Blue Angels to Fly at “Wings Over the Pacific” Air Show

Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam “Wings Over the Pacific” Air Show featuring the Blue Angels, U.S. Navy’s world-famous flight demonstration squadron.
blue angels
The Blue Angels flight demonstration will use the F/A-18 Hornet aircraft, to exhibit the choreographed refinement of skills possessed by all naval aviators on Sept. 27 & 28, 2014, from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at Hickam Field on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.

The Leap Frogs, the United States Navy Parachute Team will also perform, and there will be demonstrations by Blue Angels C-130 Hercules support aircraft affectionately known as “Fat Albert” and a C-17.  “Wings Over the Pacific” will offer static displays of vintage and modern aircraft, food booths and an Xtreme Fun Zone for the kids featuring rides, games and more.  The show is free and open to the general public. Security restrictions will be in place.  For more information visit www.wingsoverthepacific.com.

Meet the Blue Angels
Navy Capt. Stan Keeve, commander of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, said “On behalf of our Navy and Air Force community, I invite you to join our `ohana for this great event.  We think you will be entertained by the Blue Angels and other air show performers, and you will have an opportunity to see static displays of a variety of aircraft.”

“Members of our armed services are forward-deployed around the world today – dedicated to supporting our freedoms.  As you enjoy the air show, please keep this in mind as you witness firsthand the dedication, integrity and professionalism of your service members.”

Blue Angels

The mission of the United States Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron is to showcase the pride and professionalism of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and inspire a culture of excellence and service to country by conducting flight demonstrations and community outreach.  For more information: www.blueangels.navy.mil

Skydiver Seriously Injured on North Shore – Pacific Skydive Has Another Incident

This afternoon at Pacific Skydive on the North Shore of Oahu, a man was was seriously injured skydiving, when the steering line on his canopy broke and he was not able to land properly.

Guy Banal, President at Pacific Skydiving

Guy Banal (sunglasses), President at Pacific Skydiving looks on.

The Emergency Medical Team and the Hawaii Fire Department are on the scene now:

Paramedics on the scene

Paramedics on the scene

A skydiver at the scene stated, “…Broken steering line on landing. Check your gear, especially if it is older, for degradation.

Historical Kakaako Pumping Station to be Rehabilitated and Refurbished

Gov. Neil Abercrombie yesterday announced the release of $1 million in capital improvement grant funds to the Pacific Gateway Center (PGC) to rehabilitate and refurbish the historical Kakaako Pumping Station into a community resource center.

The once historic Kakaako Pumping Station

The once historic Kakaako Pumping Station

Identified by the state Legislature, these funds will create a new facility that will focus on services for the elderly and specifically on inter-generational programs, in which Hawaii’s youth will be engaged to help older adults with workshops and services, such as teaching computer skills or assisting with lifelong learning opportunities.

“After 35 years of neglect, this administration is transforming Kakaako into a vibrant community with affordable housing options that Hawaii needs,” Gov. Abercrombie said. “The Kakaako Pumping Station is the latest example of a facility that had fallen into disuse but now will be preserved and given the opportunity for a second life, providing area residents with a gathering place for kupuna and keiki as the community grows.”

PGC was founded in 1973 and has since developed a 40-year track record of delivering critical need-based services and designing innovative social enterprises to support the community. It offers a wide range of direct and support services to approximately 5,000 clients per year.

Man Seriously Injured Skydiving at Pacific Skydiving

Pacific Skydiving had another skydiving incident today that sent a person to the hospital.

Whoops!

Whoops!

According to a skydiver on the scene it was “…totally preventable with proper instruction. This is why you should trust professionals, not a bunch of poser skydivers…The guy stalled his canopy from 100ft and held toggles buried pretty much until he hit. No PLF, no training, straight to the hospital.”

Didn't walk away!

Didn’t walk away!

Pacific Skydiving has had a few mishaps sending skydivers to the hospital over the years.

Skydiving incident as Pacific Skydive

Skydiving incident as Pacific Skydive

As of this write-up there has been no release on the condition of the skydiver.

