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International Market Place Celebrates Grand Opening Today in Waikiki

Thousands gathered today to take part in the grand opening of the fully reimagined International Market Place in Waikīkī. The 345,000-square-foot, open-air shopping center offers Hawai‘i’s first Saks Fifth Avenue as well as a world-class lineup of restaurants and retailers – nearly 50 percent of which will be unique to O’ahu.

The new International Market Place reopened in Waikiki today.

The new International Market Place reopened in Waikiki today.

“From dining under the sun and stars on the spectacular Grand Lānai to the excellent retail and entertainment, International Market Place will once again serve as a special gathering place for residents and tourists in the heart of Waikīkī,” said Robert S. Taubman, chairman, president and CEO of Taubman Centers, Inc. “We believe it will become a premiere destination on the island, and one of the best assets in our portfolio.”

Situated between the bustling Kalākaua and Kūhiō Avenues, International Market Place will offer approximately 90 of today’s most sought-after retailers and ten world-class restaurants. The center’s exceptional design incorporates a “cultural journey” of the land and its people, water features, indigenous landscaping and the historic 160-year-old banyan tree.

“International Market Place offers a unique Hawaiian sense of place that honors the past, perpetuates Queen Emma’s legacy and looks to the future,” said Cordell Lietz, president, CoastWood Capital Group. “It has been an honor to work with Taubman and Queen Emma Land Company to bring to fruition our shared vision for the important historic site.”

“We are excited for this property’s future as it establishes its own reputation and legacy as a new iconic landmark and gathering place,” said Eric Martinson, president of Queen Emma Land Company, the owners of the land on which International Market Place sits.

The International Market Place retail and restaurant lineup includes the following. A single asterisk (*) before the name indicates brands that are unique to the island.

STORES:
*45rpm
ABC Stores
*Abeo
Abercrombie & Fitch
Aesop
Anthropologie
Banana Republic
*BCBG MAX AZRIA
Brunello Cucinelli
*Capital Teas
*Catimini
Chapel Hats
*Christian Louboutin
Clarks
Crazy Shirts
*Fabletics
Flip Flop Shops
FootAction USA
Fossil
*Free People
GameStop
GNC Live Well
Godiva Belgium 1926
Greenroom Hawaii
*Hanna Andersson
*Hervé Léger
Hilton Grand Vacations (kiosk)
Hollister
Honolulu Cookie Co.
*Intermix
Island Art & Sole
*Jo Malone
*Kona Coffee Purveyors
*Kula & Ko
Laline
Lani Beach by Mireille
L’Occitane en Provence
LUSH Fresh Handmade Cosmetics
MAC
Magnolia Ice Cream & Treats
Maui Divers Jewelry
Michael Kors
*Mitsuwa Marketplace
*Oliver Peoples
*Ondademar
Pacific Harley-Davidson
Pandora
Papyrus
*Penhaligon’s
*Robin’s Jean
*Saks Fifth Avenue
Sand People
*Seafolly Australia
*Shinola
Shoe Palace
*Stuart Weitzman
*Sugarfina
Sunglass Hut
Swarovski
Tabora Gallery
Tesla
*Trina Turk
Vera Bradley
Vilebrequin
*YOGASMOGA

RESTAURANTS ON THE GRAND LĀNAI (THIRD LEVEL):
*Baku
*Eating House 1849 by Roy Yamaguchi
*Flour & Barley – Brick Oven Pizza
Goma Tei Ramen
*Herringbone
*Kona Grill
*STRIPSTEAK
*Yauatcha

RESTAURANT ON THE FIRST LEVEL:
*The STREET, A Michael Mina Social House

In addition to the stellar shopping and dining, guests can enjoy a free show each evening called “O Nā Lani Sunset Stories” that kicks off with a ceremonial lighting of the Lamakū Torch Tower that sits proudly on Kalākaua Ave. Honoring the beloved Queen Emma, the nightly show highlights stories, traditions and culture of this special gathering place.

Guests to International Market Place may take advantage of many amenities, including a 700-space parking garage, valet parking, electric vehicle charging stations, free Wi-Fi and much more.

