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Kona Historical Society Celebrating Girls’ Day with Dolls, Mochi Pounding

Hina Matsuri, better known as Girls’ Day Doll Festival, is a Japanese holiday still observed in Hawaii, even amongst multiethnic families. Visitors to Kona Historical Society’s Kona Coffee Living History Farm in Captain Cook on Friday, March 3, will have the opportunity to participate first-hand in some of the beloved traditions.

Inside the historic farmhouse, the public will see a display of elaborate dolls, generously provided by Kona Historical Society members Anne Harvey and Paul Schneider of Holualoa. This doll set is called hina ningyo and represents the Japanese emperor, empress and their court, all in traditional costume and often seated on tiers. Families with young daughters display these doll sets starting in late February. The dolls are immediately taken down after March 3 to avoid a superstition. Some people believe dolls left on display too long delay the marriage of the family’s daughters.

Kona Coffee Living History Farm visitors can also make their own paper dolls. In addition, the public can help Kona Historical Society staff prepare mochi, smooth white sweet glutinous rice cakes often associated with holidays. During Hina Matsuri, Hishi-mochi, a pink-colored mochi, is often placed with the doll sets. The farm will have Hina Arare, sweet bite-sized rice crackers, for visitors to eat as a snack.

Kona Historical Society, a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii. The Society celebrates Hina Matsuri because it’s an opportunity to reflect on the rich, unique traditions the Japanese brought to Hawaii.

The Kona Coffee Living History Farm is located at 82-6199 Mamalahoa Highway in Captain Cook, near mile marker 110. It is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays. The award-winning historic farm tells the stories of Kona’s coffee pioneers during 1926-45 and early Japanese immigrants. It is the only living history coffee museum in the U.S.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Kona Historical Society Offers A Tasty Tradition

Kona Historical Society will make its famous Portuguese cinnamon bread to celebrate Shrove Tuesday. This special bake will happen on February 28 at Kona Historical Society’s stone oven, or forno, located in the pasture below its main office and its historic general store museum in Kealakekua.

From 10 a.m. to noon, the public is invited to watch Kona Historical Society staff and volunteers create these sticky, sweet loaves of cinnamon bread. Attendees will also learn about the traditional art of Portuguese bread making and the contributions of the Portuguese, who arrived in Hawaii in the 1880s. While many of these immigrants worked in the sugar plantations, a fair number did find their way to Kona dairies and are credited for helping develop this industry.

Kona Historical Society makes cinnamon bread on Shrove Tuesday to pay homage to the days of the sugar plantations of the 1800s, when resident Catholic Portuguese would mark the day by eating richer, fatty foods and desserts before the ritual fasting of the Lent season, which lasts 40 days. They would often use up butter and sugar prior to Lent by making large batches of malasadas, the well-known and beloved Portuguese doughnut without a hole. Shrove Tuesday is also known as Fat Tuesday.

Cinnamon bread loaves, each costing $8, can be purchased starting at 12:30 p.m. Bread sales are on a first come, first served basis and go until 4 p.m. or everything is sold out. Proceeds go toward supporting the Kona Historical Society, a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii.

For those who can’t make it to this special bake, consider joining Kona Historical Society staff and volunteers every Thursday at the forno for its weekly Portuguese bread baking program. During this free program, the crew bakes close to 100 loaves of white, wheat and sweet bread and the public is invited to lend a hand by helping roll the dough.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Free Home Ownership Seminar

Becoming a homeowner is one of the most important steps in a person’s life, and there’s a lot of prep work to do before checking out housing listings. To help prospective buyers become happy homeowners, Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union (HCFCU) is hosting “ABC’s of Home Ownership” — a free educational seminar that will be held on Wednesday, February 22, 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m at HCFCU’s Kaloko Facility in the John Y. Iwane Credit Union Center Training Room (73-5611 Olowalu Street, Kailua-Kona, HI).  To register for this free seminar or for additional information, contact the HCFCU Call Center at 930-7700 or marketing@hicommfcu.com.  Seating is limited.

