University of Hawaii Astronomers Discover New Comet

Media Release:

Astronomers at the University of Hawaii at Manoa have discovered a new comet that they expect will be visible to the naked eye in early 2013.

Animation showing the comet moving against the background of stars. Images taken at the Pan-STARRS 1 Telescope on the night of June 5-6, 2011. Hawaii time is 10 hours earlier than Universal Time (UT). Credit: Henry Hsieh, PS1SC

Animation showing the comet moving against the background of stars. Images taken at the Pan-STARRS 1 Telescope on the night of June 5-6, 2011. Hawaii time is 10 hours earlier than Universal Time (UT). Credit: Henry Hsieh, PS1SC

Originally found by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope on Haleakala, Maui, on the night of June 5-6, it was confirmed to be a comet by UH astronomer Richard Wainscoat and graduate student Marco Micheli the following night using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea.

A preliminary orbit computed by the Minor Planet Center in Cambridge, Mass., shows that the comet will come within about 30 million miles (50 million km) of the sun in early 2013, about the same distance as Mercury. The comet will pose no danger to Earth.

Wainscoat said, “The comet has an orbit that is close to parabolic, meaning that this may be the first time it will ever come close to the sun, and that it may never return.”

The comet is now about 700 million miles (1.2 billion km) from the sun, placing it beyond the orbit of Jupiter. It is currently too faint to be seen without a telescope with a sensitive electronic detector.

The comet is expected to be brightest in February or March 2013, when it makes its closest approach to the sun. At that time, the comet is expected to be visible low in the western sky after sunset, but the bright twilight sky may make it difficult to view.

Over the next few months, astronomers will continue to study the comet, which will allow better predictions of how bright it will eventually get. Wainscoat and UH astronomer Henry Hsieh cautioned that predicting the brightness of comets is notoriously difficult, with numerous past comets failing to reach their expected brightness.

Making brightness predictions for new comets is difficult because astronomers do not know how much ice they contain. Because sublimation of ice (conversion from solid to gas) is the source of cometary activity and a major contributor to a comet’s overall eventual brightness, this means that more accurate brightness predictions will not be possible until the comet becomes more active as it approaches the sun and astronomers get a better idea of how icy it is.

The comet is named C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS). Comets are usually named after their discoverers, but in this case, because a large team, including observers, computer scientists, and astronomers, was involved, the comet is named after the telescope.

C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS) most likely originated in the Oort cloud, a cloud of cometlike objects located in the distant outer solar system. It was probably gravitationally disturbed by a distant passing star, sending it on a long journey toward the sun.

Comets like C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS) offer astronomers a rare opportunity to look at pristine material left over from the early formation of the solar system.

The comet was found while searching the sky for potentially hazardous asteroids—ones that may someday hit Earth. Software engineer Larry Denneau, with help from Wainscoat and astronomers Robert Jedicke, Mikael Granvik and Tommy Grav, designed software that searches each image taken by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope for moving objects. Denneau, Hsieh and UH astronomer Jan Kleyna also wrote other software that searches the moving objects for comets’ tell-tale fuzzy appearance. The comet was identified by this automated software.

The Pan-STARRS 1 telescope has a 1.8-meter-diameter mirror and the largest digital camera in the world (1.4 billion pixels). Each image is almost 3 gigabytes in size, and the camera takes an image approximately every 45 seconds. Each night, the telescope images more than 1,000 square degrees of the night sky.

NASA, Hawaii’s Partner For Space Exploration

Media Release:

NASA and the State of Hawai’i have agreed to collaborate on a wide range of activities to promote America’s human and robotic exploration of space. The partnership also will contribute to the development of education programs and foster economic opportunities including new, high-tech jobs.

The Scarab

The Scarab

Governor Neil Abercrombie and NASA Associate Deputy Administrator Rebecca Keiser signed a two-year agreement, formally called a non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement Annex, during a ceremony today in the Governor’s Office. The ceremony was held on the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s historic announcement committing the country to land an American on the moon and return him safely before the end of the decade.

