Bikes Stolen From Tour Company

Kalapana Cultural Tours (KCT) has reported that sometime in the early morning of Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017, between 12:30 and 5 a.m., five “specialized” mountain bikes which were locked together at the KCT property in Kalapana were stolen.

“These are the exact same colors and type of bikes and that were stolen from KCT last night or early this morning” said Kalapana Cultural Tours Manager Fred Aiona

“The five bikes were valued at about $2,000 to $3,000” said KCT Co-Owner Andrew Dunn.

KCT President and Co-owner Ikaika Marzo posted the following to Facebook:

“Someone stole our bike’s this morning from my property in Kalapana. Five specialized bikes which were locked together. They had cut the lock and stole my company’s bikes. Anyone with information, please contact me or message me. REWARD! For any info. No questions.”

Anyone with information on the bikes is asked to contact the Hawai‘i Police Department’s non-emergency line at (808) 935-3311 or contact KCT at (808) 345-4964.

Repair Work on ‘Akaka State Falls Park Trail Completed

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Division of State Parks has completed repair work to the 0.4-mile loop trail at Akaka Falls State Park necessitated due to accidental damage caused by earlier removal of invasive albizia trees in February this year.

Site Engineering completed the repairs to the Akaka Falls walkway as of October 30 and Division of State Parks opened the entire trail as October 31. Repairs had been expected to take until December, so the park is re-opening earlier than expected.

The work quality appears to be good and the path of the walkway has been adjusted where the stairs are located for improved safety. Project cost is $297,400.

Repairs were completed on the longer trail section that is to the right of the loop trail starting point that was closed after the damage. Workers removed and repaired damaged concrete walkways and steps, and replaced railings
The entire park was closed from October 16 – 20 for work on the shorter, left side of the trail to the Akaka Falls lookout.

The park offers a pleasant family walk through lush tropical vegetation to scenic vista points overlooking the cascading Kahuna Falls and the free-falling ‘Akaka Falls, which plunges 442 feet into a stream-eroded gorge. It requires some physical exertion and will take about 1/2 hour for the full loop.

The paved route, which includes multiple steps in places (not wheelchair accessible), makes an easy to follow loop offering stunning viewpoints of the two waterfalls. To view ‘Akaka Falls only, take the path to the left (south) from the first junction. The waterfall view is just a short walk down the path.

Hapuna Beach Construction Costing Over $4.2 Million

Hapuna Beach project costing some big bucks!


The first of three phases of capital improvement construction costing just over $4.2 million, that will last almost a year, is underway at Hapuna Beach State Recreation Area. These will affect the makai and mauka areas of the Hapuna Beach section and the park’s Waialea section. Work is being done by contractor Site Engineering, Inc.

The first phase of work, which began on Monday, October 30, in the Hapuna Beach North section, has required closure of the comfort station and pavilion — a portable toilet will be provided. Replacement has also begun of the concession pathway, beach and shower pathways, and pathway from the upper parking lot. Security fencing will be installed. This phase is expected to be completed by January 7, 2018.

The park will remain open during each phase of work, however, closures should be expected in the specific areas impacted, (see below), including pathways, comfort stations, pavilions, showers and parking areas.
Portable toilets will be provided during comfort station closures, as well as security fencing in construction areas, and park signage as needed.

Hapuna Beach Section Improvements to include:

  • Renovation and repair of the 3 comfort stations in the North, South and main parking areas.
  • Renovation and repair of the 2 pavilions including new roofing supports, replacement of barbecue units, flooring and wall repairs.
  • Replacement of the makai pathway with a 10-foot wide concrete pathway/emergency roadway.
  • Replacement showers at the North and South sections, 3 new foot showers at the North, South and main parking areas, and 1 new rinsing shower in the center area of this section.
  • Replacement pathways from the upper parking area, and replacement of the pathway behind the concession stand.
  • Parking improvements – in the upper parking area: removal of existing light fixtures and restriping of this parking area to increase number of stalls — in the main parking area: adding more ADA stalls and installing bike racks
  • Related repairs and improvements as needed – ADA accessibility compliance, plumbing and building code compliance, etc.
    Mauka areas: repaving of the mauka entry road, adding an unpaved gravel shoulder/parking area near the cabins, and relocating the ADA parking stall adjacent to the dining hall.

Wailea Section Improvements:

  • Renovation and repair of the comfort station
  • Replacement rinsing shower
  • Construction of a new stairway connection from the pathway by the comfort station to the picnic table area
  • Installing new bike racks near the comfort station.

Successive phases of construction work are scheduled for:

  • Phase 2, from February to April 2018: at the Hapuna beach central and south sections including the remainder of the makai pathway, comfort station, pavilion, showers, and ADA parking.
  • Phase 3, from– May to July 2018: Hapuna’s upper areas including the main parking lot, comfort station, and upper parking lot.
    In the Waialea section, from August to September 2018: at the comfort station, shower and pathway areas.
  • At the Mauka cabin area, from September to October 2018: on the mauka roadway to cabins and dining hall.