U.S. Women’s National Volleyball Team to Visit Sailors from USS Paul Hamilton

Members of the U.S. Women’s National Volleyball Team will take a break from the court for a tour and meet and greet with Sailors aboard Pearl Harbor-based ship, USS Paul Hamilton (DDG 60) on Thursday, July 10, 2014, at 2:30 p.m. at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam

USA VolleyballThe second-ranked U.S. Women’s National Volleyball Team is in Hawaii for the USA Volleyball Cup match between Team USA No. 2 and No. 1 Brazil. Brazil defeated USA in the last two Olympic Gold Medal Finals in Beijing and London. The legendary Karch Kiraly, voted Best Male Player of the Century with three Olympic Golds, coaches Team USA. The games will be played at the Stan Sheriff Center on the University of Hawaii campus at 7 p.m. July 11-12. The Navy will participate in the patriotic opening ceremonies at the games.

USS Paul Hamilton (DDG 60) U.S. Navy photo by Aviation Structural Mechanic 1st Class (AW) William Contreras (RELEASED)

USS Paul Hamilton (DDG 60) U.S. Navy photo by Aviation Structural Mechanic 1st Class (AW) William Contreras (RELEASED)

Guided-missile destroyer USS Paul Hamilton is one of 10 surface combatants currently assigned to Commander, Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific, Destroyer Squadron 31. Guided-missile destroyers are multi-mission anti-air warfare, anti-submarine warfare and anti-surface warfare combatants that operate independently for the support of carriers and expeditionary and surface strike groups.

Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to Hold Change of Command

After three years as commander, Capt. Jeffrey W. James will transfer command of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to Capt. Stanley Keeve, Jr. during a change of command ceremony on Friday, July 11 at 10 a.m. The ceremony will be held at the grassy knoll on the south end of Ford Island.

Capt. Jeffrey W. James (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jon Dasbach/Released)

Capt. Jeffrey W. James (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jon Dasbach/Released)

James took command in June 2011 as the second commander of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, which officially stood up in October 2010. Prior to reporting to Joint Base, James served on the staff of Commander, U. S. Pacific Fleet. He will retire after 30 years of naval service.

A native of the Washington D. C. area, Capt. Keeve comes to Hawaii from the Pentagon, where he served as military assistant to the Defense Business Board in the Pentagon. He is a surface warfare officer with tours of duty on numerous ships, including the former Pearl Harbor-based frigate, USS Reuben James (FFG 57).

Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam is home to the Air Force’s key strategic flight line in the Pacific and the Navy’s most historically significant homeport, with 177 tenant commands and about 93,000 active duty personal and their family members, Dept. of Defense civilians and contractors.

New Summer Program for Teens at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor

Teens will have an opportunity to soar at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor’s new cross-cultural Aviation Adventure program scheduled to launch this July. The three-day/two-night program will provide a sweeping view of aviation, from ancient Hawaii up to the present day. Two dates are available to choose from: July 15~17 and July 22~24, Tuesdays through Thursdays, 9am to 4pm.

Teen Aviation Program

Aviation Adventure is designed to immerse teens in the rich history of Ford Island and Pearl Harbor, as well as the science, technology, engineering and math concepts of aviation. Hands-on, practical experiences bring these principles to life in the Museum’s historic hangars and aboard the Battleship Missouri Memorial. This cross-cultural program is open to teens who have completed the basic Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor Flight School program, or those who are at least 13 years of age. They will be joined by teens of the same age, from China. Overnight accommodations are provided onboard the Battleship Missouri.

Cost of the three-day program is $300, which includes all materials, meals, snacks, overnight accommodations, and an Aviation Adventure logo tee shirt.

For more information and to register for Aviation Adventure go to www.PacificAviationMuseum.org/Education/AviationAdventure or email Education@PacificAviationMuseum.org.

