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Coming Soon – First Annual Tiki Festival On The Island of Hawaii

Mark your calendars Tiki Tribe.  Renowned local celebrity, magician and businessman “Kozy” (Paul Kozak) along with Tiki Shark Art Inc. will be hosting the First Annual Tiki Festival on the Island of Hawaii.  This Star Studded three day FREE Art event will start at the Royal Kona Resort on Thursday November 16th and end at Kozy’s Tiki Palace at The Shops at Mauna Lani on Saturday November 18th.

Hawaii’s own celebrity artist Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker along with mainland Tiki greats, Doug Horne, Ken Ruzic and Tom “Big Toe” Laura will be showing and selling their latest work, Grammy nominated Henry Kapono and local favorite LT Smooth will be jamming their tunes with celebrity Chef Sam Choy giving out samples of his famous Poke.

From left to right are:
Tom “Big Toe” Laura, Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker, Doug Horne and Ken Ruzic

This is the first of its kind three day, free event where folks will have a chance to meet and talk story with world class artists, chef’s and entertainers.  Everyone is encouraged to participate, have fun and buy some Tiki Art at great prices.

“I am honored to be able to put together this annual event for the community. It’s the first time in Hawaii history that these Tiki artists will gotten together for a group show”  said Kozy – sponsor and owner of Kozy’s Tiki Palace.

According to Abbas Hassan – Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker and Chef Sam Choy’s agent: “This will be a yearly event on the Island of Hawaii held in an authentic Tiki environment and is going to raise the bar of all Tiki Festivals that are currently held on the mainland”.  “Tiki enthusiasts from all around the world will flock to it” he added confidently.

Celebrity Chef Sam Choy will be serving up some of his famous poke.

More details of the event will be provided on social media as time comes closer.

For more information on the event please contact:

Mayor Harry Kim Opposed to Permanent Cap on Counties’ Transient Accommodation Tax


Testimony by Harry Kim, Mayor, County of Hawai’i before Senate Ways & Means Re: SB 4:

The County of Hawai’i opposes the permanent cap on the counties’ share of the Transient Accommodation Tax (TAT). This cap is unnecessary to achieve all other aspects of the bill to finance Honolulu’s rail. The bill proposes to finance rail by extending the General Excise Tax (GET) surcharge period to 12/31/2030, increasing the share of the surcharge that goes to rail by decreasing the administrative charge retained by the State, and increasing the TAT rate by 1% and dedicating all of that increase to rail. There is no reason related to rail financing to cap the share of the TAT to the counties.

A cap on the counties’ TAT share is contrary to the Legislature’s own working group report and the original intent of the TAT tax summarized as follows:

  • Working Group Recommendation. The working group recommended the Tourism Special Fund receive $82 million in FY 2016 and increase in subsequent years in line with the Consumer Price Index for Honolulu, $31 million constant for the Convention Center-Turtle Bay-Special Land Develop Fund, and the remainder split between the State and counties at 55% for the State and 45% for the counties. Based on total TAT revenues in 2016 of $444 million, the $103,000,000 cap represents 31% of the remainder of the TAT after allocations to the Tourism Special Fund ($82 million) and the Convention Center-Turtle Bay-Special Land Development Fund ($33 million). As a result of the cap, the counties’ share will only get worse as tourism grows.
  • Nexus to Tourism Services. The incidence of the TAT is primarily on visitors, so the TAT tax revenues should fund public services which benefit visitors. The UH Economic Research Organization (UHERO) estimated that the counties pay for 53% of the services for which visitors directly benefit (UHERO Working Paper No. 2016-4). These services include police and fire protection, rescue, parks, beaches, water, roads, and sewer systems.
  • Act 185 (1990). Recognizing that “many of the burdens imposed by tourism falls on the counties,” the legislature created the TAT as a “more equitable method of sharing state revenues with the counties” (Conference Committee Report 207 on HB No. 1148). The legislature deemed at that time that the fair allocation was 95% of the total TAT revenues to the counties.

The State has multiple sources of revenues. The counties only have property tax, motor vehicle weight tax, and public utility franchise tax. Our out-of-control homeless problems are a symptom of the soaring cost to rent or own a home in Hawai’i. And you want to offer us the power to increase the GET tax, the most regressive form of taxation that impacts the lower income the greatest. We already had to increase our property tax to make ends meet. With the collective bargaining decisions dominated by the State, we again will face possible increases. We ask only for our fair share as recommended by the Working Group, to maintain quality services that uphold the tourism industry and affordability for our people.

September Events at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park (ADIP) programs with the public throughout 2017. In addition, the community is invited to lend a hand to save native rainforest through the park’s Stewardship at the Summit (SAS) volunteer program and enjoy a fee-free day on Sat. Sept. 30 (National Public Lands Day).

ADIP, SAS and Hawaiian cultural programs are free, but entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Stewardship at the Summit. Volunteers are needed to help remove invasive, non-native plants that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. No advance registration is required for groups under six, and there is no cost to participate, but park entrance fees apply. Visit the park website for details.
When: Sept. 2, 9, 15, 22 and 30.
Where: Meet project leaders at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. on any of the above dates.

Ke Kāpili Manu Kahiko: Traditional Hawaiian Bird Catching. How did ancestral Hawaiians interact with our native birds? Much has been forgotten about traditional Hawaiian relationships with the ‘āina. Park Ranger Noah Gomes has researched traditional Hawaiian bird catching from a variety of sources. He will share some of what he has learned through years of research in pursuit of his M.A. degree in Hawaiian language and literature from the University of Hawai‘i-Hilo. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, but park entrance fees apply.
When: Tues., Sept. 12 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Lei. Create your own beautiful lei with skilled lei maker No‘eau Kalima. Traditional lei are crafted with a variety of natural materials, including leaves and flowers. The beautiful and versatile Hawaiian lei is used for adornments, blessings, rituals, gifts, and as an expression of love and celebration. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Sept. 13, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Hālau Ke ‘Olu Makani O Maunaloa. Listen to the sweet sounds and watch the graceful dancing of Hālau Ke ‘olu Makani o Maunaloa. Led by Kumu Hula Meleana Manuel, they strive to perpetuate the native Hawaiian culture through mele (song) and hula. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free, but park entrance fees apply.
When: Wed., Sept. 20 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

HI-SEAS Mission V: What It’s Like to Live on Mars. HI-SEAS (Hawai‘i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation) is a habitat for a crew of six on an isolated Mars-like site high on the slopes of Mauna Loa volcano.

