the U.S. Department of Education, visited several island schools.

In Celebration of the Merrie Monarch Festival – Learn About Hula Plants from Kumu Hula/Botanist Team

On Friday, April 11 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia and Tim Tunison lead the field seminar “Plants of Hula: Na Mea Kanu o Ka Hula” in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia (seated) is the kumu hula (hula teacher/master) of Halau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu. On Friday, April 11 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Valencia and botanist Tim Tunison team up for a cultural and scientific exploration of the plants used in hula.  To register for their field seminar “Plants of Hula: Na Mea Kanu o Ke Hula,” please contact Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park at 985-7373 or visit www.fhvnp.org. Photo by Dave Boyle

Ab Kawainohoikala‘i Valencia (seated) is the kumu hula (hula teacher/master) of Halau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu. On Friday, April 11 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Valencia and botanist Tim Tunison team up for a cultural and scientific exploration of the plants used in hula. To register for their field seminar “Plants of Hula: Na Mea Kanu o Ke Hula,” please contact Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park at 985-7373 or visit www.fhvnp.org. Photo by Dave Boyle

“Please join us for this exciting program in celebration of the Merrie Monarch Festival, in which a kumu hula (hula teacher/master) and botanist team up for a cultural and scientific exploration of the plants used in hula,” stated Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park spokeswoman Elizabeth Fien.

From kumu hula Valencia, learn about hula plants as kino lau, manifestations of Hawaiian deities in plant form (as his Halau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu understands them).

“There are plants for the hula altar, the kuahu, which include maile, ‘ie‘ie, ‘ilima, lehua, and halapepe.  In addition, there are adornments—mele hula plants that are worn by the dancers—which include maile, ‘ilima, and lehua, plus palapalai, ‘a‘ali‘i, pukiawe, and ‘olapa,” Valencia explained.

Participants meet at the Kilauea Visitor Center.  The day begins with a welcoming oli (chant), followed by a short walk to the kahua hula—the hula platform that overlooks Halema‘uma‘u Crater, home to the volcano goddess Pele.

Next the group will drive to Kilauea Overlook to discuss cultural protocols used when picking plants—and to walk among native species in their natural environment, with scientific information and insight shared by botanist Tunison.

“After lunch, we’ll visit Tunison’s property in Volcano Village, where he is restoring the land to its native ecosystem.  We’ll get a hands-on lesson in native plant propagation, plus receive plant seedlings to grow at home,” said Valencia.

Valencia was born and raised in Honolulu, though his ‘ohana (family) was originally from Hilo.  He established Halau Hula Kalehuaki‘eki‘eika‘iu in Honolulu in 1991, and currently maintains his halau (school) in Honolulu as well as Volcano.

Tunison worked for the National Park Service for over 30 years.  He was a Botanist at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park from 1982-1994 and Chief of Resource Management from 1995-2006, when he retired.  Since then, Tunison has taught field botany, native plant propagation, and forest restoration.

This event is presented by the Hawai‘i Volcanoes Institute, a program of the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a non-profit organization.  Program cost is $45 for Friends members and $65 for non-members.  Students (K-12 and college with valid student ID) are $25.  Non-members are welcome to join the Friends in order to get the member discount.

To register for the “Plants of Hula” field seminar, call 985-7373 or visit www.fhvnp.org.

Anyone who requires an auxiliary aid or service for effective communication or reasonable modification of policies and procedures to participate in this event should email institute@fhvnp.org or call 985-7373 as soon as possible, but no later than 5 days prior to the program start.

This program is supported in part by a grant from the County of Hawai’i Department of Research and Development and the Hawai’i Tourism Authority.

After Dark in the Park April Events at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park programs with the community and visitors in April. To celebrate the Merrie Monarch Festival’s 51st anniversary, special cultural presentations are offered April 23, 24, and 25. All programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association.  Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

A demonstration of ‘ohe kapala, or bamboo stamping, at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park  NPS photo/Jay Robinson.

A demonstration of ‘ohe kapala, or bamboo stamping, at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park NPS photo/Jay Robinson.