International Market Place was developed through a partnership between Taubman and CoastWood Capital Group in conjunction with Queen Emma Land Company. Revenues will directly support The Queen’s Medical Center, the state’s largest private, nonprofit hospital and its mission of providing quality health care to all of Hawai‘i’s people.

For more information on the shopping, dining and entertainment destination, please visit ShopInternationalMarketPlace.com, Instagram: @intlmktplace and in Japanese @intlmktplacejp; Facebook: facebook.com/IntlMktPlace and in Japanese at facebook.com/IntlMktPlaceJP.

Fair Wind Cruises Celebrates 45 Years of Cruises with $4.50 Kona Coast Cruises

On Saturday, September 10, 2016, family-owned and operated Fair Wind Cruises will celebrate 45 years of offering world-class ocean adventures on the breathtaking south Kona coast.

Fairwinds in KonaTo say mahalo to the community and visitors to Hawaii Island for their support, Fair Wind Cruises will be hosting a fun-filled day for the whole family from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Fair Wind Courtyard at Keauhou Bay.

One hundred percent of the proceeds from the day will go towards the Kahaluʻu Reef Teach Program committed to promoting reef etiquette to protect the bay’s fragile ecosystem. Fair Wind Cruises will match the money raised on the day dollar-for-dollar.

Fairwind3In honor of the 45-year milestone, the day’s festivities will be just $4.50 including 45-minute cruises on the Fair Wind II and Hula Kai vessels. The boats will depart every half hour from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

fairwindFair Wind II passengers will have the chance to swim and play on the water slides and high-jump platform. Hula Kai passengers (minimum 5-years) will enjoy a scenic cruise along the Keauhou and Kona coastline with historical narrative throughout the journey.

Also on offer throughout the day:

  • Hot dogs, shave ice and refreshments.
  • Raffle drawings with prizes such as Fair Wind snorkel cruise certificates, shirts, hats and more.
  • Live music by Dennis Garcia.
  • Games and activities for the whole family.
  • Live broadcast by The BEAT 93.9.

The first 200 paid entrants will receive a free special edition Fair Wind Cruises trucker hat.

fairwind2Fair Wind Cruises was born from what was supposed to be a brief stopover in Kona on a cruise from Monterey to the South Pacific in 1971. The Dant family turned their passion into a lifetime of adventure and today, 45 years later, and several Dant generations later, Fair Wind is now one of Hawaii’s premier ocean activity companies.

For more information about Fair Wind Cruises 45th anniversary celebration visit Fair-Wind.com/anniversary

  • WHAT: Fair Wind Cruises 45th anniversary celebration
  • WHEN: Saturday, September 10 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • WHERE: The Fair Wind Courtyard at Keauhou Bay, 78-7130 Kaleiopapa Street Kailua-Kona
  • COST: $4.50 per person (toddlers under three free)
  • PARKING: Available on Kamehameha III Road. Link to map: https://www.fair-wind.com/directions/

INFORMATION: Call 808-322-2788 or visit:

https://www.fair-wind.com/anniversary/

Delta Airlines to Serve Free Alcohol on Flights Flying To or From Honolulu

Well this is a sure way to get customers back after the recent computer glitches left passengers stranded around the country:

Delta enhances its services onboard, offering complimentary meals and beer, wine and spirits for customers on all flights, in all cabins on its long-haul flights to and from Honolulu.

Mai Tai on flightThe service will initially launch on flights between Atlanta and Honolulu beginning Sept. 15, and will apply to seasonal flights to/from Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport beginning Nov. 3 and John F. Kennedy International Airport to/from HNL beginning Dec. 17.

Delta inflightDelta Comfort+ and Main Cabin customers will be offered two complimentary meal services, one at the beginning of the flight and one prior to arrival, to align with the airline’s similar long-haul flights.

Snack boxMeal service enhancements include a meal service with a choice of two hot entrees, a sandwich with a brownie and a continental breakfast snack box, depending on the route, as well as complimentary beer, wine and spirits, including the airline’s signature Mai Tais.

Debi Bishop Appointed Managing Director at Hilton Hawaiian Village

Hilton Worldwide announced today that Debi Bishop has been named managing director of its flagship resort in Hawai‘i, Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort.

