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International Market Place Celebrates Grand Opening Today in Waikiki

Thousands gathered today to take part in the grand opening of the fully reimagined International Market Place in Waikīkī. The 345,000-square-foot, open-air shopping center offers Hawai‘i’s first Saks Fifth Avenue as well as a world-class lineup of restaurants and retailers – nearly 50 percent of which will be unique to O’ahu.

The new International Market Place reopened in Waikiki today.

The new International Market Place reopened in Waikiki today.

“From dining under the sun and stars on the spectacular Grand Lānai to the excellent retail and entertainment, International Market Place will once again serve as a special gathering place for residents and tourists in the heart of Waikīkī,” said Robert S. Taubman, chairman, president and CEO of Taubman Centers, Inc. “We believe it will become a premiere destination on the island, and one of the best assets in our portfolio.”

Situated between the bustling Kalākaua and Kūhiō Avenues, International Market Place will offer approximately 90 of today’s most sought-after retailers and ten world-class restaurants. The center’s exceptional design incorporates a “cultural journey” of the land and its people, water features, indigenous landscaping and the historic 160-year-old banyan tree.

“International Market Place offers a unique Hawaiian sense of place that honors the past, perpetuates Queen Emma’s legacy and looks to the future,” said Cordell Lietz, president, CoastWood Capital Group. “It has been an honor to work with Taubman and Queen Emma Land Company to bring to fruition our shared vision for the important historic site.”

“We are excited for this property’s future as it establishes its own reputation and legacy as a new iconic landmark and gathering place,” said Eric Martinson, president of Queen Emma Land Company, the owners of the land on which International Market Place sits.

The International Market Place retail and restaurant lineup includes the following. A single asterisk (*) before the name indicates brands that are unique to the island.

STORES:
*45rpm
ABC Stores
*Abeo
Abercrombie & Fitch
Aesop
Anthropologie
Banana Republic
*BCBG MAX AZRIA
Brunello Cucinelli
*Capital Teas
*Catimini
Chapel Hats
*Christian Louboutin
Clarks
Crazy Shirts
*Fabletics
Flip Flop Shops
FootAction USA
Fossil
*Free People
GameStop
GNC Live Well
Godiva Belgium 1926
Greenroom Hawaii
*Hanna Andersson
*Hervé Léger
Hilton Grand Vacations (kiosk)
Hollister
Honolulu Cookie Co.
*Intermix
Island Art & Sole
*Jo Malone
*Kona Coffee Purveyors
*Kula & Ko
Laline
Lani Beach by Mireille
L’Occitane en Provence
LUSH Fresh Handmade Cosmetics
MAC
Magnolia Ice Cream & Treats
Maui Divers Jewelry
Michael Kors
*Mitsuwa Marketplace
*Oliver Peoples
*Ondademar
Pacific Harley-Davidson
Pandora
Papyrus
*Penhaligon’s
*Robin’s Jean
*Saks Fifth Avenue
Sand People
*Seafolly Australia
*Shinola
Shoe Palace
*Stuart Weitzman
*Sugarfina
Sunglass Hut
Swarovski
Tabora Gallery
Tesla
*Trina Turk
Vera Bradley
Vilebrequin
*YOGASMOGA

RESTAURANTS ON THE GRAND LĀNAI (THIRD LEVEL):
*Baku
*Eating House 1849 by Roy Yamaguchi
*Flour & Barley – Brick Oven Pizza
Goma Tei Ramen
*Herringbone
*Kona Grill
*STRIPSTEAK
*Yauatcha

RESTAURANT ON THE FIRST LEVEL:
*The STREET, A Michael Mina Social House

In addition to the stellar shopping and dining, guests can enjoy a free show each evening called “O Nā Lani Sunset Stories” that kicks off with a ceremonial lighting of the Lamakū Torch Tower that sits proudly on Kalākaua Ave. Honoring the beloved Queen Emma, the nightly show highlights stories, traditions and culture of this special gathering place.

Guests to International Market Place may take advantage of many amenities, including a 700-space parking garage, valet parking, electric vehicle charging stations, free Wi-Fi and much more.

International Market Place was developed through a partnership between Taubman and CoastWood Capital Group in conjunction with Queen Emma Land Company. Revenues will directly support The Queen’s Medical Center, the state’s largest private, nonprofit hospital and its mission of providing quality health care to all of Hawai‘i’s people.

For more information on the shopping, dining and entertainment destination, please visit ShopInternationalMarketPlace.com, Instagram: @intlmktplace and in Japanese @intlmktplacejp; Facebook: facebook.com/IntlMktPlace and in Japanese at facebook.com/IntlMktPlaceJP.

Coast Guard Tows Disabled Fishing Vessel Back To Honolulu

The Coast Guard safely towed a disabled 46-foot commercial fishing vessel with three persons aboard back to the Port of Honolulu, Friday.

The Coast Guard safely towed a disabled 46-foot commercial fishing vessel with three persons aboard back to the Port of Honolulu, Aug. 19, 2016. A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu relieved the the USCGC Kittiwake (WPB 87316) in towing the vessel at the entrance of the Port of Honolulu and brought them back safely to the pier. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sean Mazer/Released)

The Coast Guard safely towed a disabled 46-foot commercial fishing vessel with three persons aboard back to the Port of Honolulu, Aug. 19, 2016. A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu relieved the the USCGC Kittiwake (WPB 87316) in towing the vessel at the entrance of the Port of Honolulu and brought them back safely to the pier. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sean Mazer/Released)

A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu relieved the USCGC Kittiwake (WPB 87316) in towing the vessel at the entrance of the Port of Honolulu and brought them safely to the pier.

