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Kona Patrol Officer Chandler Nacino as “Officer of the Month” for March

The Kona Crime Prevention Committee recognized Kona Patrol Officer Chandler Nacino as “Officer of the Month” for March in a luncheon ceremony Wednesday (March 1) at Huggo’s restaurant in Kailua-Kona.

Officer Chandler Nacimo

Nacino, who has been with the police department since August 2013, was honored for his efforts that led to the arrest of an individual for several drug offenses and the discovery of evidence in numerous open financial crime investigations.

On August 20, Nacino was checking what he knew to be hangouts of a man who was wanted for abuse, when he spotted the suspect driving and stopped him for traffic infractions and then arrested him for the abuse. While investigating, he made what Sergeant Mekia Rose described as “crucial observations” that led Nacino to recover the vehicle, ultimately resulting in the recovery of numerous drugs and items of drug paraphernalia, as well as personal information belonging to victims of financial crimes.

In nomination papers, Sergeant Rose said it was “encouraging and inspirational” to see Nacino “performing police work at a level usually associated with seasoned veterans.”

Nacino was previously named “Officer of the Month” in June 2015. As “Officer of the Month” again, he is eligible for “Officer of the Year.”

The Kona Crime Prevention Committee is an organization that encourages community involvement in aiding and supporting police in West Hawaiʻi.

Kona Historical Society Announces Name Chosen for Baby Donkey

Kona Historical Society has something to sing about. The nonprofit has given its new baby donkey a name: Mele. The name announcement occurred March 1 after Kona Historical Society conducted a three-week-long voting contest on its website and at its Kona Coffee Living History Farm in Captain Cook.

Voting contest generates $1,254 in donations for nonprofit

Mele was the top contender, generating a total of 640 votes. The name was nominated by Cindy Wittemore, Ashley Chamberlain, Donna S. Starr and Jiraphon G on Kona Historical Society’s and the farm’s Facebook Pages. “Many Kona coffee farmers used Mele as their name for female donkeys,” says Miki Izu, a local kupuna, long-time coffee farmer and Kona Historical Society volunteer. Mele also refers to the chants, poems, and songs of Native Hawaiians. For Kona Historical Society staff, the new donkey’s braying song reminds us of Kona’s rich traditions.

In addition to Mele, the public was given four other options, including Shizu (262 votes), Florence (174 votes), Lucy (160 votes) and Manini (18 votes). Each vote was a dollar donation. Voters helped generate a total of $1,254, which will be used for the support and care of animals at the historic 5.5-acre farm, as well as for supporting Kona Historical Society’s educational programs and other needs.

“We’re excited to name our new baby donkey Mele, which would have been a traditional name for a female donkey on an early 20th century Kona coffee farm. This traditional name fits perfectly with our commitment to preserve and share Kona’s stories,” said Farm Museum Manager and Kona Historical Society Assistant Program Director Gavin Miculka. “We’re also grateful for everyone who voted and donated. We look forward to using the money for Charlie and his new bestie Mele.”

The 7-month-old female donkey arrived Jan. 31 at the Society’s Kona Coffee Living History Farm and was the result of a crowdfunding campaign, which sought a companion for the historic farm’s approximately 30-year-old donkey, Charlie, and upgrades to his home. Kona Historical Society plans to eventually use Mele to demonstrate some of the jobs Kona Nightingales performed on coffee farms, such as hauling coffee and other farm goods. Mele is currently undergoing training. Until Mele is deemed ready, she will mostly serve as Charlie’s companion and visitors to the farm will be able to observe the budding friendship from afar.

“Charlie and Mele have been getting along well,” said Assistant Farm Manager Joel Pearson. “We’ve noticed Mele is sweet and very smart. One of her favorite things to do is to chase the chickens out of the farm pasture.”

Kona Historical Society is a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Smithsonian Museum affiliate that has spent the past four decades collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii.