Debbie Bishop

Debi Bishop

Bishop brings with her 30 years of industry experience as she takes the helm of the company’s largest hotel, which encompasses 22 beachfront acres and 2,860 guest rooms effective April 1. “I’ve been impressed watching Debi successfully develop and lead our team at Hilton Waikoloa Village over the past seven years,” said Jerry Gibson, area vice president, Hilton Hawaii.

“We’re lucky she’ll remain in our Hilton Hawaii Ohana as the new leader at the Hilton Hawaiian Village.” Bishop served as general manager of Hilton Waikoloa since 2008. During her tenure at Hilton Waikoloa Village, the resort achieved numerous awards of excellence, including the Hilton Worldwide Genius of the AND; Hilton Worldwide Sales American Summit Breakaway; Best Use of Social Media; Best Tactical Marketing Revenue Generating and Most Improved Profit.

She currently serves on the board of directors for the Big Island Visitors Bureau, Hawaii Island Chapter of the Hawaii Lodging & Tourism Association, Kohala Coast Resort Association, Waikoloa Beach Resort Conference, and Waikoloa Resort Association. She is also on the advisory board for University of Hawaii at Hilo College of Business and Economics.

Prior to joining the Hilton Waikoloa Village, Bishop served as managing director of Sawgrass Marriott Golf Resort & Spa in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Bishop also served as vice president of sales for Interstate Hotels & Resorts and worked with MeriStar Hotels & Resorts in several capacities, including vice president of operations and director of operations, Atlanta.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Centennial Events for September 2016

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2016, and continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park (ADIP) programs with the public in September.

All ADIP and Hawaiian cultural programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Conservation in Hawai‘i: A Living Legacy. Join Bryan Harry, former superintendent of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and founding member of the Hawai‘i Conservation Alliance, as he talks about the state of conservation in Hawai‘i and what it means for Hawai‘i to host the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) in 2016.

Bryan HarryPart of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

  • When: Tues., Sept. 13 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Hawaiian ‘Ukulele Demonstration. Oral Abihai shares his passion for making ‘ukulele from discarded or naturally fallen pieces of wood.

Oral Abihai Ukulele

Learning only several years ago in Lahaina from Kenny Potts, he has since made more than 50 ‘ukulele. Oral currently lives on Hawai‘i Island, where he makes ‘ukulele by hand. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

  • When: Wed., Sept. 14 from 10 a.m. to noon
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Hula Performance by Hālau Hula Ulumamo o Hilo Palikū. Kumu hula Mamo Brown is a lifelong resident of Hilo, and was formally trained by Nālani Kanaka‘ole and Pualani Kanaka‘ole Kanahele of Hālau Kekuhi in the ‘ai ha‘a, or low bombastic style, of kahiko (traditional) hula.

Halau at volcanoAfter her ‘ūniki (graduation), Mamo started her own hālau and carries on the kahiko tradition. She and her hālau have performed at the park’s annual Hawaiian cultural festival several times. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.

  • When: Wed., Sept. 21 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Centennial Series After Dark in the Park: Hawaiian Adze Production and Lithic Block Quarries on Kīlauea. Park Archeologist Caleb Houck shares his knowledge about the lithic block quarries on Kīlauea volcano.

Basal Rock

Learn how Hawaiians crafted finely grained basalt rock into adze (stone tools) following the 1790 summit eruptions, why these particular rocks were prized by Hawaiians, and how archeologists discovered these abandoned quarries centuries later.

  • When: Tues., Sept. 27, 2016 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Make a Hawaiian Broom. Join park rangers and learn to make a useful pulumi nī‘au.

Hawaiian BroomFashioned from the midribs of coconut leaves, pulumi nī‘au are a kind of broom used to keep houses tidy and clean. The coconut tree is an incredibly useful species utilized by people throughout the Pacific, and pulumi are just one example of its myriad uses. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

  • When: Wed., Sept. 28 from 10 a.m. to noon
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Centennial Hike: Hawaiian Adze Production—Lithic Block Quarries on Kīlauea. Join Park Ranger Jay Robinson on an easy hour-long hike among the abandoned adze quarry at Kīlauea Overlook. Most visitors have no idea this area was showered by large basalt rocks erupted from Kīlauea during its summit eruptions of 1790, or that Hawaiians coveted the rocks for stone tools (adze). Sturdy footwear, water, raingear, sun protection, and a snack are recommended.

