Search for Possible Missing Kayaker Near Kauai

The Coast Guard is searching for a possible missing kayaker approximately half a mile northeast of Kilauea Point on the north shore of Kauai, Saturday.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Station Kauai received a call at 11:11 a.m. from a good Samaritan on shore stating that she noticed an unmanned, adrift yellow kayak in the area.

The Kauai Fire Department located the kayak with dive gear that included fins, a wet suit, paddle and weights aboard. The Fire Department searched in the vicinity of the kayak and found no one in distress.

KayakThe kayak is approximately 15 feet long with the words “KAYAKKAUAI.COM” and “OCEAN KAYAK,” and a single line hanging off the side. There are no other markings on the kayak.

A 47-foot Motor Lifeboat crew from Station Kauai is actively searching the area.

No one has been reported missing or in distress in the area.

The Coast Guard advises the public to register and label all watercraft and equipment with contact information in order to quickly account for owners and prevent any unnecessary searches.

Through the Operation Paddle Smart program, the Coast Guard offers a free “If Found” decal to be placed in a visible location on small, human-powered watercraft. The information on the sticker can allow response entities to quickly identify the vessel’s owner and aid search and rescue planners in determining the best course of action.

The stickers can be obtained for free at local harbormasters, the Coast Guard Auxiliary, from Honolulu Sail and Power Squadron offices and at select marine retail and supply stores.

The Coast Guard is asking mariners to keep a sharp eye out for anyone possibly in distress.

Anyone with information can help identify the owner of the kayak is asked to contact the Coast Guard Sector Honolulu Command Center at (808) 842-2600.

Collaboration Between the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy and Wilcox Hospital Formed to Help Combat Infectious Diseases on Kaua`i

A collaboration between the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy and Wilcox Hospital has formed Hawai’i’s first interdisciplinary Antimicrobial Stewardship Program (ASP) to help combat infectious diseases on Kaua`i.

UH Hilo MonikerASPs are programs designed to improve the utilization of appropriate antibiotics with the goals of improving patient outcomes and lowering healthcare associated costs, as well as slowing the development of antimicrobial resistance.

“The management of infectious diseases is a constant arms race, and, as medication experts, pharmacists are uniquely qualified to help drive ASPs,” said Roy Goo, assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice, who is based on Kaua`i. “As new antimicrobial agents are developed, bacterial, viral and fungal organisms evolve with new resistance mechanisms that confer immunity to even our best medications. Even with proper medication, it is estimated that 50 percent of antibiotics are used inappropriately.

“The practice of infectious diseases is the art of using only what is necessary to cure the infection and nothing more,” added Goo. “One of the basic principles of infectious diseases is the more antimicrobial agents we use, the faster resistance develops.” He points out that in recent years multiple strains of bacteria have arisen that are resistant to all currently available antibiotics.

In Hawaiʻi, Goo shows how the College of Pharmacy has played an integral role in the development of these programs across the State. With support from Wilcox Hospital’s inpatient pharmacy department and the hospital’s infectious disease physician Dr. Jimmy Yoon, students screen for patients who are on high-cost or high-risk antimicrobials. They then assess the appropriateness of the antimicrobial regimen for each patient and present their recommendations to the entire infectious disease team, who makes changes to optimize therapy.

“The Center for Disease Control strongly recommends that hospitals perform some form of antimicrobial stewardship, and it is likely that it will become mandated by the Center for Medicare/ Medicaid Services (CMS) in a couple of years,” Yoon said. “At Wilcox Memorial Hospital, we like to be ahead of the curve. Right now we are lucky that we have very few resistant bacteria, and we want to keep it that way. There is a clear correlation between bacterial resistance and increased morbidity and mortality as well as healthcare costs.”

Recognizing the importance of training pharmacists to fill this growing need, Yoon often spends time with students and tests them on their drug knowledge. Students consult with members of Wilcox Memorial Hospital’s Radiology staff, who also volunteer their time to go over chest X-rays and other imaging studies to point out abnormalities that serve as possible indications of infection.

“The drug pipeline for antimicrobial agents is dry so we need to save the agents that we have,” Yoon said. “My anticipation is that for pharmacists this is going to be a huge area for growth.”

This positive experience has led to other collaborative programs at Straub Hospital and Pali Momi Medical Center (PMMC) on O`ahu. Pharmacist Melissa Yoneda, a DKICP alumni from the Class of 2013, is currently helping to establish a pharmacy-driven ASP at PMMC in collaboration with the PMMC pharmacy, nursing and physician staff.

The release of an ASP module and guidance statement from the CDC indicates that ASPs will likely become a requirement across the United States. Certain states such as California have already made it mandatory that hospitals that enjoy Medicare reimbursement have an established ASP in place.