NASA Engineers Checking Out the SCARAB

NASA Engineers Checking Out the SCARAB

“Hawai’i has been part of America’s space activities from the beginning of the space program when Apollo astronauts trained in the islands for their historic missions to the moon,” Governor Abercrombie said. “This partnership with NASA will broaden educational and employment opportunities for our local families and bring dollars into our economy.”

Moon dust to water

Moon dust to water

The agreement establishes a partnership between NASA’s Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, Calif., and Hawai’i to explore and test new technologies, capabilities and strategies supporting America’s space exploration and development goals.

Under the agreement, the state is proposing to explore the development of a prototype International Lunar Research Park at the University of Hawai’i on Hilo. It would use the state’s unique terrain, which is similar to that of the moon and Mars, to enable development and testing of advanced automated and tele-robotic vehicles. Researchers would benefit from Hawai’i’s natural geography, advanced communications, power generation and other technologies required for space exploration.


“This is the type of participatory exploration involving universities and small- to mid-sized high technology companies that is becoming an increasingly important component of the 21st century space program,” Keiser said. “Americans want to participate directly and personally in space activities. As we have seen from NASA’s Commercial Orbital Transportation Services project and the Centennial Challenges prize competitions, harvesting the country’s innovative talent is important to the success of our future endeavors in space. The space frontier is opening in novel and exciting ways.”

The state will provide the prototype test environment and infrastructure for the proposed analog test facilities. NASA will evaluate new concepts and models for conducting space exploration. The state will explore the potential to develop and mature innovative space-related technologies for educational, industry and government use.

“From NASA’s perspective, this partnership can inspire ideas and applications from analog test sites that can be generalized to space exploration and development of the moon and other planetary bodies,” said Ames Director Pete Worden.

The state’s Office of Aerospace Development will be the lead state agency for the project, enhancing dialogue and coordination among the state, private and academic partners to enable growth and diversification of the state’s aerospace economy.

“We support NASA’s goal to promote public-private partnerships and multinational alliances to help reduce the cost, enhance the feasibility and accelerate the implementation of future space missions – leading to settlements beyond low-Earth orbit,” said Jim Crisafulli, director of Hawai’i’s Office of Aerospace Development. “Locally, this collaboration should catalyze Hawai’i-based economic innovation and engage engineers, scientists, educators, and students, as well as commercial entrepreneurs, to increase the opportunities and benefits of space exploration.”

For more information about the International Lunar Research Park, visit: https://sites.google.com/site/internationallunarresearchpark

For more information about Ames, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/ames

For more information about Hawaii’s aerospace initiatives, visit: http://aerospacehawaii.info

The following pictures are from when the Media got to go up to Mauna Kea and check out the NASA equipment being tested  up there a few years ago. Click on the Picture for a larger view:

pahoaetc-029
Demonstrating Lunar Barrel Scooper
Demonstrating Lunar Barrel Scooper
Barrel Scooper for Lunar Dust
Barrel Scooper for Lunar Dust
More Demonstrations
More Demonstrations
Not sure what this is now
Not sure what this is now
Ramp for Lunar Dust Scooper
Ramp for Lunar Dust Scooper
Lunar Dust Scooper
Lunar Dust Scooper
Water Creating Machine
Water Creating Machine
Water Creating Machine
Water Creating Machine
SCARAB - Back
SCARAB – Back
Drill on SCARAB
Drill on SCARAB
Demonstrating the Mobility
Demonstrating the Mobility
Demonstrating the SCARAB
Demonstrating the SCARAB
SCARAB - Side
SCARAB – Side
NASA workers explain the unexplainable
NASA workers explain the unexplainable
SCARAB Million Dollar Tire
SCARAB Million Dollar Tire
SCARAB - Side
SCARAB – Side
SCARAB - Front
SCARAB – Front
Mauna Kea workers look on in awe
Mauna Kea workers look on in awe
Larson continures explanations
Larson continures explanations
Bill Larson - Chief, Applied Sciences Division, NASA
Bill Larson – Chief, Applied Sciences Division, NASA
Forgot the name of this toy
Forgot the name of this toy
Waiting for the UFO's
Waiting for the UFO’s
There were some boundaries
There were some boundaries
Parking Area
Parking Area
Trip Down in to Classified Site
Trip Down in to Classified Site
Wife and Weird Machine
Wife and Weird Machine
scarab-021
scarab-028
revolve
scarab-037
scarabtire
scarab2
scarab1
red-suits
valley2
valley