Island Air Files Chapter 11 Bankruptcy Protection to Fend Off Action by Aircraft Lessors

Interisland Air Service to Continue as Normal; All Tickets and Confirmed Reservations to be Honored

Hawaii Island Air, Inc. (Island Air) announced today it is filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in an effort to continue normal operations while navigating through legal challenges recently presented by the lessors of its aircraft. The bankruptcy filing was caused by threats of legal action to ground the aircraft and strand hundreds of passengers. The filing prevents the threatened action and allows Island Air to continue interisland service for its customers.

During the reorganization process, Island Air expects to fly its scheduled routes as normal and honor all previously purchased tickets and confirmed reservations. In addition, there will be no changes to the Island Miles frequent flyer and other customer service programs, including Kupuna & Keiki Saver Fare, Island Biz corporate travel program, and military and group travel programs.

On October 12, 2017, while in the process of negotiating its aircraft leases with its lessors, Island Air was very surprised that the lessors served them with notices of termination of the leases and demands to surrender its airplanes.

Prioritizing its customers, employees and the communities it serves, Island Air made the difficult decision to file for bankruptcy protection. Continuing to operate under the protection of the United States Bankruptcy Court will allow Island Air to maintain its service to its customers, provide continued employment to its more than 400 valued employees, and ensure a revenue stream so its vendors are paid.

“Island Air will continue to hold our customers and employees, as well as our invaluable vendors, as our main priorities during this reorganization process,” said David Uchiyama, Island Air president and CEO. “Once we have completed the reorganization process, Island Air expects to emerge as a stronger airline with a solid financial structure that will allow us to continue to meet the demands of Hawai‘i’s dynamic interisland market, while positioning us for future growth and expansion.”

As with all companies experiencing a growth in demand, there is an adjustment period. Island Air narrowed its 2017 first quarter loss while revenue continued to rise, making this the airline’s highest quarterly revenue since before 2013 when Island Air was required to begin reporting its financial data to the DOT due to the size of its aircraft. In the second quarter of 2017, the airline earned $12.5 million in revenues, its highest quarterly revenue in more than a decade. In the first quarter of 2017, Island Air flew 172,200 passengers (over double the previous quarter’s figure of 75,102). Additionally, Island Air has increased marketing in North America, Asia, Australia and New Zealand.

In January 2016, Hawai‘i-based investment company PacifiCap acquired controlling interest in Island Air from Ohana Airline Holdings, LLC (OAH), which is wholly owned by Oracle corporation founder Larry Ellison. Since that time the airline has been focused on improving operations, increasing efficiencies and elevating service to customers. This has included strategic investments in equipment and supplies, including upgrading its aircraft fleet, as well as expanding training and resources for employees. In addition, Island Air is currently modernizing its information technology system, which when fully implemented will enhance online reservation and bookings, expand digital services and improve interface with codeshare and interline airline partners.

Founded in 1980 as Princeville Airways, the company was renamed Island Air in 1992 and has been serving the Islands of Hawai‘i for 37 years. Island Air currently offers approximately 200 flights each week between O‘ahu, Maui, Kaua‘i and Hawai‘i Island, and employs more than 400 individuals throughout the State of Hawai‘i.

Two-Month Repair Work on Akaka Falls State Park Trail Gets Underway

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Division of State Parks has begun repair work to the 0.4-mile loop trail at Akaka Falls State Park, necessitated due to accidental damage caused by earlier removal of invasive albizia trees in February this year.  Site Engineering was selected as contractor and cost estimate is $297,400. Work is expected to be completed in December.

Akaka Falls (DLNR Photo)

Initial repair work began last week on the longer trail section that is to the right of the loop trail starting point that was closed after the damage. Workers are removing and repairing damaged concrete walkways and steps, and replacing railings

From October 16 – 20 the park will be completely closed for work on the shorter, left side of the trail to the Akaka Falls lookout.  Hopefully this will be the only time the park will need to be closed. If additional closure is needed, an announcement will be posted on the Division of State Parks website and in local news media.

Aside from the closure dates of October 16-20, access to the Akaka Falls lookout area may be interrupted along the shorter, open walkway path, due to equipment and/or material transport to the damaged areas.

The park offers a pleasant family walk through lush tropical vegetation to scenic vista points overlooking the cascading Kahuna Falls and the free-falling ‘Akaka Falls, which plunges 442 feet into a stream-eroded gorge. It requires some physical exertion and will take about 1/2 hour for the full loop.

The paved route, which includes multiple steps in places (not wheelchair accessible), makes an easy to follow loop offering stunning viewpoints of the two waterfalls. To view ‘Akaka Falls only, take the path to the left (south) from the first junction. The waterfall view is just a short walk down the path. For more information see http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/dsp/hiking/hawaii/akaka-falls-loop-trail/

Hawaii Opposes Travel Ban 3.0

Today the State of Hawaii, Dr. Ismail Elshikh, the Muslim Association of Hawaii, and two prospective Doe plaintiffs filed a proposed Third Amended Complaint in Hawaii v. Trump. The proposed complaint was accompanied by a motion for temporary restraining order.