Rescue Crews Find Missing Fisherman Safe Off Kauai

A fisherman who spent the night off the coast of Kauai is safe after Coast Guard rescue crews located him five miles off of Kapa’a, Kauai, Thursday.

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector Honolulu command center received a call at 8:30 p.m., Wednesday, from a man reporting that his friend was overdue on his 14-foot Boston Whaler. The 61-year-old fisherman departed from the Waikaea Canal in Kapa’a, Kauai earlier in the day to fish a few miles off of Kapa’a with group of other fishing boats.

Waikaea Canal

Waikaea Canal

Coast Guard Sector Honolulu launched a 47-Motor Life Boat crew from Station Kauai, the 87-foot Coast Guard Cutter Kittiwake, a C-130 Hercules airplane crew and two MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crews from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point to search for the man.

An urgent marine information broadcast was also issued to all mariners in the area, asking for their assistance in locating the missing mariner.

The Kauai Fire Department and Kauai Police Department also joined the search.

At 8:09 a.m., one of the Dolphin helicopter crews located the fisherman and directed the MLB crew to the fisherman’s position. He was safely escorted back to Kapa’a Harbor.

The search covered nearly 2,000 square miles.

“If the mariner had a VHF radio on board, he likely would have overheard the Coast Guard’s Urgent Marine Information Broadcast being transmitted on Ch. 16 looking for him.” said Petty Officer 1st Class Tyler Peterson, an operational watchstander at the Sector Honolulu command center. “He then could have contacted the Coast Guard or other mariners for assistance.”

The mariner reported hearing a helicopter but the light he was flashing was not seen by rescue crews due to the weather conditions. He was not equipped with a VHF marine radio, GPS, compass or signal flares.

The Coast Guard advises all mariners to ensure they are property equipped before heading out. This includes having life jackets, a VHF marine radio, flares and a compass or GPS.

For more information on boating safety, mariners can visit www.uscgboating.org

Wanted – Dogs Killing Albatrosses

The Department of Land and Natural Resources is asking for the public‘s help in identifying the owner(s) of two dogs recently seen attacking ground-nesting Laysan albatrosses in Moloa’a, Kauai.

Have seen these dogs in the Moloa`a area …

Have seen these dogs in the Moloa`a area …

They were photographed and the image is posted on fliers that are being distributed in the community, starting Friday.

Since December, a string of albatross killings has been reported at two coastal properties on the northeast shores of Kauai.  A total of 17 birds were found mauled to death at Moloaa by dogs this season.

Moloaa Bay Albatross Kill Flier

The total number of albatross killed on Kauai this season is 26 birds. The other deaths (9 birds) are from another property nearby.

Any person with who recognizes the dogs or knows who the dogs’ owners are, is asked to  please call the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife at 274-3521 or 274-3433.  After hours, weekends and holidays, please call the Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement (DOCARE) Hotline at 1-808-453-6780.

Please help protect Kauai’s seabirds by keeping your pet dogs on leash or kenneled. Stay on walking paths and observe seabird nesting signs.

Falko Property Moli Massacre

Falko Property Moli Massacre

Lawsuits Begin… GMO Companies Sue County of Kauai

The Honolulu Advertiser has announced that 3 companies have now filed lawsuits against Kauai Counties legislation against GMO and the restricted use of pesticides.

Syngenta, Pioneer Hi-Bred and Agrigenetics — an affiliate of Dow — have sued to block Kauai County from implementing its new genetically modified organism and pesticide regulation law.

The law, which takes effect in August, imposes greater disclosure requirements on restricted use pesticides and creates buffer zones for crops near schools, homes, and hospitals.

The lawsuit, filed Friday in U.S. District Court, contends that the law irrationally prohibits the biotechnology companies from growing any crops — GMO or not — in arbitrarily drawn buffer zones, and restricts the companies’ pesticide use within the buffer zones.

More Here:  http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/breaking/20140111_3_companies_sue_to_block_Kauais_new_law_on_GMOs_pesticides.html?id=239768391

Hawaii Agriculture Theft a Problem – Hawai’i Law Seeks To Reduce Increasing Problem

The Hawai’i Forest Industry Association (HFIA) encourages farmers, ranchers and the public to know the law regarding ownership and movement of agricultural commodities.

Hawai’i law requires ownership and movement certification on any amount of an agricultural commodity that is to be marketed for commercial purposes or when transporting agricultural commodities weighing more than 200 pounds or with a value of $100 or more.