  • When: Sat., Oct. 1, 2016 at 11 a.m.
  • Where: Meet at Kīlauea Overlook

Hawaii DOTAX Release – July 2016 Preliminary Comparative Statement

One month into Hawaii’s fiscal year (FY) 2017, the cumulative general fund tax deposits are down by 2.2% compared with the same period in FY 2016.

General excise and use tax collections, the largest single category of tax collections, were $252.5 million in July, down by 0.6% compared to last July.  Individual income tax collections were $148.4 million in July, down by 2.8% from last July.

Transient accommodations tax collections were $40.7 million for the month, up by 13.2% from last July.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Summit Explosion Justifies Closure of Halema‘uma‘u Crater

An explosion from Kīlauea volcano’s summit Saturday evening flung chunks of molten and solid rock onto the rim of Halema‘uma‘u Crater, turned night into day, and destroyed the power system for scientific equipment used to monitor the volcano.

Halema‘uma‘u Crater as seen from Volcano House on Saturday night, just following the explosion. Volcano House is approximately two miles away from the vent. NPS Photo/Sami Steinkamp.

Halema‘uma‘u Crater as seen from Volcano House on Saturday night, just following the explosion. Volcano House is approximately two miles away from the vent. NPS Photo/Sami Steinkamp.

The explosion, which occurred just past 10 p.m. on August 6, further justifies the closure by the National Park Service of the summit lava lake and Halema‘uma‘u Overlook, and the partial closure of about four miles of the 11-mile Crater Rim Drive and Crater Rim Trail. The closures have been in place since 2008 when the current summit eruption began.

 “This type of volcanic explosion is not that uncommon at the summit of Kīlauea, and could have easily killed or seriously injured and burned anyone in the area,” said Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando. “Despite the closure, people continue to trespass into the closed area, putting themselves and first responders at great risk,” she said.

Scoria and damage from 6 Aug 2016 @ 2202 explosion triggered by rockfall above and into SE sink of lava lake.

Scoria and damage from 6 Aug 2016 @ 2202 explosion triggered by rockfall above and into SE sink of lava lake.

Park ranger Tim Hopp was on routine patrol of the closed Halema‘uma‘u Overlook parking lot in his vehicle Saturday night. Suddenly, the dark sky lit up bright orange, “so surreal and bright you could read a book,” he said. He heard a violent and extremely loud sloshing sound from the crater. Fragments of volcanic rock, or tephra, were ejected from the volcano and rained down on his patrol vehicle as he cautiously left the area, respirator on. He noticed the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory equipment perched on the rim shooting off light as electrical wires burned. “It lasted about a half hour,” Hopp said.

An hour later, Hopp cited two individuals for sneaking into the closed area to get a closer look at the potentially lethal lava lake.

According to USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, rocks in the vent wall can become unstable and crash into the lava lake when the level drops, which has been the pattern the last few days. The explosion covered the southeast crater rim with a layer of tephra about eight inches thick in places, and lava bombs and spatter were hurled nearly 300 feet out beyond the crater rim at the closed overlook, extending over an area about 720 feet in width along the rim. 

Scoria and damage from 6 Aug 2016 @ 2202 explosion triggered by rockfall above and into SE sink of lava lake.

Scoria and damage from 6 Aug 2016 @ 2202 explosion triggered by rockfall above and into SE sink of lava lake.

“Part of the mission of the national park is to provide safe access to active volcanism, and our emphasis is always on safety,” Superintendent Orlando said. “The view of the summit eruption is fantastic one mile away from the Jaggar Museum observation deck, and that’s as close as visitors can safely get,” she said.

The park has no plans to reopen the closed areas until the eruption from Halema‘uma‘u ceases, she added.

Alaska Airlines Beginning Weekly Service Between Kona and Bellingham

Passengers flying out of Bellingham International Airport (BLI) will have convenient access to some of Hawaii’s best snorkeling and the world-famous Hawaii Volcanoes National Park starting Nov. 12 when Alaska Airlines begins new weekly service between Bellingham and Kona, on the Big Island of Hawaii.  The new service compliments the airline’s seasonal service from BLI to Maui which is set to begin on Nov. 6.