Click to read

As stated in the memorandum in support of the motion for temporary restraining order:

On September 24, 2017, the President issued a proclamation that imposes an indefinite nationality-based ban on travel and targets an overwhelmingly Muslim population. The President has fulfilled his prior promises: He has issued a “larger, tougher, and more specific” version of the travel ban that this Court and the Ninth Circuit found violative of the Nation’s laws and most basic constitutional commitments.

It should come as little surprise, then, that the new order replicates all of the legal flaws evident in its precursors. It again openly “discriminate[s] * * * in the issuance of an immigrant visa because of * * * nationality.” It still fails, despite its elaborate rationalizations, to make any “find[ing]” remotely adequate to support its sweeping ban of millions of foreign nationals. It exceeds the limits on the President’s exclusion authority that have been recognized for nearly a century, by supplanting Congress’s immigration policies with the President’s own unilateral and indefinite ban. And it continues to effectuate the President’s unrepudiated promise to exclude Muslims from the United States.

Copies of the proposed third amended complaint and memorandum in support of the motion for temporary restraining order are attached.

Hawaii Tourism Authority Awarding $3.5 Million to Support 124 Hawaiian Culture, Natural Resources and Community Programs in 2018

In keeping with its commitment to foster sustainable tourism in the Hawaiian Islands, the Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA) is providing funding of more than $3.5 million to 124 programs that are perpetuating Hawaiian culture, protecting natural resources and showcasing community events in 2018.Recipients of the funding are nonprofit groups, community organizations and individuals statewide who have demonstrated through proposals submitted to HTA their dedication to strengthen the enduring qualities of Hawaii’s legacy that distinguish the islands as a place to live and visit.

“Sustainable tourism starts at the community level and that’s the focus of our support for initiatives by groups and individuals who have pledged to make Hawaii a better place for future generations,” said George D. Szigeti, HTA president and CEO. “Collectively, these community-based programs will help manage tourism’s impacts by preserving the quality of life we treasure as residents through culture, the environment and the sharing of festivals and events ingrained in the traditions of Hawaii’s people.”

Funding is being provided to recipients on all islands for usage in 2018 as part of three HTA program categories: Kukulu Ola, Aloha Aina and Community Enrichment. HTA issued a request for proposals on June 21 with submittals from qualified applicants received by August 4.

  • A total of $1,240,000 is being awarded to 33 recipients that are perpetuating Hawaiian culture through HTA’s Kukulu Ola program. Awardees include community groups, practitioners, craftsmen, musicians and artists committed to strengthening a broader understanding and appreciation of Hawaiian culture through place-based activity engagement. Founded on the value of ma ka hana ka ike (in working one learns), the Kukulu Ola program assists recipients steeped in ike Hawaii to share within communities the Hawaiian values inherent in each respective practice.
  • A total of $1,150,000 is being awarded to 26 recipients that are helping to protect Hawaii’s natural resources through HTA’s Aloha Aina program. Focused on the lasting value of stewardship by responsible community-based entities that emphasize aina-kanaka relationships and knowledge, the Aloha Aina program supports efforts to manage, conserve and revitalize Hawaii’s natural resources and environment.
  • A total of $1,153,300 is being awarded to 65 recipients through HTA’s Community Enrichment program, which supports quality experiences created by communities to be shared with residents and visitors for their enjoyment. The Community Enrichment program invests in a diverse array of festivals, events and year-round programs in support of culture, education, health and wellness, nature, agriculture, sports, technology and voluntourism.

Click here for the listing of awardees receiving funding from HTA.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Announces Upcoming Flight Plans

Visitors observe Kīlauea summit lava lake last month from the Jaggar Museum observation deck, open 24 hours a day in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. NPS Photo by Janice Wei

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park announces the following upcoming flight plans for October 2017:

  • October 12, between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., to shuttle fencing material and equipment from ‘Ōla‘a Tract to Wright Road in Volcano.
  • October 14 and 15, between 9 a.m. and noon, to transport crew from Kīlauea helipad to Kahuku Unit at the 8,000-ft. elevation for archeological surveys.
  • October 18, between 7 a.m. and 10 a.m., for ungulate surveys and control work in Kahuku between 5,000- and 7,000-ft. elevation.
  • October 18, between 10 a.m. and 3p.m., to shuttle fencing material and equipment to Kahuku at about 7,000-ft. elevationfor silversword recovery efforts.
  • October 19, between 6:30 a.m. and 8:30 a.m.,for ungulate surveys and control work in Kahuku between 3,000- and 5,000-ft. elevation.
  • October 24, between 7 a.m. and 9a.m., to shuttle fencing material and equipment to Kahuku between 2,000-and 3,000-ft.elevation.

In addition, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory may conduct flight operations over Kīlauea and Mauna Loa to assess volcanic activity and maintain instrumentation.
The park regrets any noise impact to residents and park visitors. Dates and times are subject to change based on aircraft availability and weather.

Management of the park requires the use of aircraft to monitor and research volcanic activity, conduct search-and-rescue missions and law enforcement operations, support management of natural and cultural resources, and to maintain backcountry facilities.