Details about the “Charlie Needs A Bestie” crowdfunding campaign and project are available at www.razoo.com/story/Charlie-Needs-A-Bestie. For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Kawailani Street Improvement Project to Begin Monday

Jas W. Glover Ltd., contracted by the County of Hawai‘i Department of Public Works, will begin preparatory work for the Kawailani St. Improvement Project (Iwalani St. to Pohakulani St.) on Monday, March 6, 2017.

The contractor’s working hours for the project are from 8:30 am to 3:00 pm, Monday through Friday, weather and construction conditions permitting.  Motorists are advised to drive with caution.

The main construction activities on the roadway and intersections will begin in the last week of March 2017 and are estimated to be completed in the 4th quarter of 2018.

The project includes grading, paving; installing drainage improvements, water mains, retaining walls, and street lighting; constructing sidewalks, curbs and gutters, driveways, curb ramps and paved swales; and installing pavement markings and signs.  Traffic signals will be installed on the Iwalani St. and Kawailani St. intersection and on the Kawailani St. and Pohakulani St. intersection.

The County of Hawai‘i Department of Public Works apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause and thanks the community for their patience and understanding.

For more information, questions or concerns, please call David Sato, Jas W. Glover Ltd. at (808) 469-1909 or Barett Otani, Department of Public Works, Information and Education Specialist at (808) 961-8787.

Katsu Goto: Slain Honoka’a Hero – Film Sneak Preview and Talk

In 1889 Katsu Goto, one of the very first Japanese immigrants to come to Hawai‘i, was killed for helping plantation laborers. His body was found hanging from a telephone pole in Honoka‘a, not far from where a memorial in his honor stands today.

Katsu Goto memorial

For many years his story was almost unknown, however thanks to a dedicated group of writers, filmmakers and researchers, that is changing.

On Sunday, March 5, at 10 a.m. the Honoka‘a Hongwanji will host a free presentation about Goto, featuring a talk by researcher Dr. Yoshinori Kato from Oiso, Japan, Goto’s hometown, that reveals new information on Goto’s life. In addition UH Hilo professor/filmmaker Patsy Iwasaki will present a preview of the film “Honoka‘a Hero, the Story of Katsu Goto” by Danny Miller, Iwasaki and the Katsu Goto Memorial Committee.

Katsu Goto

The event will be attended by 23 students from Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan, as part of the U.S. Japan Council Sen. Inouye Tomodachi Kakehashi exchange program.

Katsu Goto gave up his family name and birthright as eldest son, to sail on the S.S. City of Tokio in 1885 bound for Hawai‘i Island. He went to work on Soper, Wright & Co’s O‘okala Plantation, for $9 a month, and when his three-year contract was fulfilled, he elected to stay and opened a store, selling general merchandise, Japanese products and medicines. Goto’s general store success and advocacy of labor led to animosity and eventual conflict with plantation staff and others.

Researcher Yoshinori Kato Ph.D. translated the inscription on a recently discovered gravestone in memory of  Goto in Oiso that provided new information on him. A resident of Oiso, Kato has a bachelor of engineering degree from Keio University in Tokyo, Japan and a doctoral degree from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

According to Kato, Goto published a business journal in Yokohama and was involved with democracy advocates influenced by the Meiji Restoration of 1868. In Kato’s March 5 talk, entitled “Deciphering the Stone: Revealing the footprints of Katsu Goto through a gravestone inscription,” Kato uses ukiyo-e (Japanese woodblock prints) to help visualize the town of Oiso and Goto’s early years.

In 2010, the 125th anniversary of Katsu Goto’s arrival as a “first boat” immigrant, Goto’s great-nephew, Kiichi Kaya, and daughter, Toyoko Saeki, traveled from Japan to attend the annual memorial service in Honoka‘a. They met Patsy Iwasaki, author of the graphic novel, “Hāmākua Hero, A True Plantation Story,” illustrated by Avery Berido.