NPS Photo

The NASA-funded project aims to help determine the individual and team requirements for long-duration space exploration missions, including interplanetary travel to Mars. Jon Mission V crew member Brian Ramos as he describes what it’s like living and working in the habitat for eight months. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, but park entrance fees apply.
When: Tues., Sept. 26 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Ku‘i Kalo Make poi, the staple food of the Hawaiian diet. The root of the kalo plant is cooked and pounded (ku‘i) to create this classic Hawaiian dish. Park rangers will share their knowledge of kalo at this authentic cultural experience. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Sept. 27, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Fee-Free Day: National Public Lands Day (NPLD). NPLD is the nation’s largest, single-day volunteer effort for public lands. Join us at Hawai‘i Volcanoes, and help ensure the future of the Hawaiian rainforest. Volunteers will help remove invasive, non-native plants that prevent native plants from growing. Meet at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. No advance registration is required. Park entrance is free, and NPLD volunteers will receive a pass to return and enjoy the park fee-free on another day of their choosing.
When: Sat., Sept. 30, 2017 at 8:45 a.m. to noon. Meet at Kīlauea Visitor Center.
Where: Participating public lands nationwide. Visit https://www.neefusa.org/ for details.

Portions of Thurston Lava Tube and Trail Will Close Temporarily

Portions of Thurston Lava Tube (Nāhuku) and its rainforest loop trail will be closed starting Sept. 5 for approximately two weeks while park maintenance workers replace the electrical conduit and lighting system.

The bridge entrance to Nāhuku (Thurston Lava Tube) is one of the most popular, and most photographed, destinations in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. NPS Photo Janice Wei

During the repairs, visitors will be able to explore the open section of the lava tube, which is one of the most popular destinations in the park. Visitors are advised to bring their own light source (cell phone lights are adequate). The nearby restrooms will remain open.

The new energy-efficient lighting system will simultaneously increase visitor safety by illuminating the interior, and protect the cultural integrity of the ‘ana (cave) by inhibiting the growth of non-native plant species.

The back portion of Nāhuku will be closed first, including the stairs leading out of the lava tube and the north section of rainforest trail. Visitors will be able to access the front section of the lava tube via the bridge entrance, and return the same way. Once work is complete in the back portion, work on the front section will start and visitors can access the rear portion of Nāhuku via the north trail and stairs.

The public will be notified of any updates. The park regrets any inconvenience to the public.

Thurston Lava Tube (Nāhuku) and its lush rainforest trail are popular features in the park, located near the summit of Kīlauea volcano off Crater Rim Drive. The lava tube was formed by a vigorous stream of magma that erupted from Kīlauea and crusted over about 550 years ago. When the magma source was exhausted, a long, hollow tunnel was left behind. The native rainforest surrounding Nāhuku is managed by the park as a Special Ecological Area, and is home to endemic plant, bird and insect species. Visitation is heaviest between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., and parking is limited to 30 minutes.

Big Island Mayor Seeks to Hold Meeting with Helicopter Operators Over Noise Mitigation Options

On August 8, 2017 (not sure why memo was dated 2018) Mayor Harry Kim sent a letter to helicopter operators and tour operators on the Big Island, requesting they meet with him to discuss noise mitigation options (It is not known by me if any of the operators have responded to his request):

In response to requests for assistance from residents across Hawai’i Island, I am convening a meeting with all local helicopter tour operators and tour partners to discuss noise mitigation options. My goal is that we develop a solution that enables you to continue your profitable operations showing guests our beautiful island while respecting the communities and wildlife your operations affect.

The meeting will be held on Tuesday, August 29, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. in my Hilo
Office located at 25 Aupuni Street, Suite 2603. Please confirm your attendance with Martha Rodillas at martha.rodillas@hawaiicounty.govor at 808-961-8211. I look forward to meeting with you.

Sincerely,
Harry Kim
Mayor

Details On Last Nights Emergency Landing at Hilo International Airport

At 10:21 pm last night Hawaii Fire Department was dispatched to an aircraft emergency. A Hawaiian Airlines Boeing 767 carrying 276 passengers and crew from Kauai to LAX experienced smoke in the cockpit and was diverted to Hilo International Airport.

The aircraft was 2 hours into their flight when diverted. All units were on scene prior to touchdown. The plane landed safely and taxied to the terminal without further incident. The cause of smoke is under investigation.

Hawaii’s Economy Continues to Grow at a Slower Pace

The Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) released its third quarter 2017 Statistical and Economic Report, which shows Hawaii’s economy continues positive growth, but at a slower pace this year and the next few years.

After two years of consecutive growth above 2 percent, Hawaii’s economy, as measured by the real (inflation adjusted) gross domestic product (GDP), grew by 0.9 percent during the first quarter of 2017, according to data released by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. This is the lowest quarterly growth rate since the first quarter of 2015.

“Hawaii’s economic fundamentals are still positive, although growth has slowed down,” said DBEDT Director Luis P. Salaveria. “We have the second lowest unemployment rate in the nation during the first half of 2017, and our visitor industry is performing well, with 4.6 million visitor arrivals during the first half of the year.”

There were 7,200 non-agriculture payroll jobs added during the first half of 2017, 78 percent of them were added by tourism-related industries such as accommodation, food services, retail trade, and recreation.

Labor force and employment created new record high levels during the first half year of 2017 and non-farm payroll jobs showed a historical best first 6 months. Hawaii’s unemployment rate (not seasonally adjusted) was the second lowest among all the states in the nation. Visitor arrivals increased 4.3 percent and visitor expenditures jumped 8.7 percent during the first half of the year.