Hawaii to Challenge Travel Ban 3.0

Today Hawaii filed supplemental briefing with the United States Supreme Court regarding the Hawaii v. Trump litigation. Shortly after filing that supplemental briefing, Hawaii notified the U.S. Supreme Court that it intends to seek leave from the Hawaii federal district court to file an amended complaint challenging the lawfulness of the third travel ban.

Click to read full letter

Attorney General Doug Chin said, “Hawaii fought the first and second travel bans because they were illegal and unconstitutional efforts to implement the President’s Muslim ban. Unfortunately, the third travel ban is more of the same. This new ban still discriminates on the basis of nationality, it still exceeds the President’s legal authority, and it still seeks to implement his Muslim ban. Simply adding an obvious target like North Korea to the list and banning travel by some government officials from Venezuela does nothing to disguise this. And – unlike the first two versions – Travel Ban 3.0 has no end date.”

Hawaii’s supplemental brief filed with the Supreme Court and its letter to the Supreme Court clerk are both attached.

Kama‘aina Special – Kohala Zipline Offers 2-for-1 on its Kohala Canopy Adventure

Isn’t it about that time for kama‘aina to zip and trek on Kohala Zipline’s aerial course? Check out the 2-for-1 Kohala Canopy Adventure now through November 15, 2017.

Kohala Zipline’s Canopy Adventure features 9 zip lines, 5 sky bridges, and a rappel in Hawaii Island’s only tree canopy adventure. Set within a towering forest on a private nature reserve, this aerial adventure is perfectly suited for beginners and experts alike. Certified guides monitor safety and comfort and share their extensive knowledge of the area’s natural and cultural history.

“Fall is one of our most favorite times of the year when our island friends and families get special deals to zip and trek. It’s Kohala Zipline’s special invitation to experience nature and our award-winning adventure,” said Marketing Director Jason Cohn. “It’s not just a zipline, it’s an aerial trekking course.”

With an elevated standard for fun, Kohala Zipline is designed from the ground up, ever mindful of zipline safety measures, complying with the highest level of safety standards set by the industry’s internationally recognized governing body, Association for Challenge Course Technology.)

Located in the former historic yellow Kohala Sugar Company building in North Kohala, Kohala Zipline’s special deal if for Hawaii residents only. Guest must present a valid Hawaii ID, meet weight restrictions between 70 and 270 pounds and be at least 8 years old.

Kohala Zipline was awarded Trip Advisor’s Certificate of Excellence and West Hawaii Today’s 2017 Best of West Hawaii award for Best Zipline.

To book Kohala Zipline 2-for-1 Kama‘aina special, call 808-331-8505. For more zipline information, log onto www.kohalazipline.com

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park: Explore Kahuku October – December

Everyone is invited to participate in the free guided hikes, “Coffee Talks” and ‘Ike Hana No‘eau Hawaiian cultural programs in the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, from October through December 2017. Visitors can also explore Kahuku on their own on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

A visitor explores the Realms and Divisions of Kahuku. NPS Photo Janice Wei

The Kahuku Unit will be open for visitors on both Christmas Eve, Dec. 24 and New Year’s Eve, Dec. 31, but no guided programs will be offered.

Enter the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on the mauka (inland) side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5, and meet near the parking area. Sturdy footwear, water, raingear, sun protection and a snack are recommended for all hikes. Entrance and all programs are free.

Participate in ‘Ike Hana No‘eau (Experience the Skillful Work) Hawaiian cultural demonstrations at Kahuku on the third Friday of each month from 10 a.m. to noon, October 20, November 17, and December 15. Programs are free.

Get to know your park and your neighbors and join an informal “Coffee Talk” conversation on a wide variety of topics at Kahuku the last Friday of most months (there is no Coffee Talk in November). Ka‘ū coffee, tea and pastries will be available for purchase. Coffee Talks are offered free on October 27 and December 29 from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Pu‘u o Lokuana is a short 0.4-mile hike to the top of the grassy cinder cone, Pu‘u o Lokuana. Learn about the formation and various uses of this hill over time and enjoy a breathtaking view of lower Ka‘ū. This hike is offered October 1 & 28 and November 5 from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Palm Trail is a moderately difficult 2.6-mile loop traversing scenic pastures along an ancient cinder cone, with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer. Highlights include relics of the ranching era, sections of remnant native forest and amazing volcanic features from the 1868 eruptive fissures. A guided hike of Palm Trail is offered October 7 & 22, November 26, and December 3 & 23 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

‘Ōhi‘a Lehua. Learn about the vital role of ‘ōhi‘a lehua in native Hawaiian forests, the many forms of the ‘ōhi‘a tree, and the new disease of Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death. Visitors will be able to identify the many differences of the most prominent native tree in Kahuku on this program, which is an easy, one-mile (or less) walk. The ‘Ōhi‘a Lehua program is offered October 8, November 12, and December 10 from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Kahuku ‘Ohana Day. Families are invited for a day of fun, culture and discovery at the Kahuku Unit. Learn about the hidden powers that plants have to keep us healthy through the teachings of Aunty Ka‘ohu Monfort, a practitioner of lā‘au lapa‘au (Hawaiian herbal medicine). Collect seeds from native plants and help park rangers bring new life to Kahuku. Kids 17 and under and their families must sign up by October 13 by calling 808-985-6019. Bring water, lunch and snacks, sunscreen, hat, long pants, shoes and reusable water bottle. Kahuku ‘Ohana Day is Saturday, October 21 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Birth of Kahuku. Explore the rich geologic history of Kahuku. Traverse the vast 1868 lava flow, see different volcano features and formations, and identify many parts of the Southwest Rift Zone of Mauna Loa. Learn about the Hawaiian hotspot and the creation of Kahuku. This guided easy-to-moderate hike is offered October 14, November 4, and December 9 & 30 from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