Iwasaki, a professor of communication at UH-Hilo, was inspired by Goto’s story. She was also the first recipient of the Goto of Hiroshima Foundation scholarship in 1993, a project of Goto’s adopted niece, Dr. Fumiko Kaya, a hibakusha, or atomic bomb survivor.

In 2011, Iwasaki was contacted by a curator at the Bishop Museum. Her book was included in the exhibit, “Tradition and Transition: Stories of Hawai‘i Immigrants,” alongside Goto’s pocket watch.

Iwasaki met with filmmaker Danny Miller, and they interviewed members of the Hāmākua community to create two videos for the Museum exhibit. From there, the concept of a Goto documentary grew, with financial support from the Hawai‘i State Legislature, YWCA, UH Diversity and Equity Initiative and others. A “living history” documentary, the film will also include reenacted scenes starring students from the UH Hilo Theatre Department, shot in historic locations around the island.

Iwasaki will present a 20-minute preview and behind-the-scenes segment of the documentary on March 5, following Dr. Kato’s talk. Subtitled in English and Japanese, the clip was aired on Nippon Golden Network in Hawai‘i. To learn more about the film, and to make a donation to help complete the film, please visit www.katsugotomovie.org.

The programs are free and presented as a service to the community, and attendees are invited to stay for light refreshments and to talk story with the presenters and the Kyushu students. For more information, contact Miles Okumura by text 808-640-4602, or email misterokumura@yahoo.com.

Three Bridges on Pa’auilo Mauka Road to be Repaired

The Ka’apahu-Waika’alulu Gulch Bridges No.44-2, No.44-3 and the Waika’alulu Bridge No.44-5 located on Pa‘auilo Mauka Road, between Ho’okahua Road and Kukuipapa Road, will be closed for repair work between the hours of  8:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. beginning on Thursday, March 2 , 2017 through Friday, March 10, 2017, weather and construction conditions permitting. 

There will be no work on the weekend and the bridges will re-open at the end of each workday by 2:00 p.m.  Motorists are advised to use alternate routes during the bridge closure hours.

The repair work involves the rehabilitation of the existing bridge structure which includes replacing the old timber components with new wood preservative treated components. 

The County of Hawai‘i Department of Public Works apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause and thanks the community for their patience and understanding.  If there are any questions or concerns, please call Barett Otani, Information and Education Specialist, at 961-8787.

Man Arrested in Pahoa With *UPDATE* (Alleged) Dynamite

Yesterday evening around 5:45 in Pahoa, a man sitting on the wall near Paul’s Gas Station was arrested and among the items found in his possession was allegedly a stick of dynamite.

An officer at the top of the picture photographing the alleged explosive device.

I asked on the Recover Pahoa Facebook Page if anyone could confirm if it was dynamite and the following was reported:

Yes the police/bomb squad detonated it around 2 this morning According to the security in Luquin parking

Here is another picture of the incident:

It is unknown at this time what he was arrested for and the Hawaii Police Department has not released a media report on this incident as of this posting.

UPDATE: I received the following report:One of the guys who had to close off the area said the ATF actually detonated the home made device under the steel shroud and it did give off a small bang.

Hawaii Police Department Captain Promotions Announced

Police Chief Paul Ferreira has announced three promotions to the rank of captain.

Gilbert Gaspar will be the captain in charge of Kona patrol.

Gilbert Gaspar

He joined the Police Department in July 1982 and has spent the bulk of his police career working in West Hawaiʻi. Since July 2008, he has been the lieutenant in charge of the Area II Juvenile Aid Section.

Gregory Esteban is promoted to captain in charge of South Hilo Patrol.

Gregory Esteban

Esteban joined the Police Department in June 1985 and was promoted to detective in 1999. In 2007, he was promoted to lieutenant and assigned first to South Hilo Patrol and then to the Area I Criminal Investigations section.

Kenneth Quiocho, who joined the Police Department in August 1992, will be captain of the Kaʻū District.