Mokulele Airlines Announces Grand Opening Celebration For Kalaeloa Airport – Adds Flights

Mokulele Airlines has announced that it will host a grand opening celebration on July 1 at the airline’s newest service location, Kalaeloa Airport on west Oahu, marking the successful conclusion of a year of preparations. Kalaeloa is located at the former Barber’s Point Naval Air Base John Rogers Field, and the grand opening and inaugural flight will take place 15 years to the day that the former base was closed and turned over to the State of Hawaii.

mokulelejet

The celebration, which is open to the public, will begin with a facility tour and entertainment by Kainani & Friends. Jenn Boneza, TV personality for Oceanic Cable 16 and Hawaii Five-0 actress will serve as the Mistress of Ceremonies.  Ron Hansen, president & CEO of Mokulele Airlines will welcome guests and special guest speakers will include Evelyn Souza, Chairperson of Neighborhood Board #24; Senator Mike Gabbard, Representative Karen Awana, Ross Higashi Deputy Director Airports Hawaii DOT,  and Shan S. Tsutsui, Lieutenant Governor of the State of Hawaii. Dignitaries from the Hawaii Department of Transportation will also be in attendance and Kahu Daniel “Kaniela” Akaka, Jr. will offer a traditional Hawaiian blessing of the airport and the plane that will make the inaugural flight.

July 1 will mark the beginning of Mokulele’s daily nonstop service to Kahului, Maui from Kalaeloa, with six scheduled daily flights, three each way. The inaugural flight to Kahului will depart at 1:00 pm. After the plane departs, closing remarks will be offered by Mokulele’s executive vice president and COO Dave Berry and a reception will follow with entertainment by award-winning slack key master Kawika Kahiapo and refreshments provided by Chef Paul Onishi, of the Culinary Art Academy and Young Life Oahu High School Students.

Kalaeloa will be the ninth airport Mokulele serves. As with most of the other airports Mokulele operates from, parking is hassle-free and TSA screenings are not required. Travelers will also save time by eliminating the need to drive to and from Honolulu on the H1. Mokulele is offering a special introductory webfare of $99 roundtrip including taxes and fees for the new Kalaeloa-Kahului route for reservations booked through July 31th for travel through August 30.

Mokulele Airlines said it has announced the expansion of its service between Kamuela-Waimea on the Big Island and Kahului, Maui by adding a third daily roundtrip flight to meet growing demand.

Mokulele began offering service form Kamuela in September 2013 after being awarded the Essential Air Service (EAS) contract from the Hawaii Department of Transportation. EAS is a government program designed to help ensure that smaller communities have access to commercial air service.

Mokulele will now offer 42 weekly flights between the two destinations, only 24 of which are subsidized by the EAS program.

More information is available at www.mokuleleairlines.com.

Body of Missing Free Diver Recovered Near Turtle Bay – Identified

The Coast Guard has recovered the body of a missing free diver approximately 10 miles offshore of Turtle Bay.

Nick Spokaeff

Nick Spokaeff

Nicholas Spotkaeff was located by a good Samaritan who was boating offshore.

The good Samaritan contacted local authorities and a Coast Guard 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew was diverted to the scene.

The body was was recovered and transported back to Haleiwa Harbor where local emergency medical personnel were waiting.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the family members during this extremely difficult time,” said Capt. Shannon Gilreath, Coast Guard Sector Honolulu commanding officer. “Our gratitude goes out to all those involved in the search who helped bring it to closure.”

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Honolulu received a report from crewmembers at Ocean Safety regarding the missing 56-year-old male free diver who was last seen swimming with his son in the vicinity of Ka’ena Point, Saturday.

The son lost sight of his father when he was on shore and the father was approximately 100 yards north of Ka’ena Point.

An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point, the crew of the 87-foot Coast Guard Cutter Kittiwake, homeported here, a 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu and crews from Ocean Safety and the Hawaii Fire Department searched for the man.

Biggest Little Airshow in Hawaii is Back

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor’s popular Remote-Control Biggest Little Airshow in Hawaii is back and it’s bigger than ever, Saturday and Sunday, August 16 and 17, 10am to 4pm. Guests will be able to drive on to Ford Island for this event, or take the free shuttle from the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center. There will be music, food, drinks, retail and entertainment booths and exhibits, and lots and lots of airplanes.

biggest 4For two days, Ford Island will come alive with remote-control flying and static aircraft and full size aircraft on display, “candy bombings” over historic Ford Island Runway for the keiki, hands-on modeling stations, and open access to Hangar 79 to see the Museum’s many aircraft exhibits and Restoration Shop.