73-5611 Olowalu Street, Kailua-Kona, HI

Presented by Reina Miyamoto, Program Director of the Hawaii Home Ownership Center, attendees will receive important information that will help them understand home ownership requirements, as well as inform them of potential obstacles to purchasing a home, such as:

  • Having too much debt (student loans, credit card, etc.)
  • Not having enough money for a down payment
  • Not knowing where to find accurate and reliable information

The Hawaii Home Ownership Center, a non-profit organization, provides information and services needed to become a homeowner, including home buyer education, one-on-one coaching, and more.

Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union is a not-for-profit credit union owned by its over 40,000 member/owners with branches in Honokaa, Kailua-Kona, Kaloko, Kealakekua and Kohala.  In addition to complete checking and savings services, the credit union offers credit cards, auto, mortgage, construction, small business, educational and personal loans; online and mobile banking; investment services; youth programs and supports numerous Hawaii Island programs and events.  Membership in Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union is open to all Hawaii Island residents. For more information visit www.hicommfcu.com.

Makahiki Traditions to be Explored in Free Kona Historical Society Lecture

Kicking off Kona Historical Society’s 2017 Hanohano ‘O Kona Lecture Series, cultural practitioner Shane Akoni Nelson will discuss the various functions of the Makahiki season, its importance to society prior to 1820, and how its traditions continue today. His lecture, “Makahiki Traditions,” is from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22, at the West Hawaii Civic Center, located at 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Highway in Kailua-Kona. It is sponsored in memory of Roland Dupree.

Makahiki is the annual four-month season in ancient Hawaii when work and warfare ceased. People devoted their days to games, sports, hula and leisure, as well as to strictly observing rules and taboos. Makahiki was observed in honor of the god Lono.

Nelson, also a producer and scriptwriter, is dedicated to the empowerment of Hawaiian people, particularly to those in South Kona on Hawaii Island.

For the past six years, Kona Historical Society has offered this community lecture series, spotlighting local and state speakers on a wide variety of cultural and historical subjects. It is a gift from the Society to the community that has supported it for so long and it is presented in cooperation with the County of Hawaii. The lectures are free of charge and open to all, residents and visitors alike.

Kona Historical Society is a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Smithsonian Museum affiliate that has spent the past four decades collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Live Fire Training at Kona International Airport Next Week

The Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) notifies the public that there will be live fire training at Kona International Airport for the Hawaii District Aircraft Rescue Fire Fighters (ARFF) on Monday, Feb. 13, 2017, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017, and Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Photo by Travis Thurston

The exercise is an annual requirement by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The ARFF section will be testing their response protocol to a live emergency scenario involving burning fuel. HDOT informs the public that the exercise will produce smoke in the area.

List of Names for Baby Donkey Narrowed to Five

The newest member of the Kona Coffee Living History Farm – a 6-month-old female donkey –  needs a name and the public is being asked to help the Kona Historical Society decide what it will be.

Starting today (Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017), fans worldwide will have the opportunity to vote for their favorite name by making a $1 donation at the farm or on Kona Historical Society’s website, www.konahistorical.org. All donations will be used for the support and care of animals at the farm. Any donations in excess will go towards supporting Kona Historical Society’s educational programs and other needs.

The baby donkey arrived Jan. 31 at the historic 5.5-acre farm in Captain Cook and was the result of Kona Historical Society’s “Charlie Needs A Bestie” crowdfunding campaign, which sought a companion for the farm’s approximately 30-year-old donkey, Charlie, and upgrades to his home.

Over the past six days, there was an overwhelming response to Kona Historical Society’s call for suggested names. The public submitted a total of 125 suggested names on the Kona Historical Society and Kona Coffee Living History Farm Facebook Pages.

On Monday (Feb. 6), a Kona Historical Society committee selected the following top five finalist names:

Florence (“Flo”) – Nominated by John Gavelek, Cathy Watkins, Terri Olsem, Balbi Brooks, and Leilehua Yuen

Kona’s coffee farm donkeys are known worldwide as “Kona Nightingales” for their distinctive “song.” Another famous Nightingale is Florence Nightingale, a social reformer and founder of modern nursing. Perhaps the new donkey will demonstrate the same compassion as her human Nightingale predecessor.

Lucy – Nominated by Mary K. Soria and and Jody Holman Webster

In Charles Shultz’s beloved comic strip Peanuts, Lucy van Pelt is one of Charlie Brown’s closest friends. She’s often temperamental, bossy, and opinionated…which happens to be a pretty good description for a stubborn donkey as well! Hopefully, our Charlie will find the new donkey’s advice a little more useful that what can be found at Lucy van Pelt’s Psychiatric Booth.