Kenneth Quiocho

His assignments have taken him to Hāmākua, South Kohala and Hilo, where he was most recently the lieutenant in charge of the department’s Accreditation Section.

West Hawaii Community Health Center Expanding – Informational Meeting Planned

West Hawaii Community Health Center (WHCHC) will soon open the doors to its newly expanded Waikoloa location, offering a wide variety of medical and dental services to area residents.

West Hawaii Community Health Center

An informational community meeting will be held Tuesday, March 7 at Waikoloa Elementary School cafeteria starting at 6:30 pm. Interested community members are invited to attend to learn more about the new services being offered.

The Waikoloa Elementary School cafeteria is located at 68-1730 Hooko Street in Waikoloa Village. Refreshments will be offered.

West Hawaii Community Health Center board members, management staff, as well as medical and dental staff will be on-hand to answer questions and share more information.

To learn more about this event, please call 808-331-6472, or visit WestHawaiichc.org

Zumba at The Shops – Yoga at the Farm

The Shops at Mauna Lani premiers Zumba Fitness on Sunday afternoons starting March 5, 2017, in partnership with Dance 4 Action. Dance 4 Action combines Zumba and fundraising for community nonprofits on Hawaii Island. Their August 2016 Zumba event raised $3,500, which were much needed funds for the West Hawaii Domestic Abuse Shelters.

Photo: Courtesy Dance 4 Action

The Shops is proud to partner with Dance 4 Action, and to offer creative physical fitness activities for residents and guests of the Kohala Coast.  Participants are encouraged to wear sneakers, bring a water bottle and towels. The cost of the class is $10 for adults and children are free. Check-in and registration begins at 3:30 p.m., class takes plance 4-5 p.m. at Center Stage.

For more information, contact Ronnie Claveran, 222-7103.

Discover a whole new way to start your Fridays. Kona Historical Society invites the public to its Kona Coffee Living History Farm in Captain Cook, where yoga instructor Elizabeth “Liz” Aschenbrenner guides guests every Friday morning through a series of uplifting stretches, toning poses and peaceful meditations during Yoga On The Farm.

These “drop in” outdoor hatha yoga classes strive to benefit the minds and bodies of beginners and experts alike. Each class, participants greet the sun with sun salutations, as well as enjoy a variety of poses, including the warrior series, cat, cow, downward dog and child’s pose. Aschenbrenner is a certified yoga instructor who has been practicing yoga for more than 20 years. Her style of yoga aims to help you connect with your breath while developing strength, mobility and stability. Her classes are truly accessible to all, regardless of age, body type or fitness level. Still, Aschenbrenner advises participants to first check with their doctor before starting something new, including yoga.

Yoga On The Farm participants practice yoga barefoot and on the farmhouse lawn. Kona Historical Society has a couple of yoga mats for newcomers to use, but if you plan to attend regularly, please consider bringing your own mat. After class, all participants enjoy a complimentary cup of 100 percent Kona coffee.

Yoga On The Farm supports Kona Historical Society’s education and outreach efforts. It is a membership benefit and free for all Kona Historical Society members. Classes cost $10 each for nonmembers. Annual Kona Historical Society membership starts at $35 and information is available at www.konahistorical.org/index.php/khs/membership. Reservations are not required to attend Yoga On The Farm.

The Yoga On The Farm schedule for March is as follows:

  • March 3 – from 7:30 to 8:45 a.m.
  • March 10 – from 8 to 9:30 a.m.
  • March 17 – from 8 to 9:30 a.m.
  • March 24 – from 8 to 9:30 a.m.
  • March 31 – from 8 to 9:30 a.m.

The Kona Coffee Living History Farm is located at 82-6199 Mamalahoa Highway in Captain Cook, near mile marker 110. Kona Historical Society is a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Smithsonian Museum affiliate that has spent the past four decades collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii.