International Colloquium on the Thirty Meter Telescope Going on Now

Media Release:

As part of the 4th International Symposium on Photoelectronic Detection and Imaging (ISPDI 2011), May 24-26, 2011 in Beijing, China, scientists and engineers from the US and China are meeting for a special colloquium on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). The colloquium is a milestone in the TMT international partnership for development and operation of TMT.

Collaborators from both countries will consider a wide range of technical, engineering and science components in the TMT plan, including specific contributions to TMT that are anticipated to be provided by China.

“TMT will be a global asset in the quest for knowledge about our universe, and this colloquium will showcase Chinese interest in building and joining this remarkable capability,” said Gary Sanders, TMT Project Manager.

Technical topics for discussion include aspects of fabricating segmented mirrors, laser assisted guide star adaptive optics, high performance science instruments, and management of cross disciplinary research. The program includes presentations from members from both the US and China collaborating institutes, including:

  • Keynote: The Thirty Meter Telescope: Opening the Next Generation of Extremely Large Telescopes, Jerry Nelson (Project Scientist, TMT)
  • TMT Construction and Operations, Gary Sanders (Project Manager, TMT)
  • Optics for the Thirty Meter Telescope, Eric Williams (Telescope Optics Group Leader, TMT)
  • The Secondary and Tertiary mirrors for the Thirty Meter Telescope, Virginia Ford (Senior Opto-Mechanical Engineer)
  • The Progress of SMP on TMT Test Mirrors, Xinnan, Li (Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, CAS)
  • CIOMP Fabrication Plan for TMT Tertiary Mirror, Xuejun, Zhang/Ligong, Zheng (Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, CAS)
  • The Design Improvement of TMT Laser Guiding Star Facility, Kai, Wei (The Institute of Optics and Electronics, CAS)
  • The Prototype of TIPC Sodium Laser, Yong, Bo (Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, CAS)
  • Feasibility Studies for the MOBIE Acquisition, Guiding, and Wavefront Sensing (AGWFS) subsystem, Zhongwen, Hu (Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, CAS)

The colloquium is hosted by the National Astronomical Observatory of China, the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and the Chinese Society of Astronautics – Optics and Mechanics committee.

Program sponsors come from a wide range of institutes and universities in China, including:

  • Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, CAS
  • The Institute of Optics and Electronics, CAS
  • Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics
  • CAS Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, CAS
  • Peking University
  • Tsinghua University
  • University of Science and Technology of China
  • Nanjing University
  • Shanghai Jiao Tong University

For more information, please see the ISPDI 2011 website: http://www.ispdiconf.org/en/index.html

In December 2010, China officially joined as an international observer in the TMT project. The TMT project is an international partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the Association of Canadian Universities for Research in Astronomy, joined by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Department of Science and Technology of India.

New Sketches of Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) Released

Media Release:

Following the successful conclusion of the Thirty Meter Telescope’s Environmental Impact Statement and Final Design Review of the observatory enclosure, TMT worked with acclaimed science animator and producer Dana Berry on a new, more accurate set of renderings of the observatory and its support building as they will appear on Mauna Kea.

Top View of TMT Complex

These renderings accurately portray the observatory with a reflective dome. This aluminized coating was selected to help the observatory maintain a constant temperature and to blend in with the surrounding environment. The dome will reflect the color of the local lava field during the warmer months and will appear white when snow covers the top of the mountain.