“The Big Island of Hawaii is one of the top rated travel destinations in the world and we are delighted Alaska Airlines is going to provide our customers with non-stop service to this incredible location,” said Sunil Harman, aviation director.  “Alaska Airlines is offering very competitive fares and we anticipate high demand for these flights.”

Alaska Airlines is offering one-way fares to Kona starting at $219.  The flights will be operated with Boeing 737-800 aircraft, accommodating 16 passengers in first class and 147 in the main cabin.

Online Travel Companies Owe Hawaii Taxes for Rental Car Transactions, Court Rules

State circuit judge Gary W.B. Chang ruled yesterday that online travel companies, including Expedia, Priceline, Travelocity, Orbitz, Hotwire, and others, must pay Hawaii’s general excise tax on certain rental car transactions in Hawaii.

expediaThe State had issued tax assessments of general excise taxes, interest, and penalties to online travel companies for failing to file tax returns and pay general excise taxes for tax years 2000 through 2012. Last year, the Hawaii Supreme Court concluded online travel companies must pay general excise tax on the sale of hotel rooms in Hawaii.

The Court upheld tax assessments on gross receipts from online travel car rentals not sold as part of a travel or tour package with other services like airline or hotel reservations. The Court also ruled that under a special provision in Hawaii’s general excise tax law for tourism related services, these companies owe general excise taxes on their net receipts from car rental transactions that were included in a travel or tour package sold to consumers.

The final amount of taxes, penalties, and interest to be collected by the State is yet to be determined but is expected to be in the millions of dollars.

Justin Bieber Leaves the Big Island – His Pals Were…

Well Justin Bieber left the Big Island last night after being here for a few days staying at Waterfalling Estate.

bieberbyeA lot of folks were asking who the girls were that were with him.  I have learned that one of the girls is Australian bikini model Sahara Ray and another of the ladies was Meredith Hennessy.

Bieber Girls
Fashion designer Cedric Benaroch was the guy that was seen in many of the pictures while he was on the island.  Bieber has removed this picture from his Instagram of the two of them together.
Bieber and Cedric
Benaroch later posted a photo on Instagram confirming they were leaving Hawaii by saying “Peace Out Hawaii”.
aloha bieber

Hepatitis A Cases Identified in Chili’s Kapolei Food Service Employee and Hawaiian Airlines Flight Attendant

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) is continuing its investigation of a hepatitis A outbreak on the island of Oahu and has confirmed two new cases in a food service employee at Chili’s restaurant located at 590 Farrington Highway in Kapolei, and a Hawaiian Airlines flight attendant.

Hep Hawaiian“At this time, no infections have been linked to exposure at these businesses and they are not sources of the outbreak,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park. “We are alerting the public only as a precaution; the risk of transmission is extremely low and these businesses are working with us to help prevent potentially new cases in our community.”

Although it is not a food service establishment, Hawaiian Airlines has been named because the infected crew member served inflight food and beverages to passengers. Hawaiian Airlines customers may go to www.hawaiianairlines.com/hepatitisA for detailed information on affected flights and other support available.

“The most infectious period for this disease may be as much as two weeks before the onset of symptoms — before the individual even knows he or she is sick,” Park added. “The public’s health is our main concern, and we feel it is important to equip people with this information so they may work with their healthcare providers to protect their health.”

Persons who consumed food or beverage products from these businesses during the identified periods may have been exposed to the disease and are recommended to:

  1. Contact their healthcare providers about the possibility of receiving hepatitis A vaccine or immune globulin (IG), which may provide some protection against the disease if administered within two weeks after exposure.
  2. Monitor their health for symptoms of hepatitis A infection up to 50 days after exposure.
  3. Wash their hands with soap and warm water frequently and thoroughly, especially after using the bathroom and before preparing food.
  4. Stay at home and contact their healthcare provider immediately if symptoms of hepatitis A infection develop.

To help prevent the spread of disease during the investigation, the public is encouraged to talk to their healthcare providers about vaccination. A statewide list of vaccinating pharmacies is available at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/files/2013/07/IMM_Adult_Resource_List.pdf or call the Aloha United Way information and referral line at 2-1-1.