In testifying for passage of the law, the Hawai’i Farm Bureau Federation wrote, “Everyone knows farming is inherently risky. There are no guarantees of a successful crop. Besides being vulnerable to invasive pests and diseases, erratic weather patterns, and multi-year droughts, high land, labor, fuel, and other farm costs leave us unable to compete with mainland prices. On top of this, farmers are highly susceptible to theft. Our location and relatively large acreage, usually in more remote areas and impossible to guard 24 hours a day, leave us open to thieves that reap the benefit of our hard work or vandals that destroy our crops for kicks.”

The law requires that those convicted of agricultural theft face criminal penalties and pay restitution to their victims in an amount equal to the value of what was stolen as well as the cost of replanting.

A slab was brutally cut from this koa tree, which subsequently killed the tree in Kōke'e State Park, Kauai

A slab was brutally cut from this koa tree, which subsequently killed the tree in Kōke’e State Park, Kauai

In October 2013 Kaua’i’s The Garden Island newspaper reported on koa trees cut down by poachers. In the article Deborah Ward, the information specialist for the Hawai’i Department of Land and Natural Resources, said “DLNR’s Division of Conservation and Resources Enforcement is investigating recent cases of theft of koa at Kōke’e State Park, as well as other pending cases. The majority of thefts have been on State Parks lands, most recently last week on park land, and in June 2013 in the Nā Pali-Kona Forest Reserve.”

From the theft of exotic fruit and native Kou trees on Hawai’i Island to pineapple by the truckload on Maui to valuable landscaping plants on O’ahu, agricultural theft costs farmers and ranchers millions of dollars annually. Losses also occur from vandalism and illegal hunting and cattle poaching on private lands. These costs are ultimately passed on to consumers.

Hawai’i Forest Industry Association encourages anyone suspecting agricultural theft to contact their local police department to report the crime.

 

Three Laysan Albatross Killed on North Shore of Kauai by Loose Dogs

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) is issuing a reminder to pet owners to keep all dogs on leash, after three Laysan Albatross (or Moli) were killed on the North shore of Kaua‘i this weekend in the latest incident where albatross have been slaughtered by loose dogs. The dead albatross, which have only just started returning to Kaua‘i after many months out at sea, were found by tourists walking near Moloa‘a Bay.

Photo credit: Gina Ord (Dead Albatross)

Photo credit: Gina Ord (Dead Albatross)

The Laysan Albatross is listed as near threatened under the IUCN Red List and is a federally protected species. They have only recently recolonized Kaua‘i after a lengthy period of absence and their population has slowly increased on the island in recent years. They face a number of threats including by catch in long-line fisheries, ingestion of plastics and predation by introduced mammals, particularly dogs. In recent years there have been a number of incidents where dogs have gotten into albatross colonies and killed large numbers of nesting birds.

“Yet again, protected seabirds have been killed on Kaua‘i by dogs that have been allowed to roam off their leads,” said Thomas Ka‘iakapu, DLNR Kaua‘i Wildlife manager. “Considering that these albatross can live to be over 60 years old, it is particularly tragic to see them torn apart by dogs simply because a dog owner has been irresponsible.”

Two of the three birds were marked with unique identification codes. One, KP341, was a male bird that had been banded in 2007. It was one of a pair of albatross that are known to be the first pair to lay their egg on Kaua‘i each year. The second bird, P009, was banded at the Pacific Missile Range Testing Facility on the South Shore.

“We are asking dog owners to be responsible with their pets when walking along our coastal areas”, said Ka‘iakapu. “The message is simple – keep your dogs under control and on their leads. That way we can prevent these kinds of incidents from happening over and over again.”

 

Coast Guard Locates Boaters Who Were in Possible Distress Off Kauai

Two boaters who were in possible distress off Kalalau Beach, Kauai, were located safely ashore Tuesday.

The Coast Guard Sector Honolulu Command Center received the initial report at 6:30 p.m. Monday from a concerned hiker who observed two people in a small inflatable boat with an outboard engine striking a reef just off the beach. The boaters then attempted to hand paddle their black 8-foot inflatable boat out to sea toward Haena Beach Park. The boaters were observed unsuccessfully attempting to restart their engine. They were later able to restart their engine and returned to shore.

Coast Guard Station Kauai coordinated efforts with the Kauai Police and Fire Departments to check boat ramps and landing areas along the coast. An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Air Station Barbers Point was launched at 10:30 p.m. and began searching. The Coast Guard Cutter Galveston Island, home ported in Honolulu, arrived on the Napali Coast at 6 a.m. Tuesday to join the search effort.

The Coast Guard advises all mariners to carry safety equipment to include a VHF radio, flares and life jackets. For more information about boating safety, visit www.uscgboating.org.

