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Hilo Passport Acceptance Fairs

Thinking about applying for a U.S. Passport? Don’t put it off any longer!
hilo-passport-fairApply for your U.S. Passport at a special Saturday Passport Acceptance Fair at Hawai’i Community College on December 3, 2016; April 1, 2017; and May 20, 2017.

To request an appointment, email your name, phone number, and preferred appointment date and time to PassportFair@state.gov. Walk-in customers will be accommodated as time permits.

Hawai‘i County’s Magic of the Season Open House

The public is invited to Hawai‘i County’s Magic of the Season Open House that will be held 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, December 12, through Friday, December 16, at the Hawai‘i County Building in Hilo.

christmas-at-the-county-2016County volunteers will provide refreshments and light pupu, offer holiday activities, and spread cheer so families may enjoy a safe, community-oriented event. Nā Hōkū Hanohano award-winning performers Mark Yamanaka and Darlene Ahuna will be joined by the Hawai‘i County Band, hula dancers and other exciting performers.

The Magic of the Season also features dozens of trees that County employees have decorated. Members of the public are encouraged to stop by the County Building, located at 25 Aupuni Street in Hilo, weekdays from at 8 a.m. to enjoy the festive trees.

All activities and entertainment are free.

The following is the schedule of nightly performers:

Monday, December 12

  • Christy Lassiter Trio
  • Lori Lei’s Hula Studio
  • Times Five

Tuesday, December 13

  • Komakakino
  • Kolea
  • Average Joe

Wednesday, December 14

  • Randy Lorenzo & Friends
  • Vaughn Valentino
  • Mark Yamanaka

Thursday, December 15

  • Darlene Ahuna
  • Sarah Bethany Band
  • Hawai‘i County Band

Friday, December 16

  • Kris Fuchigami
  • Hālau O Kou Lima Nani E
  • Delis Estabillio & Friends

For more information, please contact Jason Armstrong, Public Information Officer, at 961-8311 or Jason.Armstrong@hawaiicounty.gov.

Big Island Police Searching for Missing 17-Year-Old Hilo Boy

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for a 17-year-old Hilo boy who was reported missing.

George Price-Apo

George Price-Apo

George Price-Apo was last seen in Hilo on October 19.

He is described as Hawaiian, 6-foot-1, 140 pounds with brown eyes and short black hair.

Police ask anyone with information on his whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Big Island Police Searching for 16-Year-Old Girl Missing Since August

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for a 16-year-old Hilo girl who was reported missing.

Kailee-Ann Santiago

Kailee-Ann Santiago

Kailee-Ann Santiago was last seen in Hilo on August 22.

She is described as Puerto Rican, 5-foot, 145 pounds with brown eyes and brown shoulder-length hair.

Police ask anyone with information on her whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Help Celebrate the ʻAlalā on Saturday in Hilo

E Hoʻolāʻau Hou ka ʻAlalā 

‘Alala are unique treasures of our Hawaiian forests, revered in Hawaiian culture. This very intelligent native bird is found nowhere else on earth. It’s been extinct in the wild for some time and is our only native crow still surviving in captivity. The DLNR ʻAlalā Project is holding a community celebration in advance of the first release of the Native Hawaiian crow back into the wild, to be scheduled in the next few weeks.

alala-celebrationWhat:   Everyone is invited to join us for the celebration of one of Hawai‘i’s most interesting native forest birds. Learn about the ʻAlalā Project, the extraordinary efforts underway to best ensure their reintroduction and survival in their native habitats, Fun for the whole ‘ohana.  Enjoy videos, keiki activities and conservation information displays and booths.

When:  Saturday, November 19th from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Where: Mokupāpapa Discovery Center, 76 Kamehameha Ave. in downtown Hilo.

Who:  The ʻAlalā Project is a partnership between the State of Hawaiʻi Division of Forestry and Wildlife, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and San Diego Zoo Global.

Hilo Gallery Sells Art to Help Animals

High Fire Hawaii, an art and ceramics gallery in Hilo, will be hosting its 6th Annual Art Helps event, benefiting the Hawaii Island Humane Society.  High Fire Hawaii sells all locally made items including original paintings, handmade jewelry, and locally crafted pottery!

Frankie the cat was adopted at last year’s Art Helps event

Frankie the cat was adopted at last year’s Art Helps event

On Saturday, November 26h from 9am – 5pm, any purchase at the gallery will go towards helping the animals of the Hawaii Island Humane Society.  There will even be animals on site and ready to adopt!  Adoptable animals will be onsite from 10am – 2pm.