Tulsi Gabbard Visits Hawaii Island Kūpuna and Native Hawaiian Veterans

This morning at the Retired & Senior Volunteer Program recognition luncheon in Kona, Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02) visited with some of the 1,129 kūpuna who serve Hawaiʻi Island communities through the county’s Elderly Activities Division. She spent time visiting with seniors, delivered remarks thanking them for their service, and answered questions about her work in Congress. Last year, kūpuna volunteers on Hawaiʻi Island gave 97,815 hours in service at more than 140 different public and private non-profit agencies.

Photos via: Ilihia Gionson.

In Waimea today, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard met with Native Hawaiian leaders who are focusing on farming, food security, and sustainability for the homestead land they live on. The Waimea Nui Community Development Initiative is a sustainability project on 61 acres of Hawaiian Homestead land that includes a community ag park with farm lots for small farmers and a post-harvest facility. Soon, small farmers will be able to participate in a community equipment program and training through the College of Tropical Agriculture and the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo.

The congresswoman also met with several constituents, including a group organized by Father John Schroedel that has been actively supporting the Orthodox Diocese of Aleppo.

Puna Patrol Officer Named East Hawaii Officer of the Month Following Actions at Luquin’s Fire

The Aloha Exchange Club of East Hawaiʻi recognized Puna Patrol Officer Conrad Bidal on Thursday (February 23) as the East Hawaiʻi “Officer of the Month” for February.

Hilo Exchange Club board member Joey Estrella presents an ‘Officer of the Month’ award to Officer Conrad Bidal.

Bidal, who has less than a year of service with the Police Department, was honored for what Sergeant William Derr described as his “extreme courage” while evacuating occupants of apartments above Luquin’s restaurant during a midnight fire that destroyed the structure.

Noticing lights on the second floor of the building after the fire was in progress, Bidal went inside and conducted a search for occupants. He found four people and evacuated them. When he went back to make sure no one else was inside, the occupants returned to retrieve personal belongings. As Bidal completed the task of evacuating them a second time, the building became fully engulfed in flames.

“Officer Bidal’s heroic efforts and personal disregard of his own welfare insured the safety of these four people,” Derr wrote in nomination papers. “The loss of Pāhoa landmarks Akebono Theater and Luquin’s Mexican Restaurant could have been much more tragic had it not been for Officer Bidal’s intervention.”

Bidal was also recognized for his work in solving a burglary while he was a recruit working with a field training officer. In that investigation, Bidal obtained fingerprints from the burglary scene that matched a suspect later discovered in surveillance video footage.

“Officer Bidal’s courage, work ethic, and exemplary application of forensic skill so early in his career are to be applauded,” Derr wrote. “He is a prime example of how we hope all our police officers start their careers, hitting the ground running.”

As “Officer of the Month,” Bidal is eligible for “Officer of the Year.”

The East Hawaiʻi “Officer of the Month” award is a project of the Aloha Exchange Club of East Hawaiʻi.

Puna Town Hall Meeting

Representative San Buenaventura and Senator Ruderman will host a Town Hall Meeting on Monday, February 27, 2017 starting at 6:00 p.m. The meeting will be at the Pahoa Community Center. Both the Representative and the Senator will discuss bills and issues for the 29th Legislative Session.

Folks outside a meeting at the Pahoa Community Center

The Town Hall Meeting will provide updates to what bills, both new and old, along with other issues that have arisen for this session. Everyone in attendance will have the opportunity to ask questions, voice concerns, and share new ideas with both legislators during the meeting. All are welcome to attend.

Who:   Representative Joy San Buenaventura and Senator Russell Ruderman

What:  Town Hall Meeting to discuss 2017 Legislative Session Bills & Issues

Where: Pahoa Community Center, 15-2910 Puna Road Pahoa, HI, 96778

When:  Monday, February 27, 2017, 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

New Breakout of Lava Mapped

This map shows recent changes to Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone lava flow field. The area of the active flow field as of January 12 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the active flow as of February 16 is shown in red. Older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2016) are shown in gray. The yellow line marks the trace of the active lava tube (dashed where uncertain).