However, the economic growth is not evenly allocated to all the industries. There are still a few industries that lost jobs during the first half of 2017. Construction lost 500 jobs, manufacturing and health care each lost 400 jobs, and the wholesale trade lost 300 jobs.

The job loss in construction is mainly due to the decrease in the value of building permits issued during the first half of 2016, which usually shows about one year from the time building permits are issued and the start of construction. During the first half of 2016, total value of private building permits decreased by 29.6 percent from the same period in 2015, and that decrease is reflected in the actual construction activities in the first half of this year.

After five years of continuous job growth, the manufacturing industry started to lose jobs since the fourth quarter of 2016, and during the first half of 2017, this industry lost 2.9 percent of its jobs from the same time a year ago. Compared with the job count from 1990 in the manufacturing industry, the first half of 2017 job count was 66 percent of what it was then.

Wholesale trade is another industry struggling during this business cycle. In its peak year of 2008, this industry had 18,750 payroll jobs. During the first half of 2017, this industry averaged 17,400 jobs. Wholesale trade is one of the industries that has not recovered to its pre-recession job level.

The private health care and social assistance sector had been continuously adding jobs for the last three decades, however, this sector started to lose jobs since the first quarter of this year. Though the magnitude is small, this is the first showing of a decrease in these areas since 1996.

As an indicator of the unparalleled growth across the industries, initial unemployment claims increased by 1.7 percent during the first seven months of 2017.

The good news in the construction industry is that the value of private building permits increased 15.6 percent during the first half of 2017. The value of residential permits increased 32.8 percent, commercial and industrial permit value increased 120.1 percent, and value of additions and alterations decreased by 14.2 percent. The increase in building permit value will be reflected in construction activities next year.

The most recent economic forecast for the U.S. and the world indicates that most of the economies of the world, especially those where our visitors are coming from, will experience continued economic growth in 2017 and 2018. The U.S. economy is expected to grow by 2.2 percent in 2017 and 2.4 percent in 2018, both are higher than the growth rate of 2016.

DBEDT revised the visitor industry forecast upwards with visitor arrivals now growing at 3.2 percent for 2017, 1.4 percent for 2018 and 1.5 percent for 2019 and 2020. Visitor expenditures will be at 6.5 percent for 2017, 2.2 percent for 2018, and 3.6 percent for 2019 and 2020.

DBEDT revised its projection on Hawaii’s economic growth downward for 2017, from 1.9 percent projected in the previous quarter to 1.4 percent, and between 1.3 percent to 1.5 percent between 2018 and 2020.

“The increase in visitor spending is mainly due to the price increase. For example, during the first half of 2017, hotel room rates increased 6.0 percent. Apparel prices increased 5.8 percent, and gasoline prices increase 20.4 percent. Visitors spent much of their money on these items while visiting Hawaii,” said Chief State Economist Dr. Eugene Tian. “When calculating the economic growth, the price effect is removed, so you end up seeing the visitor industry booming, while economic growth is slowing down. The real growth in the tourism industry is not large enough to offset the downturn of the few industries.”

DBEDT kept its projection on non-farm payroll job count unchanged at 1.0 percent in 2017 and falling to 0.8 percent in 2020. The unemployment rate projection is also kept unchanged at 2.9 percent in 2017 and will gradually increase to 3.4 percent by 2020.

DBEDT revised the nominal personal income growth rates downward from the previous quarter forecast in the neighborhood of 3.3 and 3.5 percent. Real personal income projections were also revised downward to below 2 percent for the next few years.

DBEDT kept its projections on the Honolulu consumer inflation rates unchanged from the forecast in the previous quarter at 2.5 percent for 2017, and 2.3 percent for the outer years. Consumer inflation rate for Honolulu during the first half of 2017 was 2.5 percent.

The DBEDT Quarterly Statistical and Economic Report contains more than 120 tables of the most recent quarterly data on Hawaii’s economy as well as narrative explanations of the trends in these data.

The full report is available at: dbedt.hawaii.gov/economic/qser/.

Rental Car Return Route Modified to Construction of New Facility at Daniel K. Inouye International Airport

The Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) Airports Division is alerting the public of traffic signal modifications impacting rental car returns at the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport (HNL). The modified route is part of the scheduled improvements project to build a new Consolidated Rental Car Facility (CONRAC) on airport property.

Advantage, Avis, Budget, Hertz, and National customers returning rental cars to the interim rental car facility will enter the airport property and remain on the arrivals or ground level. They will loop around to Ala Onaona Street, pass the lei stands and continue in the eastbound or Diamondhead direction until they turn south (right) into the interim car rental facility. Please note that Ala Onaona Street transitions to Aolele Street. (See map 1). Electronic message boards have been placed in strategic areas throughout the airport to help motorists through the modified route. Permanent signs directing motorists to the new rental car return entrance have also been installed.

Click to enlarge and view all maps

The traffic signal located at the merge where vehicles exiting the H-1 Freeway westbound direction and eastbound direction, meets ground level vehicular traffic from Aolele Street will be activated on August 14, 2017. Vehicles are reminded to obey the speed limits, drive safely and be prepared to follow the instructions of the red light traffic signal. (See map 2).

The previous rental car return entrance at the corner of Paiea Street and Aolele Street will be unusable due to construction related activities. (See map 3).
HDOT has coordinated with Advantage, Avis, Budget, Hertz, and National rental car companies to distribute flyers to customers so they are aware of the changes. Rental car returns for Alamo, Dollar, Enterprise, Thrifty and other off site companies are not impacted.

Once completed, the 5-story permanent CONRAC will house the major rental car companies in one convenient location and will feature approximately 4,400 parking stalls compared to the current 895 existing parking stalls. Additional features include a Quick-Turn-Around area with fuel and car wash facilities, ready and return rental car spaces, office space and customer service counters. It will also have a common busing operation utilized by all the car rental companies that will transport passengers between the CONRAC and airport.

All customers will be able to take the same shuttle to the new facility instead of waiting for the individual company vehicle, which will reduce traffic around the airport and will be beneficial to the environment.