High Fire Hawaii is located at 223 Kilauea Ave.. in Hilo, across from Ben Franklin Crafts on the park side.  For more information, call the gallery at (808) 935- 8380 or email info@highfirehawaii.com.

DoubleTree by Hilton Opens Historic Oceanfront Hotel on Hilo Bay in Hawaii

Following a $30 million renovation, a historic Hawaiian property debuts today as the first hotel on the Big Island of Hawaii for DoubleTree by Hilton, one of Hilton’s 13 market-leading brands.

naniloaThe Grand Naniloa Hotel Hilo – a DoubleTree by Hilton is located on 70 acres of stunning and lush oceanfront property, with magnificent views of Hilo Bay and the Mauna Kea Volcano. The hotel’s 320 fully-refurbished guest rooms and suites provide upscale, contemporary lodging for vacationers exploring the charms of Hilo and nearby attractions, such as stunning waterfalls, the lava flows of Kalapana and snorkeling or surfing off the beautiful bay and ocean coasts.

Just two miles from Hilo International Airport, The Grand Naniloa Hotel Hilo – a DoubleTree by Hilton blends traditional Hawaiian culture with the most modern and luxurious conveniences. Its extensive, property-wide renovations have added a local design experience centered around respecting the cultural tradition of hula, and the spirit of Hilo’s famed Merrie Monarch Festival.

naniloa-roomKim Taylor Reece, one of the most famous hula photographers in the world, is the artistic curator for the hotel and has provided $4-million worth of his own hula art which is displayed in the guest rooms and common areas. The hotel lobby also features curated, rotating exhibits that highlight aspects of Hilo’s history and Hawaiian culture.

naniloa-lobby“Hilo Bay is filled with scenic destinations and is home to some of the most exciting, natural geology in the world,” said Dianna Vaughan, senior vice president and global head, DoubleTree by Hilton. “As our first hotel on the Big Island of Hawaii, this stunning property is sure to deliver the ‘wow’ its guests are traveling to find, while also providing the warm Chocolate Chip Cookie welcome and award-winning service that our guests expect when staying at any DoubleTree by Hilton around the world.”

Beginning with that DoubleTree Chocolate Chip Cookie welcome, The Grand Naniloa Hotel Hilo – a DoubleTree by Hilton offers an array of delightful comforts – whether guests seek adventure or relaxation. Golfers enjoy Hilo’s only 9-hole golf course, while swimmers and sunbathers bask in – or on the decks surrounding – a beautiful outdoor swimming pool. While some of Hawaii’s finest landmarks are close by, guests need not leave the grounds to take a brisk run along Banyan Drive under the shade of towering banyan trees or to exercise in the state-of-the-art fitness center.

naniloa-fitnessEach inviting guest room comes with complimentary Wi-Fi, a generously-sized work desk, a microwave, refrigerator, in-room safe and DoubleTree Sweet Dreams® Sleep Experience beds. Guests who upgrade to a spacious suite may also relax in a separate living area and enjoy breathtaking ocean views from the balcony.

Another stunning view may be seen from the Lobby Lounge, where guests may admire sweeping vistas of Hilo Bay while sipping cocktails, wine and locally brewed beer from the large outdoor deck. Those who are eager for entertainment may visit the hotel’s vast showroom, a stylish venue providing nightlife and a space to showcase talented local musicians.

naniloa-corner-roomThe longtime host to activities surrounding the annual Merrie Monarch international hula competition, The Grand Naniloa Hotel Hilo – a DoubleTree by Hilton is the ideal venue for meetings, conferences and weddings. Its 13,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor event space, including a wedding gazebo, can accommodate gatherings of up to 400 people. An updated sound system and A/V equipment are also available, as is a 24-hour complimentary business center. Plus, the hotel provides the most extensive catering facility on the east side of the Island of Hawaii.

The hotel also provides a full complement of services and DoubleTree by Hilton brand amenities, including an assortment of gourmet in-room tea and coffee offerings by The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf®, and a refreshing array of the Aroma Actives Essentials natural skin and body care line.

naniloa-outdoors“For years, our property has been a marquee destination for guests traveling to the volcanoes or for business. Now, thanks to our extensive renovations and inclusion under the DoubleTree by Hilton brand banner, we are undoubtedly the finest upscale hotel option anywhere on this side of the Island of Hawaii,” said Phyllis Branco, general manager, The Grand Naniloa Hotel Hilo – a DoubleTree by Hilton.