 

Coast Guard Seeking Public’s Help in Identifying Two Boaters Possibly in Distress off Kauai

The Coast Guard is seeking the public’s help in identifying two boaters who were seen in a possible distress situation off Kalalau Beach, Kauai Monday.

The Coast Guard Sector Command Center received a call at 6:30 p.m. from a concerned hiker who observed two people in a small inflatable boat with an outboard engine striking a reef just off the beach. The boaters then attempted to hand paddle their black 8-foot inflatable boat out to sea toward Haena Beach Park.  The boaters were observed unsuccessfully attempting to restart their engine.

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

Coast Guard Station Kauai coordinated efforts with the Kauai Police and Fire Departments to check boat ramps and landing areas along the coast to verify the safety of the two men, but have yet to find anyone matching the description. An MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Air Station Barbers Point was launched at 10:30 p.m. and began searching for the boat, but could not locate them. The Coast Guard Cutter Galveston Island, home ported in Honolulu, arrived on the Napali Coast at 6 a.m. Tuesday to join the ongoing search effort.

Anyone with information regarding the two boaters’ whereabouts or safety is requested to contact the Coast Guard Command Center immediately at (808) 842-2600.

Workshops for Backyard Egg Farmers Scheduled – Federal and State Regulations Apply for Eggs for Sale

A series of workshops have been scheduled to educate the growing number of Hawaii residents who are raising backyard poultry and selling eggs to friends, family and in some instances, the public.  Many are not aware that if they sell their eggs, they must follow federal and state regulations to ensure good food safety practices. Buyers should also know the regulations so they may purchase eggs that are properly handled.

Egg Workshop

Workshops to educate backyard farmers have been scheduled for Kauai, Molokai, Kona and Hilo in the month of November in a collaborative effort between the Hawaii Departments of Health and Agriculture and the University of Hawaii’s College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources.

Dates, Times & Locations:

The workshop will cover topics such as:

  • Candling and grading of eggs
  • Washing and good handling practices
  • Packaging and labeling
  • Compliance with federal and state laws
  • Resources for the backyard egg farmer

Farmers are encouraged to bring their eggs to the workshop.

For workshop information, contact:  Lynn Nakamura-Tengan on Maui at 808-244-3242 ext. 222 or e-mail:  lynnnaka@hawaii.edu

State Develops Voluntary Guidelines for Pesticides Use on Kauai

The Pesticides Branch of the Hawaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA) has completed voluntary pesticide-use guidelines and established the “Kauai Agricultural Good Neighbor Program” to provide more information and education on pesticide use on the island.

Good Neighbor Program

Click to view the report

The voluntary pesticide-use guideline will go into effect on Dec. 1, 2013. It will apply to the five agricultural companies mentioned in Kauai County Bill 2491 (Dow AgroSciences, Pioneer, Syngenta, BASF, and Kauai Coffee Company) and assures that adequate buffer zones are in place when restricted-use pesticides (RUP) are applied.

The voluntary guidelines are in addition to federal guidelines established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

“The department used existing federal worker protection standards and increased buffer zones to provide extra protection for residents in areas surrounding these farming operations,” said HDOA Deputy Scott Enright. “We will also be requesting that the Legislature establish 10 additional inspector and pesticide education positions statewide in this upcoming legislative session.”

Under the Kauai Agricultural Good Neighbor Program, neighbors who are located nearest to the farm operations will be the primary focus of continuing outreach efforts to provide information on pesticide use and to discuss any concerns.

Under the Voluntary RUP Notice section of the program, the guidelines will register schools, hospitals and medical clinics that are within 1,000 feet of the farming operations so they may receive a weekly schedule of any planned RUP application near their property. Registered entities will also be notified at least 24 hours in advance should there be any change in the weekly RUP application schedule.

The guidelines also require a 100-foot buffer zone between application areas and schools, medical facilities and residential properties, unless the EPA regulations are stricter. By law, all requirements found on the pesticide label must be followed.

The companies are also required to file a monthly report on RUP use with HDOA’s Pesticides Branch. The report will be available for public viewing at the state’s Open Data portal: https://data.hawaii.gov

The program will be assessed after one year.

Kauai Mayor Vetoes GMO Ban on Kauai – Statement From Hawaii Crop Improvement Association

HCIA

We commend Mayor Carvalho for his decision to veto Bill 2491 and for recognizing that the measure was severely flawed and would do more harm than good for Kauai County.

We thank the Mayor for his leadership in giving thoughtful consideration to balancing the issues raised in Bill 2491. This measure, although intended to be good for the community, would have had long-term negative effects on all agriculture in Kauai and our state, not just the seed industry or big agriculture.