Biggest

Talented local performers, Mainland pilots from the Academy of Model Aeronautics, and remote control flyers from Japan will perform remote-control aviation feats for two days. Airshow pilots will fly their massive, 1-to-5 scale planes in the skies above the Museum. Specialty acts to be performed include: Pattern, 3-D fixed wing and helicopter aerobatic flights, South Pacific battles, “Candy Bomber” drops, and Skycam drone helicopters. There will be remote control aircraft in the air and on static display, including jets, helicopters, F-22s, warbirds, B-17s, P-38s, Corsairs, OV-10s and more.

Biggest 2

Visitors can also enjoy free tours of Hangar 79, which still bears the bullet holes of the December 7, 1941attack. Inside, guests will see helicopters, fighter planes, and the Lt. Ted Shealy Restoration Shop–the 1941 machine shop that is busy restoring the Museum’s aircraft. They’ll also get up close and personal with an F-14 Tomcat, F-15 Eagle, F-86s, P-40, MiG-15, F-111, and the Museum’s “MiG Alley” and Flying Tigers Exhibits.

biggest 3Admission to the Airshow is $5 per person (including entry to Hangar 79), $15 per family (limit 6 entries per family). It’s free with Museum general admission and free to Museum Members. Tickets for the Airshow only and tickets for the entire Museum visit that day are available online at www.PacificAviationMuseum.org. Museum admissions may also be purchased at the Museum and at the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center ticketing desk. Shuttles depart every 15 minutes, 7:30am to 5:00pm from the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center, round trip to the Museum. Call 808/441-1007 for more information or visit www.PacificAviationMuseum.org, Facebook, Flickr, Instagram, and @PacificAviation on Twitter, for updates.

This is a City & County of Honolulu and Hawaii Tourism Authority sponsored event. Sponsored in part by Clear Channel Media + Entertainment, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Yelp, Pearlridge Center, Mokulele Airlines, Pizza Hut, Aqua Hospitality, and Hawaii Gas. Sponsors and vendors are invited to participate by calling 808-441-1013.

Shark Bites Woman Near Palmyra Atoll – Victim Medically Evacuated to Oahu

The Coast Guard medically evacuated a woman after she was bitten by a shark near Palmyra Atoll, Sunday.

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Joint Rescue Coordination Center Honolulu received a call from the Palmyra research facility director reporting that a 37-year-old female patient sustained a shark bite to her left hand.

A Coast Guard flight surgeon consulted with the medical staff treating the victim and determined that a medevac was warranted due to the risk of infection and possible nerve and tendon damage. Commercial aircraft were not available until Tuesday.

An HC-130 Hercules airplane crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point launched to Palmyra Atoll to conduct the medevac. The woman was transported to Air Station Barbers Point on Oahu where emergency medical technicians safely transported her to Kaiser Permanente Moanalua Medical Center and Clinic for further treatment.

The aircrew flew more than 1,000 miles from Hawaii to Palmyra Atoll to complete the medevac. This is comparable to dispatching an ambulance from Seattle to respond to a patient in San Diego. The 14th Coast Guard District encompasses more than 12.2 million square miles of the Central and South Pacific.

There are four HC-130 Hercules airplanes based on Oahu serving the Central and South Pacific. These aircraft are the primary means of conducting long range missions and are scheduled to be replaced by the HC-130J, which will bring increased speed, range and capability to the Coast Guard mission in the Pacific. For more information on the HC-130J visit http://www.uscg.mil/acquisition/programs/air.asp.

For more information on this case, or the Coast Guard’s role in long range search and rescue, contact the 14th Coast Guard District public affairs office at.(808) 535-3230.

DLNR Leads Management Team To Investigate Sea Urchin Disease

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) and the U.S. Geological Survey National Wildlife Health Center Honolulu Field Station (USGS) are jointly responding to and investigating a recently reported disease affecting collector urchins (hawae or Tripneustes gratilla) in Maunalua and Kaneohe Bays.

A Sick Urchin

A Sick Urchin

Reports were initially made in late February by biologists from The Nature Conservancy (TNC) when they observed sick urchins on the mud scow barge, an artificial reef in Maunalua Bay. The USGS conducted the initial assessment and lab tests of the urchins. The preliminary diagnosis of the sea urchins is it is a disease that causes progressive loss of spines. Laboratory tests to identify the cause of this disease are ongoing, and some causes (e.g. parasites) have been ruled out.