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector Honolulu command center received a report Wednesday from the crew of fishing vessel Lily Kaileia that they were disabled and adrift approximately 115 miles south of Honolulu Harbor.

Sector Honolulu launched the Kittiwake to tow the Lily Kaileia back to shore due to the fact that the vessel was drifting and there was no commercial or private vessel assistance available.

The Coast Guard safely towed a disabled 46-foot commercial fishing vessel with three persons aboard back to the Port of Honolulu, Aug. 19, 2016. A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu relieved the the USCGC Kittiwake (WPB 87316) in towing the vessel at the entrance of the Port of Honolulu and brought them back safely to the pier. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sean Mazer/Released)

The Coast Guard safely towed a disabled 46-foot commercial fishing vessel with three persons aboard back to the Port of Honolulu, Aug. 19, 2016. A 45-foot Response Boat-Medium boat crew from Coast Guard Station Honolulu relieved the the USCGC Kittiwake (WPB 87316) in towing the vessel at the entrance of the Port of Honolulu and brought them back safely to the pier. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Sean Mazer/Released)

The Kittiwake is a Marine Protector Class Patrol Boat homeported in Honolulu. As one of Sector Honolulu’s most versatile afloat assets, Kittiwake provides support to over 50,000 square miles around the waters of the Hawaiian Islands conducting law enforcement patrols, search and rescue missions as well as aiding in living marine resources and marine protected species missions.

Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to Conduct Harbor Security Exercise

Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH) will be holding a harbor defense training exercise with activities that can be seen and heard in the vicinity of the harbor on Aug. 22 to 26 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Exercise Citadel Protect

During the training period, JBPHH will make “Giant Voice” announcements at the beginning and conclusion of the daily training exercises. The exercise will involve increased activities in the harbor, including using blank ammunition to simulate live fire. The exercise is not in response to any specific threat. There is no cause for concern.

This training is part of Exercise Citadel Protect, an annual exercise designed to enhance the training, readiness and capability of Navy security forces to respond to threats to military installations and units.

For questions, please contact JBPHH Public Affairs Office at (808) 473-3152 or 473-2924.

Another Confirmed Case of Hepatitis A in an Oahu Food Service Worker

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) today confirmed an additional case of hepatitis A in an Oahu food service worker. The infected case is an employee at Hokkaido Ramen Santouka restaurant, located at 801 Kaheka Street, Honolulu. The employee worked on July 21-23 and 26-30, and Aug. 2-6 and 9-11, 2016.

Hokkaido Ramen Santouka restaurant

“Even though we’ve identified and work to confirm the likely source of the overall outbreak, we may continue to see new cases with hepatitis A infection like this person because of how long ago people would have been exposed,“ said State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park.  “Our work to control further spread of disease is not yet over.”

DOH is providing this information to the public as a precaution in an attempt to prevent any new cases.  The likelihood that patrons of this business will become infected is very low. To date, DOH has confirmed a total of 206 cases of hepatitis A as part of this outbreak investigation. Updated case counts and information are provided each Wednesday along with a complete list of food service establishments who have had employees diagnosed with hepatitis A infection at the following link: http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/hepatitis-a-outbreak-2016/.

Vaccination provides the best protection from hepatitis A, so any person who consumed food or beverage products prepared or served at this business during the identified periods may want to contact their healthcare providers about receiving a vaccine or immune globulin (IG).  This may provide some protection against the disease if administered within two weeks after exposure. A statewide list of vaccinating pharmacies can be found at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/files/2013/07/IMM_Adult_Resource_List.pdf, or call the Aloha United Way information and referral line at 2-1-1

Help prevent the spread of hepatitis A by washing your hands often and thoroughly.  For more information on proper handwashing: http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/dib/infectious-disease-surveillance/handwashing/.

Coast Guard Terminates Voyages of 3 Commercial Fishing Vessels for Safety Violations

The crew of the USCGC Galveston Island (WPB-1349) terminated the voyages of the 79-foot Lady Jackie, the 62-foot commercial fishing vessel Blue Sky and the 82-foot Jennifer Lynn for hazardous conditions and safety violations during a boardings off Honolulu since Aug. 8.

The crew of the USCGC Galveston Island (WPB-1349), with an officer from the Cook Islands Ministry of Marine Resources engaged in a professional exchange, conduct a fisheries boarding aboard a commercial vessel off Honolulu Aug. 8, 2016. The boarding team conducted 21 boardings over 6 days and terminated the voyages of the 79-foot Lady Jackie, the 62-foot commercial fishing vessel Blue Sky and the 82-foot Jennifer Lynn for hazardous conditions and safety violations. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by USCGC Galveston Island (WPB-1349/Released)

The crew of the USCGC Galveston Island (WPB-1349), with an officer from the Cook Islands Ministry of Marine Resources engaged in a professional exchange, conduct a fisheries boarding aboard a commercial vessel off Honolulu Aug. 8, 2016. The boarding team conducted 21 boardings over 6 days and terminated the voyages of the 79-foot Lady Jackie, the 62-foot commercial fishing vessel Blue Sky and the 82-foot Jennifer Lynn for hazardous conditions and safety violations. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by USCGC Galveston Island (WPB-1349/Released)

“Our experience shows that hazardous safety conditions like these often lead to marine casualties with loss of life and that is why we take enforcement so seriously and will turn vessels back to the dock,” said Lt. Ryan Ball, commanding officer, Galveston Island. “Mariners need to understand that they must meet the regulations before putting to sea. It is a matter of safety and ultimately we want to see everyone return home after every voyage.”