Construction on the HNL Car Rental Facility project began November 2016 and is 12 percent complete. It is anticipated to be finished in December 2020. The $330 million project is funded by a Customer Facility Charge which consists of a daily charge of $4.50 for cars rented on airport property, not taxpayer money from the State’s general fund.

Hawaiian Monk Seal Pup ‘Kaimana’ to be Moved to Undisclosed Location

Multi-Agency Decision Made to Protect Seal and People

The Hawaiian monk seal pup, PO3, born on O‘ahu’s Kaimana Beach in late June will be relocated to a remote, undisclosed shoreline area where she can continue her natural growth as a wild seal with less human interaction and other hazards. The decision to move the seal was made following extensive discussion and analysis by experts, managers and scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries); the DLNR Chair’s Office and its Divisions of Aquatic Resources (DAR) and Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE). Other agencies involved in managing public and seal safety during its time at Kaimana include the City and County (C&C) of Honolulu Emergency Services Department, Division of Ocean Safety and Life Guard Services, C&C Dept. of Parks and Recreation, the Honolulu Mayor’s Office; and Hawai‘i Marine Animal Response (HMAR).

“This large and expert team of people from all levels of government, carefully considered options for this seal (now named ‘Kaimana’) after it weans from its mother (‘Rocky’),” said DLNR Chair Suzanne Case. “The determination was made that the risks of leaving this now famous seal in place are too great. The team considered a number of factors and the risks of leaving ‘Kaimana’ at her natal beach outweighed the risks of relocating her,” said Chair Case.

David Schofield, NOAA Fisheries Regional Marine Mammal Response Coordinator explained, “We weighed two options with utmost consideration for safety; both for the seal and the public. One option was to simply leave the weaned seal at Kaimana Beach. The other, our chosen option, is to move the seal to a more secluded location, where she can grow up naturally in the company of other wild monk seals, without a high level of human inter-action.”

Not the least of those risks at Kaimana Beach is the seal’s propensity for swimming into the badly dilapidated Natatorium adjacent to Kaimana beach at least three times. First on Friday, July 28th, Kaimana disappeared from her mom and was then spotted in the Natatorium’s pool. NOAA staff and volunteers managed to rescue her and hand-carry her back to her mother after a forty-five-minute long separation. Then again, on Thursday, August 3rd, both ‘Kaimana’ and ‘Rocky’ found their way into the large Natatorium pool, replete with unseen, underwater hazards.

During an impromptu news conference on the beach that day, both mom and pup finally exited the Natatorium and swam a bee-line for the center of Kaimana Beach. C&C lifeguards, NOAA Marine Mammal Response Team Members, DLNR representatives, and HMAR volunteers quickly cleared the beach and the water to give the returning seals wide berth. Again last night both mom and pup swam into the Natatorium and later exited without issue.

Jim Howe of the Honolulu Emergency Services Dept. observed, “Ever since Rocky gave birth to her pup at Kaimana Beach, city lifeguards have been focused on the safety of beachgoers as well as these remarkable animals. I want to thank all of the lifeguards and our federal and state partners who remained vigilant over the past 40 days while Rocky successfully weaned her pup.”

Dr. Bruce Anderson, DAR Administrator explained, “Once a pup weans from its mom it begins exploring and learning to forage for food further away from her birth site. Young seals are extremely impressionable and if Kaimana was exposed to extensive human interaction, she will likely develop unhealthy behaviors. If a seal does become conditioned to people, as it gets older, bigger and more powerful, people in the water sought out by a seal can and have been badly hurt.” Anderson continued, “One handout from a well-intentioned human and Kaimana may become troublesome and need further relocations and controls which put her further at risk.”

DOCARE Enforcement Chief Robert Farrell added, “This decision to relocate is not made lightly, as there are human-caused dangers elsewhere too, not the least of which is illegal unattended lay gill nets that have caused the sad drownings of four seals in recent years. We know lay gill nets are a real problem for monk seals, turtles and other animals that all too frequently get entangled in them and die because they can’t breathe. We ask everyone to help us be extra vigilant in reporting these dangers through our new app, DLNRtip or by calling the DOCARE hotline at 643-DLNR.”

‘Rocky’ and ‘Kaimana’s’ long stay on one of Waikiki’s most popular beaches became a tourist draw and an Internet sensation. HMAR President Jon Gelman says the non-profit’s response to this pupping event on a busy Waikiki beach was a test of the organization’s resources and commitment. “Our folks are there to conduct public outreach and help seals have a safe, quiet place to rest and care for their pups. I think our volunteers and staff have done a great job and we have had the opportunity to educate thousands of residents and visitors while at the same time managing safety perimeters, monitoring the mom and pup’s behaviors and maintaining appropriate separation between the seals and humans in an extremely challenging environment.”

“We are so thankful and blessed that ‘Rocky’ birthed ‘Kaimana’ here in our ahupua‘a. She has been a true gift from our Akua to the residents and visitors of Waikīkī who had the opportunity to learn from her, and we are honored she will now carry the name of the place where she was born,” said area descendant Trisha Kehaulani Watson. “As Hawaiians managed natural resources in a custom that ensured sustainability, we agree with NOAA, DLNR and other officials that the best management decision for ‘Kaimana’ and the 60,000 daily resource users is to relocate her as soon as she has weaned from her mother.”

All of the government partners want to ensure that both visitors and residents are informed about safe and proper seal and other wildlife viewing procedures. Several videos have been produced regarding safe wildlife viewing and the media has provided extensive coverage of ‘Kaimana’. A news conference today concluded with a blessing sending young ‘Kaimana’ to a long and wild life.

`Iao Valley State Monument to Reopen Tomorrow

‘Iao Valley State Monument will reopen on Saturday, August 5, 2017,  at 7:00 a.m., The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) is in the process of completing repairs to the areas in the park that were damaged by a massive flood event in September 2016.  Due to pending permit approvals to complete the project, the DLNR Division of State Parks, decided to re-open the park for residents and visitors during the hiatus of construction activity. It’s anticipated construction will resume sometime this fall after permits are approved.