Manini – Nominated by Lindsay Sieberg

Manini are small fish that can be found in Hawaii’s coral reefs and are a favorite among local kupuna. They are distinctive for their narrow black stripes, similar to the stripe on our donkeys’ shoulders. To avoid predators, manini live in large schools. With the addition of the new donkey, we’re happy to have our own “school”— or herd —of donkeys.

Mele – Nominated by Cindy Wittemore, Ashley Chamberlain, Donna S. Starr, and Jiraphon G

“Many Kona coffee farmers used Mele as their name for female donkeys,” says Miki Izu, a local kupuna and long-time coffee farmer. Mele also refers to the chants, poems, and songs of Native Hawaiians. Maybe the new donkey’s braying song will remind us of Kona’s rich traditions.

Shizu – Nominated by Pixie Navas and Leslie Christman

In Japanese, “shizu” means quiet and clear, and is the nickname for a few of Kona’s residents. Shizuka Uchida was a proud daughter of the Kona Coffee Living History Farm’s founding family. Shizuko Teshima was a long-lived, devoted businesswoman who established Kona’s famed Teshima’s Restaurant. Shizu Kahikina was a dedicated woman who worked on Pu`u Wa`awa`a Ranch. The name Shizu is a testament to Kona’s humble and hardworking women.

“We narrowed the nominations to names that were clearly very popular among social media followers and names that are significant to Kona’s history and culture,” said Kona Coffee Living History Farm Museum Manager and Kona Historical Society Assistant Program Director Gavin Miculka. “We love that everyone is as excited about the new donkey as we are. We’re grateful to everyone that suggested names.”

Voting online and at the Kona Coffee Living History Farm happens now until Feb. 27. The farm is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays and is located at 82-6199 Mamalahoa Highway in Captain Cook, near mile marker 110. There is no limit to the number of times fans may vote. It’s a $1 donation per vote. The winning name will be announced on March 1.

Kona Historical Society is a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Smithsonian Museum affiliate that has spent the past four decades collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society and Kona Coffee Living History Farm on Facebook.

Mayoral Luncheon March 2 Featuring Mayor Harry Kim, County of Hawaii Leadership and Business Expo

Mayor Harry Kim and select cabinet members discuss opportunities and challenges to West Hawai‘i’s economy at the Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce (KKCC) 2017 Luncheon 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Thurs., March 2 at the Sheraton Kona Resort & Spa at Keauhou Bay.

Sponsored by the Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union, Hawaii Water Service and Pacific Media Group, the annual luncheon offers a unique opportunity for the local community to meet with county department representatives in a casual setting.

Attendees will have the opportunity to have lunch with a specific county department, as well as pose questions to the mayor and cabinet heads. Issues discussed may include update on county priorities, roads and infrastructure, affordable housing, mass transit and opportunities for economic development in West Hawai‘i.

In addition, attendees can also learn about new and existing KKCC businesses at the Chamber’s annual Business Expo, which precedes and follows the banquet. Times are 10 -11:30 a.m. and 1:30-2 p.m.

General admission is $68; Chamber and Rotary members $58. RSVP by Monday, February 27; no walk-ins are allowed. For more information and/or to register, visit www.kona-kohala.com or call the Chamber office, 808-329-1758.

“Sail With The Whales” Fundraisers Slated Benefit for West Hawaii Community Health Center

The 4th Annual benefit whale watching cruise is set to sail on Sunday, February 12 and Sunday, March 12, 2017. Community residents and visitors are invited to “Sail With The Whales” and help support West Hawaii Community Health Center’s mission to make quality, comprehensive and integrated health services accessible to all regardless of income.

Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Christopher Hyde watches as a whale swims underneath a Coast Guard Station Honolulu 47-foot Motor Life Boat in waters west of Molokai, Hawaii, U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Angela

This benefit 2-hour whale watch adventure aboard the Ocean Sports luxury catamaran takes off from Kawaihae Harbor at 12:30 pm, returning at 2:30pm. Check in time is noon. During the cruise, guests will enjoy the sounds of Hawaiian music from award winning slack-key (Kiho`alu) guitarist John Keawe.