As part of the Hilton portfolio of brands, The Grand Naniloa Hotel Hilo – a DoubleTree by Hilton encourages guests to participate in Hilton HHonors, Hilton’s free-to-join loyalty program. Hilton HHonors members who book directly with Hilton save time and money and gain instant access to the benefits they care about most, including:

  • An exclusive member discount at more than 4,500 hotels worldwide.
  • Instant benefits, such as free Wi-Fi, the ability to earn and redeem Points for free nights as well as access to digital check-in with room selection and Digital Key.
  • Unforgettable, exclusive experiences, available via Points at HHonors.com/auctions, such as access to private concerts or sought-after events.

To celebrate the hotel joining the DoubleTree by Hilton portfolio, Hilton HHonors members will earn an additional 5,000 Points for a three-night minimum stay from opening day through March 15, 2017, when booking directly with Hilton. Gold and Diamond members will also enjoy free premium Wi-Fi and space-available upgrades to the hotel’s exclusive Hilton HHonors floor and complimentary Wake Up DoubleTree Breakfast.

naniloa-suiteThe Grand Naniloa Hotel Hilo – a DoubleTree by Hilton is located at 93 Banyan Drive, Hilo, Hawaii USA 96720.

For more information, or to make a reservation, travelers may visit grandnaniloahotelhilo.doubletree.com or call 808-969-3333. The property is owned by WHR, LLC and managed by Aqua-Aston Hospitality.

Hilo Casting Call for Jumanji

Hilo Casting call for stand-ins for Jumanji.  This is the film that is currently wrapping up filming on Oahu featuring Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Kevin Hart, Nick Jonas and many others.

If you live in Hilo or are able to commute for a couple days and look anything like the main cast here’s your chance to work on the movie.

jumanjiSounds like they’ll be doing a waterfall jump stunt.

Casting Notice – Stand-Ins on Big Island
Production Title: JUMANJI
Contract: SAG-AFTRA Theatrical
Shoot Location: Hilo, Hawaii
Shoot Date: Nov. 10
Seeking stand-ins on the Big Island able to portray the following:

  • Stand-in 1: Male, Polynesian mix. 6’4″, extremely muscular, 250- 260 lbs. Bald preferred, tan coloring.
  • Stand-in 2: Male, African American, 5’4″, 140 lbs.
  • Stand-in 3: Male, Caucasian, 5’6″, 200 lbs.
  • Stand-in 4: Female, Caucasian, 5’11, 120 lbs., red hair.

Submissions: Please email submissions to katiedoylecasting@gmail.com

Japanese Government Delegation Tours Hilo Today on World Tsunami Awareness Day

In observance of World Tsunami Awareness Day on November 5, Hawaii County Civil Defense hosted a Japanese government delegation for a tour of Hilo and briefings at the Emergency Operations Centers at Hilo Airport and at Civil Defense. The delegation finished today’s tour with a visit to the Pacific Tsunami Museum.

(clockwise starting from top left):  Marlene Murray, Hawaii County Managing Director Randy Kurohawa, Secretary General Ryota Takeda, Ed Teixeira, Ilihia Gionson, Tiffinie Smith, Rumi Ariyoshi, Consul General Yasushi Misawa, Satomi Okagaki, and Honorary Consul General of Hilo Art Taniguchi.

(clockwise starting from top left): Marlene Murray, Hawaii County Managing Director Randy Kurohawa, Secretary General Ryota Takeda, Ed Teixeira, Ilihia Gionson, Tiffinie Smith, Rumi Ariyoshi, Consul General Yasushi Misawa, Satomi Okagaki, and Honorary Consul General of Hilo Art Taniguchi.

Ryota Takeda, Secretary General for the House of Representatives, Japan Diet, led the visiting delegation. Joining him was Takeshi Ogino, a deputy director in the Japan Ministry of Defense, Kimihito Aguin also of the Ministry of Defense, and Satomi Okagaki, from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The delegation arrived in Hilo from an evacuation drill in Valparaiso, Chile involving 100,000 people. They were joined in Hilo by Yasushi Misawa, Consul General of Japan in Honolulu, and Rumi Ariyoshi of the Consul General’s office.

“We human beings cannot escape from natural disasters, but we can minimize the damage. Preparedness makes a big difference in the outcome of a disaster,” Takeda said. “I trust that our cooperation and collaboration with Hawaii will boost preparedness in years to come.”

The Japan delegation was hosted in Hilo by Hawaii County Managing Director Randy Kurohara, Civil Defense Director Ed Teixeira, Hawaii Island District Airports Manager Chauncey Wong Yuen, members of Hawaii County’s emergency management team, and Marlene Murray, Director of the Pacific Tsunami Museum.