People and Land of Kahuku is a moderate two-mile, three-hour guided hike that loops through varied landscapes to explore the human history of Kahuku. Emerging native forests, pastures, lava fields, and other sites hold clues about ways people have lived and worked on the vast Kahuku lands – from the earliest Hawaiians, through generations of ranching families, to the current staff and volunteers of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Learn about the powerful natural forces at work here and how people have adapted to, shaped, and restored this land. The guided hike is offered October 15, November 19 and December 17 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Nature & Culture: An Unseverable Relationship (He Pilina Wehena ‘Ole). Hike the Palm Trail and be inspired by a place where hulihia (catastrophic change) and kulia (restoration) can be observed as the land transitions from the 1868 lava flow and its pioneer plants, to deeper soil with more diverse and older flora. Learn about native plants and their significance in Hawaiian culture. This moderate hike is about two miles and takes two hours. The Nature & Culture program is offered October 21 and November 25 from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Realms and Divisions of Kahuku. Experience the sense of place that evolves at the intersection of nature and culture on this moderately difficult two-mile, two-hour guided hike on the Kahuku Unit’s newest trail, Pu‘u Kahuku. Explore the realms and divisions of the traditional Hawaiian classification system at Kahuku. Bring a snack for the “talk story” segment of this hike. Offered October 29, November 11, and December 16 from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Hi‘iaka & Pele. Discover two fascinating Hawaiian goddesses, sisters Pelehonuamea (Pele) and Hi‘iaka, and the natural phenomena they represent. Visitors will experience the sisters coming alive through the epic stories depicted in the natural landscape of Kahuku on this easy 1.7-mile walk on the main road in Kahuku. The Hi‘iaka and Pele program is offered November 18 and December 2, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Keep up with Kahuku events and visit the calendar on the park website, https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/kahuku-hikes.htm, and download the Kahuku Site Bulletin https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/upload/2013_11_05-Kahuku-Site-Bulletin.pdf.

Statement by George D. Szigeti, President and CEO, Hawaii Tourism Authority

George D. Szigeti, president and CEO of the Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA), issued the following statement commenting on Hawaii’s visitor statistics results for August 2017.

George D. Szigeti

“Knowing summer is the peak period for leisure travel globally, our State’s tourism industry partners deserve a collective thank you for how they continued to elevate Hawaii as a premier destination experience in August. The solid increases in visitor spending reported for all four major islands was a notable highlight.

“Two key economic figures for the first eight months of 2017 reveal how fortunate our State’s tourism industry has been this year. Through August 2017, visitor spending statewide is at $11.34 billion and the State tax revenue generated by tourism is $1.32 billion.

“By comparison, when Hawaii was starting to emerge from the Great Recession in 2010, the tourism industry realized $11.01 billion in total visitor spending and generated $1.05 billion in State tax revenue for the entire year. With four months to go in 2017, our tourism industry has already surpassed both of the full-year totals from just seven years ago.

“The natural disasters that struck Texas, Louisiana, Florida, Puerto Rico and the Caribbean Islands these past few weeks remind us again that we can never take tourism in Hawaii for granted, and that our State’s future well-being could be suddenly altered. Going forward, we must strive for a balance that allows Hawaii’s tourism industry to continue thriving while seeking sustainable solutions that perpetuate culture, preserve natural resources and supports the quality of life we all want.”

Hawaiian Airlines and Japan Airlines Announce Comprehensive New Partnership

Two of the most popular airlines between Hawai’i and Japan yesterday signed a comprehensive new partnership agreement that will greatly enhance the ease and comfort of travel for passengers traveling between the two island chains. The agreement between Hawaiian Airlines and Japan Airlines, signed at a ceremony in Tokyo, takes effect March 25, 2018 (subject to government approval). The agreement provides for extensive code sharing, lounge access and frequent flyer program reciprocity.

(L-R): Theo Panagiotoulias, senior vice president of global sales and alliances, Hawaiian Airlines; Mark Dunkerley, president and CEO, Hawaiian Airlines; Yoshiharu Ueki, representative director and president, Japan Airlines; and Hideki Oshima, executive officer, Japan Airlines.

“We are delighted to partner with Japan Airlines for our long-term future in Japan,” said Hawaiian Airlines President and CEO Mark Dunkerley. “Japan Airlines embodies the welcoming culture of Japan and is renowned for the quality of its services. Our partnership will greatly increase travel choices for those in Japan looking to travel to Hawaii as well as for those in Hawaii looking to travel to Japan.”