With only 60 seats available for each cruise, these tickets will go fast for this exciting ocean adventure! Hurry and purchase tickets before you miss the boat!

Tickets are $100 per person and can be purchased by calling Terri at 808-329-0400 or email whchcdevelopment@gmail.com

 

Officer Jeremiah Hull “Officer of the Month” for February

The Kona Crime Prevention Committee recognized Kona Patrol Officer Jeremiah Hull as “Officer of the Month” for February in a luncheon ceremony Wednesday (February 1) at Huggo’s restaurant in Kailua-Kona.

Police Officer Jeremiah Hull

Hull was honored for his work on the Area II Special Enforcement Unit, which was formed to address crime trends in Kona, such as burglaries, robberies, thefts, auto thefts and auto break-ins.

In one case, Hull observed a woman in a suspicious vehicle concealing and then attempting to destroy a methamphetamine smoking pipe when officers approached her. This observation led to the recovery of more than a pound of processed marijuana from the vehicle and, ultimately, to numerous felony drug charges.

In another case, Hull’s observations resulted in the recovery of nearly an ounce of methamphetamine from a suspected narcotics distributor.

In nomination papers, Sergeant Zachary Houchin praised Hull’s “focus, determination, attention to detail, and dedication.”

As “Officer of the Month,” Hull is eligible for “Officer of the Year.”

The Kona Crime Prevention Committee is an organization that encourages community involvement in aiding and supporting police in West Hawaiʻi.

Kona Historical Society Welcomes Baby Donkey – Public Can Submit Names

Charlie, the approximately 30-year-old donkey at the Kona Coffee Living History Farm, got a late Christmas present. His new bestie, an estimated 6-month-old female donkey, arrived Jan. 31, 2017, at Kona Historical Society’s 5.5-acre historic farm in Captain Cook.

This new donkey is part of Kona Historical Society’s first-ever crowdfunding campaign, “Charlie Needs A Bestie,” which project aimed to get Charlie a friend and an upgraded home. At the Kona Coffee Living History Farm, these donkeys are ideal ambassadors for helping tell the story of Kona Nightingales.

“Donkeys were a crucial part of Kona coffee farm families in the early 20th century. Coffee farming was and is labor-intensive and would have been near-impossible without donkeys,” said Kona Coffee Living History Farm Museum Manager and Kona Historical Society Assistant Program Director Gavin Miculka. “I’m very excited about bringing a second donkey to the farm. Our campaign inspired interest from visitors from all over the world. I know that they will all be pleased to know that Charlie has a bestie!”

Yamagata Farms, a South Kona family farm started in 1898, donated the young donkey to Kona Historical Society on Dec. 27, 2016. Yamagata Farms has been paying for its feed, board and training with Kala’i Nobriga of K.N. Performance Horses at Mahealani Ranch. Nobriga is an established horse trainer in the state of Hawaii. Over the past couple of weeks, he has been teaching the baby donkey to lead, as well as to be comfortable when handled and when surrounded by crowds. He thinks the donkey is adjusting well and describes her as shy, but curious.

The baby donkey was brought this week to the Kona Coffee Living History Farm for some acclimation. Later in February, she will be receiving additional training with Nobriga at Mahealani Ranch. Following this training, she will make a permanent return to the farm. Kona Historical Society plans to eventually use her to demonstrate some of the jobs Kona Nightingales performed on coffee farms, such as hauling coffee and other farm goods. Until the donkey is deemed ready, she will mostly serve as Charlie’s companion and visitors to the farm will be able to observe the budding friendship from afar. Kona Historical Society staff believe the good-natured Charlie will befriend her and can serve as a mentor to the juvenile donkey as she grows into an adult.

This new donkey will soon reach one of her most important milestones yet — getting her name. She will be named on March 1, 2017. From now until Feb. 5, 2017, the public is invited to submit names on Kona Historical Society’s Facebook Page. A Kona Historical Society committee will select the top three to five names, which will be announced on the Society’s Facebook Page, website and at the farm. Fans worldwide will have the opportunity to vote for their favorite name by making a $1 donation at the farm or on Kona Historical Society’s website. All donations will be used for the support and care of animals at the farm. Voting opens Feb. 7, 2017, and closes Feb. 27, 2017.