The delegation visited the Hilo Airport Incident Command Center for a briefing on the annual tsunami evacuation drill conducted by schools in Keaukaha, which was accomplished in tandem with the November 1 statewide test of the emergency warning system. The delegation also toured Keaukaha and the tsunami-vulnerable areas of Hilo including Banyan Drive.

At the Civil Defense Emergency Operations Center the group shared a presentation of recent tsunami evacuation drills in Japan and Chile, participated in a communications exercise with the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency, the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center, and amateur radio operators. “Today we demonstrated how we rely on important communications systems when a warning needs to go out to the public in times of emergency. We activated redundant lines of communication to the State Warning Point in Diamond Head, Oahu; the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center in Pearl Harbor, Oahu; and the Amateur HAM radio operators throughout the State, Pacific region, and mainland,” said Civil Defense Director Ed Teixeira.

“We hope that all we have been through will go far in making our community stronger and more prepared for disasters,” said Hawaii County Managing Director Randy Kurohara, referencing the multitude of natural disasters challenging the Hawaii Island community in the eight years since Mayor Billy Kenoi’s administration took office –  tsunami threats including one generated by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake in Japan that caused damage in West Hawaii, multiple hurricane warnings, wildfires, flooding, the dengue outbreak, Tropical Storm Iselle, and the Puna Lava Flow.

Jointly proposed by 142 nations including the U.S. and Japan, the United Nations General Assembly voted in December 2015 to designate November 5 as World Tsunami Awareness Day. This year’s observance is the first. The Assembly called on all nations and communities to observe the day to raise tsunami awareness and share approaches to risk reduction. According to Takeda, over 1,000,000 people worldwide participated in the inaugural event.

The debut World Tsunami Awareness Day focused on education and evacuation drills. Exchange students from Hilo and Waiakea schools will go to Japan to participate in a disaster risk reduction summit for high school students, November 25-26 in Kuroshio. The summit will host 350 students from 30 countries.

For more World Tsunami Awareness Day info, visit World Tsunami Awareness Video. For tsunami preparedness tips, visit http://www.prh.noaa.gov/hnl/pages/tsunami_safety.php. Sign up for Civil Defense alerts at https://countyofhawaii.bbcportal.com/.

Temple Children Completes Six Murals in Downtown Hilo

Seven renowned artists recently completed six large-scale, sustainability and Hawai‘i Island-themed murals throughout Downtown Hilo. Artists painted – through rain and shine – October 17-24, 2016.

The murals were driven by Temple Children, a local arts and sustainability organization that coordinates projects to strengthen communities, promote social and environmental innovation, and incite positive global change.

The October mural series is the third public art activation by Temple Children aimed at beautifying and revitalizing the Downtown Hilo community.

During the visiting artists’ stay, all were immersed in Hawai‘i Island culture, educated on local food sustainability, and fed nearly 100 percent locally-sourced on-island fare. In addition to painting, artists participated in a lo‘i restoration workday in Waipi‘o Valley organized by local non-profit Pōhāhā I Ka Lani. Kilauea EcoGuides led an educational hike to the lava flow prior to artists’ departure.

Completed murals may be viewed at:

Hilo Backpacker’s Hostel on Waianuenue Ave //
Artists: Rick Hayward and Emily Devers @frankandmimi (Brisbane, Australia)

Frank and Mimi’s mural is inspired by hands-on immersion in Waipiʻo Valley, where they worked collectively with the Temple Children crew to restore a loʻi for non-profit, Pōhāhā I Ka Lani. As a duo, they explore sustainable food production methods and use their artwork to stimulate necessary discussion about the future of food. Frank and Mimi believe it is our responsibility to regenerate what we take, allowing the earth to heal from human touch. Their Hilo mural celebrates the indigenous papaya, taro and ʻolena, with the phrase ‘Land of Plenty’ layered over imagery of the powerful Hawai‘i Island foods. The text is illustrated using topographic line work directly referencing Mauna Kea, framing negative space in which sustainable food production conversations can continue.

Agasa Furniture Store on Ponahawai St //
Artist: Yoskay Yamamoto @yoskayyamamoto (Toba, Japan)

Yosaky’s piece draws inspiration from the vast skies and oceans of Hawai‘i. His on-island experience with Temple Children has provided him with the opportunity to deepen his connect with Mother Earth.

Yosaky’s piece draws inspiration from the vast skies and oceans of Hawai‘i. His on-island experience with Temple Children has provided him with the opportunity to deepen his connect with Mother Earth.