“Hawaiian Airlines is well known among Japanese travelers for its warm hospitality and its excellent record for punctuality and safety,” said Japan Airlines President Yoshiharu Ueki. “We look forward to providing our passengers with additional options of exceptional service and comfortable travel to and throughout the Hawaiian Islands.”

As part of this comprehensive partnership, the two carriers also intend to establish a joint venture designed to provide even more choices, convenience and enhancements to the traveling public to/from Japan and beyond to multiple Asian markets.

In the near-term:

• JAL guests will have unlimited access to Hawaiian’s vast neighbor island and Japan-Hawai’i network, including non-stop flights between Sapporo and Honolulu.

• Hawaiian Airlines will have full access to JAL’s domestic network, which includes Nagoya, Fukuoka, Sendai and Aomori.

• Hawaiian’s Japan-to-Hawai’i flights will be offered as new options within Japan Airlines’ wholly owned subsidiary, JALPAK, a highly reputable package tour operator in Japan.

• JAL Mileage Bank and HawaiianMiles members will be able to earn miles on the codeshare flights. Further opportunities for accrual and redemption of mileage will be expanded at a later date.

• Guests will have access to both airlines’ lounges, and when Hawaiian has completed its planned relocation to Terminal 2 at Tokyo Narita Airport, guests of each airline will be able to seamlessly transfer between each carrier’s networks.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Offers Free Entry and Stewardship Opportunities on National Public Lands Day

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park offers free entrance and two opportunities to help protect Hawai‘i this Saturday, National Public Lands Day, Sept. 30, by removing invasive plant species in the park and in the Ocean View community.
In honor of National Public Lands Day, the largest single-day volunteer effort for public lands in the United States, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is offering the Stewardship at the Summit program from 9 a.m. to noon. Meet volunteers Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m., then head into the forest to remove Himalayan ginger from the summit of Kīlauea.

NPS Photo

Himalayan ginger is one of the most invasive plants in the park, and on earth. It is listed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature as one of the 100 World’s Worst Invasive Alien Species. The park strives to protect the rainforest habitat of native birds and plants, but Himalayan ginger takes over the native rainforest understory, making it impossible for the next generation of forest to grow, and it crowds out many native plants, including pa‘iniu (a Hawaiian lily), ‘ama‘u fern, and others. Wear sturdy, closed-toe shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, sunscreen, raingear, snacks, and water. Loppers/gloves provided. No advance registration required.

Volunteers for Stewardship at the Summit on Saturday will receive a free park pass to use on another date of their choosing.

In Ocean View, volunteers are needed to remove invasive fountain grass from roadsides in Hawaiian Ocean View Estates (HOVE). Meet at the Ocean View Community Center on Sat., Sept. 30 at 9 a.m.; bring lunch, water, a hat and sun protection. This noxious weed increases the risk of wildfire. In 2005, fountain grass was responsible for a 25,000-acre fire that forced evacuation of Waikoloa Village. Contact Park Ecologist David Benitez at (808) 985-6085 or email him at david_benitez@nps.gov for more information about this project.

Every year on National Public Lands Day (NPLD), all fee-charging national parks offer free entry. Many parks and public lands across the nation organize stewardship projects and special programs on NPLD to raise awareness about why it is important to protect our public lands.

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor Hosts 3,000 Visitors at Annual Living History Day

In Partnership with Smithsonian Museum Day Live!

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor brought America’s WWII history to life at its annual all day Living History Day, September 23. More than 3,000 visitors attended the annual historical celebration event.

The event was held in affiliation with Smithsonian Magazine’s Museum Day Live!, providing free admission to those who presented a Museum Day Live! ticket, downloaded free from the website.

This year’s event recognized the role of film and photography in documenting and preserving the events of WWII. A special screening of “Finding KUKAN” was held in the Museum’s theater, followed by a question and answer session with the documentary’s filmmaker, Hawaii resident Robin Lung. “Finding KUKAN” is an award-winning documentary that uncovers the forgotten story of Hawaii resident Li Ling-Ai, the uncredited female producer of “KUKAN,” an Academy Award-winning color documentary about WWII China that has been lost for decades.

Other themed activities included demonstrations on how to preserve WWII-era and family photos, as well as the process of colorizing black and white photographs; a scavenger hunt throughout the Museum to find famous images from WWII from around the globe; costumed interpreters including WWII pilots, and swing dancers who conducted swing dance demonstrations with the public; displays and presentations by local students; and open cockpits. Canon USA, Inc. was also on-site to loan cameras and offer photography workshops for visitors.

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor is located on Historic Ford Island, where bombs fell during the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. It is a sacred battlefield, America’s aviation battlefield. Visitors to the Museum can see remnants from that day of infamy, including the 158-foot tall, red and white iconic Ford Island Control Tower, Hangars 37 and 79, and bullet holes in Hangar 79. Through its preservation and restoration of World War II fighter planes and accompanying artifacts in the Museum’s historic hangars, Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor shares the story of the vital role aviation played in the winning of World War II, and its continuing role in maintaining America’s freedom.

Man Achieves Goal to Visit ALL 59 National Parks

When Dave Parker entered Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Tuesday night, he accomplished his lifelong dream to visit the 59 iconic national parks in the U.S.