Kona Historical Society, a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii, launched the “Charlie Needs A Bestie” campaign Dec. 9, 2015, on Razoo.com. By January 31, 2016, Kona Historical Society raised roughly $9,658.16 for the project from more than 90 donors.

Over the course of a year, the farm’s pasture was transformed, thanks to community collaboration and partnerships. During the summer of 2016, Steven Equipment cleared the farm’s pasture areas that were once overgrown with invasive plants while Affordable Tree Care trimmed overgrown trees and removed unwanted trees. A group of teens and their leaders from Wilderness Adventures spent a couple of hours removing weeds around the hitching post and in the farm’s front entrance pasture that Charlie likes to spend time in. This fall, Paradise Lawn & Garden Care installed the new fencing and utilized the 70 kiawe posts, which were donated by The Nature Conservancy from its Kiholo Preserve and delivered to Kona Historical Society by volunteers. Kona residents Aaron Mitchell and Kai Auld, updated the plumbing and installed a self-watering trough. A crew of volunteers from Ali’i Woodtailors cleaned up the stall area and built the hitching rails. Hardwoods Hawaii donated wood for rails, which Kona Historical Society volunteers Jack Nessen, Ted Quist and Stephen Ratcliff installed to enclose the pen.

In the future, Kona Historical Society hopes to make improvements to stone walls in the pasture area and expand the stall for feed and equipment storage. The Society will likely start planting grass, particularly suitable for the donkeys’ diets, in the lower pasture later this spring.

“The community was a crucial component in making improvements to our pasture and bringing the second donkey to the farm,” Miculka said. “We’re excited to now have the community play an active role in naming her.”

The award-winning Kona Coffee Living History Farm tells the stories of Kona’s coffee pioneers during 1920-45. It is the only living history coffee museum in the U.S. Located at 82-6199 Mamalahoa Highway in Captain Cook, near mile marker 110, this historic farm is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Kona Historical Society Awarded $28,000 Grant From Hawaii Tourism Agency

Kona Historical Society has been awarded a $28,000 grant from Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA) to support its Hands On History program at the Kona Coffee Living History Farm in Captain Cook. This engaging and interactive program allows visitors and residents the opportunity to experience first-hand traditional crafts, trades, practices and foodways that were common on an early 20th century Kona coffee farm.

“We are very grateful that HTA will be supporting this successful program for a second year. The grant enables Kona Historical Society to share traditional practices that, in many cases, can be experienced nowhere else,” said Gavin Miculka, Kona Historical Society Assistant Program Director and Farm Museum Manager. “With this grant, the Kona Coffee Living History Farm becomes a unique venue for shared experiences between visitors and residents that facilitates deeper connections to Kona’s rich history and culture.”

Kona Historical Society, a community-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit and Smithsonian Museum affiliate, will use the funds from the HTA Community Enrichment Program to support unique interpretive talks and hands-on living history demonstrations, each featuring one of 10 activities, hosted by staff members and volunteers. The activities are roasting coffee using traditional home methods, lauhala weaving, Japanese calligraphy, traditional medicinal gardening, sustainable vegetable gardening, Japanese pickling, mochi making, tofu making, Sashiko crafts, and Japanese floral arrangement. Hands On History will happen two times each week and be offered from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays at the farm.

Kona Historical Society launched Hands On History at the Kona Coffee Living History Farm in March 2016 with support from a grant from Hawaii Tourism Authority and Hawaii County’s Research and Development Department. At the time, the program was offered only once a week and featured eight activities. The program quickly grew in popularity and now demands more days.

For four decades, the Kona Historical Society has collected, preserved and shared the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii through its educational programs, historic sites and preservation projects. Its Kona Coffee Living History Farm is a “must see” Hawaii attraction and the only living history coffee museum in the nation. A self-guided experience, visitors talk story with the costumed historians while discovering the history behind Kona’s famous gourmet crop and the people who helped make the industry what it is today. The farm is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays and is located at 82-6199 Mamalahoa Highway in Captain Cook, near mile marker 110.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Third Circuit Seeking Applicants for Independent Grand Jury Counsels

The Circuit Court of the Third Circuit (Hawaii) is seeking applications for Independent Grand Jury Counsels (Hilo and Kona).  The compensation shall be as provided by law.
Article I, Section 11 of the Constitution of the state of Hawaii establishes that whenever a grand jury is impaneled, an independent counsel shall be appointed as provided by law, to advise the members of the grand jury regarding matters brought before it.