The crew of the USCGC Galveston Island (WPB-1349), with an officer from the Cook Islands Ministry of Marine Resources engaged in a professional exchange, conduct a fisheries boarding aboard a commercial vessel off Honolulu Aug. 9, 2016. The boarding team conducted 21 boardings over 6 days and terminated the voyages of the 79-foot Lady Jackie, the 62-foot commercial fishing vessel Blue Sky and the 82-foot Jennifer Lynn for hazardous conditions and safety violations. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by USCGC Galveston Island (WPB-1349/Released)

The crew of the USCGC Galveston Island (WPB-1349), with an officer from the Cook Islands Ministry of Marine Resources engaged in a professional exchange, conduct a fisheries boarding aboard a commercial vessel off Honolulu Aug. 9, 2016. The boarding team conducted 21 boardings over 6 days and terminated the voyages of the 79-foot Lady Jackie, the 62-foot commercial fishing vessel Blue Sky and the 82-foot Jennifer Lynn for hazardous conditions and safety violations. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by USCGC Galveston Island (WPB-1349/Released)

All three vessels were escorted by the Galveston Island crew to the pier in Honolulu. Coast Guard Sector Honolulu personnel are attending the vessels to ensure all discrepancies are rectified prior to any new voyages.

The boarding team from the cutter found discrepancies aboard the vessels including inoperable high water alarms, inoperable and/or expired survival craft, expired distress signals, an expired emergency position indicating radio beacon, a lack of or unserviceable life jackets, crews untrained in first aid or emergency procedures and a failure to conduct regular drills. In one case there was excessive fuel in the bilge and in another the vessel’s commercial fishing vessel safety decal and their registration are both expired.

Mandatory dockside safety exams must be completed for all commercial fishing vessels that operate beyond 3 nautical miles from the territorial sea baseline. These exams are free and any discrepancies found at the dock are unlikely to result in fines. Fishing vessel that are required to carry National Marine Fisheries Service observers are required to have a valid decal (un-expired). Mariners interested in scheduling commercial fishing vessel safety exams may contact Charlie Medlicott at 808-535-3417 or Charles.J.Medlicott@uscg.mil.

In addition to the two terminations the crew of the Galveston Island boarded 19 other vessels in the area during their six-day patrol. The crew also hosted a marine resources officer, as part of a professional exchange with the Cook Islands. The Cook Islands is a self governing island country in the South Pacific Ocean in free association with New Zealand. It comprises 15 islands whose total land area is 92.7 sq. miles. The Cook Islands’ Exclusive Economic Zone, however, covers 690,000 sq. miles of ocean and borders the U.S. EEZ near American Samoa. The professional exchange was conducted to strengthen partnerships and examine both nations’ approach to fisheries enforcement and safety requirements aboard vessels operating in the Pacific.

The Galveston Island is a 110-foot Island class patrol boat homeported in Honolulu. The cutter is a multi-mission platform with a primary operation area of the main Hawaiian Islands.

Debi Bishop Appointed Managing Director at Hilton Hawaiian Village

Hilton Worldwide announced today that Debi Bishop has been named managing director of its flagship resort in Hawai‘i, Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort.

Debbie Bishop

Debi Bishop

Bishop brings with her 30 years of industry experience as she takes the helm of the company’s largest hotel, which encompasses 22 beachfront acres and 2,860 guest rooms effective April 1. “I’ve been impressed watching Debi successfully develop and lead our team at Hilton Waikoloa Village over the past seven years,” said Jerry Gibson, area vice president, Hilton Hawaii.

“We’re lucky she’ll remain in our Hilton Hawaii Ohana as the new leader at the Hilton Hawaiian Village.” Bishop served as general manager of Hilton Waikoloa since 2008. During her tenure at Hilton Waikoloa Village, the resort achieved numerous awards of excellence, including the Hilton Worldwide Genius of the AND; Hilton Worldwide Sales American Summit Breakaway; Best Use of Social Media; Best Tactical Marketing Revenue Generating and Most Improved Profit.

She currently serves on the board of directors for the Big Island Visitors Bureau, Hawaii Island Chapter of the Hawaii Lodging & Tourism Association, Kohala Coast Resort Association, Waikoloa Beach Resort Conference, and Waikoloa Resort Association. She is also on the advisory board for University of Hawaii at Hilo College of Business and Economics.

Prior to joining the Hilton Waikoloa Village, Bishop served as managing director of Sawgrass Marriott Golf Resort & Spa in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Bishop also served as vice president of sales for Interstate Hotels & Resorts and worked with MeriStar Hotels & Resorts in several capacities, including vice president of operations and director of operations, Atlanta.

All Oahu and Kauai Genki Sushi Restaurants Ordered to Close Immediately

The Hawaii State Department of Health has mandated that all Oahu and Kauai Genki Sushi Restaurants close immediately.

Genki Sushi

The Department of Health determined the hepatitis A outbreak on Oahu is likely due to imported frozen scallops served raw at these restaurants.

The restaurants are now closed to prevent any further illness and protect the public.  No word on when they may reopen.

Hawaii Election Results Online

Hawaii GifElection results will be posted upon the close of polls on Election Day. Links to the Summary Reports will be available at that time.

* The results files may be temporarily inaccessible while we are uploading new files. Please refresh your browser window (e.g. click the refresh button) to view new results.  Clicking on another year in the menu does not load new results when returning to 2016.