On May 6, 2014, USGS and Division of Aquatic Resources staff responded to reports of urchins with similar lesions in Kaneohe Bay. Approximately 10 percent of urchins on one patch reef showed signs of the disease at that time.

In partnership with TNC, USGS and the University of Hawaii, DAR is coordinating a management team to address the issue and monitor the affected areas on a weekly basis. Lab results and monitoring plans will be continuously updated on the team’s Reef Response website: http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/reefresponse/

The Public’s Help Is Needed!
The Eyes of the Reef (EOR) Network serves as extra eyes in local coastal areas. The public’s help is needed to determine how widespread the sea urchin disease is. Here’s what the public can do:
1. Look for sickly collector sea urchins.
2. Make a report using the EOR Network “Fish Disease and Miscellaneous” online report form (www.eorhawaii.org/make-a-report).
3. Send photos of the sick urchins to: RRCPcoordinator@gmail.com
3. Please do NOT collect samples or specimens at this time.

Video: 2014 World Fireknife Championship Final Highlights

From the Polynesian Culture Center in Laie, Hawaii… The 2014 World Fireknife Championship Final Highlights:

Champion Viavia “VJ” Tiumalu (Orland, Florida)
1st Runner Up Falaniko Penesa (Samoa)
2nd Runner Up Malo “MJ” Mata’u (Laie, Hawaii)

Big Island Police Identify Man Who Died in Wednesday’s Car Crash

HPDBadgeHawaiʻi Island police have identified the man who died Wednesday (May 14) from injuries he sustained in a two-vehicle crash on Hawaiʻi Belt Road (Route 11) in the area of the 13-mile-marker in Mountain View.

He was identified as 69-year-old Hubert F. Silva of Pearl City, Oahu.

“Battle of Midway” at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor

Marking the 72nd Anniversary of the turning point of WWII, Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor will present a special program featuring Curator and Author Burl Burlingame and Museum’s Restoration Manager Jim Martinelli on June 7, 2014, 2 to 4pm.

The "Swamp Ghost"

The “Swamp Ghost”

Presentation will begin at 2pm in the Museum Theater, followed by an audience question and answer session. Mr. Burlingame will present a talk entitled “Flying Fortresses Over Midway.” The Boeing B-17 played an important roll in The Battle of Midway. Following the Q & A session, the audience will be invited out to Hangar 79 for a special presentation and behind-the scenes look at the restoration progress of the Museum’s Boeing B-17E Flying Fortress—the famous “Swamp Ghost,” by Mr. Martinelli.

The event is free with regular Museum admission and free to Museum Members. Call (808) 441-1000 or visit www.PacificAviationMuseum.org for more information.

DLNR Reminds Public Of Sacred Falls Park Closure, Acknowledges 15-Year Anniversary Of Tragedy

Due to a recent rise in citations for unauthorized entry into Sacred Falls State Park, the Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) announces and underscores that the park remains closed to the public due to danger from falling rocks.

Sacred Falls

Signs at entrance to Sacred Falls

Mother’s Day marks the 15-year anniversary of tragedy at Sacred Falls State Park, where a massive rockslide on May 9, 1999, killed 8 and injured around 50 people. Following that incident, DLNR closed the park, locked the entrance, and posted and maintained numerous signs indicating the park’s closure and hazardous conditions.

To address public safety concerns raised by this event, the state Legislature established a statewide warning signage system, through Act 82 SLH 2003, to protect the state and county governments from liability on certain parks and trails.

“So many of us remember the loss, pain, and suffering that ensued at Sacred Falls 15 years ago,” said Board of Land and Natural Resources (BLNR) Chairperson William J. Aila, Jr. “Yet, people continue to illegally hike in the park, ignoring DLNR’s clear signage and exposing themselves to possible injury or death, and criminal citation.”

From March to April 2014, the DLNR Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) issued about 30 citations for prohibited entry into Sacred Falls State Park, many of which involved out-of-state residents or U.S. military personnel.