In accordance with Hawaii Revised Statutes (§612-51 to §612-57), the Chief Justice of the State Supreme Court appoints grand jury counsel for the four judicial circuits of the state, selecting from among those individuals licensed to practice law in Hawaii who are not public employees.

If you are interested in being considered for a one-year appointment to either Hilo or Kona, please submit a letter indicating your interest and resume by April 15, 2017 to:

Chief Judge Ronald Ibarra
Keakealani Building
79-1020 Haukapila St.
Kealakekua, HI  96750

Also, please fax a copy to:

Lester Oshiro, Chief Court Administrator
Fax No. 808-961-7577

January 2017 Update on Queen Kaahumanu Highway Widening, Phase II

The Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT), Goodfellow Bros., Inc. (GBI), and all the Project Team members, are pleased to announce construction for the Queen Kaʻahumanu Highway, Phase 2 project will resume Monday, January 30, 2017.

The work beginning on January 30 will involve excavation of retaining walls near the National Park; traffic signal, interconnect, and street light foundation and conduit installation at multiple locations on the north end of the project; and, reclaimed water utility installation and testing. This will be followed by subgrade preparation for aggregate base course and pavement and further utility work.

HDOT is coordinating the protection of the State Inventory of Historic Place (SIHP) #10714 and SIHP #00002 sites affected by the prior breaches and has been able to lift stop work orders in those areas.

The redesign of the project on the south end between Kealakehe Parkway and Hulikoa Drive for the Section 106 and Section 4(f) process is nearing completion. Retaining wall designs are being submitted and reviewed with the drainage design to follow.

HDOT continues to work with the appropriate parties to revise the project Area of Potential Effect (APE) and expects resolution in a matter of weeks. Once the revised APE is accepted by the State Historic Preservation Division, the construction of the utility crossing at Kealakehe Parkway can be scheduled. This specific work will occur during night time hours in an attempt to limit impacts to traffic.

HDOT and GBI anticipate beginning construction of the pavement structure at the Hulikoa intersection in the near future. The additional work at this intersection includes the installation of temporary traffic signal heads on the existing Queen Kaʻahumanu Highway lanes, temporary pavement, and new striping for that intersection as it currently is not signalized.

Retaining wall construction is anticipated to take multiple months to complete. As retaining walls are completed on the north end of the project, subgrade, aggregate base course, and pavement will follow.

The construction end date has not been finalized as first priority has been to resolve the issues attributable to the work stoppage to allow GBI to recommence construction. Now that construction is resuming, HDOT, GBI, and the Project Team members are examining schedule impacts as well as opportunities that will allow for expedition of the project with the goal of keeping the completion date as close to the initial contract date as possible. Additional details will be given once rescheduling is done.

Mahalo for your patience, and we look forward to a successful and safe construction project. Future announcements will be issued as work progresses.

Message boards, HDOT news releases, and notices posted to the buildqueenk.com website will alert the public to upcoming work.

Big Island Police Searching for 16-Year-Old Kona Boy Missing Since November

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for a 16-year-old Kailua-Kona boy who was reported missing.

Thomas Salonia

Thomas Salonia was last seen November 7 in Kona.

He is described as 5-foot-5, 125 pounds with blond hair and blue eyes.

Police ask anyone with information on his whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Bicycle Rider Killed on Queen Ka’ahumanu Highway

A 42-year-old Kona man died in a vehicle-bicycle crash Saturday afternoon (January 21) in Kona near the 98-mile marker of Queen Kaʻahumanu Highway.

He has been identified as Richard Topenio of Kailua-Kona.

Responding to a 1:53 p.m. call, police determined that a red 2011 Ford pickup truck had been traveling south on Queen Kaʻahumanu Highway when it veered onto the shoulder of the roadway and collided with Topenio, who was riding his bicycle southbound on the shoulder of the highway. Topenio sustained critical injuries from the collision and was taken to Kona community Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 4:25 p.m. Saturday.

The operator of the truck, 60-year-old Jeffrey Pelham of Kamuela, was arrested on suspicion of negligent homicide and operating a vehicle while under the influence of an intoxicant. He was later released pending further investigation.