Reports (PDF format)

Hawaiian Electric Donates $25K to Waianae Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii

Students at the Waianae Clubhouse of Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii (BGCH) have received a much-needed boost from the Hawaiian Electric Companies today with a check for $25,000.

Hawaiian Electric presented a $25,000 grant to the Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii for the Waianae Clubhouse "Power Hour" - an afterschool program for students to focus on their studies so they can improve their school performance and achieve academic success.

Hawaiian Electric presented a $25,000 grant to the Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii for the Waianae Clubhouse “Power Hour” – an after school program for students to focus on their studies so they can improve their school performance and achieve academic success.

The funds, appropriated for the 2016-2017 school year, will be used to support the Clubhouse’s Power Hour, a dedicated after-school time for students to focus on homework or be tutored by trained staff members, allowing students to stay on pace with their peers and enter the next school day with confidence.

“Power Hour has helped me a lot,” said Tyrese Clark, a Waianae Clubhouse kid. “I use to hate math and I wasn’t very good at it. I didn’t like to do the homework, because it was hard. I was failing tests and not trying my best. But at Power Hour, Mr. Ortiz-Morales taught me how to do fractions in a way I can understand – and I made an ‘A’ on my last test.”

Power Hour at the Waianae Clubhouse began on August 1, 2016 with an estimated 65 elementary through high school student participants. Last year, the program served over 120 students throughout the school year.

“We are deeply grateful for Hawaiian Electric Companies’ generous gift,” said Tim Motts, President and CEO of BGCH. “Often coming from an underserved community and unstructured home environment, the students from the Waianae Clubhouse will benefit immensely from Power Hour to encourage academic success for a bright future.”

Statistics overwhelmingly show that nationally one in five kids will not graduate from high school, perpetuating the cycle of poverty. For low-income children, academic struggles can lead to disengagement from school and high drop-out rates. In 2015, 98 percent of BGCH high school seniors graduated with a high school diploma. Hawaiian Electric Companies’ support of Power Hour will provide youth with the opportunity to achieve their educational goals.

“We are encouraged by organizations like the Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii for their unwavering commitment to improving the lives and future of the communities they serve,” said Colton Ching, Hawaiian Electric vice president – energy delivery, and BGCH board member. “Seeing first-hand the impact of their programs and hearing from the kids themselves has been so rewarding. We share BGCH’s commitment to the health and welfare of children and youth, and we are honored to partner with them in their efforts.”

Coast Guard Evacuates Man From Oil Tanker Off Oahu

The Coast Guard medevaced a 45-year-old citizen of India from an oil tanker 12 miles south of Oahu, Wednesday.

An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point rescued a 45-year-old man from an oil tanker 14 miles south of Oahu, Aug. 10, 2016. Personnel aboard the Bahamian-flagged oil tanker Andromeda Voyager reported a crewmember with heart attack symptoms to watchstanders at the Joint Rescue Coordination Center in Honolulu. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Ron Green/Released)

An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point rescued a 45-year-old man from an oil tanker 14 miles south of Oahu, Aug. 10, 2016. Personnel aboard the Bahamian-flagged oil tanker Andromeda Voyager reported a crewmember with heart attack symptoms to watchstanders at the Joint Rescue Coordination Center in Honolulu. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Ron Green/Released)

An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point safely hoisted the man from the 1,050-foot Bahamian-flagged oil tanker Andromeda Voyager at 7 a.m. and transferred him to Queen’s Medical Center in Honolulu.

An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point lowers a rescue swimmer onto an oil tanker 14 miles south of Oahu, Aug. 10, 2016. Personnel aboard the Bahamian-flagged oil tanker Andromeda Voyager reported a 45-year-old crewmember with heart attack symptoms to watchstanders at the Joint Rescue Coordination Center in Honolulu. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Ron Green/Released)

An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point lowers a rescue swimmer onto an oil tanker 14 miles south of Oahu, Aug. 10, 2016. Personnel aboard the Bahamian-flagged oil tanker Andromeda Voyager reported a 45-year-old crewmember with heart attack symptoms to watchstanders at the Joint Rescue Coordination Center in Honolulu. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Ron Green/Released)

Personnel aboard the ship contacted watchstanders at the Coast Guard Joint Rescue Coordination Center at 11 a.m. Saturday requesting assistance for a crewmember presenting heart attack symptoms. The vessel was 1,438 miles from Oahu at the time headed toward the U.S. from Southeast Asia and elected to divert their course toward Honolulu.

An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point hoists a 45-year-old man from an oil tanker 14 miles south of Oahu, Aug. 10, 2016. Personnel aboard the Bahamian-flagged oil tanker Andromeda Voyager reported a crewmember with heart attack symptoms to watchstanders at the Joint Rescue Coordination Center in Honolulu. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Ron Green/Released)

An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point hoists a 45-year-old man from an oil tanker 14 miles south of Oahu, Aug. 10, 2016. Personnel aboard the Bahamian-flagged oil tanker Andromeda Voyager reported a crewmember with heart attack symptoms to watchstanders at the Joint Rescue Coordination Center in Honolulu. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Ron Green/Released)

A Coast Guard flight surgeon was consulted and recommended the vessel continue toward Honolulu. The man’s condition was stable and plans were made to get him to shore via water taxi. However, when his condition began to deteriorate it was decided that a hoist would be conducted when the vessel arrived 14 miles offshore of Oahu to expedite his access to a higher level of medical care.

