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Hulihe’e Palace Remembers Princess Ruth Ke‘elikolani

The Daughters of Hawai‘i and Calabash Cousins present Afternoon at Hulihe’e on Sunday, Feb. 21. The 4 p.m. event on the grounds of Hulihe‘e Palace remembers the late Princess Ruth Ke‘elikolani.

Hulihee

The event presents the Merrie Monarchs and Hawaiian performing arts by Kumu Hula Etua Lopes and his Halau Na Pua U‘i O Hawai‘i. Kindly bring a beach mat or chair as seating won’t be provided.

Princess Ruth (1826-1883) was the half-sister of King Kamehameha IV and V. She inherited Hulihe‘e after the death of her husband, William Pitt Leleiohoku; he was the adopted son of John Adams Kuakini. Kuakini built the palace in 1838 after erecting Moku‘aikaua Church, which sits directly across from the palace on Ali‘i Drive.

Hulihee Hula

Hulihe‘e Palace is open for docent-guided and self-guided tours. Museum hours are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday—with the exception of the palace open 1-4 p.m. the Monday following the monthly Kokua Kailua Village stroll.  Palace admission for a self-guided tour is $8 for adults, $6 for kama‘aina, military and seniors, and $1 for keiki 18 years and under. Docent-guided tours are available upon request. For details, contact the palace at 329-1877, the palace office at 329-9555 or visit www.daughtersofhawaii.org. The gift shop, open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday- Saturday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, can be reached by phoning 329-6558.

Caretakers of Hulihe‘e Palace are the Daughters of Hawai‘i and the Calabash Cousins. The Daughters was founded in 1903 and opens membership to any woman who is directly descended from a person who lived in Hawai‘i prior to 1880. Helping the Daughters in its efforts since 1986 are the Calabash Cousins; membership is available to all.

Hikianalia Sails to Hilo – Local Schools Invited to Participate (Must RSVP)

As legendary traditional sailing vessel Hokulea travels around the world, sister voyaging canoe Hikianalia continues to make her impact in Hawaii by delivering the Malama Honua message of taking care of Island Earth – this time on Hawaii Island- with the help of Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS) crew members, Hawaii’s Ohana Waa (canoe family), and Imiloa Astronomy Center.

Vaka Sail - Oahu to Kauai - July 2011

Vaka Sail – Oahu to Kauai – July 2011

“It’s very important to PVS that Hikianalia continue engaging our local communities by offering opportunities for the public to interact with crew members and learn more about the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage,” stated Miki Tomita, director of the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s Learning Center. “As an organization, we’re always striving to ensure that the public, especially our islands’ schoolchildren, are engaged in the educational aspects of the voyage at home as well as abroad,” Tomita added.

Between Feb. 15-25, weather-permitting, Hikianalia, Ohana Waa, and partner organizations will be hosting community outreach events in Hilo, with some events open to the general public.

Hilo Day

A welcome ceremony in Palekai, Keaukaha will be held on Monday, Feb. 15, with the time to be determined. Local schools are invited to participate in the momentous occasion and will need to RSVP.

On Friday, Feb. 19 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., Hawaii Island teachers and students will have the opportunity to take part in Hikianalia Education Day – again, schools will need to make reservations to participate.

Hikianalia Community Day will be held on Saturday, Feb. 20 from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The event will be at Suisan Pier, and all of the Hawaii Island community is invited – no reservations are required.

Imiloa Astronomy Center celebrates its tenth anniversary on Sunday, Feb. 21 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The public is invited to enjoy the day by visiting the astronomy center for free, meeting PVS crew members, and learning more about Hikianalia, Hokulea and the Worldwide Voyage.

For more information or to participate in events that require reservations, visit http://www.hokulea.com/hikianalia/.

Commentary – Forced Land Sales Bills killed

We have been informed by House Committee on Water and Land Chair Ryan Yamane that this Saturday’s hearing for the two forced land sales bills (House bills 2173 and 1635) has been cancelled.
HB2173

HB1635
Representative Yamane indicated that this effectively kills both bills for this session, noting that he was persuaded to take this action in light of strong concerns voiced by a broad spectrum of community members, including many voices of our Lāhui — alumni, parents, haumāna, kumu, staff, other Native Hawaiian trusts and agencies, charter schools, other educational partners and collaborators, and many others. He and members of his committee also heard from other landowners and business leaders who shared their concerns about these bills from their perspectives. Clearly this response was a collective effort put forth by many.

We mahalo Chair Yamane and the committee’s vice chair, Rep. Ty Cullen, for listening to the voices in our community and pulling back these two bills.

Today, the news is positive. But with nearly three months remaining in the legislative session, we will continue to monitor the process for any signs of these bills being brought back in some other form. We must be vigilant. E kūpa‘a mau!

Mahalo nui to all for taking a stand on this issue and engaging in the civic process to make a difference for our people and for all of Hawai‘i. Our voices were heard; our rights and connections to our ‘āina were protected.

While it is easy to think our work is now done, in so many ways, our work has just begun. We need to make sure that bills like these don’t ever come back and that those who introduce them continue to hear our voices. More importantly, at Kamehameha Schools, we need to use these experiences to step up and join those in our community who are fighting hard to protect and advance Native Hawaiian education, well-being and identity, whether it be on ‘āina, in community, in the legislature, in boardrooms, in classrooms, or elsewhere. This is what our new Strategic Plan 2020 is really about.