The valley has been closed since massive flooding swept through it September 13th and 14th, 2016

State Parks Administrator Curt Cottrell said, “We thank the Maui community and visitors for their patience and understanding during the park closure, but we still need to complete further safety measures later this year.  We believe these improvements and repairs will provide our park users and visitors with the assurance that their health and safety are our top priorities.”

Cottrell added, “We coordinated with the tour industry and the local community to inform them on our repair plans, and consulted with the ‘Aha Moku representatives to ensure that the mitigation work was consistent with cultural values and protocols. A private blessing with ‘Aha Moku representatives and parties involved in the restoration took place today, to ensure public safety, and that we honor the place we are reopening tomorrow.”

As a demonstration of the collaborative relationship between state parks and tour industry to benefit the community, Polynesian Adventure Tours is intentionally not scheduling its bus tours for the first week after ‘Iao opens, to allow the community to visit without the buses returning.

Contractor Maui Kupono Builders, LLC. began work on February 13, 2017 to remove green waste, concrete debris and railings, followed by interim slope stabilization in the Wailuku River (‘Iao Stream). Visitors will see a significant change to the slopes of the now wider river, which now sport a revetment of stacked rocks and 300-400 feet worth of Shotcrete slope coating to prevent loose material from falling down.

Changes to the parking lot include restriping and installation of flexible traffic delineators, as well as installation of a green security guardrail fencing at various locations to keep buses only within the upper parking area, and warning signs to prevent people from getting close to the stream’s edge.

A pedestrian corridor has been marked with striping and surface repairs to the pathways leading to the Hawaiian Garden and to the summit lookout were made. The iconic pedestrian bridge over Kinihapai Stream received a new support structure and the comfort station and upper lookout hale have been painted.

Still closed is the lower streamside loop trail area in the Hawaiian garden, which sustained severe damage. It was cleaned up but will remain fenced off. State Parks is considering options for ways to make it safe for people to enjoy.
Division of State Parks will hold a community meeting later this year to explain a second phase of additional streamside slope stabilization and improvements requiring park closure again. Total project cost is $1,837,341.

‘Iao Valley State Monument is among the top attractions on Maui and sees hundreds of thousands of visitors each year. The flash flood in 2016 caused millions of dollars of damage to manmade structures like railings and pedestrian bridges and created serious erosion, stream channel and land movement.  State Parks obtained emergency restoration funding and began clean-up and restoration operations within weeks of the flood.

Coast Guard Enforcing Lava Delta Safety Zone – Large Delta Collapse Expected

The Coast Guard continues to enforce the temporary Kamokuna Lava Delta Safety Zone for the navigable waters surrounding the Kilauea Volcano active lava flow entry into the Pacific Ocean on the southeast side of the Big Island, Hawai’i.

According to the U.S. Geologic Survey, several large cracks have developed in the lava delta, running parallel to the coastline and spanning the width of the delta. These cracks increase the likelihood of a large delta collapse.

“For mariners without prior limited entry approval, the safety zone encompases all waters extending 300 meters (984 feet) in all directions around the entry of the lava flow into the ocean and remains in effect,” said Lt. Cmdr. John Bannon, Coast Guard Sector Honolulu, waterways management lead. “All waterway users should be aware of this new delta formation, the potential for a significant collapse with little or no warning and the natural hazards associated with such an event.”

According to the Hawaii Volcano Observatory, large and dense fragments ejected during delta collapses can be thrown in all directions from the point of collapse, including out to sea.  Based on a review of nearly 30 years of delta collapse and ejection distance observations in the Hawaii Volcano Observatory records, a radius of 300 meters was determined as a reasonable minimum high hazard zone around a point of ocean entry.

Enforcement of the safety zone began March 28.  Lava delta growth and subsequent lava bench threat of collapse could cause an increase in hazardous conditions for mariners.  The ocean entry hazards result in lava delta instability and fracturing from lava accumulation built on unconsolidated lava fragments and sand.  This loose material can easily be eroded away by surf, causing the new land and existing sea cliff to become unsupported and slide explosively into the sea.  Getting too close to the lava can result in serious injury or death.

As long as lava enters the ocean, further sea cliff degradation, delta construction and hazardous conditions relating to the collapse are likely to occur.  These collapses occur with little to no warning and cannot be predicted. The Coast Guard took action to ensure public safety because of the aforementioned dangers.

The temporary Safety Zone is set to expire in September 28. Notification of any changes to the waterway safety zone enforcement will be provided to the public if the Safety Zone is changed or deactivated earlier than anticipated.

Furthermore, the Coast Guard promulgated a Notice of Proposed Rule Making to establish a permanent Safety Zone for this region.  Feedback was solicited from the public on this rule making process.  Comments were collected in docket number USCG-1017-0234 viewable in the Federal eRulemaking Portal at http://www.regulations.gov.

Hawaii’s Visitor Statistics Results for First Half of 2017

George D. Szigeti, president and CEO of the Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA), issued the following statement commenting on Hawaii’s visitor statistics results for the first six months of 2017.

“Our State’s economy benefited from the consistently strong travel demand that Hawaii realized in the first half of the year, especially from the mainland U.S., Japan and Canada. Visitor spending statewide grew by 8.7 percent through the first six months, which strengthened Hawaii’s economy as a whole and also generated $976 million in State tax revenue, an increase of $78.3 million.

“These statewide results and Hawaii’s ability to successfully compete with other global destinations is shared by all of our tourism stakeholders and industry professionals who make being in the Hawaiian Islands such a wonderfully enjoyable experience for visitors from around the world.

“As global competition expands and diversifies giving travelers more options, the sharing of the Hawaiian culture, the warmth of our aloha spirit lifestyle and goodwill of our residents distinguishes Hawaii as a place to come enjoy and experience, in many cases, again and again. Mahalo to everyone who contributes to tourism’s vitality and the benefits it brings to communities and families statewide.”