One incident in March 2014 necessitated search and rescue efforts by DOCARE and the Honolulu Fire Department (HFD). During the past two years, DOCARE and HFD have conducted four search and rescue operations in Sacred Falls State Park, some of which involved bodily injury.

“DOCARE takes prohibited entry violations seriously and will continue to monitor Sacred Falls State Park, issue citations, and protect public health and safety when necessary,” said DOCARE Enforcement Chief Randy Awo. “But the reality is that these illegal entries divert time and attention from natural resource protection.”

Sacred Falls Sign

Entry into Sacred Falls State Park, and any other closed state park, is a petty misdemeanor crime, punishable in court with fines of a minimum $100 for a first offense; $200 for a second offense; and $500 for a third or subsequent offense. Moreover, The Board of Land and Natural Resources may also pursue civil administrative penalties of up to $2,500 for a first violation; $5,000 for a second violation; and $10,000 for a third or subsequent violation.

“We encourage people to enjoy the many other state parks and trails that are open and accessible to the public, such as the trails managed by the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife under the Nā Ala Hele Trail Access system,” said Dan Quinn, administrator for the DLNR Division of State Parks.

For more information about the Hawai‘i State Park system, visit http://hawaiistateparks.org/ and http://hawaiitrails.org.

To report an incident, call 643-DLNR.

Open Cockpit Day at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor

Visitors will have the opportunity to sit in the seat, man the controls, and really feel the history of WWII fighters and modern-day jet fighters at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor’s third Open Cockpit Day, Saturday, May 17, 9am to 4pm.  The event is free with paid Museum admission and free for Museum Members.

Open Cockpit3

Guests younger than 10 years of age will require parental supervision to climb up and into the aircraft. Guests must also be able to climb boarding stairs and into a cockpit, to participate. Museum visitors are invited to bring cameras and the Museum staff will do the rest. Pilot’s gear, the Museum’s vintage aircraft, and meetings with aviation heroes will create a unique family day.

Open Cockpit2Download a free flight simulator coupon and purchase tickets online at www.PacificAviationMuseum.org. Phone 808-441-1007 for more information or email Education@PacificAviationMuseum.org.

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor is open 9am to 5pm daily and is accessed by shuttles from the USS Arizona Memorial/Pearl Harbor Visitor Center. A 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor is located at 319 Lexington Boulevard, Historic Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Honolulu, Hawaii 96818.

$2.2 Million in Safe Routes to School Grants Awarded

The Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) is pleased to announce the following Safe Routes To School (SRTS) grant awards. Applications were received and grants awarded in each county statewide.

Safe Routes

Applications for these projects were submitted during HDOT’s third round call for applications for SRTS federal funds provided by the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU). SRTS grants are awarded in two categories: Non-Infrastructure and Infrastructure Projects.

Non-Infrastructure Projects:

  • Fern Elementary School, Oahu, was awarded $46,933 for the Fern Elementary School SRTS Project. The project will consist of pedestrian and bicycle safety education, a walking school bus program, and school meetings and flyers to educate parents and neighbors of Fern Elementary School. In addition, the project will include a media campaign of 30-second radio spots written and recorded by students.
  • PATH – Peoples Advocacy for Trails Hawaii, a non-profit organization, was awarded $20,094 for the Putting Our Plans to Work Project. The project will provide bicycle education at West Hawaii Explorations Academy and pedestrian education, bicycle education and sign waving at Keonepoko Elementary School. Also, the project will establish new walking school bus routes at Waimea Elementary School and Waikoloa Elementary School on Hawaii Island.
  • The University of Hawaii at Manoa Office of Public Health Studies was awarded $24,630 for the Get Fit Kauai SRTS Project. The project will consist of bicycle education at Kapaa Elementary School and King Kaumualii Elementary School, as well as a comprehensive media plan that will include print and radio.