As of July 26, the current number of hepatitis A cases linked to the outbreak is 93. This number is updated weekly on Wednesday and posted at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/hepatitis-a-outbreak-2016/.

Symptoms of hepatitis A infection include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, abdominal discomfort, dark urine, diarrhea, and yellow skin and eyes. Individuals, including food service employees, exhibiting symptoms of hepatitis A should stay home and contact their healthcare provider.

While vaccination provides the best protection, frequent handwashing with soap and warm water after using the bathroom, changing a diaper, and before preparing food can help prevent the spread of hepatitis A. Appropriately cooking foods can also help prevent infection.

For the complete list of food service establishments that have had employees diagnosed with hepatitis A infection, visithttp://health.hawaii.gov/docd/hepatitis-a-outbreak-2016/.

For additional information about hepatitis A go to http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/hepatitis-a-outbreak-2016/.

 

Happy 100th Birthday Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Kīlauea is putting on quite a show for park visitors eager to see a volcanic eruption – just like it was 100 years ago today when Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park was established on August 1, 1916.

Visitors were treated to free entry to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on its 100th anniversary, August 1. The entrance station was draped in two 40-foot tī leaf lei made by park staff . NPS Photo/Sami Steinkamp

Visitors were treated to free entry to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on its 100th anniversary, August 1. The entrance station was draped in two 40-foot tī leaf lei made by park staff . NPS Photo/Sami Steinkamp

Today, as the park enters its next century, park visitors were treated to free entry,  a native plant giveaway, Hawaiian music by Ken Makuakāne, lei making and kōnane (Hawaiian checkers), plus presentations about park efforts to save endangered nēnē (Hawaiian goose) and honu‘ea (Hawaiian hawksbill turtle). Lava cookies and centennial stickers were shared with the first 100 visitors who arrived for the festivities.

A lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the volcano’s 4,000-foot summit continues to rise and spatter, deflate and degas. At night, the lake casts a magnificent glow; by day, a plume of steam, particles and gas billows upward. Visitors can easily and safely observe this eruptive activity from an accessible overlook at Jaggar Museum.

“It is amazing that in 1916, the year the park was established, we had two eruptions. Mauna Loa erupted during May, and sent lava towards Kahuku, and Halema‘uma‘u fountained and spattered,” said Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando.  “Fast forward 100 years and Kīlauea erupts from two locations. What an auspicious way to commemorate our centennial anniversary,” she said.

A week ago, out in the volcano’s remote east rift zone, lava from the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent streamed down forested cliffs and crossed an emergency access route. Early the next morning, streams of rough ‘a‘ā and smooth, viscous pāhoehoe lava plunged down jagged coastal cliffs into the ocean. This cascade of molten lava, at the Kamokuna ocean entry, has enlarged to almost 800 feet (240 m) across and is being fed by the active flow field on the coastal plain.

Park visitors are urged to stay away from the steep, unstable sea cliffs, and rangers have placed rope barriers along the ocean entry to keep people safe.

hvo roped

Visitors observe the beauty of the Kamokuna ocean entry on the eve of the Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s 100th anniversary. Rangers have placed rope barricades to keep people away from the unstable, steep cliff edges, flying volcanic debris and fumes, and bench collapse. NPS Photo/Sami Steinkamp

Hikers can access the active flow field from the end of Chain of Craters Road in the park, along the gravel emergency route (Chain of Craters-Kalapana Road), and are rewarded with beautiful sights of molten, flowing lava. It’s a long and hot hike, nearly five miles one-way. Preparation is key. Bring at least three to four quarts of water per person. Wear sturdy closed-toe hiking shoes or boots, gloves to protect the hands, and long pants to protect against lava rock abrasions. Wear sunblock, sunglasses and a hat. Visitors who plan to stay after dark need a flashlight and/or headlamp with extra batteries.

“There’s no way to tell what Kīlauea will do next, and it’s likely that someone will be saying the same thing 100 years from now,” Orlando said.

As Lava Meets the Ocean, New Dangers Persist

The 61G lava flow extending southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō towards the coastal plain on Kīlauea’s south flank remains active. The 61G lava flow extending southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō entered the ocean, as of as of 1:12 a.m. HST, last night. Areas of incandescence remain visible in overnight webcam views of the active lava flow field, marking lava tube skylights and areas of active lava on the pali and along the flow as it extends towards the coast.