It is not immediately known if speed was a factor in the crash.

Traffic Enforcement Unit officers have initiated a negligent homicide investigation and have ordered an autopsy to determine the exact cause of death.

Police ask anyone who witnessed the crash to call Officer Kimo Keliipaakaua at 326-4646, extension 229. Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo.

This is the third traffic fatality this year compared with none at this time last year.

Kona Historical Society to Close Store Museum in Preparation for Special Exhibit

The H.N. Greenwell Store Museum in Kealakekua is closing its doors from January 23 to March 27 as the Kona Historical Society prepares a special exhibit.

Sharing the rich history of coffee in Kona through the eyes of families and farmers who built the lucrative industry, Kona Historical Society will present the award-winning exhibit, “The Kona Coffee Story:  Along the Hawaii Belt Road.” The exhibit is slated to run March through November in the H.N. Greenwell Store Museum.

With the introduction of coffee to Kona in 1828, the development of Kona’s world-famous coffee industry experienced its highs and lows. Voices of hard working coffee farmers and community leaders can be heard through personal accounts, historic photographs and artifacts featured in this exhibit, all of which tell the compelling story of the early days of Kona coffee.

A product of extensive community collaboration led by the Kona Japanese Civic Association and the Japanese American National Museum, Kona Historical Society’s renewal of this world-traveled exhibit offers visitors the opportunity to be inspired by stories of Kona’s coffee pioneers and learn more about the deep roots of Kona’s coffee heritage and culture.

The H.N. Greenwell Store Museum’s regular programming is temporarily discontinued while Kona Historical Society Collections staff installs “The Kona Coffee Story: Along the Hawaii Belt Road” and while this exhibit is running in the historic general store museum. Kona Historical Society apologizes for any inconvenience the temporary closure may have caused.

As an alternative, Kona Historical Society encourages the public to explore its other historic site, the Kona Coffee Living History Farm in Captain Cook, as well as participate in its educational programs such as the Portuguese Stone Oven Bread Baking Program and Hanohano ‘O Kona Lecture Series. Kona Historical Society is a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Smithsonian Museum affiliate that has spent the past four decades collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

North Kona Residents MUST Reduce Water Consumption by 25%

This is a Department of Water Supply water notice for customers in the North Kona area.  Due to ongoing repairs to wells in North Kona, a water restriction notice is being issued.

Customers must reduce water consumption by 25 percent.

For a list of ways to reduce water use, please go to our website at www.hawaiidws.org.  Your cooperation is greatly appreciated in using water sparingly at this time.  Once again, this is a water restriction notice for North Kona. For further information, please call 322-0600 during normal business hours, 7:00 to 3:30.

Commentary – Ane Keohokālole Highway Phase III Should Be Top Transportation Project

Ane Keohokālole Highway Phase III should be top transportation project for Hawaii County in North Kona. This segment will connect Hina-Lani Street to Kaminani Drive, so we’ll be able to drive from Henry Street to Kona Palisades without having to use Mamalahoa or Queen Kaahumanu highways.

Much attention was paid to honoring the culture and the place in building the Ane Keohokālole Highway. Markers indicate the boundaries of the ahupua‘a that the road runs through, like this one where Keahuolū meets Kealakehe.

This will help address chronic traffic circulation issues prevalent in this area. Its frustrating to see  the horrible traffic congestion on Highway 190, especially in the mornings and afternoon at Hina-Lani Street intersection. The intersection at Kaiminani Drive and Queen Kaahumanu Highway is  another traffic congestion hot spot. Both of  these issues will be addressed if the county proceeds with Phase III of Ane Keohokālole Highway.

There has been some discussion about resurrecting the Alii Parkway
project in light of the completionof the Alii Drive Extension (Mamalahoa Highway bypass) instead of proceeding with Ane Keohokālole Highway. I strongly believe this would be a huge mistake. Hawaii County has spent decades and untold millions of dollars to construct this road with nothing to show for it. I highly doubt the lingering archaeological issues will ever be resolved, especially with the renewed focus on preserving sensitive Native Hawaiian archaeological sites.

The Hawaii DOT has started preliminary planing to widen  Queen Kaahumanu Highway Extension (from Henry Street) and  Kuakini Highway past Kamehameha III Road, which should adequately address the ongoing congestion issues in this area.