Chief Ranger John Broward shakes hands with Dave Parker of McLean, VA who completed his quest to visit all 59 National Parks on Wednesday. (All photos NPS Photos by Janice Wei)

“To see Kīlauea erupt is indescribable and it’s just spectacular to see,” Parker said. “It’s the reason we came here,” he said.

On Wednesday, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park surprised Parker with a “59ers” Certificate of Achievement, signed by National Park Service Acting Director, Mike Reynolds. The certificate was presented by Acting Superintendent and Chief Ranger John Broward, who congratulated Parker in front of visitors and staff at the Kīlauea Visitor Center.

Dave Parker poses for a photo in front of an interpretive display in the Kīlauea Visitor Center of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

“It’s uplifting that Mr. Parker made it a priority to see all 59 of the iconic national parks,” Broward said. “Park visitors help steward our public lands, and by appreciating them, they protect them. And Dave Parker, you couldn’t have a better last name,” he said.

Parker’s love for national parks blossomed at the tender age of 14, when his parents took him to his first parks, Yellowstone and Grand Teton. His family camped, rode horses, hiked the trails and watched Yellowstone’s famous geyser, Old Faithful, erupt.

Now 77, Parker, his wife Carol, and friends Red and Sheri Cavaney, will spend a few nights at Volcano House and explore the eruptions of Kīlauea and Mauna Loa. They enjoyed a ranger talk about the volcanic origins of the Hawaiian Islands, and a guided tour with the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park (FHVNP).

Left to right: Elizabeth Fien, Executive Director of the Friends of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park; Dave Parker “59er”; , Margot Griffith, Executive Director of the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association; and Hawaii Volcanoes’ Acting Superintendent and Chief Ranger John Broward smile for a photo in the Kīlauea Visitor Center.

The park’s non-profit supporting partners, the FHVNP and the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, presented the Parkers and friends with commemorative items including ball caps, T shirts, pins, a gift certificate for The Rim restaurant, and other mementos and educational items to help them enjoy and discover the park.

“There are many ways to support your parks,” Parker said. “All parks have organizations that support them that you can donate to. You can volunteer and give back with your time. It’s an important investment to make for the survival of public lands and our future generations,” he said.

The auspicious visit was Parker’s fifth time to Hawai‘i, and his first to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. During his early career working for the Dept. of Commerce in Wash., D.C., he helped promote travel to the U.S., and had close ties to the Hawai‘i visitor industry. He and his wife live in McLean, VA.

Left to right: Sheri Cavaney, Dave Parker, Carol Parker and Red Cavaney, smile for photos in the Kīlauea Visitor Center on Wednesday. Dave is wearing an NPS Centennial T-shirt listing all 59 national parks.

The National Park Service has more than 20,000 National Park Service employees who care for America’s 417 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.

73 Hawaii Companies Represented at the 2017 Tokyo International Gift Show

Seventy-three companies represented Hawaii at the 2017 Tokyo International Gift Show (TIGS).

This year marks the sixth consecutive year that the Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) organized a Hawaii Pavilion at TIGS, which was held September 6-8, 2017, at the Tokyo International Exhibition Center (Tokyo Big Sight).

This year, the Hawaii pavilion filled 32 booths, and featured a café section. Last year’s gift show resulted in $11 million in export sales by Hawaii’s participating vendors. This year’s exhibitors are expected to top $13 million in export sales.

“The Tokyo International Gift Show is huge and it’s the perfect opportunity to showcase small and medium-sized businesses from Hawaii to the rest of the world,” said DBEDT Director Luis P. Salaveria.  “Each exhibitor walks away with new exposure to the international market and a global perspective on how to do business outside of Hawaii.”

“The Hawaii Pavilion grows each year in size and number of local companies exhibiting,” said Dennis T. Ling, administrator for DBEDT’s Business Development and Support Division.  “The Hawaii brand is established and recognized for quality and authenticity, which is reflected in the dramatic increase in our sales in the Japan market.”

As a result of dollar amount of exports achieved at TIGS, the U.S. Small Business Administration announced this week an award of $400,000 to continue the Hawaii State Trade Export Program.  Under the tag “Buy Hawaii, Give Aloha”, this program provides training, grants and tradeshows for companies looking to start exporting or increase their exports.

Angie Higa, owner of Sky Dreams LLC explained: “The Tokyo International Gift Fair is an important show that I look forward to each year.  As a designer and having the opportunity to expand my collection to Japan, where they love Hawaii and Hawaii-made products, is absolutely amazing.”

Keoki Tavares, owner of Aloha Elixir said: “This was a great experience. The Tokyo International Gift Show has really opened the door for us to make important business connections in Japan. Our products were well-received and it was exciting to participate for the first time this year.”
Erin Kanno Uehara, owner of Choco lea noted: “Our mission is ‘bringing peace to our world one chocolate at a time’ – so this is the perfect opportunity for us to fulfill that mission and spread our love and aloha from Hawaii.”