The Dolphin aircrew launched from Air Station Barbers Point at 5:45 a.m. and conducted the hoist at 6:35 a.m. He was delivered to awaiting emergency medical personnel in stable condition.

Hawaiian Petroglyphs Revealed By Shifting Sands – Experts Believe 400+ Years Old

On a warm July evening, visitors Lonnie Watson and Mark Louviere from the Ft. Worth, Texas metro area did what they normally do during their frequent visits to Hawaii.  They wandered out to the coastline to watch the setting sun. On this particular day they spotted something that they say has humbled and blessed them. Watson explained, “For some reason there was a beam of light…just a beam…it landed right on one of them and for some reason I just turned my head. I said, look, it was just a stroke of luck.”

Waiana PetroglyphWhat they saw was a large petroglyph, etched into the sandstone. Upon further investigation, they discovered at least 10 figures, stretching over roughly 60 feet of beach. While it’s likely this series of petroglyphs, created by aboriginal inhabitants of the Waianae coast, have revealed themselves in the past, this is the first time they’ve come to the attention of the DLNR State Historic Preservation Division (SHPD) and the U.S. Army. Both agencies have been working together to record and document the petroglyphs; which now number at least 17 figures.

Army archaeologist and Waianae native Alton Exzabe was one of the first officials to arrive at the site. He said, “What’s interesting is the Army in Hawaiʻi manages several thousand archaeological sites, but this is the first one with petroglyphs directly on the shoreline.

What’s exciting for me, is I grew up coming to this beach and now as an archaeologist working for the Army, helping to manage this site, we discovered these petroglyphs that have never been recorded. Some people have said they’ve seen them before, but this is quite a significant find.”

Waianae PetroglyphsGlen Kila is a lineal descendent of the aboriginal families who first settled in Nene’u on the Waianae Coast. His family home is a short ways from the petroglyph field, and he says until now he was unaware of these particular figures. “They record our genealogy and religion. It’s very important to know about the lineal descendants of the area and their understanding of these petroglyphs. The interpretation of these petroglyphs can only be interpreted by the lineal descendants who are familiar with its history and culture,” Kila said.

Several days after the Texas families first saw the petroglyphs, a small group of people stood atop the rocks as sand was washing back in to recover them. Exzabe and fellow archaeologists from the SHPD encourage people to look and not touch. Even the process of scraping sand away by hand or with brushes can damage the integrity of the figures.

Exzabe added, “We can now come up with a plan to further protect and preserve this site.  The ones with the fingers, for me, are pretty unique. I believe there are some elsewhere with fingers, but fingers and hands are pretty distinct, as well as the size of them.  We find a lot of petroglyphs that are a foot or so tall, but this one measures 4-5 feet from head to toe. It’s pretty impressive.”

Waianae Petroglyphs2

The petroglyphs were only viewable for a short time. Since the Texans’ initial reporting, the sand has moved back in to cover them; however, the Army and SHPD are committed to protecting the “new” discovery whether visible or not.

Dr. Alan Downer, the administrator for the SHPD said, “We’re eager to join the Army in developing a protection and preservation plan for these petroglyphs. They are an important part of Hawaii’s culture and while sands have covered them again, in time they will reappear and we want to make sure people know that they are fragile and culturally sensitive and should only be viewed; not touched.”

University of Hawaii Law Students Getting New Building

University of Hawaii law students are getting a new $7.4 million dollar building to work on projects.

law buildingConstruction will begin in October on the William S. Richardson School of Law’s new Clinical Building at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. It’s expected to be complete in July 2017.

“We are extremely pleased that this much-needed and long-awaited project is actually under way,” said Dean Avi Soifer. “Our law school is uniquely involved with, and committed to, the community. This Clinical Building gives us vital professional space for our students to be prepared for trial practice and advocacy.  Additionally, it is significant for reaccreditation and also helps us remain on par with other law schools around the country that have recently upgraded their facilities.”

Maui-based F&H Construction is scheduled to break ground late September. The building design has already qualified at the LEED Silver level as a green building and may attain Gold status.

More here: University of Hawaii Builds New Clinical Building

Hepatitis A Infection in Food Service Worker at Tamashiro Market

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) has confirmed an additional case of hepatitis A on Oahu in a food service worker at Tamashiro Market, located at 802 N. King St. in Honolulu. The employee worked from July 2-23, 2016 (actual dates: July 2, 4, 6–8, 11–13, 15–19, and 23).

Tamashiro Market

The department is continuing its investigation of cases and at this time, no food establishment or business has been identified as a source of the ongoing hepatitis A outbreak. There have been no new cases linked to exposure at businesses where workers who handled food or drink were identified, however, the information is provided to prevent possible new cases. The likelihood that patrons of this business will become infected is very low.

“Tamashiro Market is not at fault for this, but given that much of what is sold there is typically prepared and purchased raw, it is important to inform the public of possible exposure,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park. “This business understands that public health is our primary concern, and they have been working with us to help prevent new cases.”

Persons who consumed food or beverage products prepared or served at this business during the identified periods may have been exposed to the disease and are recommended to:

  1. Contact their healthcare providers about the possibility of receiving hepatitis A vaccine or immune globulin (IG), which may provide some protection against the disease if administered within two weeks after exposure.
  2. Monitor their health for symptoms of hepatitis A infection up to 50 days after exposure.
  3. Wash their hands with soap and water frequently and thoroughly, especially (a) after using the bathroom or changing a diaper and (b) before preparing food.
  4. Stay at home and contact their healthcare provider immediately if symptoms of hepatitis A infection develop.