At Puʻu ʻŌʻō, surface flows are occurring within about 2.4 km (1.5 mi) of the 61g vent and on the coastal plain. These flows pose no threat to nearby communities at this time.

The blue lines over the Puʻu ʻŌʻō flow field are steepest-descent paths calculated from a 2013 digital elevation model (DEM), while the blue lines on the rest of the map are steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 DEM (for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth’s surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The base map is a partly transparent 1:24,000-scale USGS digital topographic map draped over the 1983 10-m digital elevation model (DEM).

This small-scale map shows Kīlauea’s active East Rift Zone lava flow field in relation to the southeastern part of the Island of Hawaiʻi. The area of the active flow field as of January 12 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the active flow as of February 16 is shown in red. Older Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flows (1983–2016) are shown in gray.

The blue lines over the Puʻu ʻŌʻō flow field are steepest-descent paths calculated from a 2013 digital elevation model (DEM), while the blue lines on the rest of the map are steepest-descent paths calculated from a 1983 DEM (for calculation details, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2007/1264/). Steepest-descent path analysis is based on the assumption that the DEM perfectly represents the earth’s surface. DEMs, however, are not perfect, so the blue lines on this map can be used to infer only approximate flow paths. The base map is a partly transparent 1:24,000-scale USGS digital topographic map draped over the 1983 10-m digital elevation model (DEM).

Waika’alulu Gulch Bridge Repair Feb. 27th – March 1st

The Waika’alulu Gulch Bridge No.44-6 (TMK:4-4-009:009) located mauka of Highway 19 on Ka’apahu Road, near the intersection with Apelanama Road, will be closed for repair work between the hours of at 8:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. beginning on Monday, February 27, 2017 through Wednesday, March 1, 2017, weather and construction conditions permitting.

The bridge will re-open the end of each workday by 2:00 p.m.  Motorist are advised to use alternate routes during the bridge closure hours.

The repair work involves the rehabilitation of the existing bridge structure which includes replacing the old timber components with new wood preservative treated components.

The County of Hawai‘i Department of Public Works apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause and thanks the community for their patience and understanding.  If there are any questions or concerns, please call Barett Otani, Information and Education Specialist, at 961-8787.

Kona Historical Society Celebrating Girls’ Day with Dolls, Mochi Pounding

Hina Matsuri, better known as Girls’ Day Doll Festival, is a Japanese holiday still observed in Hawaii, even amongst multiethnic families. Visitors to Kona Historical Society’s Kona Coffee Living History Farm in Captain Cook on Friday, March 3, will have the opportunity to participate first-hand in some of the beloved traditions.

Inside the historic farmhouse, the public will see a display of elaborate dolls, generously provided by Kona Historical Society members Anne Harvey and Paul Schneider of Holualoa. This doll set is called hina ningyo and represents the Japanese emperor, empress and their court, all in traditional costume and often seated on tiers. Families with young daughters display these doll sets starting in late February. The dolls are immediately taken down after March 3 to avoid a superstition. Some people believe dolls left on display too long delay the marriage of the family’s daughters.

Kona Coffee Living History Farm visitors can also make their own paper dolls. In addition, the public can help Kona Historical Society staff prepare mochi, smooth white sweet glutinous rice cakes often associated with holidays. During Hina Matsuri, Hishi-mochi, a pink-colored mochi, is often placed with the doll sets. The farm will have Hina Arare, sweet bite-sized rice crackers, for visitors to eat as a snack.

Kona Historical Society, a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii. The Society celebrates Hina Matsuri because it’s an opportunity to reflect on the rich, unique traditions the Japanese brought to Hawaii.