2017 Rusty Scalpel Award Winner Is…

HB 375, CD 1 (Act 214, Session Laws of Hawaii 2017) has been selected by the League of Women Voters and Common Cause Hawaii for their 2017 “Rusty Scalpel” award. The “Rusty Scalpel” award recognizes enactment of a bill whose subject has been substantially amended without opportunity for legislative review as required by the Hawaii Constitution.Article III, Section 14 of our State Constitution provides “Each law shall embrace but one subject which shall be expressed in its title.”  HB 375 was titled “Relating to Taxation”.   When introduced, HB 375 proposed amending income tax rates to negate any income tax liability for those at or below poverty thresholds. The Senate Ways and Means Committee was the first to drastically amend the bill, gutting its contents, and replacing it with provisions to repeal the sunset date for the refundable food/excise tax credit. Then during Conference Committee, the bill was drastically altered to appropriate $1 million, subject to a dollar for dollar match by the private sector, to the Hawaii Tourism Authority, working in conjunction with the Hawaii Lodging and Tourism Association, for projects to address homelessness in tourist and resort areas.

Corie Tanida, of Common Cause Hawaii said, “While addressing homelessness in Hawaii is important and commendable, an ‘appropriation’ is not the same as ‘taxation’.  The final version of this bill doesn’t pass the relatively ‘low bar’ of having the bill’s subject match the bill’s title.”

Article III, Section 15 of our State Constitution provides that “No bill shall become law unless it shall pass three readings in each house on separate days.”  The unambiguous intent is to provide  the House and Senate, separately, the  opportunity to thoroughly review every single bill.  Amending a bill’s subject in conference committee without such review ignores this Constitutional requirement.

According to Ann Shaver, President of the League of Women Voters of Hawaii, “The 2017 session was a ‘Good News, Bad News’ situation.  HB 375, CD 1 was the only real candidate for our 2017 ‘Rusty Scalpel’ award.  On the other hand, HB375, CD1 was the worst we’ve seen in the five years we have presented this award.”  On July 12, 2017, without the Governor’s signature, HB 375 became Act 214, Session Laws of Hawaii 2017.

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Hawaiian Airlines Adding Three New Non-Stop Daily Mainland Routes

Hawaiian Airlines will expand its U.S. West Coast presence with the arrival of an A321neo fleet by adding three new non-stop daily routes early next year: Portland-Maui; Oakland-Kaua‘i; and Los Angeles-Kona. The routes will offer guests more options for direct access to Hawaiian’s neighbor islands while enjoying the company’s award-winning, warm hospitality in the comfort of medium-haul, single-aisle A321neo aircraft.

“The introduction of A321neo service to the Western U.S. heralds the dawn of a new era for Hawaiian Airlines and its guests,” said Peter Ingram, executive vice president and chief commercial officer at Hawaiian Airlines. “The A321neo offers an unrivaled combination of comfort and efficiency, allowing our guests to choose from three cabin experiences to customize their journey. We look forward to announcing additional routes in the months and years ahead.”

The new A321neo service between Portland (PDX) and Maui (OGG) will launch on Jan. 18. Hawaiian’s seasonal widebody service currently offered between Oakland (OAK) and Kaua‘i (LIH) through Sept. 4 will resume April 11 as a daily A321neo flight. Daily service between Los Angeles (LAX) and Kona (KOA) on the Island of Hawai‘i launches March 11 with widebody aircraft before the A321neo is introduced in the summer of 2018. Guests may visit www.hawaiianairlines.com to purchase tickets for all routes operated by Hawaiian Airlines.

Hawaiian’s inaugural A321neo flight between the U.S. West Coast and Hawai‘i is planned for Jan. 8 on its existing OAK-OGG service. Additional routes will be announced as Hawaiian welcomes 18 new A321neo aircraft between the fourth quarter of 2017 and 2020.

Hawaiian’s signature style flows throughout the A321neo’s three cabins, including 16 luxurious leather recliners in the Premium Cabin, 45 Extra Comfort premium economy seats, and 128 Economy class seats. All seats are equipped with complimentary high-power USB outlets for device charging, while guests in the Premium Cabin and Extra Comfort seats will enjoy access to an additional AC power outlet. Pivoting overhead bins maximize the space for carry-on luggage.

Hawaiian carefully designed its A321neo cabin interiors with textiles and materials that reflect traditional island crafts, from bark cloth (kapa) to fishing nets, and even LED lighting mirroring Hawai‘i’s idyllic sunrises and sunsets.

New to Hawaiian’s guest experience, the A321neo will feature wireless streaming in-flight entertainment. Guests will be able to simply download an application on their personal electronic devices to enjoy a wide selection of complimentary and premium content, including movies, TV shows, music and other exclusive programming. Holders for personal hand-held devices and tablets will be integrated into the tray tables of the Premium Cabin as well as the first row of Extra Comfort, and built into the backrest of all other seats.

The A321neo boasts the quietest and most fuel-efficient engines for this aircraft type, along with aerodynamic wingtips called Sharklets that significantly reduce carbon emissions.

Hawaiian’s A321neo flight schedules will be as follows:*

**Route will launch with widebody aircraft before receiving dedicated A321neo service.

The core of the A321neo experience will remain Hawaiian’s award-winning onboard hospitality program, Mea Ho‘okipa (translation: I am host). All guests are treated to island-inspired complimentary meals and made-in-Hawai‘i snacks to go along with the airline’s engaging presentation of the islands’ culture, people and Aloha Spirit throughout the flight.

Sales for additional routes served by new A321neo aircraft will be announced later this year. For more information, please visit https://www.hawaiianairlines.com/A321neo.

Statewide Public Hearings On Proposed Amendments to State Boating Rules

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR), Division of Boating and Ocean Recreation (DOBOR) will hold public hearings statewide starting next week on proposed amendments to state boating rules.

Click to view proposed changes

These amendments to Hawaii Administrative Rules (HAR) are being proposed to allow DLNR to better manage and facilitate boating and ocean recreation-related activities within State small

Boat harbors and nearshore waters, and to reorganize the HAR provisions relating to DOBOR for clarity and general efficacy.

“This extensive rule package contains modifications we have wanted to make for many years,” says Ed Underwood, DOBOR administrator.  “Some amendments are being proposed because facility management and the ocean recreation industry are changing rapidly and our existing rules cannot address the way people are using our harbors and the ocean today.  Some rules are being repealed because they are obsolete.  In all cases, the rules being proposed will allow DOBOR to do its job of managing its facilities and responsibilities more effectively.”