Adventures in the Philippines. Experience the Philippines through the eyes of Ranger Adrian Boone, who visited last November as Typhoon Haiyan bore down on the island nation. His travels included several UNESCO World Heritage Sites, including the 2,000-year-old Banaue Rice Terraces and Puerta Princesa Subterranean River National Park. He explored the hanging coffins of Sagada, the limestone caves of Sumaguing, northern Luzon, Manila, the ancient Spanish city Vigan in Ilocos Sur, and much more! Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, and your $2 donation helps support After Dark programs.
When: Tues., April 8, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Earthquake Storms: The Past & Present of the San Andreas Fault. Dr. John Dvorak explains the San Andreas Fault: what it is, where it is, and how it works. His new book, Earthquake Storms: The Fascinating History and Volatile Future of the San Andreas Fault will be available for sale, and it explains how the recent seismic lull in could result in an “earthquake storm” of large earthquakes. Dr. Dvorak studied volcanoes and earthquakes for the U.S. Geological Survey, taught at the University of Hawai‘i, and has written numerous cover articles for scientific publications. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, and your $2 donation helps support After Dark programs.
When: Tues., April 22, from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Events Honoring the Merrie Monarch Festival. The park will offer nearly a dozen cultural programs to celebrate the 51st anniversary of the Merrie Monarch Festival, from April 23-25. All of these programs are part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Check the park website to print posters of these and other events at http://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/events.htm.

Wednesday, April 23

Kalo Demonstration.
Join Edna and Sam Baldado as they share the cultural uses of kalo, or taro plant. See how each plant is identified by its leaf, steam, corm, color, and shape. Discover the hundreds of varieties of kalo in Hawaii, and how kalo was used for food, medicine, glue, dyes, and much more.
When: Wed., April 23 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai:

Feather Kāhili Workshop. Helene Hayselden will demonstrate the art of making a feather kāhili, a symbol of royalty. Watch or join in and make your kāhili to take home.
When: Wed., April 23 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai:

Music by Rupert Tripp, Jr. Enjoy the beautiful music and voice of singer, songwriter, and multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano Award nominee, Rupert Tripp, Jr.
When: Wed., April 23 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai:

La‘au Lapau. Ka‘ohu Monfort shares her knowledge and love of the island’s native plants. Learn how her passion for plants and the Hawaiian culture are used to heal and nourish. See and touch a variety of medicinal plants, including kuku‘i, ‘ōlena, ha‘uowī, noni, kī, and guava.
When: Wed., April 23 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai:

Thursday, April 24

Feather Work. Watch Vi Makuakāne demonstrate the intricate art of feather work. Thousands of feathers are sorted, graded, trimmed, and sewn to a base. The result is a beautiful lei hulu, or feather lei.
When: Thurs., April 24 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Kenneth Makuakāne. This multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano award-winning singer, songwriter, and producer will play original songs from his solo albums and compositions.
When: Thurs., April 24 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

‘Ohe Kapala. ‘Ohe kapala, or bamboo stamps, are used to create distinct designs for traditional Hawaiian kapa. Join Keiko Mercado as she demonstrates how ‘ohe (bamboo) are carved into beautiful designs and how they are used. There will be samples and a hands-on opportunity to learn this Hawaiian art form.
When: Thurs., April 24 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Lei Making. Patricia Ka‘ula will demonstrate different styles of lei making: hilo, haku, hili and Ku‘i. Lei is used for everything from blessing crops, adornments for hula dancers, healing and sacred rituals, to show royal status or rank, honor guests, as peace offerings, to celebrating a birth.
When: Thurs., April 24 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Robert Cazimero Book Signing. Robert Cazimero, a highly regarded and respected kumu hula, will sign the latest edition of Men of Hula, which will be available for sale. This 2011 edition by award-winning author Benton Sen chronicles how the hula teacher and Nā Hālau Kamalei shattered the stereotypical image of hula (girls in grass skirts and coconut bras) by revitalizing the masculine aspects of the ancient dance.
When: Thurs., April 24 from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center