Downtown KTA Super Stores on Keawe St //
Artist: Kai Kaulukukui @artworkofkai (Puna, Hawai‘i)

Kai’s two murals– focused on food sustainability and utilizing locally grown produce to feed our ‘ohana–are located at the iconic Downtown Hilo KTA market. The two panels directly next to Kai’s were painted murals by local artist Kathleen Kam, and are also about food sustainability. Kai felt a responsibility to the existing art to continue the story. While Kathleen painted the farming and harvesting aspect, Kai concentrated on preparation and consumption. One mural depicts a lu’au set in the past to show the similarities of how we dine together now. The second mural is a collage of fresh and healthy harvested foods.

Former Ebesugawa Flower Shop on Furneaux Ln //
Artist: Jet Martinez @jetmar1 (Oakland, California)

Jet’s mural is a celebration of the Ebesugawa sisters’ lifetime of work with flowers in Downtown Hilo. It was a great coincidence for Jet that the site of his mural was formerly a flower shop as his subject specialty is flowers. In Jet’s research of the Ebesugawa family, he found repeated references of the sisters often talked about serving their clients with kindness and openness, which really resonated with him. The mural features a Hilo-inspired floral arrangement, creating a bright, uplifting, and harmonious space.

Jet’s mural is a celebration of the Ebesugawa sisters’ lifetime of work with flowers in Downtown Hilo. It was a great coincidence for Jet that the site of his mural was formerly a flower shop as his subject specialty is flowers. In Jet’s research of the Ebesugawa family, he found repeated references of the sisters often talked about serving their clients with kindness and openness, which really resonated with him. The mural features a Hilo-inspired floral arrangement, creating a bright, uplifting, and harmonious space.

Hana Hou Hilo on Bayfront //
Artist: Brandy Serikaku @b_alia (Hilo, Hawai‘i)

Brandy’s piece honors the famous rain of Hilo, Ka Ua Kanilehua. The name speaks about the sound it makes when it rains on the ʻōhiʻa lehua tree. The artist worries about losing lehua trees to rapid ʻōhiʻa death and never hearing this special rain again. To the artist, growing up in Hilo, the rain is everything. She calls the rain a source of inspiration, life and the only way one can enjoy rainbows. Brandy wanted to honor the town and hālau she grew up in, by honoring the one thing Hilo is famous for since our kūpuna, Ka Ua Kanilehua.

Brandy’s piece honors the famous rain of Hilo, Ka Ua Kanilehua. The name speaks about the sound it makes when it rains on the ʻōhiʻa lehua tree. The artist worries about losing lehua trees to rapid ʻōhiʻa death and never hearing this special rain again. To the artist, growing up in Hilo, the rain is everything. She calls the rain a source of inspiration, life and the only way one can enjoy rainbows. Brandy wanted to honor the town and hālau she grew up in, by honoring the one thing Hilo is famous for since our kūpuna, Ka Ua Kanilehua.

Nikisa Properties Building on Ponahawai + Kinoole //
Artist: Sam Yong @saminthewolf (Auckland, New Zealand)

Sam’s piece depicts an ‘io, endemic to Hawai‘i Island and a symbol of Hawaiian royalty. The bird’s history teaches the community to look at life from a different perspective, to love nature, and take care of the land.

Sam’s piece depicts an ‘io, endemic to Hawai‘i Island and a symbol of Hawaiian royalty. The bird’s history teaches the community to look at life from a different perspective, to love nature, and take care of the land.

The public art and sustainability project was made possible with financial support from Novo Painting (Cole and Lisa Palea), OluKai, K. Taniguchi, Ltd., Hana Hou Hilo, Agasa Furniture Store and Keaukaha One Youth Development.

HPM Building Supply donated Pratt & Lambert paint; ladders and lifts supplied by Takamine Construction; and artist meals donated by Sweet Cane Café, Aloha Mondays and Loved by the Sun. Additional local donations were provided by Aiona Car Sales, Two Ladies Kitchen, Moon and Turtle, Big Island Booch, OK Farms, The Locavore Store, Island Naturals, Shark’s Coffee and MaruMaru Hawaii. Onsite support and keiki volunteers provided by Circle of Life Hilo’s Leandra Keuma and local artist Kathleen Kam.

The October project was led by Temple Children founders, Miya Tsukazaki and David “MEGGS” Hooke, and Regional Director Ashley Kierkiewicz. It was documented by Cory S. Martin, a freelance cinematographer, director and editor based in Buffalo, New York.