Proposed amendments to Hawaii Administrative Rules,Title 13, Subtitle 11, Ocean Recreation and Coastal Areas, parts I, II and III, are posted on the DOBOR website at: http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/dobor/draft-rules/

Hearings to present the rules and accept public testimony will be held as follows:

On Kauai – July 24, 2017, 6 to 8 p.m. at Wilcox Elementary School Cafeteria. 4319 Hardy Street in Lihue.

On Maui – July 26, 2017, 5 to 7 p.m.at Velma McWayne Santos Community Center Wailuku Community Complex, 395 Waena Place in Wailuku.

On Hawaii Island (Hilo) — July 27, 2017, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Hilo State Building Conference Room 75 Aupuni Street.

On Hawaii Island (Kona) — July 28, 2017,  6 to 8 p.m. at Kealakehe High School Cafeteria 74-5000 Puohulihuli Street, Kailua-Kona.

On Oahu —  July 29, 2017,  8:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Aiea Elementary School Cafeteria 99-370 Moanalua Road.

Notice was published in The Garden Island, Hawaii Tribune Herald, Honolulu Star Advertiser, Maui News, and West Hawaii Today. During the comment period DOBOR will only accept testimony on the rules proposed for amendment.

All interested parties are invited to attend the meetings and to present their views on the proposed amendments, either orally or in writing.

All forms of written comments will be accepted up to one week following the last public hearing date, by midnight, Saturday August 5, 2017.

If you are unable to attend the public hearing to submit your testimony, written testimony may be submitted:

  1. By e-mail to dlnr.harreview@hawaii.gov, Subject: Rule Amendment Package 2017;
  2. By fax to (808) 587-1977, Attn: Rule Amendment Package 2017.
  3. By mail to the Dept. of Land & Natural Resources, 1151 Punchbowl Street, Room 130, Honolulu, Hawaii 96813, Attn: Chairperson, Re: Rule Amendment Package 2017

The proposed rule amendments can be reviewed online on the Division of Boating and Ocean

Recreation (DOBOR) website located at http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/dobor/draft-rules or can be

Reviewed in person at the following DOBOR district offices:

  • Hawaii District Office – 74-380 Kealakehe Parkway, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii 96740, Telephone: (808) 327-3690
  • Kauai District Office – 2494 Niumalu Road, Lihue, Hawaii 96766, Telephone: (808) 241-3111
  • Maui District Office – 101 Maalaea Boat Harbor Road, Wailuku, Hawaii 96793, Telephone: (808) 243-5824
  • Oahu District Office – 4 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu, HI 96819, Phone: (808) 832-3520

Persons unable to review the proposed rule changes online or in person may request, verbally or in writing, a copy of the proposed rules. A charge of $0.50 per page will be assessed for hard copies. Hard copies will be mailed at no charge upon receipt of a valid request and applicable payment. Please make requests to:

Division of Boating and Ocean Recreation – 4 Sand Island Access Road, Honolulu, HI 96819, (808) 832-3520

Meeting locations are disability accessible. For persons requiring special needs accommodations (e.g., large print, taped materials, sign language interpreter, etc.), please call (808) 832-3520 at least one week in advance of the designated date and time of the applicable public hearing to make special needs requests.

Global Tourism Summit to Honor Malama Honua and Crew of Hokulea at Tourism Legacy Awards Luncheon

Recognizing their global quest to share Hawaii’s sustainability message, Malama Honua and the crew of the Polynesian voyaging canoe, Hokulea, will be the honorees of the 2017 Global Tourism Summit at the Tourism Legacy Awards Luncheon, September 19.

Over a three-year period, from May 2014 until its triumphant return to Honolulu on June 17, 2017, Hokulea’s crew circled the world sailing approximately 40,300 nautical miles, stopping in more than 150 ports, and visiting 23 countries and territories. In completing Malama Honua (which means “to care for our Earth”), Hokulea’s crew shared its message worldwide on the significance of perpetuating native cultures and protecting natural resources, especially the ocean environment.

Presented by the Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA), the three-day Global Tourism Summit takes place September 19-21 at the Hawaii Convention Center. The Tourism Legacy Awards Luncheon is a highlight event of the opening day. The festive luncheon in the Center’s ballroom will feature live music, a video tribute to the worldwide voyage of Holukea, and remarks from Master Navigator Nainoa Thompson of the Polynesian Voyaging Society.

“Malama Honua is the greatest accomplishment in modern Hawaiian history and we are proud to honor the crew and the purpose for the voyage at the Tourism Legacy Awards Luncheon,” said George D. Szigeti, HTA president and CEO. “Attendees of the Global Tourism Summit can join us in showing their aloha to the legacy of Malama Honua and Holukea’s crew, and celebrate the message of sustainability they shared with nations and people around the world.”

Attendance to the Tourism Legacy Awards Luncheon honoring Malama Honua is included as part of the registration to the Global Tourism Summit, which is available online at the dedicated summit website, www.GlobalTourismSummitHawaii.com.

Several options are available for registration, including early-bird savings being offered to individuals and groups attending all three days of the summit if they register by July 31.

  • Individuals: Full Conference, September 19-21: $325, a savings of $70
  • Groups of Eight or More: Full Conference, September 19-21: $300 per person, a savings of $65 per person (Groups can mix and match different attendees during the conference)
  • Student and Faculty Members: Full Conference, September 19-21: $150
  • Individuals, Partial Conference, September 19-20: $275
  • Individuals, Partial Conference, September 20-21: $265

Sustainable tourism is the theme of the Global Tourism Summit. The significance of the Hawaiian culture, global marketing, technology and innovation will be shared in presentations and panel discussions, with the overall intent to bring people together to improve tourism in Hawaii and abroad.

Previously known as the Hawaii Tourism Conference, HTA changed the name of the annual event to the Global Tourism Summit to more accurately reflect Hawaii’s emergence as a leader in international travel and tourism.