The public is encouraged to talk to their healthcare providers about Hepatitis A vaccination. For a statewide list of vaccinating pharmacies, visit http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/files/2013/07/IMM_Adult_Resource_List.pdf or call the Aloha United Way information and referral line at 2-1-1.

Symptoms of hepatitis A infection include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, abdominal discomfort, dark urine, diarrhea, and yellow skin and eyes. Individuals, including food service employees, exhibiting symptoms of hepatitis A, should stay home and contact their healthcare provider.

While vaccination provides the best protection, frequent and thorough handwashing with soap after using the bathroom or changing a diaper, and before preparing food can help prevent the spread of hepatitis A. Appropriately cooking foods can also help prevent infection.

For the complete list of food service establishments who have had employees diagnosed with hepatitis A infection, visit http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/hepatitis-a-outbreak-2016/.

Additional information about hepatitis A can be found on the DOH website at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/hepatitis-a-outbreak-2016/.

Hawaii Hepatitis A Outbreak Now at 135 Confirmed Cases

As of August 3, 2016:

Since the last update, HDOH has identified 42 new cases of hepatitis A.  All cases have been in adults, 39 have required hospitalization.

Findings of the investigation suggest that the source of the outbreak is focused on Oahu.  Seven (7) individuals now live on the islands of Hawaii, Kauai, and Maui, and one visitor has returned to the mainland.

Confirmed Cases of Hepatitis A: 135

Onset of illness has ranged between 6/12/16 – 7/24/16.

Places of Interest

An employee of the following food service business(es) has been diagnosed with hepatitis A. This list does not indicate these businesses are sources of this outbreak; at this time, no infections have been linked to exposure to these businesses. The likelihood that patrons of these businesses will become infected is very low. However, persons who have consumed food or drink products from these businesses during the identified dates of service should contact their healthcare provider for advice and possible preventive care.

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Hepatitis A Cases Identified in Chili’s Kapolei Food Service Employee and Hawaiian Airlines Flight Attendant

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) is continuing its investigation of a hepatitis A outbreak on the island of Oahu and has confirmed two new cases in a food service employee at Chili’s restaurant located at 590 Farrington Highway in Kapolei, and a Hawaiian Airlines flight attendant.

Hep Hawaiian“At this time, no infections have been linked to exposure at these businesses and they are not sources of the outbreak,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park. “We are alerting the public only as a precaution; the risk of transmission is extremely low and these businesses are working with us to help prevent potentially new cases in our community.”

Although it is not a food service establishment, Hawaiian Airlines has been named because the infected crew member served inflight food and beverages to passengers. Hawaiian Airlines customers may go to www.hawaiianairlines.com/hepatitisA for detailed information on affected flights and other support available.

“The most infectious period for this disease may be as much as two weeks before the onset of symptoms — before the individual even knows he or she is sick,” Park added. “The public’s health is our main concern, and we feel it is important to equip people with this information so they may work with their healthcare providers to protect their health.”

Persons who consumed food or beverage products from these businesses during the identified periods may have been exposed to the disease and are recommended to:

  1. Contact their healthcare providers about the possibility of receiving hepatitis A vaccine or immune globulin (IG), which may provide some protection against the disease if administered within two weeks after exposure.
  2. Monitor their health for symptoms of hepatitis A infection up to 50 days after exposure.
  3. Wash their hands with soap and warm water frequently and thoroughly, especially after using the bathroom and before preparing food.
  4. Stay at home and contact their healthcare provider immediately if symptoms of hepatitis A infection develop.

To help prevent the spread of disease during the investigation, the public is encouraged to talk to their healthcare providers about vaccination. A statewide list of vaccinating pharmacies is available at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/files/2013/07/IMM_Adult_Resource_List.pdf or call the Aloha United Way information and referral line at 2-1-1.

As of July 26, the current number of hepatitis A cases linked to the outbreak is 93. This number is updated weekly on Wednesday and posted at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/hepatitis-a-outbreak-2016/.

Symptoms of hepatitis A infection include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, abdominal discomfort, dark urine, diarrhea, and yellow skin and eyes. Individuals, including food service employees, exhibiting symptoms of hepatitis A should stay home and contact their healthcare provider.

While vaccination provides the best protection, frequent handwashing with soap and warm water after using the bathroom, changing a diaper, and before preparing food can help prevent the spread of hepatitis A. Appropriately cooking foods can also help prevent infection.

For the complete list of food service establishments that have had employees diagnosed with hepatitis A infection, visithttp://health.hawaii.gov/docd/hepatitis-a-outbreak-2016/.

For additional information about hepatitis A go to http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/hepatitis-a-outbreak-2016/.

 

Tropical Storm Howard Turns South

At 800 PM PDT (0300 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Howard was located near latitude 17.7 North, longitude 126.4 West.

TS Howard

Howard is moving toward the west-northwest near 14 mph (22 km/h), and this general motion with a slight increase in forward speed is forecast during the next couple of days.

Maximum sustained winds remain near 50 mph (85 km/h) with higher gusts.  Some additional strengthening is possible during the next 12 hours or so, but weakening should commence by Tuesday night.

Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles (110 km) from the center.

The estimated minimum central pressure is 999 mb (29.50 inches).

FORECAST DISCUSSION:

Visible imagery and a 01/2038 UTC AMSR2 microwave pass show that Howard’s center of circulation has become exposed to the west of the cloud canopy.  Additionally, the entire western half of the cyclone has become devoid of deep convective banding.  It appears that modest westerly shear is impinging on the storm and undercutting the diffluent flow aloft.  A blend of the Final-T numbers from both TAFB and SAB yields an initial intensity of 45 kt for this advisory.  Some additional strengthening is forecast during the next 12 hours while Howard remains over SSTs greater than 26C.