All of us, moving forward together — I mua kākou! I mua Kamehameha! I mua ka Lāhui Hawai‘i!
Livingston “Jack” Wong
Chief Executive Office, Kamehameha Schools

Flags to Fly at Half-Staff in Honor of Hawaii State Senator Gilbert Kahele

As a mark of respect for the late Hawai’i State Senator Gilbert Kahele, Gov. David Ige has ordered the flags of the United States and State of Hawai‘i shall be flown at half-staff at all state offices and agencies, as well as the Hawai‘i National Guard, from sunrise to sunset on Monday, February 8, 2016.

Hawaii Flag Half Staff

“Senator Kahele was a dedicated public servant who spent the last few years working for the good of his beloved community at the Hawai‘i State Legislature. He was a respected and influential leader both in the legislature and in his hometown community of Hilo. On behalf of the people of Hawai‘i, I extend our heartfelt condolences to the Kahele ‘ohana,” said Gov. Ige.

Sen. Kahele grew up in the fishing village of Miloli‘i on Hawai‘i Island and graduated from Hilo High School. He enlisted and served in the U.S. Marines and worked for the Hawai‘i Department of Defense for more than three decades.

Kahele was appointed to the Hawai‘i State Senate in 2011 by former Gov. Neil Abercrombie. He served as chairman of the Tourism and International Affairs Committee.

Kahele worked to strengthen Hilo’s economy and was instrumental in obtaining funding to build the Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. He was also a staunch supporter of the School of Aviation at Hilo International Airport.

Previously, Kahele served as chairman of the Hawai‘i County Police Commission and vice chairman of the Democratic Party for East Hawai‘i.

Note: Flag orders are issued to coincide with the day of the memorial service.

Notice – Attorneys Interested in Providing Legal Services to DLNR as Hearing Officer in Thirty Meter Telescope CDUP PERMIT Contested Case

In anticipation of the need for the Board of Land and Natural Resources to hold a  contested case hearing on In Re Petitions Requesting a Contested Case Hearing Re Conservation District Use Permit (CDUP) for the Thirty Meter Telescope at the Mauna Kea Science Reserve, Kaohe Mauka, Hamakua District, Island of Hawaiʻi, TMK (3) 4-4-015:009, the Department of Land and Natural Resources now seeks qualified applicants to provide professional legal services as a hearing officer in this potential case which is pending a remand to the Board by the Third Circuit Court of the State.

TMT laser

Qualifications

An applicant must possess the following basic qualifications:

  • Being an attorney licensed to practice law in the State of Hawaiʻi and in good standing;
  • Being able to serve with strict impartiality and no conflicts of interest or appearance of conflict;
  • Being available to devote a substantial amount of time in the next six to twelve months; and
  • Willing to accept the prevailing charge rate relevant to the professional service as a hearing officer, as determined by the Department.

Other desirable qualifications include civil litigation experience, practice in administrative law and process, familiarity with government proceedings and procedures, and knowledge of the Hawaii Revised Statutes and Hawaii Administrative Rules administered by the Department.

Submittal Requirements

Qualified parties interested in being considered for selection are invited to submit a letter of interest with a curriculum vitae or resume to:

Department of Land and Natural Resources
Attn: Administrative Proceedings Office
1151 Punchbowl Street, Room 130
Honolulu, Hawaii 96813
Facsimile: (808) 587-0390
E-Mail: DLNR.CO.APO@HAWAII.GOV

Applicants from the same company or law firm must submit separate applications to the Department.  Applications may be submitted by mail, facsimile or electronic mail.  The Department will not be responsible for lost or misdirected mails.

All submittals must be received by the Department or postmarked by Tuesday, February 9, 2016, 4:30 p.m. to be considered.

Waipi‘o Valley Stakeholders Alliance Offers United Voice on Bishop Museums Announcement to Sell Its Waipi‘o Valley Lands

On January 8, 2016, Bishop Museum issued a public announcement they are moving forward with the sale of the Amy Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in Capt. Cook and 537 acres of land in Waipi‘o Valley.

Green areas represent Bishop Museum Land.

Green areas represent Bishop Museum Land.

While the news has taken most of Hawai‘i by surprise, it is not the case for the Waipi‘o Valley community. Over the past 20 years, the Museum has periodically considered selling it’s Valley holdings, and there have been several proposals by State legislators for the state to purchase the lands, the most recent in 2014.

Since 2013, the Waipi‘o community has undergone major changes, with three of the most committed groups becoming more organized and actively seeking ways to work together collaboratively on matters that impact the Valley and surrounding communities.

In late 2015 the Waipi‘o Taro Farmers Association, the Waipi‘o Community Circle and Ha Ola o Waipi‘o Valley formed the Waipi‘o Valley Stakeholders Alliance as a mechanism to reach general consensus and provide a unified voice when communicating with government officials, Bishop Museum and the general community.

Founded in 1989, the Waipi‘o Taro Farmers Association (WTFA) is the oldest active organization in Waipi‘o Valley. The Association is made up of generational taro farming families who lease the majority of Bishop Museum ’s lands in the Valley. WTFA represents the surviving edge of the Native Hawaiian culture in Waipi‘o Valley and serves as Bishop Museum ’s primary land managers and local community advisors.

Formed in 2000, at the request of 13 community members, the Waipi‘o Community Circle (the Circle), serves as a general community forum. The Waipi‘o Valley Information & Education Officer Program was created by the Circle, as were the five large interpretive signs at the rock wall near the pavilion. A small group of Circle volunteers provided general oversight of the Information & Education Officer program from 2007 until 2014 when the program moved to the Department of Parks & Recreation. This group also represents the efforts of Auntie Ku’ulei Badua who was responsible for initiating “Friends of the Waipi‘o Community Park ” (the former Rice/Thomas property, at the Waipi’o lookout).