Last night Senator Kahele walked out to the flow.

Last night Senator Kahele walked out to the flow.  That would make “Lava Meets Kai” a reality… LOL!

As a strong caution to visitors viewing the new ocean entry (location where lava meets the sea) for Flow 61G, there are additional significant hazards besides walking on uneven surfaces and around unstable, extremely steep sea cliffs. Venturing too close to an ocean entry exposes you to flying debris created by the explosive interaction between lava and water.

Also, the new land created is unstable because it is built on unconsolidated lava fragments and sand. This loose material can easily be eroded away by surf causing the new land to become unsupported and slide into the sea. Finally, the interaction of lava with the ocean creates an acidic plume laden with fine volcanic particles that can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Lava Flow Crosses Emergency Road and Flows Into Ocean

Flow 61G reached the emergency access road inside Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park on July 25 at 3:20 pm and crossed the road in about 30 minutes. At 4:00 pm, the flow front was approximately 110 m (0.07 miles) from the ocean.

hvo 726aThe active lava flow on Kīlauea Volcano’s south flank crossed the emergency access road in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park this afternoon around 3:20 p.m., HST, providing wonderful lava-viewing experiences for Park visitors.

. A section of the road can be seen here, with fume from the active lava tube in the far distance behind it, and the active flow front in the foreground.

A section of the road can be seen here, with fume from the active lava tube in the far distance behind it, and the active flow front in the foreground.

The flow front continued to advance, and was less than 100 meters (yards) from the ocean a few hours later (when this photo was taken).

The lava flow reached the ocean about 01:15 a.m. on  July 26.

The lava flow reached the ocean about 01:15 a.m. on July 26.

Lava Now 0.2 Miles from Ocean

Activity Summary: Eruptive activity continues at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit and East Rift Zone. The 61G lava flow extending southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō towards the ocean remains active but poses no threat to nearby communities. As of yesterday, the flow tip was about ~370 m (0.2 miles) from the ocean. The lava lake at Halemaʻumaʻu Crater continues to circulate and intermittently spatter. Seismicity and deformation rates throughout the volcano remain at background levels.
hvo 725 g61
Summit Observations: The lava lake within the Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook crater remains active. The depth to the lake was estimated at 26 m (85 ft) below the crater rim, measured on Sunday. Tiltmeters at Kīlauea’s summit recorded a slight inflationary tilt. Seismicity is within normal, background rates with tremor fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering. The summit sulfur dioxide emission rate ranged from 3,700 to 7,300 metric tons/day.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: Webcam images over the past 24 hours show persistent glow at long-term sources within the crater. There were no significant changes in seismicity over the past 24 hours. The tilt still recovering due to heavy rainfall over the weekend. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from all East Rift Zone vents on July 22 was about 500 metric tons/day.

Lava Flow Observations: The 61G lava flow extending southeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō towards the coastal plain on Kīlauea’s south flank remains active. On Sunday, the flow tip was active and breakouts were active within a few hundred meters (yards) upslope. The flow was approximately ~240 m (0.15 miles) from the coastal emergency road and 370 m (0.2 miles) from the ocean; based on National Park personnel observations. Areas of incandescence remain visible in overnight webcam views of the active lava flow field, marking lava tube skylights and areas of active lava on the pali and along the flow as it extends towards the coast.

New Thermal Image Map Shows Where Lava is Active

This image shows a thermal map of the flow on the pali and coastal plain, created from airborne thermal images. White pixels are hot, and show areas of active surface breakouts. The background image is a satellite image collected before the current lava flow was active.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

The thermal map shows minimal activity on the upper pali, with a channelized ʻaʻā flow at the base of the pali. The flow front area had scattered pāhoehoe breakouts, with a narrow lobe of active lava forming the leading tip of the flow. The leading tip of the flow was 730 m (0.45 miles) from the ocean.

Lava Visible at Kilauea Volcano’s Summit – Can Be Seen From Jaggar Museum Overlook

A long, hot hike was not needed to see red lava today. Vigorous spattering from Kīlauea Volcano’s summit lava lake was visible from the Jaggar Museum Overlook in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park as of this afternoon.