UH Hilo Announces Night Photography Classes

The College of Continuing Education and Community Service (CCECS) at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo announces classes in night photography with award-winning landscape photographer Michelle Shuey. Sessions will be held on the main campus Friday & Saturday, November 11 & 12, from 5:30 – 9 p.m. at a location to be announced and will include a field trip. Tuition is $75 and includes transportation.

Kīlauea aglow from its summit crater is visible from Kulanaokuaiki Campground.  NPS Photo/Jacob W. Frank

Kīlauea aglow from its summit crater is visible from Kulanaokuaiki Campground. NPS Photo/Jacob W. Frank

Shuey, a member of the UH Hilo Geography and Environmental Science faculty, will teach participants how to manipulate a Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) camera to take captivating night photos. The classes will focus on basic camera techniques and settings used for long exposure photos, and taking photographs at various locations, with possible venues including Hilo town, Hilo Bay, Coconut Island, Mauna Kea, and the night-time glow from Halema`uma`u crater, weather permitting.

Students are responsible for providing their own DSLR or mirrorless camera, a remote shutter release, and tripod. To register and for more information, contact CCECS at 932-7830 or email ccecs@hawaii.edu.

Arbor Day Tree Giveaway in Hilo

Hawaii Electric Light announces the Arbor Day Tree Giveaway will be held on Saturday, Nov. 5, at its office at 1200 Kilauea Avenue in Hilo from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. or while supplies last.

hayden-arbor-dayThe annual event is a partnership with Kua O Ka La Public Charter School, Hooulu Lahui, Kaulunani Urban and Community Forestry Program, and Hawaii Electric Light. To help perpetuate native species, a variety of organizations across the state routinely organize educational events to distribute native trees and shrubs to the community. Trees to be given away this year include ohia, koa, puhala, lama, niu, kou, and kukui.

Kua O Ka La students care for the trees and compile a newsletter to distribute with the trees. Information on how to properly plant, site, and care for the tree also is distributed. Students and instructors will be available to educate the public on how to care for their trees and explain the cultural significance of the native plants.

For more information, contact Kenyan Beals at (808) 969-0137.

Butchering and Curing Meat Class Coming to Hilo

The College of Continuing Education and Community Service (CCECS) at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo offers a class in “The Art of Butchering and Curing Meat for Home Food Preservation” on Saturdays, November 19 and December 3, from 1 – 4 p.m. at The Kitchen, located at 615 Haihai Street in Hilo. Tuition is $80.

Porchetta

Porchetta

Chef Dean Shigeoka, co-founder of The Kitchen, will cover a wide range of topics, including meat dressing, salting, corning and aging. Shigeoka will also provide participants with an introduction to the craft of charcuterie as they make sausage and porchetta, corn their own beef, and taste samples. The instruction and hands-on experience will provide students with the basic skills needed to begin experimenting with home butchery and charcuterie.

For more information, disability accommodations, or to register, call CCECS at 932-7830 (V) or 932-7002 (TTY).

Judge Dismisses Records Tampering Counts Against Mayor Kenoi, Felony Theft Counts Remain

State circuit court judge Dexter D. Del Rosario dismissed today three of eight counts against Hawaii County Mayor William P. Kenoi based upon insufficient evidence after the State of Hawaii rested its case.

Mayor Kenoi in court during a recess.

Mayor Kenoi in court during a recess.

The three counts were for tampering with a government record; each was a misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in jail and a $2,000 fine.

On March 23, 2016, a Hawaii Island grand jury indicted Mayor Kenoi for two counts of felony theft, two additional counts of misdemeanor theft, and one count of false swearing, in addition to the three counts dismissed today. The charges arose from alleged conduct taking place from 2011 through 2015. Mayor Kenoi is presumed innocent of the remaining five counts unless and until a trial jury finds him guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

Kauai Mayor Bernard Carvahlo was one of the witnesses called to the stand today by the defense.

Kauai Mayor Bernard Carvahlo was one of the witnesses called to the stand today by the defense.

Closing arguments and the conclusion of the trial are expected to occur on October 31.

Free Youth Soccer Clinic November 2 in Hilo

Boys and girls age 6 to 14 years old are invited to a free soccer clinic that will be held 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday, November 2, at Dr. Frances F.C. Wong Stadium in Hilo.

wong-stadiumHawai‘i’s Chevy dealers, in partnership with the Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation, are sponsoring the Chevy Youth Soccer Instructional Clinic. Special needs participants of all ages are welcome to attend.

Players will be divided into age groups and rotate through skills stations to learn the essentials of dribbling, passing, shooting, and more. Instruction will be provided by soccer.com staff. All players will receive a T-shirt and post-clinic snack.