The Kona Coffee Living History Farm is located at 82-6199 Mamalahoa Highway in Captain Cook, near mile marker 110. It is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays. The award-winning historic farm tells the stories of Kona’s coffee pioneers during 1926-45 and early Japanese immigrants. It is the only living history coffee museum in the U.S.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Hawaii Civil Defense Lava Flow Update

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reports the active lava flow from Puʻu ʻŌʻō in the East Rift Zone is entering the ocean at Kamokuna located within Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Additional surface flows are active near Puʻu ʻŌʻō and more recently moving beyond the National Park eastern boundary onto private property near the abandoned Royal Gardens subdivision. Bright incandescence is visible from the active lava flow field, and the lava flow does not pose a threat to any community at this time.

This image is from a research camera positioned on Holei Pali, looking east towards Lava Flow 61G and Kalapana.

To maintain public safety and to extend the use of the emergency road or Highway 130, the County of Hawai‘i opened the emergency road to lava viewing since June 30, 2016. Vehicular traffic on the emergency road is limited to local residents and emergency vehicles, and is being monitored by security guards posted along the viewing area. The road is unpaved and surrounded on all sides by rough lava flows on private property. Public access is restricted to the graded roadway and viewers are asked to please respect private property and the rights of local residents.

The “firehose flow” at Kīlauea Volcano’s Kamokuna ocean entry was clearly visible from the public lava viewing area established by Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. The viewing area is 800 meters (about one-half mile) from the ocean entry, but affords excellent views of the lava flow. HVO Photo

Visitors need to be aware of the following reminders:

  • Viewing area hours are from 3:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. daily, with the last car allowed to park at 9:00 p.m.
  • It is about 8.5 miles round-trip from end of the pavement on Highway 130 to the ocean entry at Kamokuna and back. The flow can be seen starting from just beyond the parking lot all along the viewing area route.
  • Restroom facilities are limited and lack running water.
  • All members of your party should dress appropriately with boots or sturdy, covered shoes, long pants and a hat.
  • Be prepared for rain, wind, sun, heat and dust exposure.
  • Bring lots of water (1-2 liters per person), there is no potable water available.
  • Bring a flashlight for walking at night.

Our goal is to maintain public safety, protect the interests of Kalapana residents, and extend the use of the emergency road or Highway 130.  We ask for your patience and kokua (help).

Kona Historical Society Offers A Tasty Tradition

Kona Historical Society will make its famous Portuguese cinnamon bread to celebrate Shrove Tuesday. This special bake will happen on February 28 at Kona Historical Society’s stone oven, or forno, located in the pasture below its main office and its historic general store museum in Kealakekua.

From 10 a.m. to noon, the public is invited to watch Kona Historical Society staff and volunteers create these sticky, sweet loaves of cinnamon bread. Attendees will also learn about the traditional art of Portuguese bread making and the contributions of the Portuguese, who arrived in Hawaii in the 1880s. While many of these immigrants worked in the sugar plantations, a fair number did find their way to Kona dairies and are credited for helping develop this industry.

Kona Historical Society makes cinnamon bread on Shrove Tuesday to pay homage to the days of the sugar plantations of the 1800s, when resident Catholic Portuguese would mark the day by eating richer, fatty foods and desserts before the ritual fasting of the Lent season, which lasts 40 days. They would often use up butter and sugar prior to Lent by making large batches of malasadas, the well-known and beloved Portuguese doughnut without a hole. Shrove Tuesday is also known as Fat Tuesday.

Cinnamon bread loaves, each costing $8, can be purchased starting at 12:30 p.m. Bread sales are on a first come, first served basis and go until 4 p.m. or everything is sold out. Proceeds go toward supporting the Kona Historical Society, a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii.

For those who can’t make it to this special bake, consider joining Kona Historical Society staff and volunteers every Thursday at the forno for its weekly Portuguese bread baking program. During this free program, the crew bakes close to 100 loaves of white, wheat and sweet bread and the public is invited to lend a hand by helping roll the dough.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Free Home Ownership Seminar

Becoming a homeowner is one of the most important steps in a person’s life, and there’s a lot of prep work to do before checking out housing listings. To help prospective buyers become happy homeowners, Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union (HCFCU) is hosting “ABC’s of Home Ownership” — a free educational seminar that will be held on Wednesday, February 22, 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m at HCFCU’s Kaloko Facility in the John Y. Iwane Credit Union Center Training Room (73-5611 Olowalu Street, Kailua-Kona, HI).  To register for this free seminar or for additional information, contact the HCFCU Call Center at 930-7700 or marketing@hicommfcu.com.  Seating is limited.