Neil Everett of ESPN to Deliver Keynote Address at 2017 Global Tourism Summit in Honolulu

Neil Everett, the popular ESPN SportsCenter anchor known for opening each show with Howzit! and frequently referencing other Hawaii terms during broadcasts, will present the opening keynote address on the second day of the 2017 Global Tourism Summit in Honolulu.

Photo Credit: ESPN

Everett will make his presentation on Wednesday, September 20, starting at 8:30 a.m., at the Hawaii Convention Center. His topic, Paying Aloha Forward – How Hawaii Saved My Life, will draw upon the inspiration of Hawaii’s aloha spirit in helping to steer him through a difficult period in his life and how, today, he shares the power of aloha with others.

“I spent 15 years in Hawaii and the love I have for the people and aloha will forever be in my heart,” said Everett. “Living in the islands changed me and made me into a better person, and now I pay aloha forward whenever I can.”

Everett moved to Honolulu in 1985 after graduating from the University of Oregon. For the next 15 years, he worked in the athletics department at Hawaii Pacific University, while also writing, producing and reporting news and sports at various times for three Hawaii TV networks, KITV, KHNL, and KGMB. Everett joined ESPN in 2000 as a SportsCenter anchor at its headquarters studio in Bristol, CT, before moving to Los Angeles in conjunction with the opening of ESPN’s West Coast studio in 2009.

Presented by the Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA), the three-day Global Tourism Summit, September 19-21, will share the significance of the Hawaiian culture, global marketing, technology and innovation in presentations and panel discussions, with the overall intention of bringing people together to help improve tourism in Hawaii and abroad. Sustainable tourism is the summit theme.

“Like people throughout the country, I’m a fan of SportsCenter because of Neil Everett and how he cleverly combines fun with professionalism in the telling of scores and reporting of sports news,” said George D. Szigeti, HTA president and CEO. “You meet Neil and can quickly tell his soul is filled with a goodness to do what’s right and to help others, and much of that stems from him living in Hawaii. Attendees of the Global Tourism Summit will enjoy hearing his story of personal inspiration.”

Attendees can register to attend the Global Tourism Summit and hear Everett’s keynote address by registering online at www.GlobalTourismSummitHawaii.com.

Several options are available for registration, including early-bird savings being offered to individuals and groups attending all three days of the summit if they register by July 31.

  • Individuals: Full Conference, September 19-21: $325, a savings of $70
  • Groups of Eight or More: Full Conference, September 19-21: $300 per person, a savings of $65 per person (Groups can mix and match different attendees during the conference)
  • Student and Faculty Members: Full Conference, September 19-21: $150
  • Individuals, Partial Conference, September 19-20: $275
  • Individuals, Partial Conference, September 20-21: $265

Body Found in Kilauea Caldera

The body of a 38-year-old man was recovered by park rangers early Sunday morning near the bottom of Kīlauea caldera.

NPS Photo

On Sat., July 8, two visitors discovered a backpack on Crater Rim Trail at approximately 7 p.m. Park dispatch was notified, and rangers searched the caldera rim and floor on foot, but were unable to locate the owner. The search was suspended due to unsafe conditions at night, and resumed at first light yesterday morning, Sun., July 9.

Rangers aboard a helicopter found the victim about 250 feet below the caldera rim, in an area that is not currently erupting, around 5:35 a.m.

The victim’s name is being withheld pending notification of next of kin. An investigation is underway.

Aloha in Abundance at Park’s 37th Annual Hawaiian Cultural Festival & BioBlitz

Sunny skies, outstanding views of Mauna Loa and Kīlauea, and an outpouring of aloha from all who participated in the Hawaiian Cultural Festival & BioBlitz, made for a joyful Saturday at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

NPS Photo(s) – Janice Wei

Although the official count isn’t yet available, park staff estimated that several thousand people, from keiki to kupuna, from local residents to first-time visitors, enjoyed the annual event that celebrates and perpetuates authentic Hawaiian culture. For the third year, the event connected people to science with BioBlitz field hikes.

The 37th annual Cultural Festival and BioBlitz were held on the grounds of Kilauea Military Camp in the park from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and park entrance was free all day.

The festival’s theme, Hilina‘i Puna, Kālele iā Ka‘ū, (Puna leans and reclines on Ka‘ū), celebrates the two land districts that comprise the park. The event was sponsored by Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, and Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

60+ Hikers Cited or Warned for Trespassing on Kohala Forest Reserve

More than 60 hikers were either cited or warned today for trespass into the closed Kohala Forest Reserve on Hawai‘i island. A team of eight officers from the DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) wrote citations to 49 adults and gave written warnings to 14 hikers under the age of 18.

Social media has popularized the so-called White Road hike, even though the forest reserve it passes through has been closed since shortly after a 2007 earthquake. DOCARE North Hawai‘i Supervisor Verl Nakama said, “People don’t realize this is a dangerous hike and if you get hurt there’s no cell service and help can be a long ways off.” He hopes people who got citations today, requiring court appearances, will help spread the word that there are numerous, equally as stunning, safe and legal hikes across the state.

This waterflume has been featured as part of the White Road Hike.

For most hikers trespassing into the forest reserve, their destination is a water flume on the Kohala ditch that drops 35 feet into a small, shallow pool. Officers say it’s amazing no one has been hurt sliding down the flume. In addition to trespassing onto closed DLNR lands hikers pass through private land, Dept. of Hawaiian Home Lands (DHHL) property, and across physical features under the jurisdiction of the Dept. Of Agriculture (DOA).

As officers took individuals or small groups of hikers aside to explain why they were being cited, they asked if the trespassers crawled over two locked gates and noticed numerous closed and no trespassing signs? In every instance each hiker said yes, they’d ignored the gates and signs.

DLNR plans to inform travel oriented websites and blogs that post encouragements to ignore the law, to inform their readers that they will be cited if they trespass into the Kohala Forest Reserve and the restricted Kohala watershed. Hunters and others with valid permits from the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) can legally enter the reserve as long as they are engaged in activity listed on their permits. “Shooting the flume is never one of those activities and is just one of the dangers trespassers don’t often take into account”, according to Nakama. DOCARE plans additional, unannounced sweeps in the future.