TIGS is the largest international trade show in Japan, drawing 200,000 buyers, distributors, wholesalers and retailers to meet exhibitors at more than 4,500 booths spread out over Tokyo Big Sight exhibition area.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s October 2017 Events

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park (ADIP) programs with the public throughout 2017. In addition, the community is invited to lend a hand to save native rainforest through the park’s Stewardship at the Summit volunteer program.
ADIP and Hawaiian cultural programs are free, but entrance fees apply.

Programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Stewardship at the Summit. Volunteers are needed to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. No advance registration is required, and there is no cost to participate, but park entrance fees apply. Visit the park website for additional planning details: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm.
When: October 7, 13, 21, and 27 at 9 a.m.
Where: Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. on any of the above dates.

Lomi. Lomi is the traditional massage practice of the Hawaiian people.

Lomi massage demonstrated in the park. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson

There are many different styles of lomi used throughout Hawai‘i, and most are used as a way to heal body and mind. Lomi practitioner Annie Erbe will demonstrate this popular healing art. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Oct. 11 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Footprints in the Ash. Hawaiians once traversed Kīlauea on foot to travel between Puna and Ka‘ū, and during the 18th century, explosions from the volcano rained volcanic ash down on the people, preserving their footprints in the sands of “Keonehelelei.”

Footprints fossilized in volcanic ash in the Ka‘ū Desert will be the subject of October’s After Dark in the Park. NPS Photo.

Park Ranger Jay Robinson discusses new interpretive displays in the Ka‘ū Desert and explains what we know today about the impact of these explosive eruptions on native society. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Oct. 17 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium

Mark Yamanaka in Concert. Join local recording artist Mark Yamanaka for a free concert.

Mark has been awarded multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano awards since the debut of his first album, Lei Puakenikeni. His next album, Lei Maile, has also received critical acclaim. Mark’s crisp, clear falsetto and rich baritone voice will mesmerize you. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., Oct. 18 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kahuku ‘Ohana Day. Families are invited for a day of fun, culture and discovery at the Kahuku Unit! Learn about the hidden powers that plants have to keep us healthy through the teachings of Aunty Ka‘ohu Monfort, a practitioner of lā‘au lapa‘au (Hawaiian herbal medicine).

Aunty Ka‘ohu Monfort demonstrates lā‘au lapa‘au at the 2017 Cultural Festival. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson

Collect seeds from native plants and help park rangers bring new life to Kahuku. Kids 17 and under and their families must sign up by October 13 to participate by calling 808-985-6019. Bring water, lunch and snacks, sunscreen, hat, long pants, shoes and reusable water bottle. Kahuku is located between the 70 and 71 mile markers on Highway 11.
When: Sat., Oct. 21, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (Registration required by Oct. 13).
Where: Kahuku Unit

Lau Hala. Join park staff and learn one of the great traditional arts of Hawaii, ulana lau hala. Hawaiians have used the hala (pandanus) tree to create many useful and beautiful items for centuries. Learn to weave lau hala and take home your own piece of lau hala art. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Oct. 25 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Governor Ige Welcomes Japan Airlines’ Inaugural Flight From Narita to Kona

Gov. David Ige and the Hawai‘i Department of Transportation welcomed Japan Airlines’ inaugural flight from Narita International Airport to the Kona International Airport at Keāhole on Hawai‘i Island. The new daily, non-stop service marks JAL’s return to Kona.

The new service is expected to generate $9.8 million in tax revenue and create 900 new jobs, according to the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority.

“We warmly welcome Japan Airlines back to Kona and are extremely excited about the new daily service to Kona, which is on its way to becoming Hawai‘i’s second major international port of entry,” said Gov. Ige. JAL has offered excellent service to the Aloha State for more than 60 years, and has played a significant role in expanding and supporting our tourism industry and economy. We are also thankful for the opportunity for cultural exchange with Japan.”

“Our thanks go to Japan Airlines and Chairman Masaru Onishi for being such a great and loyal friend to Hawaii’s tourism industry. This new non-stop flight connecting Tokyo and Kona reinforces Japan Airlines’ commitment to support travel to the Hawaiian Islands, while offering its customers an enticing new vacation experience to discover the allure and natural beauty found on the island of Hawai‘i,” said George Szigeti, president and chief executive officer Hawai‘i Tourism Authority.

In addition to JAL’s Narita to Kona service, the airline currently has six non-stop flights between Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya and Honolulu.

Mayor Kim’s Letter to HICOP Board – RE: Helicopter Tours

Dear Mr. Ernst & HICOP Board:
RE: Helicopter Tours

In our meeting, I clearly indicated how I will proceed.

  • Request a meeting with Helicopter Tour Industry to begin dialogue with industry.
  • Request organization of a program by industry to address concerns.
  • Plan working group meeting of community and industry to see if any anything can be addressed together.

Meeting of first two bullets have been completed and waiting for report.

I was not aware that at this time a definitive position was established by HICOP and believed that the desire was to see if the whole issue can be discussed to work out acceptable solutions. Your correspondence indicate otherwise. If I am incorrect, please correct me.

I truly feel that at this time an effort should be made to address the problem by coming together for open dialogue, regardless of past attempts. As you know, the authority of this issues is with the FAA.

Sincerely,
Harry Kim
Mayor