Friday, April 25

Kapa Demonstration. Kapa maker Ku‘uleimomi Makuakāne-Salāve‘a shares the art of kapa making. See how the inner bark of the paper mulberry tree is beaten into cloth.
When: Fri., April 25 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Ulana Lauhala. Members of ‘Aha Pūhala o Puna perpetuate the ancient art of lauhala weaving. Observe this art form and learn to weave your own lauhala star from the leaves of the hala, or pandanus tree.
When: Fri., April 25 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Music by Lito Arkangel. Listen to music by Lito Arkangel, one of Hawai‘i Island’s most popular entertainers, as he plays his original compositions and Hawaiian favorites.
When: Fri., April 25 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Keiki Choir Performs for Disneyland Audience

The Keiki Choir of the Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Campus, is on a Southern California tour during spring break.  Today they took the stage at Disneyland and performed there.

KSBE at Disneyland

Third Annual Sam Choy’s Keauhou Poke Contest Names Winners

Over 40 professional, amateur and high school contestants vied in the third annual Sam Choy’s Keauhou Poke Contest March 16 at the Sheraton Keauhou Convention Center. Proceeds benefit the $150,000 Equip the Kitchens Campaign for the future Hawai’i Community College-Palamanui campus and the Kealii Pauahi Foundation.

Poke in Cup

New to this year’s contest was a category for using Hamakua Mushrooms and a fun Poke Throw Down. The Throw Down pitted winner Nakoa Pabre of Umeke’s preparing a quick poke in competition with Bryan Fujikawa of Sun Dried Specialties.

Poke Wontons

Florist Barbara Meheula won the Celebrity Poke Contest, besting pro football player Max Unger, Hawai‘i County Mayor Billy Kenoi, West Hawaii Today Publisher Tracey Fosso, Miss Kona Coffee 2014 Jeanne Kapela and Facebook Chef Billy Desmond.

Kila Pablo Tripe Poke

Sam Choy’s Keauhou Poke Contest is part of Kamehameha School’s annual Kamehameha III celebration that commemorates the Keauhou-born king, Lani Kauikeaouli.

The contest is sponsored by presenting sponsor Kamehameha Schools, plus Aloha Shoyu Company, Suisan Company Ltd., Hawaiian Springs, Hamakua Mushrooms, West Hawaii Today, the Sheraton Kona Resort and Spa at Keauhou Bay, Fresh Island Fish, Coca Cola, BMW of Hawaii, Tanioka’s Seafood & Catering, Sam Choy’s Kai Lanai, Roberts Hawaii, Bacardi, Sun Dried Specialties, Kapa Radio and Young’s Market Co.

2014 Sam Choy’s Keauhou Poke Contest Winners

Professional Division

Category: Traditional Poke:

  • 1st Nakoa Pabre of Umeke’s
  • 2nd Wade Tamura of Facebook
  • 3rd Robin Ganir of Broke Da Mouth

Category: Cooked

  • 1st Peter Kaluna of UH Dining Services
  • 2nd George Gomes of King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel

Category: Poke with Aloha Shoyu

  • 1st Robin Ganir of Broke Da Mouth
  • 2nd Nakoa Pabre of Umeke’s

Category: Non-Seafood

  • 1st Paul Muranaka of King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel
  • 2nd Nakoa Pabre of Umeke’s

New Category: Poke with Hamakua Mushrooms

  • 1st George Gomes of King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel
  • 2nd Troy Cataraha of Sam Choy’s Kai Lanai
  • 3rd Robin Ganir of Broke Da Mouth

Non-Professional Division

Category: Traditional Poke

  • 1st Ryan Koyanagi
  • 2nd Chuck Okazaki
  • 3rd Pono Bintliff

Category: Poke with Aloha Shoyu

  • 1st Keauhou Canoe Club Boys #1
  • 2nd Shane Lee
  • 3rd Cal Haena

Category: Non-Seafood

  • 1st Punana Leo Team #2

New Category: Poke with Hamakua Mushrooms

  • 1st Tori Koyanagi

Division: High School

Category-Traditional: 1st Konawaena #304

Category-Cooked: 1st Kealakehe #302

Category-Poke with Aloha Shoyu

  • 1st: Kealakehe #301
  • 1st Runner Up: Konawaena #305
  • 2nd Runner Up: Konawaena #303