The new images also demonstrate how the support building and access road will utilize native rock and colors to better match the local environment.

Side View of TMT Complex

The telescope will be sited on the northern plateau of Mauna Kea at a location known as 13 North within Area E. This section of the mountain, which was identified as the preferred site for a next-generation optical observatory in the 2000 Mauna Kea Reserve Master Plan, is below the summit and its predominant geologic feature is a basalt lava flow. This particular rock has weathered to a reddish hue, which influenced the exterior appearance and color choices of the observatory.

Astronomers Discover Close-knit Pairs of Massive Black Holes

Media Release:

Astronomers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), and University of Hawaii (UH) have discovered 16 close-knit pairs of supermassive black holes in merging galaxies.

The discovery, based on observations done at the W. M. Keck Observatory on Hawaii’s Mauna Kea, is being presented in Seattle on January 12 at the meeting of the American Astronomical Society, and has been submitted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal.

 

Three of the newly discovered black-hole pairs. On the left are images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The images on the right show the same galaxies taken with the Keck telescope and the aid of adaptive optics, revealing pairs of active galactic nuclei, which are powered by massive black holes. Credit: S. George Djorgovski

 

These black-hole pairs, also called binaries, are about a hundred to a thousand times closer together than most that have been observed before, providing astronomers a glimpse into how these behemoths and their host galaxies merge—a crucial part of understanding the evolution of the universe. Although few similarly close pairs have been seen previously, this is the largest population of such objects observed as the result of a systematic search.

“This is a very nice confirmation of theoretical predictions,” says S. George Djorgovski, professor of astronomy, who will present the results at the conference. “These close pairs are a missing link between the wide binary systems seen previously and the merging black-hole pairs at even smaller separations that we believe must be there.”

As the universe has evolved, galaxies have collided and merged to form larger ones. Nearly every one—or perhaps all—of these large galaxies contains a giant black hole at its center, with a mass millions—or even billions—of times higher than the sun’s. Material such as interstellar gas falls into the black hole, producing enough energy to outshine galaxies composed of a hundred billion stars. The hot gas and black hole form an active galactic nucleus, the brightest and most distant of which are called quasars. The prodigious energy output of active galactic nuclei can affect the evolution of galaxies themselves.

While galaxies merge, so should their central black holes, producing an even more massive black hole in the nucleus of the resulting galaxy. Such collisions are expected to generate bursts of gravitational waves, which have yet to be detected. Some merging galaxies should contain pairs of active nuclei, indicating the presence of supermassive black holes on their way to coalescing. Until now, astronomers have generally observed only widely separated pairs—binary quasars—which are typically hundreds of thousands of light-years apart.

“If our understanding of structure formation in the universe is correct, closer pairs of active nuclei must exist,” adds Adam Myers, a research scientist at UIUC and one of the coauthors. “However, they would be hard to discern in typical images blurred by Earth’s atmosphere.”

The solution was to use Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics, a technique that enables astronomers to remove the atmospheric blur and capture images as sharp as those taken from space. One such system is deployed on the W. M. Keck Observatory’s 10-meter telescopes on Mauna Kea.

The astronomers selected their targets using spectra of known galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In the SDSS images, the galaxies are unresolved, appearing as single objects instead of binaries. To find potential pairs, the astronomers identified targets with double sets of emission lines—a key feature that suggests the existence of two active nuclei.

By using adaptive optics on Keck, the astronomers were able to resolve close pairs of galactic nuclei, discovering 16 such binaries out of 50 targets. “The pairs we see are separated only by a few thousands of light-years—and there are probably many more to be found,” says Hai Fu, a Caltech postdoctoral scholar and the lead author of the paper.

“Our results add to the growing understanding of how galaxies and their central black holes evolve,” adds Lin Yan, a staff scientist at Caltech and one of the coauthors of the study.

“These results illustrate the discovery power of adaptive optics on large telescopes,” Djorgovski says. “With the upcoming Thirty Meter Telescope, we’ll be able to push our observational capabilities to see pairs with separations that are three times closer.”