These past several months have been difficult for Kauai. Bill 2491 has divided us – families, friends and neighbors – for far too long. It is time that we come together and do what the people of Hawaii have done for so long – ho’oponono, work together for a better Kauai.

Since this measure was introduced, the public debate has been loud, emotional and often filled with fear, rather than fact. As responsible stewards of the land, we take pride in growing the seeds that help farmers all over the world grow safe, healthy and affordable food for all people. We care for the land and the people of Kauai and are committed to transparency, being good neighbors and working with the community.

We look forward to continuing to work collaboratively with the Mayor and the Council on how to address the concerns of the community and continue to support a voluntary program to address these concerns.

Alicia Maluafiti, Executive Director Hawaii Crop Improvement Association

 

Study Proves Cancer Cases NOT HIGHER on Kauai Then the Rest of the State of Hawaii

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) jointly with the Hawaii Tumor Registry and University of Hawaii Cancer Center is releasing an evaluation of the incidence of cancer on Kauai and each of its census tracts. The evaluation found that there is not a higher incidence of cancer on Kauai compared to the rest of the state; except for melanoma of the skin, a cancer related to ultraviolet exposure.

The evaluation was conducted at the request of Kauai legislators and community members in response to concerns about the health impact of pesticides used by agricultural chemical companies.

Kauai Cancer Report

Click to view the full report

The analysis found that cancers of the breast, endometrium, Hodgkin lymphoma, liver, ovary, prostate and thyroid were lower on Kauai compared to the entire state of Hawaii. Higher rates of melanoma on Kauai were found and may be explained by a larger proportion of older adults of Caucasian ancestry with high levels of lifetime sun exposure residing in the northern region of Kauai.

“Cancer clusters are rare, especially those that are linked to environmental exposures. Doctors and scientists often cannot explain why one person develops cancer and another does not,” said Dr. Barbara Brooks, DOH Toxicologist.

Cancer may be caused by a variety of factors acting alone or together, usually over a period of many years. These risk factors include age, family history and exposures to viruses and bacteria, lifestyle choices, sunlight exposure and on the job exposure to chemicals.

Of the more than 12,000 cancer deaths in Hawaii between 2000 and 2005, it is estimated that nearly 30 percent could have been prevented by avoiding tobacco use and up to 35 percent could have been averted by improving nutrition and maintaining a normal body weight. Geographic, economic, and educational barriers and other social inequities influence lifestyle factors that increase a person’s chance of developing cancer.

Health Director Loretta Fuddy said, “DOH through its Foundations for Healthy Generations Initiative is committed to addressing the social conditions and physical environments where people live, work and play in order to improve the health of all groups in Hawaii.”

The Hawaii Tumor Registry conducts cancer surveillance and maintains a confidential database of information on all reportable cases of cancer, benign brain tumors and many blood disorders diagnosed in Hawaii. The Registry is jointly operated by the University of Hawaii Cancer Center and DOH.

The DOH Hazard Evaluation and Emergency Response Office provides leadership, support, and partnership in preventing, planning for, responding to, and enforcing environmental laws relating to releases or threats of releases of hazardous substances.

The full evaluation report is available on the DOH website at www.health.hawaii.gov.

 

Governor Works with Kauai Legislators to Address Community Concerns on Pesticides

Gov. Neil Abercrombie, together with members of the Kauai Legislative Delegation, today announced that the state would be putting forth standards and guidelines for seed/diversified agriculture companies to voluntarily comply with certain health and safety requests of the community. The guidelines will include disclosure of aggregated usage of restricted use pesticides and implementation of a setback from schools and hospitals.

abercrombieheader

“Kauai legislators and members of my administration have been discussing current issues regarding agriculture on the island of Kauai, including residents being informed about activities in their immediate area,” Gov. Abercrombie said. “We collaborated with the Kauai Delegation and farmers about taking steps to address the concerns of the community, including providing disclosure of use of pesticides and creating buffer zones around schools and hospitals. Farmers will comply on a voluntary basis with temporary standards until such time as department heads and stakeholders can develop necessary rules or legislation for next session.”

Kauai Mayor Bernard P. Carvalho, Jr. and Kauai County Council Chair Jay Furfaro have been notified of these intentions.

Earlier this year, the Legislature passed House Bill 673, which the Governor in June signed into law as Act 105, requiring the state Department of Agriculture to post certain information regarding restricted use pesticides on its website. The act also requires the Hawaii Legislative Reference Bureau to conduct a study on other states’ reporting requirements for non-restricted use pesticides.