Founded in 2014 Ha Ola o Waipi‘o Valley (Ha Ola) is a membership organization of Valley residents, farmers, cultural educators and practitioners, and Waipi‘o tour operators. The organization is guided by elected Officers with support from the County of Hawaii , the State of Hawaii , Kamehameha Schools and Friends of the Future. Ha Ola was formed to provide representation for Valley stakeholders who were not recognized in the State’s 2013 proposed Senate Bill to purchase Bishop Museum’s lands in Waipi‘o. Among Ha Ola’s current projects are River Maintenance in collaboration with WTFA, stewardship of Kamehameha Schools Valley beach parcels, eradication of Little Fire Ants in the Valley and a 2016 Kalo Festival.

The Waipi‘o Valley Stakeholders Alliance, combines the strengths of all available community and advisory resources and is committed to protecting current lessees and ensuring the community has a lead voice in proactively engaging Bishop Museum in discussions about the future stewardship of its’ Waipi‘o Valley lands.

For more information about the Alliance contact:

Alliance Community Liaison: Jim Cain, Cell: 333-0457 kinglaulau@hotmail.com

Alliance Culture & Education Liaison: Ka‘iulani Pahio, Cell: 960-5272 kaiulani@kalo.org

Hawaiian Aha Convention Does Not Represent the Public

Despite a Supreme Court injunction that halted the race-based election sponsored by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and the Native Hawaiian Roll Commission, government contractor Na’i Aupuni unilaterally transformed the election into an “everybody wins” scenario, seating everyone who had been on the ballot.  The resulting convention–the stated intent of which is to formulate a government for Native Hawaiians–begins today amid continued controversy over the actions of Na’i Apuni and OHA and whether any tribal entity developed from the meeting will be able to pass legal muster.

Hawaiian Activist Walter Ritte escorted out of a meeting.

Hawaiian Activist Walter Ritte escorted out of a meeting.  Click to view video

The lawsuit against the election is still ongoing and currently before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. In addition, Native Hawaiian activists continue to protest the political aims of Na’i Apuni and OHA, questioning OHA’s management of funds intended for the betterment of Native Hawaiians.

“The Aha convention clearly does not represent the voices of Hawaii’s citizens in general nor of Native Hawaiians in particular,” stated Keli’i Akina, Ph.D., President of the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii and a plaintiff in the case against the election. “Whatever document or governing organization the delegates come up with will have no more force of law or moral authority than a wish list put together by any group of 150 or so individuals.  The participants in this convention have been misled by organizers if they believe that they are able to start a viable race based government. Their efforts are also at risk as the status of the Na!I Aupuni  process is still an open case before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals”

Dr. Akina continued, “The more than 6.5 million dollars of public funds that have been wasted on the Native Hawaiian roll and Aha convention have robbed Hawaiians of money that should have been spent on housing, education, jobs, and health services.”

A list of documents and filing associated with the case of Akina v. Hawaii can be viewed at:  http://new.grassrootinstitute.org/2015/10/akina-v-hawaii-the-documents/

Click here to watch a video of Walter Ritte protesting the process.

Hokulea Departs Fernando de Noronha for Natal

After a four-day stop at Fernando de Noronha, an archipelago off the Brazilian coast, Hokulea departed the UNESCO Marine World Heritage site yesterday at 11:00 a.m. Brazil time (3:00 a.m. HST) and is now headed to Natal, Rio Grande do Norte. Note: Fernando de Noronha is eight hours ahead of Hawaii Time. During their stay, crewmembers were able to learn about efforts to protect the marine life and other natural resources of the pristine island.

Hokulea21a

The Hokulea crew is now sailing approximately 241 miles to reach Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, located in northeastern Brazil. The arrival to the coastal city will mark Hokulea’s first visit to the South America continent. The leg will take approximately two days.

Hokulea21c

After stopping in Brazil, Hokulea will continue the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage and stop in several ports in the Caribbean before sailing north and visiting cities along the East Coast of the United States. She is scheduled to arrive in New York City by June 8, 2016 to celebrate World Oceans Day.

Hokulea21b

Since departing Hawaiian waters in May 2014, Hokulea has sailed more than 20,000 nautical miles and made stops in 11 countries and 46 ports, weaving a “Lei of Hope” around the world. Along the way, more than 160 volunteer crewmembers have helped to sail Hokulea accompanied by escort vessel Gershon II to spread the message of malama honua (or taking care of Island Earth) by promoting sustainability and environmental consciousness, as well as exchanging ideas with the countries she has visited.

Hokulea21d

So far, crew members have connected with over 45,000 people in communities across the South Pacific, Tasman Sea and Indian Ocean including Samoa, Aotearoa (New Zealand), Australia, Indonesia, Mauritius and South Africa. For a midway recap of the Worldwide Voyage, please view http://www.hokulea.com/2015-worldwide-voyage-recap/

Hokulea first set out on the Pacific Ocean in 1975. Since then, she has traveled to multiple countries across the globe, reawakening a Hawaiian cultural renaissance in the process through reviving the traditional art of wayfinding – navigating the sea through means of using natural resources like ocean swells, stars, and wind.