A Darkerview on “Ziplinegate” Oh the IRONY!

Geez… I don’t know what I’ve gotten myself involved in… but I’ll be posting more comments on this entire situation going on with the possible lawsuit against my blog when I know more status about it.

In the meantime, I’ll throw the attention to the latest blogger to give attention to this matter and that is Andrew Cooper over at The Darker View where he states in his post “Blogging and Libel“:

“…The ironic part is that Damon had previously given a great deal of positive press to this operation. This top banner on his blog even features a photo of Damon riding the Umauma zipline!..”

Damn Andrew… you really know where to sock me in the gut huh? Just teasing as I’ve previously stated this is one of the best pictures of me taken ever!

I’ll be changing my header in the next few days due to the recent things that have happened in the last few days.

Keck Telescope: “Total Number of Stars in the Universe is Likely Three Times Bigger Than Realized”

Remember the phrase “There are more stars in the sky then grains of sand on the planet” well the amount of stars out there may be even more then what we first expected.

Big Island Blogger Andrew Cooper, who works up at the Keck Telescope,  reports:

Astronomers have discovered that small, dim stars known as red dwarfs are much more prolific than previously thought—so much so that the total number of stars in the universe is likely three times bigger than realized

Full release here: A Lot More Stars Out There

Tribune Herald on the TMT Project… HUH? Where are the Locals?

I was trying to figure out how the TMT project was providing a boost in our economy when not many folks right now are even from Hawaii that are working on this project and construction has not officially began.

I fired off the following question to Sandra Dawson the “Task Leader for the TMT Site Master planning”:

I read in the newspaper the other day that the TMT has helped employment numbers on this island, but at no time have I seen an announcement listing job opportunities.

I do see quite a few people employed: http://www.tmt.org/about-tmt/people

Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like many local folks have been hired yet.

When will local folks have an opportunity at applying for positions with TMT.

I got the following response from Ms. Dawson regarding the newspaper article:

The newspaper should have said “will help employment numbers”.  The only hiring we have done so far is a few small contracts with local companies for surveys, and several contracts for consulting.  I am still the only
TMT employee in Hawaii.
Current TMT employees are are specialized telescope designers and scientists, and are in California and Canada.  If there are local folks who qualify for these specialized positions they will be considered.  I see every applicant for jobs from Hawaii, and there have been very few so far.

We hope to begin construction by the end of 2011.  When we do that, we will likely beef up our office staff here with local people, as well as hiring local construction workers.

Final EIS – TMT Observatory Project

Media Release:

The University of Hawai‘i at Hilo (UH Hilo) in its capacity as the proposing agency for the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) Project has approved the publication of the Final EIS.  The notice of availability has been published in the May 8, 2010, edition of The Environmental Notice.  A copy of the Final EIS is available for download at www.TMT-HawaiiEIS.org.

The Final EIS identifies the “13-North” (13N) site as the Project, as the Draft EIS did, and this site remains the focus of the Final EIS.  The selection of the 13N site was based on consideration of the impacts of both the 13N site and the Project alternatives considered.

The acceptance of the Final EIS by the Governor of Hawai‘i completes the Project’s compliance with the EIS law (Hawai‘i Revised Statutes, Chapter 343) and the EIS rules (Hawai‘i Administrative Rules, Title 11, Chapter 200).  Therefore, you will not receive any further notifications regarding the Project.  You can continue to follow the Project at www.tmt.org.

Japanese Megastars Masami Nagasawa and Asami Mizukawa Visit Mauna Kea and Cruise Hilo

Japanese Superstars Masami  Nagasawa

and Asami Mizukawa

…recently visited Mauna Kea on the Big Island.

The following is a video of their visit to the mountain and then they cruise Hilo:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_Be1Of7kQQ&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&hd=1]

A Waikiki View

I’ve seen everything… so I thought! Here is a street vendor soliciting views of Jupiter through a telescope… and people are bucking up!