“We believe that this law, in addition to existing usage requirements posted on pesticide labels, will help to address the concerns raised as they pertain to pesticide use and transparency,” Gov. Abercrombie added. “In January, we can look into codifying law regarding disclosure and setback requirements in the context of protection of public health and safety.”

The Governor also stated that he would work with the Legislature to restore positions within and seek additional funding for the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health’s Environmental Health Administration, particularly for the neighbor islands, to address pesticide compliance and conduct inspections regarding pesticide contamination, and ensure that inspections are conducted in a timely manner.

 

Kauai’s South Shore Shearwater Colony Decimated By Dogs and Cats

State urges pet owners to help protect native birds, which aid local fisherman

A large colony of Hawaiian ‘ua‘u kani (wedge-tailed shearwaters) located along a coastal path on the south shore of Kaua‘i has been decimated in two attacks this summer by dogs and feral cats.

Shearwater killed in its coastal habitate. DOFAW photo

Shearwater killed in its coastal habitate. DOFAW photo

Recently, several more freshly killed birds were found in the area, suggesting that the colony is still being hit hard by dogs and cats. At the same time state biologists searching wedge-tailed shearwater burrows in the area known to have been active this year, found that the burrows were now abandoned, many with dead eggs inside.

Earlier, in July and August, more than 80 of the native seabirds (many of them actively breeding) have been found slaughtered in their nesting area. Injuries sustained by the birds showed that they were killed by dogs and feral cats.

“It appears that the entire colony in this area has been severely depleted, and it is likely that very few breeding birds now remain,” said Thomas Kaiakapu, Kaua‘i wildlife manager for the state Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW).

The wedge-tailed shearwater, also known as “matori” to local fishermen, is one of the more familiar seabirds on Kaua‘i, with large concentrations of the birds seen off shore in the late afternoon as they gather to return to nest sites at night. At this time of year, the birds are either sitting on eggs or raising very small chicks, making them particularly vulnerable to dogs and cats.

“Large feeding flocks of matori, or ‘ua‘u kani, help fishermen to locate feeding schools of tuna,” said William J. Aila, Jr., DLNR chairperson. “The birds use tuna to drive their prey (small fish and squid) to the surface where they can catch them. We ask that fishermen speak to their neighbors about keeping their dogs and cats under control so that these important friends to fishermen can survive.”

“There are signs placed along the south coast path asking dog owners to keep their dogs on leashes and their cats indoors. No matter how friendly or docile you think your dog may be, if it gets near a nesting seabird the dog will kill it – it’s as simple as that. We ask the general public to act responsibly in these areas with their pets to prevent similar instances from happening again.”

“While this large kill of shearwaters is particularly alarming, we unfortunately get reports of mass kills of this species every year on the island,” said Kaiakapu. “As these birds breed in dense colonies along the coast, they are particularly vulnerable to dogs that have been let off of their leashes or feral cat colonies located near the breeding areas.”

 

Missile Defense System Intercepts Target in Test Off Kauai

The Missile Defense Agency, U.S. Pacific Command and sailors aboard the USS Lake Erie conducted a successful flight test today of the Aegis ballistic missile defense system, intercepting a ballistic missile target over the Pacific Ocean.

An SM-3 Block 1B interceptor is launched from the guided-missile cruiser USS Lake Erie (CG 70) during a Missile Defense Agency and U.S. Navy test of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) system off the coast of Kauai, Hawaii. The Lake Erie-launched missile successfully intercepted a complex short-range ballistic missile target. (U.S. Navy photo) Click to Enlarge

An SM-3 Block 1B interceptor is launched from the guided-missile cruiser USS Lake Erie (CG 70) during a Missile Defense Agency and U.S. Navy test of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) system off the coast of Kauai, Hawaii. The Lake Erie-launched missile successfully intercepted a complex short-range ballistic missile target. (U.S. Navy photo) Click to Enlarge

A complex separating short-range ballistic missile target was launched from the Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai, Hawaii, and flew northwest toward a broad ocean area of the Pacific Ocean. The USS Lake Erie detected and tracked the missile with its onboard AN/SPY-1 radar. The ship, equipped with the second-generation Aegis BMD weapon system, developed a fire control solution and launched two SM-3 Block IB guided missiles to engage the target.

The first SM-3 that was launched successfully intercepted the target warhead. This was the first salvo mission of two SM-3 Block IB guided missiles launched against a single separating target, officials said, adding that they will assess and evaluate system performance based upon telemetry and other data obtained during the test.

The test exercised the latest version of the second-generation Aegis BMD Weapon System, capable of engaging longer-range and more sophisticated ballistic missiles, officials said. This was an operationally realistic test, as the target’s launch time and bearing are not known in advance, they added, and the target complex was the most difficult target engaged to date.