Kamehameha Schools and the Pauahi Foundation Announce the Return of Mahiʻai Match-Up

Kamehameha Schools and the Pauahi Foundation announce the return of Mahiʻai Match-Up – an agricultural business plan contest dedicated to supporting Hawaiʻi’s sustainable food movement and decreasing the state’s dependence on imports.  Mahiʻai means farmer.  The contest is open to all farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural entrepreneurs. The application window opens today and ends Feb. 29, 2016.

Pahoehoe Parcel

Pahoehoe Parcel

“Mahiʻai Match-Up provides a venue for farmers and entrepreneurs to access some of our most valuable agricultural lands,” said Sydney Keliʻipuleʻole, senior director of statewide operations for Kamehameha Schools. “Kamehameha Schools is engaged in an ongoing effort to work with community partners to find and nurture talented farmers with innovative ideas that will increase food production for Hawaiʻi’s market.”

The top two business plans will receive an agricultural land agreement with up to five years of waived rent from Kamehameha Schools and seed monies from the Pauahi Foundation totaling $35,000 to help increase the probability of long-term, sustainable success.

Ulupono Initiative – the Hawai’i-focused impact investing firm – is once again lending its support to the business plan contest.

“Ulupono Initiative is proud to continue its partnership with Kamehameha Schools and Pauahi Foundation to assist talented farmers in realizing their dream of establishing a bona fide agricultural business in Hawaiʻi,” said Murray Clay, managing partner of Ulupono Initiative. “The goal of Mahiʻai Match-Up directly aligns with our mission of making Hawaiʻi more self-sufficient by increasing local food production. The group of entrants from the first two years has been impressive, and we are excited to see what year three has in store.”

Hawaiʻi Farm Bureau’s “Hawaiʻi Food and Farm” magazine is also a sponsor of the contest.

This year the program provides more opportunities for aspiring farmers with the introduction of Mahiʻai Mentorship – a competition created through a partnership between the schools and GoFarm Hawaiʻi aimed at developing the next generation of farmers.

Four applicants will be chosen to receive funding from Pauahi Foundation and Kamehameha Schools to attend GoFarm Hawaiʻi, a program that turns the AgCurious into AgProducers. Valued at $3,000, participants are given a combination of knowledge, experience, and support designed to assist them in becoming viable production growers, and accomplish it in a manner that encourages sustainability.  Applications for Mahiʻai Mentorship will be accepted from March 1 through May 2, 2016

To apply for the Mahiʻai Match-Up contest or for more information, visit http://www.pauahi.org/mahiaimatchup/index.html.

2016 Mahiʻai Match-Up Parcels:

 

Scientist Sequence Genome of the ‘Alalā (Hawaiian Crow)

In collaboration with PacBio, scientists at San Diego Zoo Global and the University of Hawaii, Hilo have fully sequenced the genome of the ‘Alalā, or Hawaiian crow and shared the results of this effort at the recent annual Plant and Animal Genomics XXIV Conference in San Diego. The ‘Alalā was once reduced to a population of about 20 birds, and the sequencing of the species’ genome will be important to track any genetic challenges that may occur due to the reduced genetic diversity now seen in the species.

The sequencing of its genome comes at the beginning of what is hoped to be an important year for the Hawaiian crow. Conservationists hope to reintroduce this species into prepared habitat on the island of Hawaii later this year. The ‘Alalā has been extinct in the wild since 2002, preserved only in the program run by San Diego Zoo Global at their bird centers in Hawaii.

“We have been working for many years to build up a large enough—and genetically diverse enough—population to allow us to begin putting the ‘Alalā back in the wild,” said Bryce Masuda, conservation program manager of the San Diego Zoo’s Hawaii Endangered Bird Conservation Program. “We have achieved our goal, and are now preparing to release birds into the wild in 2016.”

The program’s goal has been to increase the ‘Alalā flock to 75 or more individuals before releasing them into their native forests on the island of Hawaii. The ‘Alalā is a member of the crow family that was brought to the brink of extinction by loss of habitat, and introduced predators and diseases. For species that have been at the brink of extinction, genetic fitness and the information stored in their genome may prove an important tool in the fight to save them.

“Learning more about the genome of the species can help us understand more about how that species will interact with and fit back into its native habitat,” said Jolene Sutton, assistant professor at the University of Hawaii, Hilo. “Through scientific collaboration with PacBio, we now have a map of ‘Alalā DNA that could prove critical to their long term recovery. We are absolutely thrilled with the quality of the sequencing, and we have already identified several gene locations that we think could have a big influence on reintroduction success.”

Lyman Museum Lecture – Why Early Hawaiians Moved to Mainland

Even before Kamehameha I founded his kingdom, Native Hawaiians were traveling to distant ports and visiting far-off lands. Kanaka labor is credited with helping to settle the northwest coast of North America, from fur trading to gold mining, and Hawaiians also participated in the U.S. Civil War. But what would be sufficiently attractive to draw them away from paradise … and why would some choose to make their new homes permanent?

Hawaii in CaliforniaOn Monday, February 8, from 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Lyman Museum, Hawai‘i Island historian Boyd D. Bond shares this little-known aspect of Hawaiian history.

The nationally accredited and Smithsonian-affiliated Lyman Museum showcases the natural and cultural history of Hawai`i. Located in historic downtown Hilo at 276 Haili Street, the Museum is open Monday through Saturday, 10:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Admission to this program is free to Museum members, $3 for nonmembers. First come, first seated. For additional information, call (808) 935-5021 or visit www.lymanmuseum.org.