The Dark Side of the Moon… in the Daytime

Have you ever looked up in the sky…

Moon

… And wondered why you can’t see the dark side of the moon in the daytime?

Dark Side of the Moon

I bet Andrew, Tom, Anthony, or Canspice can give me a reasonable explanation.

I understand the sun is on that side etc… but why can’t I at least see the round black dark side of the moon in the daytime?

Video: 2009 Galileo Block Party

The Mauna Kea Observatories Outreach Committee (www.mkooc.org) planned and sponsored the International Year of Astronomy 2009 Galileo Block Party. Held in Hilo, Hawaii on Saturday, October 24th.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xV9f7MxiT4Q&hl=en&fs=1&]

Thirty Meter Telescope to Sponsor WordPress Bloggers

TMT and WordPress

Media Release:

In a stunning move today, the Thirty Meter Telescope announced an alliance with WordPress Bloggers.

WordPress Project spokesman Nick states:

Between the WordPress Bloggers and the Thirty Meter Telescope… We look forward to working with the TMT

Well It’s not April… But I may have gotten a few of you!

If you look closely at the TMT Dome… You will see that I inserted the WordPress Logo into it somewhere.

I’m gonna try and win this contest: “Support Hours and WordPress Logo Fun

China to Co-Op on TMT Project?

tmt

BEIJING: Astronomers from China and the United States are considering cooperating on the world’s largest telescope, through which scientists will have a deeper insight into the very early stages of the universe…

…”It is a big undertaking and it will define the future of astronomy and astrophysics for about 60 or 70 years, so it will automatically involve a large international community,” said Caltech president Jean-Lou Chameau in an interview with Xinhua on Friday…

but no final decision has been made for China’s participation.

Canada and Japan have signed up to the TMT project, which needs total financing of US$1 billion…

…China has observer status on the TMT project, and will become a partner after signing a memorandum of understanding and agreeing on commitment of funds….

Full Article: China, US Discuss co-op on world’s largest telescope (China Daily)

*Update* Mainland Videoblogger On Assignment for TMT Opposers? Millilani Trask Responds to Him… Others on Hidden Camera?

Just ran across a bunch of clips that have been posted by someone who is obviously posting youtube clips to make a buck and isn’t happy with the TMT project.

Before I go on and show the featured videos… I’ll pass on a few of his other youtube clips he has posted:

Alien Human Sperm Theft:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DyuBMZXhswE&hl=en&fs=1&]

Is Making War on Iraq Like Making a Sandwich?

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zTzU1-8cEwQ&hl=en&fs=1&]

So without passing along judgment and just posting some of the previous stuff the guy has posted… here are some of his anti TMT videos he is now posting.

Here is what Millilani Trask gave the guy (part1):

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j19gc_txoLw&hl=en&fs=1&]

Part 2:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQdTBSIZEqM&hl=en&fs=1&]

And a very weird interview by the Waiakea High School Golf Coach a guy wearing a Waiakea High School golf shirt that appears to be done via hidden camera (I say this because he never looks in the camera once):

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gSFq85xc4a0&hl=en&fs=1&]

There are some other videos that you can find on his youtube site regarding this matter.

Looking at what he covers… he obviously is some sort of paid lobbyist… DESPITE Telling the coach above he wasn’t in the first part of the clip!

UPDATE:

I have been told that the guy wearing the Waiakea Golf Shirt is not a coach on the team.  It is interesting how the camera pans to the Logo a few times though.

Bio of the Film Maker:

Name: John Sefick
Age: 69

Filmmaker for the last 5 years. I am a retired federal agent.

Hometown: Rio Rancho New Mexico

Interests and Hobbies: Astronomy founder of Chaco Canyon Observatory

A Cool Time Lapse of the Gemini Observatory

Here is a time-lapse movie of the Gemini North observatory during a Laser Guide Star (LGS) run, taken from the catwalk around the outside of the UH 2.2 meter telescope. LGS creates an ‘artificial star’ which is used as a reference source for adaptive optics systems on Gemini instruments. Directly behind the Gemini Observatory is the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT).