This was the fourth consecutive successful intercept test of the SM-3 Block IB guided missile with the Aegis BMD 4.0 Weapon System and the 27th successful intercept in 33 flight test attempts for the Aegis BMD program since flight testing began in 2002.

Across all Ballistic Missile Defense System programs, this is the 63rd successful hit-to-kill intercept in 79 flight test attempts since 2001.

‘Ulu Smartphone App Highlights Kauai Breadfruit

In advance of the September 15, 2013 Breadfruit Festival Takes Root on Kauai, the Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu project has added sites of interest on Kauai to the Talking Trees app for iPhone and Android.

The Talking Trees App

The Talking Trees App

The Talking Trees app is free and features suggested stops on Kauai and Hawaii Island that offer the opportunity to learn about the culture and history of the islands through stories of the ‘ulu (breadfruit). Information is conveyed through photos, articles and video interviews with local cultural practitioners. For people who want to learn how to cook with breadfruit, the app also features award-wining breadfruit recipes. Other links include information about how to cultivate and use breadfruit and Hawaiian mythology.

“There are many different drive guides out there, but ours is the only one in Hawaii that takes people on a journey to see the islands and learn about the culture and history by seeking out the breadfruit trees,” says Andrea Dean, Co-Director of the Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu project, “It’s a fun way to see Kauai or Hawaii Island—kind of like a treasure hunt for ‘ulu trees.”

“Breadfruit was a primary staple food of Hawaii and still is in much of the Pacific. Raising awareness about how few trees are remaining and the importance of breadfruit to local and global food security is a part of our mission. The Talking Trees app puts people in direct contact with these beautiful trees,“ says Dr. Diane Ragone, Director of the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden.

The Talking Trees app was developed with support from the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority’s Kūkulu Ola—Living Hawaiian Culture Program administered by the Hawai‘i Community Foundation. A corresponding enhanced web-based map was developed with support from the Atherton Family Foundation. Ho’oulu ka ‘Ulu is a project of the Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network and the Breadfruit Institute of the National Tropical Botanical Garden.

Learn more and download the app at breadfruit.info.

 

Governor Abercrombie Releases $18.7 Million for Capital Improvement Projects

Governor Abercrombie announced the release of more than $18.7 million in capital improvement project (CIP) and grant funds for priority repairs and improvements at state facilities and public schools, as well as installation of a new photovoltaic system for a charter school on Kauai.

“Our economy is getting stronger, and capital improvement projects are key to maintaining our positive momentum while enriching state services, improving public areas and enhancing learning environments throughout Hawaii,” Gov. Abercrombie said. “A portion of these funds will go toward the installation of a new photovoltaic system at Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Charter School on Kauai, allowing the school and its K through 12 students to meet 100 percent of their classrooms’ energy needs.”

Allotment of funds for the following priority projects, identified by members of the state Legislature, has been approved by the Governor:
Kauai High School

Education:

$9,895,000 – Kauai High School Gymnatorium, Kauai – Construction for a new gymnatorium (gymnasium/auditorium) building, which will include a wrestling room, boys and girls locker rooms, an athletic director’s office, and other support spaces

$2,500,000 – Heeia Elementary School, Oahu – Design and construction to provide covered play courts and help alleviate drainage issues due to frequent rain common in the Kaneohe area

$1,000,000 – Campbell High Athletic Track and Field Complex, Oahu – Design and construction for improvements to the existing cinder track and a new press booth; the project will also start design for a new synthetic track

$180,060 – Ke Kula Niihau O Kekaha Charter School Photovoltaic System, Kauai – Capital improvement grant to Aha Punana Leo, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, for planning, design and construction of a new 30 kilowatt photovoltaic system to supply 100 percent of the charter school’s power

Other

$2,597,000 – Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) CIP Administrative Services, statewide – Financing for wages and fringe benefits of DLNR’s project-funded positions for fiscal year 2014

$2,000,000 –  Puhawai Culvert, Oahu – Construction of culverts and other related drainage improvements to alleviate flooding along Puhawai Road in Waianae (The Lualualei Flats area is prone to flooding due to insufficient drainage infrastructure, lack of stream maintenance, and illegal dumping in streams and ditches)

$300,000 – Hilo Harbor Mooring Buoys, Hawaii Island – Construction to install five-day use mooring buoys (DMBs) as mitigative measures to comply with permit requirements for the dredging of Hilo Harbor (DLNR will install DMBs as part of the existing program to provide mooring opportunities in areas of high vessel traffic to reduce damage to natural resources from anchors)

$300,000 – Kewalo Basin Jetty Riprap Wall Repair, Oahu – Design to repair the riprap wall, located in a popular surfing area, which has been damaged by wave action creating potential danger to individuals

 

Hawaii BioEnergy Awarded $5 Million to Produce Algae Oil

The U.S. DOE has announced more than $22 million in new investments to help develop cost-competitive algae fuels and to streamline the biomass feedstock supply chain for advanced biofuels. Of the investment, nearly $16.5 million will be split between four algae projects; two located in California, one in Hawaii and another in New Mexico. The goal is to boost the productivity of sustainable algae while reducing capital and operating costs.