Combined Cancer Statistics Mask the Truth for Native Hawaiians

Papa Ola Lōkahi, the Native Hawaiian Health Board, is joining with other Hawaiian health organizations and health care providers to emphasize the importance of research and data that accurately describes the health and wellness status for Kānaka Maoli, Hawai‘i’s indigenous community.  We are gravely concerned to see cancer data for Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPI) reported in combination with Asian Americans (AA) in the just-released ACS Cancer Facts & Figures 2016, which includes a Special Section:  Cancer in Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders.

Cancer in Hawaiians

Hawaiian health advocates have fought for nearly 30 years to raise awareness about the pronounced cancer health disparities among Native Hawaiians, some of which are the highest in the nation and certainly the highest in our state. The Hawaiian congressional delegation and health community contributed to the revision of the Office of Budget & Management Directive of 1997(OMB 15), which charges federal agencies, institutes and offices with disaggregating AA and NHPI data.  Furthermore, the Affordable Care Act requires that all federal data be collected and reported in accordance with the accepted population identifiers.

“Reporting aggregated data sabotages the gains we’ve made over the past 3 decades.  It changes the mo‘olelo, or story, for us Kānaka Maoli,” asserts Dr. Noa Emmett Aluli, Molokai family physician and Vice-President of the ‘Ahahui o nā Kauka, Association of Native Hawaiian Physicians.  “Unfortunately, it can lead to inappropriate education, treatment strategies, and misallocation of resources and efforts.”

Examples of community harm that is perpetuated by aggregating NH and AA cancer data:

The Special Section on AANHPI, 2016 reports that “Cancer is the leading cause of death among AANHPIs…”  In fact, while Native Hawaiians carry the highest cancer mortality burden in Hawai‘i, heart disease is the leading cause of death among Native Hawaiians (Aluli et al, 2010).

The Special Section also reports “Breast cancer incidence and death rates are reported to be 30 to 50%lower for AANHPI.”  Breast cancer incidence among Hawaiian women is 24% higher than for whites, 60% higher than for Chinese, and 12.4% higher than for Japanese.  Breast cancer mortality rates in Hawai‘i are 31% higher than for whites, 127% higher than for Chinese, and 85% higher than for Japanese.  The rates are even more disparate among Pacific Islanders, such as women from the Marshall Islands (Hawaii Cancer Facts and Figures 2010).

“We understand researchers’ concern for stable data sets to produce reliable data, but Hawai‘i has participated in the Nation Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program since SEER’s inception.  As such, significant incidence and mortality data on Native Hawaiians in Hawai‘i are available,” clarifies Dr. Kathryn Braun, co-Principal Investigator of ‘Imi Hale Native Hawaiian Cancer Network (‘Imi Hale).

Hardy Spoehr, former Executive Director of Papa Ola Lōkahi, has been a long standing champion of this issue. “It’s disappointing that aggregation of NH data with that of AA is still prevalent in federal data reporting.  American Cancer Society is an internationally respected organization and needs to be a leader in this realm of data presentation, not a perpetuator of harmful reporting practices that have made it so difficult for the Hawaiian community to raise awareness about its cancer burden.”

Misrepresented data promotes harmful perceptions about the health status and health needs of the Hawaiian community. All minority and small groups who are not equitably represented in national data collection and reporting are victims of this harmful practice.

Papa Ola Lōkahi will remain diligent about raising awareness about this and we ask our local and national partners and colleagues to do the same.

2016 Big Island Quilt Shop Hop

A road trip for quilters and fabric fanatics, the 8th Annual Big Island Quilt Shop Hop revs up February 1- 29, 2016, featuring six different shops from Kona to Hilo and points in between. Traveling quilters can have passports stamped for a chance to win prizes, collect kits to create a custom “Honu on the Water” quilt for 2016, and enjoy the company of fellow quilters island-wide.

Hawaiian Quilt

Grand prize, for those who visit and get passports stamped at all six shops, is a $300 brand new Elna Sewing machine. Other winners will receive one-yard cuts of fabric, quilt shop gift certificates and more—with special in-store prizes at individual shops, for a total of 13 winners.

Each of the six quilt shops will have a different “step” available for the 2016 Honu on Water quilt. All six steps are needed to complete the quilt top, with borders and add-ons additional. This allows each quilt to be a one-of-a-kind creation.

The 8th Annual Big Island Quilt Shop Hop launches February 1, leading into the 23nd Annual Waimea Cherry Blossom Heritage Festival and the SKEA (Society for Kona’s Education and Art)  quilt show in Captain Cook February 13-14.

This year, quilt shops will have Sunday hours. West side shops will be open on Feb. 7 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. East Hawai’i shops will be open Feb 21 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Maps and passports can be picked up any quilt shop on the route, and “shop-hoppers” can follow their own path, or sign up for a West Hawaii bus tour by calling Karen Barry at Quilt Passions, 808-329-7475; or East Hawaii tour, with Leimomi at Kilauea Kreations II, 808-961-1100.

For more information contact Mary at bigislandquiltsh@earthlink.net, or visit www.facebook.com/BigIslandQuiltShopHopHawaii.

2016 Big Island Quilt Shop Hop:

West Hawaii

East Hawai‘i

The Hawai‘i Big Tree Competition is Accepting Nominations for the Spring 2016 Season

The start of a new year also marks the beginning of the annual Hawai‘i Big Tree Competition.  Sponsored by the Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry and Wildlife and American Forests, the Big Tree program focuses attention on the largest trees of particular native species, as a way to raise awareness about the importance of healthy trees and forests.