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7H3EQGfY9KY&hl=en&fs=1&]

The Black Sun From the Big Island

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ci6gkemsoOk&hl=en&fs=1&]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t56TyZ8oFnI&hl=en&fs=1&]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REFuwa6FafA&hl=en&fs=1&]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUGMieuja5M&hl=en&fs=1&]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0qCMLhHlhnY&hl=en&fs=1&]

Thirty Meter Telescope Chairman: “Chinese American Hero”

Chairman of the board for the Thirty Meter Telescope project, Henry Yang

Chairman of the board for the TMT project, Henry Yang

The chairman of the board for the Thirty Meter Telescope project, Henry Yang was recently featured in “AsianWeek” as a Chinese American Hero.

Profession (s): Professor of Engineering and University Chancellor

Education: B.S., Civil Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1962; M.S., Structural Engineering, West Virginia University, 1965; Ph.D., Structural Engineering, Cornell University, 1969

Awards:
• Neil A. Armstrong Distinguished Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, 1988-1994
• Elected member of National Academy of Engineering, 1991
• Elected member of Academia Sinica, 1992
• Benjamin Garver Lamme Award, American Society of Engineering Education, 1998
• Honorary doctorates from City University of Hong Kong (2005), National Taiwan University (2004), Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (2002), and Purdue University (1996)

Contributions:
During Chancellor Yang’s tenure since 1994, UC Santa Barbara faculty members have won five Nobel Prizes (one in 1998, two in 2000, and two in 2004), a National Humanities Medal (1997), a National Technology Medal (1999), and a Millennium Technology Prize (2006). The campus’s distinguished 900-member faculty also includes a Fields medalist, numerous Guggenheim and Fulbright fellows, and scores of elected members or fellows of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 1995 the campus was elected to the prestigious Association of American Universities.

Dr. Yang has served on scientific advisory boards for the Department of Defense, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, NASA, and the National Science Foundation. He is currently serving as the chairman of the board for the Thirty Meter Telescope project. He is also a member of the Kavli Foundation board, Millennium Technology Prize selection committee, Association of Pacific Rim Universities steering committee, Association of American Universities executive committee, Singapore Ministry of Education international academic advisory panel, and Ho Leung Ho Lee Prize selection board.

Publications/Patents: His book Finite Element Structural Analysis has been translated into Japanese and Chinese. He has published more than 170 articles in scientific journals with the 52 Ph.D. students he has supervised.

Mayor Kenoi Urges a Respectful Dialogue on Mauna Kea Telescope

Media Release

Hawai’i Island Mayor Billy Kenoi today urged all parties in the debate on the Thirty Meter Telescope to engage in a respectful dialogue as the community works toward a collaborative decision on the project.

“In this time of economic hardship for many County of Hawai’i residents, it is critical that the community pull together to search for a solution that benefits our island and our neighbors,” Mayor Kenoi said. “I know that all of the participants in this discussion sincerely want the best outcome for our community, and we owe it to each other to debate the project in a reasoned, respectful way.”

While the Big Island hosts some of the most sophisticated star-gazing technology in the world, Mayor Kenoi said that until now the youth from the island have had little hope of participating in the science and discovery happening on Mauna Kea.

That will change only when Hawai’i Island students are offered exceptional science and math education at the earliest grades, Mayor Kenoi said. It is critical that any additional projects on the mountain be harnessed to provide the foundation in science education that will allow Hawai’i youngsters to grow up to be the engineers, mathematicians and physicists who make astronomy on the mountain possible.

University of Hawai’i President David McClain recently announced that the TMT would bring a community benefit package of $1 million a year to the Big Island that would help fund children’s education.

“As a parent, I want exciting science education career opportunities for our young people so they can dream big about the future,” Kenoi said. “As a Hawaiian, I believe we can preserve our culture, protect our environment and support astronomy. As your mayor, I hope to facilitate compromise and find common ground.”