By the 24 hour period, the cyclone is expected to move over cooler sub-24 deg C water. Cooler SSTs and increasing southwesterly shear should induce steady weakening, resulting in Howard degenerating into a post-tropical cyclone in 48 hours, and a remnant low by day 3.

After that time, the large-scale models show the remnant low degenerating into a trough of low pressure.  The intensity forecast is a little above the previous forecast, but is lower than the IVCN intensity consensus.

Satellite position estimates suggest that Howard is moving toward the west-northwest, or 295 degrees, at about 12 kt.  Howard is expected to move in a general west-northwestward motion during the next 72 hours along the southern periphery of a subtropical ridge located to the north of the cyclone.  Through the remainder of the period, the cyclone is forecast to become a shallow remnant low and turn toward the west following the low-level easterly tradewind flow.  The official NHC forecast is quite similar to the previous one, and is hedged toward the TVCN multi-model consensus.

 

Public Invited to View Visiting RIMPAC Ships and Vessels

Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH) invites the general public to free, narrated boat tours of the harbor to view visiting Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) ships and vessels on Aug. 3-4.  The tours will be approximately 20-minutes long aboard the Navy’s white boats, and will be departing from the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center, 1 Arizona Memorial Place.

In this file photo, 42 ships and submarines representing 15 international partner nations steam in close formation during RIMPAC 2014. (U.S. Navy/MC1 Shannon Renfroe)

In this file photo, 42 ships and submarines representing 15 international partner nations steam in close formation during RIMPAC 2014. (U.S. Navy/MC1 Shannon Renfroe)

Tours for the general public will be limited to the following schedule, on a first-come, first-served basis (300 guests per tour time). No tickets or reservations required.

  • Wednesday, Aug. 3 at 4 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 5 p.m., 5:30 p.m.
  • Thursday, Aug. 4 at 4 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 5 p.m., 5:30 p.m.

No backpacks, fanny packs, luggage, diaper bags, camera bags, purses, large cameras/tripods or other items that provide concealment are allowed in the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center.  No bag storage is available for these after-hours tours, so please plan accordingly.  Limited photography will be allowed during the tour.

For questions, please contact JBPHH Public Affairs Office at (808) 473-3152 or 473-2924.

Abandoned and Seized Merchandise Donated to Institute for Human Services

The state Foreign-Trade Zone No. 9 (FTZ9), a division within the state Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) donated a large truckload (31 boxes) full of new and unused items to The Institute for Human Services (IHS) today.

IHS2FTZ9 has accumulated a significant amount of abandoned or seized merchandise in its public warehouse, which consisted of multiple cartons of slippers, cooler bags (reusable lunch bags, soda coolers, and small duffel bags), and clothing and accessories (t-shirts and hand-bags). FTZ9 determined that these items, which would normally have been disposed of due to their limited market value, could put be put to good use by helping the disadvantaged in Hawaii.

“This arrangement is a prime example of how the state is collaborating with community organizations to address homelessness in Hawaii,” said Gov. David Ige. “This donation from FTZ9, will raise awareness in our communities about the different ways we can all help.”

IHS1

Inspired by the Food Recovery Network, a program that eliminates food waste, DBEDT’s FTZ9 Division decided they wanted to donate these items to homeless clients, since 100 percent of in-kind donations received by the public are made available to IHS clients at no charge to re-start their lives with new belongings they can claim as their own.

“This is an example of how government can work to creatively support our state in ways that can have a lasting impact on struggling families and individuals,” said DBEDT Director Luis P. Salaveria. “This donation will help those who are working to rebuild their lives and actively choosing to end their difficult situation.”

David Sikkink, FTZ9’s Administrator said, “We have been accumulating a significant amount of new and unused clothing and accessories over the past several years when tenants either go out of business or have simply abandoned the goods, leaving them in our custody. Generally, we try to recapture some of the lost storage revenue, however, with these types of items we felt they could be of a greater value to various non-profits / charities. We immediately thought of IHS and how these clothing items could be used help those in need.”

Connie Mitchell, IHS Executive Director, complimented the Ige Administration stating, “We truly appreciate the State’s commitment to make available to our homeless clients, valuable goods that offset the costs of basic necessities as they start over with a new home, employment and life. New clothing, accessories and other personal items are tangible ways to offer a personal boost. It’s a ‘big deal’ in a person’s journey out of homelessness after losing nearly all they’ve owned by the time they enter a shelter.”

IHS3

IHS ended its fiscal year on June 30, 2016, having assisted 1,561 individuals with permanent housing placements utilizing State, City and Private sector housing options. Mitchell added, “Every sector, industry and private citizen is invited to contribute in their own way. Whether it be financial resources, volunteerism, skills and expertise, simple acts of kindness, or in-kind donations; every bit helps and we ensure public donations have a significant impact and are used in a cost efficient way.”

ABOUT FTZ9 (Foreign-Trade Zone No.9)

Since 1966, Foreign-Trade Zone No.9’s mission has been to encourage value-added and international trading activities that will create new investment and job opportunities in Hawaii by operating a statewide Foreign-Trade Zone program. FTZ9 reduces the barriers and costs associated with international trade through the establishment, maintenance, and administration of general-purpose Foreign-Trade Zones and special-purpose Foreign-Trade Subzones throughout the state. It also provides storage and distribution services to firms engaged in the import/export of merchandise; and leases office, warehouse, and manufacturing space to firms engaged in international trade at its Honolulu facility.