This national competition comes in light of the tragic falling of two previous Hawai‘i Big Tree champions: the coconut tree from Hawai‘i Kai popularly known as “Coco,” and an ‘a‘ali‘i tree (Hopbush) from the Maui Botanical Gardens.  Both trees are being respectively preserved and/or re-used at their locations so their spirit may live on.

"Coco"

“Coco”

In 2014, Coco the coconut palm, was crowned the National Big Tree coconut species winner and the National Ultimate Big Tree winner among all candidate species after several weeks of intense on-line voting.  The public is invited to find new champions for these species, as well as the other 19 eligible species acknowledged by American Forests.

The current 8 Hawaiian champions are listed below:

Wiliwili (Erythrina sandwicensis) in Waikoloa dry forest, Hawai‘i island
(circumference: 186.96”) (height: 40’) (Crown Spread: 43.50’)

Olopua (Nestegis sandwicensis) in Pu‘u Wa‘awa‘a Forest Reserve, Hawai‘i island
(circumference: 204.52”) (Height: 32’) (Crown Spread: 42.58’)

Pāpalakēpa(Pisonia brunoniana) in Pu‘u Wa‘awa‘a Forest Reserve, Hawai‘i island
(circumference: 52.46”) (Height: 28’) (Crown Spread: 15.25’)

Māmane (Sophora chrysophylla) in Pu‘u Wa‘awa‘a Forest Reserve, Hawai‘i island
(circumference: 165) (Height: 24) (Crown Spread: 25.5’)

Kōlea lau nui (Myrsine lessertiana) in Pu‘u Wa‘awa‘a Forest Reserve, Hawai‘i island
(circumference: 85.14”) (height: 32’) (Crown Spread: 25.5’)

Koa (Acacia koa) in Kona Hema Preserve, South Kona, Hawai‘i island
(Circumference: 343”) (Height: 115’) (Crown Spread: 93’)

Hau (Hibiscus tiliaceus) in Hulihe‘e Palace, Kailua-Kona, Hawai‘i island
(Circumference: 110”) (Height: 20’) (Crown Spread: 25’)

Mānele (Sophora chrysophylla) in Volcanoes National Park, Hawai‘i island
(Circumference: 30”) (Height: 73’) (Crown Spread: 57’)

The Hawai‘i Big Tree Competition does not have a champion for the following Hawaiian species that are eligible for the National Big Tree Program.  Therefore, any tree nominated from the following list will likely be crowned a National Champion.

Hawaiian Tree Name Genus & Species
Lama Diospyros sandwicensis
‘Ohi‘a ha Syzygium sandwicense
‘Ohi‘a ai Syzygium malaccense
Koki‘o ke‘oke‘o Hibiscus arnottianus
Ma‘o hau hele Hibiscus brackenridgei
Aloalo Hibiscus clayii
Kāwa‘u Ilex anomala
Nenelau Rhus sandwicensis
Lonomea Sapindus oahuensis
A‘e Zanthoxylum oahuense
Wauke Broussonetia papyrifera

To replace a current champion, the challenger tree must have more total points.

Total Points = Trunk Circumference (inches) + Height (feet) + ¼ Average Crown Spread (feet).

To nominate a tree, contact the Hawai‘i Big Tree Coordinator Krista Lizardi at 808-587-0164 or Krista.M.Lizardi@hawaii.gov and provide the tree height, trunk circumference, and average crown spread.  Also, please know your tree’s specific location (GPS coordinates are appreciated).

For more on the Hawai‘i Big Tree Program: dlnr.hawaii.gov/forestry/info/big-tree/

For more on the National Big Tree Program: www.americanforests.org/bigtrees/bigtrees-search/

Ke Kulanui o Hawaiʻi ma Hilo, Na Pua Lei o ka Na`auao (College of Hawaiian Language Dean’s List)

Ke kukala aku nei ko ke Kulanui o Hawaiʻi ma Hilo, Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikolani, i na inoa o na haumana kaha `oi no ke kau ha`ulelau 2015:

(The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikolani College of Hawaiian Language announces its Dean’s List for the fall 2015 semester):

UH Hilo Moniker
Della Ann Ah Nee, Destanie Alayon, Jainine Abraham, Alexandria Agdeppa, Kristen Enriquez, Pomaikai Iaea, Kayla Ing, Bridgette Ige, Brenna Usher, Karise Hallsten, Kiana Kamala, Alana Kanahele, Hyesun Kong, Seoryoung Lee, Sheena Lopes, Alohilani Maiava, Michael Moore, Hokulani Mckeague, Zachary Nanbu, Daniel Nathaniel, Samantha Nua, Alana Paiva, Isaac Pang, Vanessa Winchester-Sye, Joshua Bass, Courtney Ann Brock, John Crommelin, Anayah Doi, Angelica Durante, Mahealani Freitas, Philip Gamiao, Alexander Guerrero, Kalai Grothman, Pomaikai Ravey, Samantha Reis, Koa Rodrigues, Eliza Silva, Nakuinaokalani Soma, Marleena Sheffield, Trevor Slevin, Victoria Taylor, Gin Tezuka, Kiliona Young, Cheyne Yonemori, and Abcde Zoller.

Waimea Ocean Film Festival Begins Friday

Welcome the New Year with a superb lineup of films, special guests, intimate coffee talks, Q&As, exhibits and more January 1-8 at the 2016 Waimea Ocean Film Festival (Ocean Film).