Infrastructure Projects:

  • The County of Kauai Public Works Department was awarded $251,500 for the Island-Wide Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacon (RRFB) Crosswalks and Sidewalk Improvements Project. The Project will install RRFB systems near Kalaheo Elementary School, Kekaha Elementary School and Kapaa Middle School. In addition, a new sidewalk will be constructed along the east side of Alae Road from Kaumualii Highway to Iwipolena Street near Kekaha Elementary School.
  • The County of Kauai Public Works Department was awarded $416,540 for the King Kaumualii SRTS Phase 1 Project. The project will install RRFB systems at two existing school crosswalks on Hanamaulu Road. The project will also construct new sidewalks along Hoohana Street from Laukona Street to Akuili Street, Akuili Street from Hoohana Street to Hanamaulu Road, and the north-side of Hanamaulu Road from King Kaumualii Elementary to Hanamaulu Place. In addition, a new median on Hanamaulu Road at the school entrance and a striped crosswalk at the school exit will be provided.
  • The County of Kauai Public Works Department was awarded $490,875 for the Koloa Safe Routes Phase 2 Project. The project will replace the existing sidewalk on Poipu Road fronting Koloa Elementary School, construct new sidewalk on the east-side of Poipu Road from Waikomo Road to Blakes Lane, and extend the existing sidewalk on Paanau Road west to Hikina Road. The project will also extend existing bike lanes on Poipu Road from Koloa Road to Waikomo Road and from Blakes Lane approximately 1,000 feet south.
  • The County of Maui Public Works Department was awarded $502,443 for the Paia School Frontage Improvements Project. The project will construct new sidewalk along the south-side of Baldwin Avenue from Anohou Street to Paia Gym, and the frontage of Paia School. The project will also provide a new sidewalk from the alleyway off the Haawina Street and Palekana Street intersection within Skill Village to the existing Paia Gym parking lot.
  • The County of Maui Public Works Department was awarded $455,495 for the Paia School Sidewalk Improvements Project. The project will replace and widen the existing sidewalk from Paia Gym to Paia School.

SRTS is an international effort to increase safety and promote walking and bicycling to and from school. The federally-funded SRTS program was established by Section 1404 of SAFETEA-LU and signed into law in 2005. For more information on the SRTS federal program in Hawaii, please visit http://hidot.hawaii.gov/highways/safe-routes-to-school-program/.

Agreement Reached to Place a Conservation Easement Over Lands Owned by Turtle Bay Resort

Gov. Neil Abercrombie today announced an agreement has been reached between the State of Hawaii, City and County of Honolulu, The Trust for Public Land, and Turtle Bay Resort (TBR) to establish a conservation easement on 665.8 acres of land at Turtle Bay Resort in Kahuku. Portions of this land had previously been planned for development but will now be protected forever from future development.

Governor announces North Shore Land Preservation Deal

Governor Abercrombie announces North Shore Land Preservation Deal

“As I said in my State of the State Address this year, ‘there are times for planning, and there are times for acting; now is the time to preserve open spaces at Turtle Bay,’” Gov. Abercrombie said. “This historic agreement is the result of public and private interests joining together to benefit the people of Hawaii and our visitors. This protects the heritage and rural character of the North Shore to ‘Keep the Country Country.’ ”

State Sen. Clayton Hee said: “The shoreline from Kahuku Point to Kawela Bay represents one of the most beautiful and pristine areas on all of Oahu. As elected leaders, we have a profound and solemn duty and responsibility to preserve and protect this shoreline for future generations just as our ancestors did before us.”

The conservation easement will be placed upon the land and will permanently limit use of the land in order to protect the ecological, recreational and open space characteristics of Oahu’s North Shore. TBR will continue to own, use and hold title to the land, but it and future owners of the land will be bound by the restrictions. The easement will protect, and in many cases, allow restoration of critical marine and land ecosystems and Hawaiian cultural resources. It will foster and enable recreational and educational uses of the land.

The total value of this agreement is $48.5 million; $40 million will be provided by the state, $5 million will be provided by the city, and $3.5 million will be provided by The Trust for Public Land. The amounts of money provided by the state and the city are subject to appropriation and release of the funds. Gov. Abercrombie has previously asked for and encourages the Legislature to appropriate $40 million in general obligation bonds. The City Council has previously appropriated $5 million for this matter. TPL will be obtaining funds from various sources. The final documents and details of the agreement are to be worked out between the parties.

“We are excited to be a part of the stewardship to protect these natural resources and to secure forever the public’s access to that entire shoreline from Kawela Bay to Kahuku Point,” said Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell. “We want to thank the state for its leadership in this effort and to the people around the table who worked hard to make sacrifices and to find common ground. The work is not yet complete, but we can see the light at the end of the tunnel.”