Poke Throw Down

  • 1st Nakoa Pabre of Umeke’s
  • 2nd Bryan Fujikawa of Sundried Specialties

Celebrity Poke Contest

  • Winner: Barbara Meheula, florist

Contestants: Pro football player Max Unger, Hawaii County Mayor Billy Kenoi, West Hawaii Today Publisher Tracey Fosso, Miss Kona Coffee 2014 Jeanne Kapela and Facebook Chef Billy Desmond

Wordless Wednesday – Native Hawaiian Princess Research/Development Area

Native Hawaiian

All Royalties Derived From Geothermal Resources Development on Hawaiian Home Lands Must Benefit Native Hawaiians

Attorney General David M. Louie announced today that he has issued a Formal Opinion concluding that 100% of the royalties derived from geothermal resources development on Hawaiian home lands must be used for the benefit of native Hawaiians.

Puna Geothermal Venture

Puna Geothermal Venture

Attorney General Louie has announced that he has issued Formal Opinion No. 14-1 (Op. No. 14-1) in which he has concluded that pursuant to article XII, sections 1 and 3, of the Hawaii State Constitution, and section 4 of the Admissions Act, 100% of the royalties derived from geothermal resource development on Hawaiian home lands must be paid to the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands (DHHL) to be used for the benefit of native Hawaiians.

As a compact with the United States upon admission of Hawaii as a state, Hawaii accepted responsibility to manage and dispose of the Hawaiian home lands under the terms of the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act, 1920, as amended (HHCA). Section 203 of the HHCA describes the lands that comprise the Hawaiian Home lands (also known as the “available lands”). The Admissions Act provides that “all proceeds and income from the ‘available lands’, as defined by the [HHCA], shall be used only in carrying out the provisions of [the HHCA].”

Attorney General Louie stated that “following a comprehensive legal analysis by the capable deputy attorneys general in my office, I have concluded that the DHHL has the right to receive all proceeds and income from the available lands, including 100% of the royalties derived from geothermal resource development.” Based on the analysis of sections 204 and 206 of the HHCA, the opinion also concludes that DHHL is the state entity authorized to manage geothermal resources on Hawaiian home lands.

“I hope that by issuing Op. No. 14-1, the Legislature and the community will have a greater appreciation of the constitutional and legal foundation for DHHL’s rights to the economic benefits of geothermal resource development on Hawaiian home lands.”

A copy of Op. No. 14-1 can be reviewed and downloaded at Op. No. 14-1 Letter to the Honorable Jobie M.K. Masagatani, Chairman, Hawaiian Home Commission, Regarding Management and Disposition of Geothermal Resources on DHHL Lands<http://ag.hawaii.gov/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/AG-Opinion-14-1.pdf>.

Hawaii House of Reps Honors the Bishop Museum on Its 125th Anniversary

The state House of Representatives today honored the Bishop Museum on its 125th anniversary, four inductees to the Junior Achievement Hall of Fame, and three veteran war heroes who have since made significant contributions to the community.

Bishop honorees

Bishop Museum was recognized on its 125th anniversary for promoting the culture and history of Hawaii. Taking part in the floor presentation was Bishop Museum President and CEO Blair Collis; Allison Holt Gendreau, Chair of the museum’s Board of Directors; board member Watters O. Martin, Jr.; and Dr. Yoshiko Sinoto, Bishop Museum’s Kenneth Pike Emory Distinguished Chair in Anthropology.

Three outstanding community minded military leaders were also honored by the House. They included: Tim Guard, Chairman and CEO, McCabe, Hamilton & Remy; Ron Hayes, Admiral, U.S. Navy, Retired; and Joe Vasey, Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy, Retired. These individuals have distinguished themselves, not only as outstanding former military leaders, but also as civic leaders who have made a difference in the state through their significant contributions to the community at large.