The lava lake surface, measured at 25 m (82 ft) below the vent rim this morning, was high enough for the spattering to be seen from afar.

The lava lake surface, measured at 25 m (82 ft) below the vent rim this morning, was high enough for the spattering to be seen from afar.

A zoomed-in view of the lava lake spattering.

A zoomed-in view of the lava lake spattering.

7 People Rescued From Ocean After Being Swept Out at Hakalau Beach Park

Hawaii County Fire Department reports that seven people were rescued from the ocean today at Hakalau Beach Park.

Hakalau Beach Park

Situation Found at Scene: Fast flowing river, unable to get a visual on victims from land.  Chopper 01 located victims, deployed 2 rescue swimmers and extricated all victims to land via chopper 01

Remarks: Total of 7 victims, All victims accounted for, and extricated out of the water by chopper 01.  No emergency medical services was needed at scene.

Hawaii County Product Enrichment Program Hō‘ike

The 2016 Hawai’i Tourism Authority (HTA) County Product Enrichment Program (CPEP) Ho’ike will be held at the Hilton Waikoloa Village on July 29th from 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM.
Hilton Waikoloa Village Skyview

This one day event is a celebration for all who have worked hard to support festivals, events and community programs in the county of Hawai’i. This Ho’ike will also provide a platform for CPEP applicants and grantees to network and connect with each other essentially creating a greater opportunity to grow their programs.

A registration fee of $30 includes continental breakfast, lunch, refreshments, a panel discussion discussing “How To Involve Millennials in Community Events”, inspiring speakers and round table discussions with industry experts and past CPEP success stories. Bo Campos from Kai Opua Canoe Club, Richard Oshiro from Island Air, Missy Kaleohano from Island of Hawai’i Visitor Bureau, and Gary Marrow the Co-owner of KapohoKine Adventures are just a few who will be sharing their experiences, success stories and greatest achievements. For the first time this year, the County will be hosting an “Aloha Friday” gathering from 4-6pm for more time to talk story and network. Register online at cpephoike.org.

Some festivals, events and programs that are funded by CPEP include HawaiiCon, Queen Liliʻuokalani Canoe Races, Big Island Film Festival, Hawai’i Yoga Festival, Pana’ewa Stampede, and First Fridays in Downtown Hilo. They showcase the unique and diverse experiences available for residents and visitors.

This year, HTA is supporting 162 community, environment and cultural programs; 18 of those are on Hawai’i Island. The results of this program include more efficient and effective use of HTA and County funds and resources, more local control, direction and management, and better oversight and support of awardees.

Good Outdoor Ethics Encouraged as “POKEMON GO” Craze Impacts Hawaii

A DLNR Division of State Parks employee reports that two people searching for virtual reality Pokemon Go figures wandered into a sensitive heiau on Kauai where a cultural protocol was underway.

Pokemon Hawaii

DLNR Chair Suzanne Case said, “Unfortunately, we are quickly seeing unintended consequences of this new application by Google, in the outdoor issues that the hunt for Pokemon characters via digital devices can create, for both cultural and natural resources here in Hawai’i and elsewhere.”

In the first week since the release of Pokemon Go, the media has reported on two men walking off a cliff in California while using the app.  This increases the potential of increasing public safety and unauthorized access problems for local people and visitors venturing into our state parks, onto our trails and onto beaches, when paying attention to electronics rather than trails and signs.

This phenomenon provides a good opportunity to remind people to practice good outdoor ethics.  Curt Cottrell, DLNR Division of State Parks Administrator reminds folks heading into the outdoors:

  • Be safe.  Use electronic devices responsibly and in emergencies to call for help. Distracted hiking, like distracted driving, can lead to accidents.
  • Stay on designated trails.  Follow all signs and closures.  Do not trespass, or enter natural or cultural areas where access is prohibited.
  • Carry out what you carry in.  Leave no trace.

“We want and encourage people to enjoy all of the outstanding natural and cultural resources  Hawai’i has to offer.  Given the release of Pokemon Go, this is an opportune time to remind everyone that these resources can and should be enjoyed in a pono way,” Case concluded.