Clinic spots will be awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited.

To register, go to http://soccer.youthsportsclinics.com/, select “Hawai‘i” in the drop-down menu, enter the password “kickit” in lowercase, and click “Submit.” Then, click “Register Now” for the desired session, enter registration information, click “Add Attendee” on the next screen to add players, and click the blue “Complete Registration” button at end of the page to submit the registration. Don’t forget to download the wavier. Each keiki must have a completed waiver to participate.

Questions should be directed to Beth Heyer at 678-852-5379 or bheyer@gmdealerprograms.com.

92-Year-Old Woman Dies Following Two Vehicle Crash in Hilo

A 92-year-old Hilo woman died following a two vehicle crash Sunday afternoon (October 23) in Hilo.

She was identified as Masako Okano.

hpd-badgeResponding to a 12:22 p.m. call, police determined that a 2000 Ford pickup truck was traveling south on Komohana Street and starting to make a left hand turn down Ponahawai Street when it was struck by a 2012 Nissan sedan that was traveling north on Komohana Street.

Okano, who was the front seat passenger of the sedan, was taken to Hilo Medical Center, where she was pronounced dead at 3:54 p.m.

The driver of the sedan, a 25-year-old Pāhoa woman, was also taken to Hilo Medical Center, where she was treated for her injuries and released.

The driver of the pickup, a 28-year-old man from Hauʻula, Oahu, was not injured.

Police do not know if speed was a factor in this crash but they do not believe alcohol was a factor.

The Area I Traffic Enforcement Unit has initiated a negligent homicide investigation. Police ask anyone who witnessed the crash to contact Officer Clarence Acob at 961-2293 clarence.acob@hawaiicounty.gov. Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island wide Crime Stoppers at 961-8300.

This is the 24th traffic fatality this year compared with 16 at this time last year.

Groundbreaking Held for Hawaii Island Veterans Memorial – Affordable Senior Housing

Yesterday afternoon, Mayor-Elect Harry Kim and Big Island Veterans broke ground on the Hawaii Island Veterans Memorial.
harry-kim-at-hivmThe project has been in the works for quite some time and it’s good to see that it is finally going to happen.The location is located off Kawili Street below the University of Hawaii Hilo Campus and across the street from Waiakea High School.

hivm-site-planEarlier this year, after HIVM received the first increment of our $425,000 state grant to help us start the project, we had an engineer prepare a plan for a box culvert common-use entrance into our lots along Kawili Street. Isemoto Construction was selected from our list of bidders to construct the common-use driveway entrance and perform related construction tasks and they have begun the installation of the box culvert and new entryway. We are in the final stages of an agreement with a large and respected non-profit housing development corporation, EAH Housing, Inc., to develop and operate 75 units of affordable senior-living units on our upper 5+ acre lot.

Artist rendition

Preference for these units will be given to veterans and their spouses. Other income-qualified senior Hawaii residents will also be able to rent these units in the event there is an insufficient number of qualified vets, their spouses or vets’ widows on the wait list at the time of vacancy. This senior independent living community will also include a centrally located community center for socializing, educational, recreational, and leisure activities.

 The lot is outlined with a thin white line and is bordered on the left by Kapiolani Street across from the lower end of the UHH campus. The lot is bordered at the bottom by West Kawili Street.

The lot is outlined with a thin white line and is bordered on the left by Kapiolani Street across from the lower end of the UHH campus. The lot is bordered at the bottom by West Kawili Street.

History: Hawaii Island Veterans Memorial, Inc. (HIVM) is a tax exempt 501(c)(3) all-volunteer non-profit corporation privately organized in 1997 to serve as a development entity for the island’s many veterans and veterans groups. Our mission was to develop a one-stop combined veterans center (CVC) together with a senior independent living community complete with a multi-purpose activity center and dining facility for our islands’ 20,000+ active, reserve, retired, veterans, and other eligible seniors. A site was identified on an overgrown 7 acre parcel of unplanned public lands in Hilo along Kawili St. just below the University of Hawai’i at Hilo and was obtained for this purpose in 2004 by a Governor’s executive order.

After acquiring a start up lease in 2005, funds were raised privately to complete an approved final environmental assessment (FEA) including a master plan with all preliminary engineering. This was developed with all stakeholders, including the University of Hawai’i at Hilo (UHH), neighbors and neighboring institutions, AARP, all the veterans organization on Hawai’i and the county of Hawai’i. The FEA was completed in 2006 and was accepted and approved by the County.