The House also paid tribute to the 2014 Junior Achievement of Hawaii Business Hall of Fame laureates. Since 1975, the U.S. Business Hall of Fame presented by Junior Achievement has honored men and women who have made outstanding contributions to free enterprise and to the community. The Junior Achievement of Hawaii’s Business Hall of Fame recognizes laureates who have helped mold our free enterprise system, and who continue to reshape and improve the manner in which businesses operates in Hawaii.

Update: KSBE Hawaii Middle School Band & Keiki Choir Southern California Tour

The Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Keiki Choir and Middle School Band will be in Southern California making some public appearances.  Here is the updated schedule of public appearances.  Note time changes:

Disney Flier

Big Island Science Teachers Invited To Hands-On Demonstration Workshop

Kamehameha Schools Hawai‘i science department is bringing in two nationally recognized professors team from the University of Wisconsin Stevens Point to conduct a special chemical demonstration workshop. All Hawai‘i island science teachers are invited to participate and learn more about how they can create fun with science.

Kamehameha Schools Hawai‘i campus hosts a chemical demonstration workshop for teachers.

Kamehameha Schools Hawai‘i campus hosts a chemical demonstration workshop for teachers.

The demonstrators, Dr. Marv Lang and Dr. Donald Showalter, have both been awarded the American Chemical Society Helem M. Free award for public education. They have been featured on television programs like Newton’s Apple and the World of Chemistry.

“The demonstrations span K-12 and all science disciplines,” said KS Hawaii chemistry teacher Joel Truesdell, who is coordinating the workshop.

“They [Lang and Showalter] are masters of teaching science demonstrations that excite kids about science. We had to book them a year in advance.”

hands on 2

The workshop is a fun, engaging professional development opportunity and a chance for teachers to network with one another.

“Our goal is to create a larger network of science teachers here on Hawai‘i island so that we can continue to collaborate and idea share throughout the year,” said Truesdell.

The workshop will take place on Saturday, March 29th from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Keawe Dining Hall on the Kamehameha Schools Hawai‘i campus in Kea‘au. All attendees will receive a handbook of demonstrations that are good for all ages.

Interested teachers should email jotruesd@ksbe.edu or call 808-220-9539 to register. The workshop is limited to 30 participants.

Public Invited to the Ocean Day Mālama Kanaloa Festival

The public is invited to the 7th annual University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Ocean Day Mālama Kanaloa Festival on Sunday, March 9, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hilo’s Bayfront Beach Park.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

This free, event is hosted by the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo’s Pacific Island Programs for Exploring Science (PIPES) in partnership with the County of Hawaiʻi, EPSCoR Hawaiʻi IMUA III, UH Hilo Student Activities Council, UH Hilo Student Association, Board of Media Broadcasting, Board of Student Publications, and the University of Hawai’i Sea Grant.

Since its debut as Ocean Day in 2007, the festival has become a popular community event, drawing crowds in excess of 2,000 participants. Volunteer Coordinator Amelie Sterling says the event also serves as an important learning resource for students.

“Ocean Day is a great volunteer opportunity for students to gain a service learning experience as well as enhance their resumes and build skills for the future,” Sterling said. “Some faculty members even offer it as an opportunity for students to gain extra credit or fulfill a community service requirement within their course.”

The Ocean Day Mālama Kanaloa Festival is focused on increasing awareness of ocean and coastal issues such as conservation, sustainable use of resources and ocean safety through interactive displays, activities and booths. Activities include fishing games, marine critter touch tanks, craft making, makahiki games, face painting, poi-pounding, seed planting, marine debris displays, and more. The event also showcases ongoing research while providing opportunities to interact with people interested in working together to care for island and ocean communities.

For more information, email: UHpipes@hawaii.edu or call Amelie Sterling at 933-0707.

Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Middle School Band & Keiki Choir California Schedule

The Kamehameha Schools Hawai’i Middle School Band & Keiki Choir will be performing in California over the Spring Break.  Here is their schedule of public performances.
California Flier

Please feel free to forward this to your friend’s and ʻohana that live in the area. We would love to see them and I am sure they would enjoy the mele of Hawaiʻi brought to them by our Keiki.