Waimea Ocean Film FestivalFind the 2016 program posted online, where you can also purchase festival passes, at www.waimeaoceanfilm.org. Program copies and pass sales will be available starting 9 a.m.-3 p.m. December 31 at the festival hospitality desk at Kahilu Theatre in Waimea. Also find programs at concierge desks at the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, Hapuna Prince Beach Hotel, The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i and Four Seasons Resort Hualalai.

Films are shown starting 9:30 a.m. January 1, and play simultaneously January 1-4 at multiple venues in Waimea (Kahilu, HPA Gates and Parker Theatres), plus at The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i. The festival moves to Four Seasons Resort Hualalai the evening of January 4, where passes will also be sold.

Ocean Film brings over 60 extraordinary films to the big screen this year, most of which are world, U.S., Hawai‘i or Big Island premieres, with many filmmakers in attendance to answer questions following the showing of each film. The format of this dynamic festival immerses participants in a greater understanding and awareness of the ocean and island culture through exceptional films, talks, exhibits and activities. Films fall into the basic categories of ocean experience (such as surfing and paddling); ocean environment—including things we do on land that impact the sea; and island culture. Inspirational films and films that shed light on who we are, or give pause for thought, form part of the mix.

The Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel is offering discounted room rates to festival pass holders from January 2-11.

For the latest updates on films and speakers, follow the festival on Facebook, www.facebook.com/waimeaoceanfilmfestival, visit www.waimeaoceanfilm.org or email info@waimeaoceanfilm.org.

The Waimea Ocean Film Festival is a 501c3 organization made possible through the support of patrons, sponsors and the community. Mahalo to the 2016 Ocean Film partners: Four Seasons Resort Hualalai, The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i, the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel, Holualoa Inn, Matson, K2 Imaging, Sushi Rock, Palani French Bakers, Big Island Brewhaus, Big Island Traveler, Maile Charters, Starbucks Coffee, Anna Ranch Heritage Center, Hawaii Preparatory Academy (HPA), Parker School, West Hawaii Today, Hawaii Tribune Herald, Kona Law, Emily T Gail Show, The Beach FM and The Wave FM.

Hundreds of Thousands of ‘Ōhi‘a Trees Killed by Mysterious Disease

Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death, is a mysterious disease that has already killed hundreds of thousands of Hawaii’s iconic and native ‘Ōhi‘a, the backbone of Hawaii’s native forests and watersheds.

Dr. J.B. Friday of the University of Hawaii Cooperative Extension Service explains, “ROD is caused by a fungus called Ceratocystis fimbriata.  This disease is new to Hawai‘i and the strain of fungus infecting ‘ōhi‘a, has never been described before.  While apparently only impacting Big Island forests currently, this has the potential of spreading statewide, so it’s critically important we do everything to stop it.”

Ohia Disease

Numerous state and federal agencies have partnered to develop up-to-date information about , Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death that will help minimize further spread and give researchers time to find answers and develop potential treatments.  Scientists say new information is being uncovered nearly on a weekly basis.

DLNR Chair Suzanne Case, along with Dept. of Agriculture (HDOA) Chair Scott Enright are two of the top state officials engaged in the battle against Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death.  Case said, “‘Ōhi‘a trees cover more than one million acres statewide and ‘ōhi‘a is widely considered the most important forest tree in Hawai‘i. They are so important for protecting our forest watersheds that it’s necessary our approach to combating this disease involves the highest levels of government and includes non-government agencies and private partners that can provide additional resources and expertise.”

The DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife, in cooperation with the UH Cooperative Extension Service of the College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources, and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agriculture Research Service & USDA Forest Service Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry have produced a brochure and rack card on Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death.  In addition DLNR has produced a video version of the brochure now available on state, federal and social media websites https://vimeo.com/149782586

HDOA Chair Scott Enright said, “Many think this is only an issue on Hawai‘i Island. However, this disease is a threat to all ‘ōhi‘a trees across the state. The Department of Agriculture has already instituted a quarantine rule which prohibits interisland movement of ‘ōhi‘a plant and plant parts without inspection and a permit. Everyone must be vigilant, especially those who transport ‘ōhi‘a trees inter-island and on Hawai‘i Island.”

The quarantine rules, along with symptoms of the disease and five things everyone can do to prevent Rapid‘Ōhi‘a Death spread are outlined in the brochure, in the video, and on a website and Facebook page established to raise awareness and provide the latest information. ‘Ōhi‘a is widely used in lei for events like the Merry Monarch Festival.  In 2016 the agencies and its partners expect to release follow-up information on traditional and cultural uses of ‘ōhi‘a, and how people can use lehua without spreading Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death.

Dr. Flint Hughes of the USDA Forest Service concluded, “With the help from nurseries, anyone traveling in, working in, or harvesting in the forest and people who transport ‘ōhi‘a, we stand a chance of stopping Rapid‘Ōhi‘a Death in its tracks.  Without this concerted, interagency effort, the impacts could be devastating.”

Latest information, maps and updates on Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death:
www.rapidohiadeath.org
www.facebook.com/rapidohiadeath

Contempt Charges Filed Against Government-Sponsored, Race-Based Nation Building Effort

The plaintiffs in the case Akina v. the State of Hawaii on Tuesday filed a Motion for Civil Contempt at the U.S. Supreme Court against the Trustees of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, the Native Hawaiian Roll Commission, Nai Aupuni, and other defendants in the case.  The motion argues that the respondents are in violation of the letter and spirit of the Court’s temporary injunction issued on December 2nd, after which Nai Aupuni cancelled their election and offered to seat all candidates as delegates in a convention to form a government.