Navy Breaks Ground on New Groundwater Monitoring Site

The Navy resumed work today on a new groundwater monitoring well near the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Facility, demonstrating an ongoing commitment to protect drinking water on Oahu.

Red Hill Drill

The monitoring well, one of four new wells to be installed in coming months, will help scientists and Navy engineers sample and check water quality and evaluate how groundwater moves in the vicinity of Red Hill.

The installation of the newest monitoring well is in accordance with the Administrative Order on Consent agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and State of Hawaii Department of Health (DOH).

In EPA’s latest Red Hill website update* the agency states the Navy has been testing groundwater at the Red Hill facility since 2005 and adds, “These new wells will supply additional data to identify the presence of contamination, better characterize groundwater flow, and guide future investigations.”

Understanding Red Hill geology and groundwater flow is a high priority. The Navy broke ground for the well earlier this month, but digging was temporarily put on hold due to Tropical Storm Darby.

“Last week we began installing an additional groundwater monitoring site to better understand exactly how groundwater moves in the area,” said Rear Adm. John Fuller, Commander, Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific. “Public records confirm that all drinking water remains safe, and this well is more tangible evidence that we are committed to keeping the drinking water safe.”

EPA reports: “Public water systems that supply drinking water to Oahu residents are required to routinely test drinking water for contaminants. All drinking water supplies in the vicinity of Red Hill continue to meet all federal drinking water standards.”

The installation of the new well coincides with visits by groups of senior civilian leaders and delegates this month. Last Monday, July 18, U.S. Representatives Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI), Ed Perlmutter (D-CO) and Bradley Byrne (R-AL), among other legislators, visited Red Hill. Navy subject matter experts provided a tour of the facility and status update briefings.

“In the past two-and-a-half years, we hosted several hundred legislators, community leaders and other stakeholders for visits to the Red Hill facility. At the same time, we continue to work closely with regulators to protect the aquifer,” said Fuller.

Since 2006, the Navy has invested nearly $200 million to continue modernizing Red Hill.

At a cost of half-a-million dollars, construction of this latest monitoring well is expected to take about one month and be completed by the end of August.  The Navy will continue to routinely take water samples and send them to an independent accredited commercial laboratory for analysis, using industry-standard EPA test methods. And the Navy will continue to submit test results to DOH and EPA for evaluation, assessment and public dissemination.

Data from groundwater samples are designed to identify whether additional action is warranted.

Red Hill is a key part of the Rim of the Pacific exercise 2016. It is a national strategic asset that provides fuel essential to our nation’s defenders.

Big Island Restaurant Linked to Hepatitis A Outbreak – Confirmed Cases at 93

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) has confirmed a new case of hepatitis A infection in a food service employee on Hawaii Island.

The employee has a history of exposure on Oahu and worked at the fast food and catering restaurant, Sushi Shiono Waikoloa, located in the Waikoloa Beach Resort, Queen’s MarketPlace at 69-201 Waikoloa Beach Drive, from July 5 through July 21, 2016 (actual dates: July 5-8, 11-15, and 18-21).

Waikoloa SushiThe department is advising persons who consumed any food products from this store during this period that they may have been exposed to the disease.

The likelihood that patrons of this business will become infected is very low. However, as a precaution, unvaccinated individuals should contact their healthcare providers about the possibility of receiving hepatitis A vaccine or immune globulin, which may provide some protection against the disease if administered within the first two weeks after exposure.

Since the outbreak began in mid-June, there have been 93 confirmed cases of hepatitis A, 29 of which have required hospitalization. All cases have been in adults who were on Oahu during their exposure periods. DOH continues to investigate and is working to identify the source of infection for this outbreak.

“Preventing exposure from infected food handlers is difficult because patients with hepatitis A are most contagious one to two weeks before symptoms start,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park.“ It is possible that other food service establishments will be affected with additional new cases.”

Affected food service establishments who are unable to notify their customers directly are listed on the DOH website at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/hepatitis-a-outbreak-2016/. These businesses are not sources of this outbreak. At this time, no infections have been linked to exposure at these businesses; the list is provided to prevent possible new cases. Hawaii State law requires all unvaccinated food handlers (persons who directly prepare, serve, or handle food) who are contacts of confirmed cases be tested for infection and have a negative hepatitis A IgM test before returning to work. A “contact” with the case is defined as unvaccinated household members, unvaccinated sexual contacts, anyone sharing illicit drugs with a case, anyone sharing food or eating or drinking utensils with a case, anyone consuming ready-to-eat foods prepared by an infectious food handler with diarrhea or poor hygiene.

Once an infected food handler has been identified, DOH staff coordinate directly with the owners and managers of the affected food service establishments to ensure their employees are tested before resuming their work.

Symptoms of hepatitis A infection include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, abdominal discomfort, dark urine, diarrhea, and yellow skin and eyes.

Individuals, including food service employees, exhibiting symptoms of hepatitis A should stay home and contact their healthcare provider.While vaccination provides the best protection, frequent and thorough hand washing with soap and warm water after using the bathroom, changing a diaper, and before preparing food can help prevent the spread of hepatitis A. Appropriately cooking foods can also help prevent infection.

Additional information about hepatitis A can be found on the DOH website at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/hepatitis-a-outbreak-2016/.

For a statewide list of vaccinating pharmacies, visit http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/files/2013/07/IMM_Adult_Resource_List.pdf or call the Aloha United Way information and referral line at 2-1-1.