I hope Mayor Kim’s administration decides to proceed with Ane Keohokālole Highway Phase III instead of Alii Parkway. The latter project divided the community  when the county tried to proceed around 13 years ago.  Ane Keohokālole Highway Phase III is a better choice for the community.

Aaron Stene
Kailua-Kona

Hawaiian Airlines to Begin Nonstop Service Between Kauai and Hawaii Island

Tickets as low as $89* one way now available for flights starting March 12

Hawaiian Airlines, Hawai‘i’s flagship carrier, today announced it will launch once daily non-stop service between Kaua‘i’s Līhu’e Airport (LIH) and Kona International Airport (KOA) on Hawai‘i Island beginning Sunday, March 12. This is the first time in the airline’s history that it will connect Līhu‘e and Kona with a direct flight.

“Demand from our kama‘āina and visitors for travel between Hawai‘i Island and Kaua‘i has been growing steadily over the past few years,” said Peter Ingram, chief commercial officer for Hawaiian Airlines. “We are proud to now offer our guests direct access between these islands, in addition to our connecting flights through Honolulu or Maui. This gives travelers greater flexibility and convenience when traveling through the Hawaiian Islands.”

The 263-mile flight becomes Hawaiian’s longest Neighbor Island route, besting its flights between Hilo, Hawai‘i Island (ITO) and Honolulu International Airport (HNL) on O‘ahu by nearly 60 miles.

LĪHU’E (LIH)/KONA (KOA) SCHEDULE
*beginning March 12, 2017

Flight Route Departs Arrives  Frequency
HA 599 KOA – LIH 9:38 a.m. 10:36 a.m. Daily
HA 500 LIH – KOA 3:44 p.m. 4:44 p.m. Daily

Hawaiian first launched flights to Kona from Honolulu on July 10, 1949 and started service from Honolulu to Līhu‘e six months later on Jan. 8, 1950. Today, the state’s largest and longest serving carrier operates an average of 21 daily departures from each airport with its Boeing 717 fleet, including:

  • LIH – HNL: 17 flights
  • LIH – Kahului Airport (OGG): four flights
  • KOA – HNL: 16 flights
  • KOA – OGG: five flights*
    *two flights operated by ‘Ohana by Hawaiian’s ATR42 aircraft

During the busy summer months, Hawaiian also offers direct flights from both Kona and Līhu‘e to Los Angeles and from Līhu‘e to Oakland, California.  In December 2016, Hawaiian started its first-ever international service from Kona with thrice-weekly flights to Tokyo’s Haneda Airport.

*Tickets between Līhu‘e and Kona, starting as low as $89 one way including taxes and fees, are now available for purchase online at HawaiianAirlines.com.  Fare is available for non-stop, one-way flights between Līhu‘e, HI and Kona, HI. Tickets must be booked by 1/19/17 for travel between 3/12/17 – 5/24/17 and are only valid in the Economy (coach) cabin.  Fares are subject to seat availability during the travel period shown. Other restrictions apply. Additional baggage charges may apply. See HawaiianAirlines.com for terms and conditions.

2017 Living & Design Show Accepting Vendor Applications

The Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce presents its 12th annual home show February 25 – 26 at the Sheraton Kona Resort Convention Center.

Formerly known as the Building and Design Expo, the renamed Living + Design Show has been attended by more than 2,000. A strong turnout is anticipated this year as homeowners continue making improvements to their properties. The newly revamped exhibition will showcase latest goods and services, door-buster deals and endless options for a better home.

Past experience has shown qualified customers come to the show with specific home improvement projects in mind and they are ready to buy. As a result, exhibitors receive a strong return on their investment with as much as a year’s worth of leads generated from the expo alone.

Two booth sizes are offered as well as sponsorship opportunities. Qualifying businesses must have a product or service that relates to building, remodeling, improvements, sales, landscaping or financing a home or business.

Participation benefits include inclusion in the show’s special advertising insert in West Hawaii Today, radio ads and mentions in Chamber social media platforms.

Businesses interested in participating and who qualify with a product or service can download a vendor application online at www.kona-kohala.com. For more info, contact the Chamber office at info@kona-kohala.com or call 808.329.1758. Vendor booths are available on a first-come, first-serve basis.