Click to read

Click to read

The plaintiffs have asked the Court to hold respondents in contempt and take all steps necessary to enforce the temporary injunction.

“It’s outrageous that Na’i Aupuni and state agencies such as OHA and the Native Hawaiian Roll Commission have ignored and defied the Supreme Court of the United States,” stated Keli’i Akina, Ph.D., president of the Grassroot Institute and a plaintiff in the case.  Dr. Akina continued, “All citizens of Hawaii, including Native Hawaiians, should be appalled at the contempt our own state government is showing to the U.S. Constitution.  The majority of Native Hawaiians, in particular, have made it clear that they do not support and are not represented by those trying to push through a state-sponsored, racially discriminatory government-creation process.”

The case is being argued by Judicial Watch, assisted by the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii, an independent, free-market think tank that has enlisted the plaintiffs.  Plaintiffs include four native Hawaiians and two non-native Hawaiians.

Robert Popper of Judicial Watch, lead attorney in the case said, “This whole election was based on a trick, using a non-profit that was really a state agent to accomplish what the State could not.  It was all an attempt to get around prior Supreme Court precedent.  This latest move of certifying all the candidates as winners is simply another trick.  This time it’s an attempt to get around the Supreme Court’s Dec. 2 injunction.”

Michael Lilly, former Hawaii Attorney General and an attorney for the plaintiffs added, “Nai Aupuni cancelled its election and certifies delegates without first asking the US Supreme Court whether that was in violation of its Temporary Injunction.  By certifying delegates, Nai Aupuni violated the Supreme Court’s order for which we have asked them to be held in contempt of court.”

To see all the filing and documents associated with the case of Akina v. Hawaii, go to http://new.grassrootinstitute.org/2015/10/akina-v-hawaii-the-documents/

US Supreme Court Upholds Injunction Against State-Sponsored, Race-Based Election

Today, the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed the decision of Justice Anthony Kennedy to halt the counting of ballots or certification of results in Hawaii’s race-based Native Hawaiian election, pending final disposition of the appeal of Akina v. Hawaii in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. In applauding the ruling, Grassroot Institute of Hawaii President Keli’i Akina, Ph.D. stressed that it was a significant victory for all citizens of Hawaii, and could be the first step towards the end of the state’s wasteful and divisive nation-building effort.
Supreme Court
“The ultimate winners are all people of Hawaii, including Native Hawaiians, who do not support the wasting of millions of dollars of public funds that have been diverted the real needs of Hawaiians for housing, jobs, education, and health care,” said Dr. Akina, who is also a plaintiff in the case brought by Judicial Watch. “This is a powerful step in holding the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and the Native Hawaiian Role Commission accountable for their unconstitutional and un-Hawaiian attempts to divide people based on race.”

“We are pleased that a majority of the Supreme Court justices granted our motion and stopped Na’i Aupuni from counting any votes until after our appeal to the 9th Circuit,” added Michael A. Lilly, former Hawaii Attorney General and attorney for the plaintiffs. “One requirement for our motion was to show that  we were likely to prevail on the merits of our claims. In short, the Na’i Aupuni election is an unconstitutional race-based election being conducted by the State of Hawaii.  We are confident that we will ultimately prevail.”

“The fact that OHA and the state have poured millions of dollars into this unconstitutional election prompts some very serious questions about how the needs of Hawaiians are being served,” stated Dr. Akina. “It is time for the state to stop this wasteful and divisive nation-building effort and pay attention to the real needs of Hawaiians, not the special interests of an entrenched elite.”

The Supreme Court order can be seen at: http://new.grassrootinstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/15A551-Akina-v-Hawaii-Order.pdf

To see all the filings and documents associated with this case, go to: http://new.grassrootinstitute.org/2015/10/akina-v-hawaii-the-documents/

1,000 Desks Donated to South African Schools on Behalf of the Worldwide Voyage

Hokulea crewmembers and a delegation of Hawaii students, teachers and families visited St. Mary’s Catholic Primary School near Cape Town, South Africa to present 50 Tutudesks featuring artwork inspired by the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage. An additional 1,000 desks will be delivered to township schools in the Durban, South Africa area in early 2016. The donation of desks will support the campaign’s goal to provide 20 million desks to 20 million children by 2020.

tutudesk

“These Tutudesks will help students have space at home to do their homework. Even in the   classroom, it’s going to help teachers do individual work with each child,” said Vuyiswa Lebenya, principal of St. Mary’s Catholic Primary School.

Following the presentation, Ke Ka o Makalii – a group comprised of teachers and students from Kamehameha Schools and Halau Ku Mana Public Charter School – offered hula and mele celebrating the past voyages of Hokulea. Students from St. Mary’s then followed with their own local songs and dances before inviting the Hawaii delegation to participate.

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“When I saw them dancing together, that is what global peace looks like. It’s finding that rhythm that’s down deep inside that allows us to be completely the same, to be respectful and caring of everyone,” said Nainoa Thompson, president of the Polynesian Voyaging Society.

Hokulea crewmembers and the Hawaii delegation are in South Africa this week as part of Polynesian Voyaging Society’s Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage.

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The Desmond Tutu Tutudesk Campaign provides portable school desks to children in sub-Saharan Africa, where more than 95 million school children do not have the benefit of a classroom desk. This shortage affects the development of literacy and overall academic performance.