Hawaii BioEnergy

Hawaii BioEnergy was awarded a $5 million investment to develop a photosynthetic open pond system to produce algae oil. The project will also demonstrate reprocessing technologies that reduce energy use and the overall cost of extracting lipids and producing fuel intermediates.

Sapphire Energy was also awarded $5 million. The funding will support the development of a new process to produce algae-based fuel that is compatible with existing refineries. The project will also work on improving algae strains and increasing yield through cultivation improvements.

An additional $5 million will go to New Mexico State University, where the investment will support research to increase the yield of microalgae. The project will also develop harvesting and cultivation processes that lower costs while supporting year-round production.

Finally, California Polytechnic State University is receiving $1.5 million to increase the productivity of algae strains and compare two processing technologies. The project, based at a wastewater treatment plant in Delhi, Calif., includes 6 acres of algae ponds.

The remaining $6 million will support a project led by RDC Enterprises to reduce the harvesting, handling and preprocessing costs of the biomass feedstock supply chain.

Coast Guard to Host Open House for Proposed Construction of Rescue 21 Radio Antenna

The Coast Guard will host an open house on the Island on Kauai for the local community to meet representatives, ask questions and voice opinions for the proposed construction of a Rescue 21 radio antenna.

  • WHAT: Hosting open house for the local community of the Island of Kauai.
  • WHERE: Elsie H. Elementary School cafeteria, 4319 Hardy St. Lihue, Kauai, 96766
  • WHEN: Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013 - 6:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.

What is Rescue 21?

Rescue 21 Equipment

Rescue 21 Equipment

Rescue 21 replaces the National Distress and Response System, which has been in use since the 1970s. Rescue 21 can more accurately identify the location of callers in distress via towers that generate lines of bearing to the source of VHF radio transmissions, thereby significantly reducing search time. Rescue 21 extends coverage out to a minimum of 23 miles from the coastline. It improves information sharing and coordination with the Department of Homeland Security and other federal, state and local first responders, and can also identify suspected hoax calls, conserving valuable response resources.

The Coast Guard Rescue 21 Project is proposing to construct a Remote Fixed Facility to provide communications for the Coast Guard’s Sector Honolulu Area of Responsibility. The proposed RFF will be Coast Guard owned and built on the Island of Kauai, on a leased portion of TMK (4) 3-8-002:005, in Hanamaulu, Kauai County, Hawaii. The Coast Guard proposes to construct a 68-foot tall monopole that will include a direction finding antenna mounted on top, three antennas installed at various locations, a mounting pole and a lightening rod. The total height of the monopole and all antennas will be 80-feet. The proposed monopole will be in a fenced compound. Associated equipment at the site will include a prefabricated equipment shelter that would be no more than 15 feet by 24 feet, a 20-kilowatt emergency backup generator with a 300-gallon diesel belly tank.

The Coast Guard has prepared a draft Environmental Assessment that evauluates the potential environmental impacts resulting from the construction of a RFF communications monopole and associated equipment near the community of Hanama’ulu, Kauai County, Hawaii. This draft EA supplements the National Distress and Response System Modernization Project’s Programmatic EA of 1998 and its Supplemental Programmatic EA of 2002. The 1998 PEA and 2002 SPEA are the first level of documents upon which subsequent National Environmental Act analysis and documentation, including this EA, are tiered for individual actions and their site-specific impacts.

This notice announces the availability of the proposed RFF Kalepa draft EA for public review at the following locations:

1) The Lihue Public Library, 4344 Hardy St., Lihue, Kauai, 96766
2) Hawaii State Library, 478 S. King St., Honolulu, 96813

The draft EA is also available for review at the following website: http://www.uscg.mil/hq/cg4/cg47/NEPAhot.asp.

Persons wishing to provide comments should contact:

Ms. Sherrill Thompson (JR07-0905),
COMMANDANT (CG-9331),
Environmental Protection Specialist – Rescue 21 Program
U.S. Coast Guard
2100 2nd St. SW
Washington D.C., 20593

Via electronic mail: Sherrill.E.Thompson@uscg.mil; Via fax: (202) 475-3916; or by telephone at (202) 475-3175.