Re-zoning and subdivision into 3 separate lots for each project component were completed by mid-2007 when the lots were graded, partially grubbed and a sewer tap installed on the lower lot planned for the one-stop CVC as Phase 1. With an agreement in hand with the USDVA (VA) to build and lease to them a 5000 sq ft facility estimated at $2.1m. $1m in state and county matching funds were then sought, approved, and appropriated for FY 2008 to enable HIVM to privately finance the balance and begin the project. However the national financial meltdown reached Hawaii in the summer of 2008 and stopped all planned construction because of no available private or public financing. With development actions at a stop for the next 4 years, HIVM subleased the site to a private contractor to use as a base yard in exchange for periodic mowing and essential maintenance.

We resumed progress in 2012 with an improved economic outlook, a new lease, new opportunities, and a rejuvenated board of directors to move us forward to our current status.

Kids Halloween Party Moved to Edith Kanaka‘ole Multi-Purpose Stadium

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation announces it has moved the Halloween Hilo Kids Party from Pana‘ewa Park to Edith Kanaka‘ole Multi-Purpose Stadium located at 350 Kalanikoa Street in Hilo.

halloween-partyOpen to all ages, the free event will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Monday, October 31.

The Department of Parks and Recreation apologizes for any inconvenience the venue change might cause and thanks the public for its understanding to utilize a different venue with more parking to accommodate the large number of participants.

For more information, please contact Jason Armstrong, Public Information Officer, at 961-8311 or Jason.Armstrong@hawaiicounty.gov.

Big Island Police Searching for Missing 36-Year-Old Woman

UPDATE: Hawaiʻi Island police have located 36-year-old Bobbie Marie Delima of Hilo, who was reported missing.  She was found unharmed Friday morning (October 21) in Hilo.

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for a 36-year-old Hilo woman who was reported missing.

Bobbie Marie Delima

Bobbie Marie Delima

Bobbie Marie Delima was last seen in Hilo in July 2016.

She is described as 5-foot-2, about 90 pounds with black hair and brown eyes.

Police ask anyone with information on her whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300. Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Temple Children Brings Global Artists, Public Art to Hilo

This week, seven globally renowned artists are on Hawai‘i Island to paint large-scale, sustainability-themed murals throughout Downtown Hilo.
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The concerted effort to beautify and revitalize the community is the third public art activation of its kind driven by Temple Children, an arts and sustainability organization that coordinates projects to strengthen communities, promote social and environmental innovation, and incite positive global change.
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The public and media are invited to drop by the following locations between Wednesday, October 19 and Saturday, October 21, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. to view artists paint live:

  • Hilo Backpacker’s Hostel on Waianuenue Ave // Artists: Rick Hayward and Emily Devers (Brisbane, Australia)
  • Agasa Furniture Store on Ponahawai St // Artist: Yoskay Yamamoto (Toba, Japan)
  • Downtown KTA Super Stores on Keawe St // Artist: Kai Kaulukukui (Puna, Hawai‘i)
  • Former Ebesugawa Flower Shop on Furneaux Ln // Artist: Jet Martinez (Oakland, California)
  • Hana Hou Hilo on Bayfront // Artist: Brandy Serikaku (Hilo, Hawai‘i)
  • Nikisa Properties Building on Ponahawai + Kinoole // Artist: Sam Yong (Auckland, New Zealand)

The public art and sustainability project is made possible with financial support from Novo Painting (Cole and Lisa Palea), OluKai, K. Taniguchi, Ltd., Hana Hou Hilo, Agasa Furniture Store and PUEO.

HPM Building Supply donated Pratt & Lambert paint; ladders and lifts supplied by Takamine Construction; and artist meals donated by Sweet Cane Café, Aloha Mondays and Loved by the Sun. Additional local donations were provided by Moon and Turtle, Big Island Booch, OK Farms, The Locavore Store, Island Naturals and Shark’s Coffee. Onsite support and keiki volunteers provided by Circle of Life Hilo’s Leandra Keuma and local artist Kathleen Kam.
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Aside from painting, artists participated in a lo‘i restoration workday in Waipi‘o Valley organized by local non-profit Pōhāhā I Ka Lani. To round out the artists’ stay, Kilauea EcoGuides will lead an educational hike to the lava flow prior to artists’ departure.

The October project is led by Temple Children founders, Miya Tsukazaki and David “MEGGS” Hooke, and Regional Director Ashley Kierkiewicz. It is being documented by Cory S. Martin, a freelance cinematographer, director and editor based in Buffalo, New York.

The murals are expected to be complete by Sunday, October 23.