Honolulu City Council Chair Ernie Martin said: “The City Council has constantly demonstrated its commitment to land conservation as evidenced by the Fiscal Year 2014 budget appropriation of $5 million to preserve Kawela Bay. Protecting such a valuable natural resource on the North Shore today is an investment that will reap dividends for generations to come.”

This agreement benefits the public in many ways, such as preserving open space and providing public access to beaches in the area at no charge. It also allows public access to more than five miles of coastal hiking trails and opens up the area for traditional native Hawaiian cultural practices. In addition, the agreement keeps recreational use available to the public and prevents the sprawl of urban development in the area.

“This historic conservation agreement is supported by The Trust for Public Land, The North Shore Community Land Trust and many community organizations, residents of the North Shore and people from all over our island, along with visitors who enjoy and treasure the area,” said The Trust for Public Land, Hawaiian Islands State Director Lea Hong.

TBR Chief Executive Officer Drew Stotesbury said, “As a part of the North Shore community, Turtle Bay Resort is proud to contribute to the conservation of these unique lands.”

DLNR Preparing Draft Kawainui Master Plan And EIS

After an extensive public input process, the Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) will release a draft updated master plan for its management of the Kawainui-Hamakua Complex on May 16. At that time, DLNR will initiate a 30-day comment period to seek public comments on the draft plan.

Photo courtesy Division of Forestry and Wildlife

Photo courtesy Division of Forestry and Wildlife

“We will continue to develop and finalize our master plan and prepare an EIS as part of the process, which allows opportunities to hear community concerns,” said William J. Aila, Jr., DLNR chairperson. “We ask for everyone to go through this important process with us as we listen to all voices in the community.”

The draft master plan, an update of the 1994 Master Plan for Kawainui Marsh, is the result of ongoing discussion with the public that seeks to strike a balance among a wide range of opinions regarding management of the area. An EIS will also be prepared for the project that will allow the community to review environmental impacts associated with the updated master plan concepts as part of that environmental review process.

“We want to make it clear that our primary concern is protection and management of the wetlands in Kawainui and Hamakua,” Aila said. “Our main objectives within the marsh are management of native water bird habitat, including habitat for Hawaii’s four species of endangered waterbirds, and the migratory shorebirds and waterfowl that utilize the area on a seasonal basis.”

“The built elements currently being considered in the draft master plan revision – trails, education center, and cultural facilities – are the result of input we have received from the community,” he added. “Neither our Divisions of Forestry and Wildlife and State Parks nor the planners have an agenda either way regarding built elements and public access. We are seeking to accommodate the various opinions and views presented to us. These proposed features are common to natural areas of this type throughout the country and the world. Whatever built elements ultimately make it into the revised plan should not detract from the fact that our primary focus is protection and management of the natural resources at the Kawainui-Hamakua Complex. We have no intention or interest in creating a ‘tourist attraction’ at Kawainui Marsh, as some have suggested.”

Another important element of the master plan for Kawainui Marsh is the flood control project installed by the City and County of Honolulu and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This involves maintenance of the flood control levee, and maintaining the marsh lands in such a way as they do not inhibit water flow through the marsh and out into the ocean.

According to David Smith, Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) Oahu branch manager, “The main elements of our resource management program include control of invasive vegetation that is choking out bird habitat. This is a very large and ongoing task involving a huge number of personnel-hours and highly specialized equipment. In addition, the program includes control of non-native predators such as cats, dogs, mongooses and rats that prey on the waterbirds. In the upland areas, we are preserving and managing existing forest cover, and converting non-native forest to native forest through selective control of certain tree and shrub species, and the planting of native species.”

These natural resource management activities make up the bulk of DOFAW’s work in the marsh. Other land management responsibilities include cleaning up illegally dumped trash, cleaning out homeless camps along the marsh periphery, control of illegal access and off-road vehicles that damage marsh resources, clearing over-grown vegetation, mowing open lawn areas, and cleaning up decades of abuse and neglect to the marsh before DLNR gained control of the land. These land management activities are an ongoing, though costly part of DOFAW’s responsibility as stewards at Kawainui.