73-5611 Olowalu Street, Kailua-Kona, HI

Presented by Reina Miyamoto, Program Director of the Hawaii Home Ownership Center, attendees will receive important information that will help them understand home ownership requirements, as well as inform them of potential obstacles to purchasing a home, such as:

  • Having too much debt (student loans, credit card, etc.)
  • Not having enough money for a down payment
  • Not knowing where to find accurate and reliable information

The Hawaii Home Ownership Center, a non-profit organization, provides information and services needed to become a homeowner, including home buyer education, one-on-one coaching, and more.

Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union is a not-for-profit credit union owned by its over 40,000 member/owners with branches in Honokaa, Kailua-Kona, Kaloko, Kealakekua and Kohala.  In addition to complete checking and savings services, the credit union offers credit cards, auto, mortgage, construction, small business, educational and personal loans; online and mobile banking; investment services; youth programs and supports numerous Hawaii Island programs and events.  Membership in Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union is open to all Hawaii Island residents. For more information visit www.hicommfcu.com.

Parker School Dedicates Athletic Field

On Tuesday, January 31 Parker School’s athletic field was named “The Goodfellow Brothers Inc. Athletic Field” in a school-wide dedication ceremony.  This special ceremony honored the fourth generation, family-owned construction company Goodfellow Brothers Inc. for their continued commitment to Parker School and the Hawai’i Island community.

Parker School administration, board members, along with Chad Goodfellow and Ed Brown both of Goodfellow Brothers Inc. unveil Parker School’s newly dedicated athletic field.

All 340 kindergarten through grade 12 students, along with current and former board members, attended the dedication ceremony held next to the school’s athletic field.  Originally constructed in 2011, Parker’s athletic field was named in honor of Goodfellow Brothers Inc. for its generous support of athletics at Parker School, including a newly resurfaced basketball court completed last year.

Lower school students showed their gratitude by presenting Chad Goodfellow, president, and Ed Brown, vice president of operations–Hawaii of Goodfellow Brothers Inc. with an oversized, handmade thank you card.  Upper school students presented each with a taro plant and Parker Bulls Soccer Club players gifted a signed soccer ball.

“Parker School is grateful to Ed Brown, Steve and Chad Goodfellow and Goodfellow Brothers Inc. for its support of our athletic programs over the past several years.  Goodfellow Brothers Inc. isn’t just a company that focuses on making money, but making a community.  This athletic field is a testament to that generosity,” says Carl Sturges, Parker School headmaster.

Parker’s athletic field is also home to the Parker Bulls Soccer Club, a player development program for youth soccer players open to the Waimea community.

Makahiki Traditions to be Explored in Free Kona Historical Society Lecture

Kicking off Kona Historical Society’s 2017 Hanohano ‘O Kona Lecture Series, cultural practitioner Shane Akoni Nelson will discuss the various functions of the Makahiki season, its importance to society prior to 1820, and how its traditions continue today. His lecture, “Makahiki Traditions,” is from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22, at the West Hawaii Civic Center, located at 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Highway in Kailua-Kona. It is sponsored in memory of Roland Dupree.

Makahiki is the annual four-month season in ancient Hawaii when work and warfare ceased. People devoted their days to games, sports, hula and leisure, as well as to strictly observing rules and taboos. Makahiki was observed in honor of the god Lono.

Nelson, also a producer and scriptwriter, is dedicated to the empowerment of Hawaiian people, particularly to those in South Kona on Hawaii Island.

For the past six years, Kona Historical Society has offered this community lecture series, spotlighting local and state speakers on a wide variety of cultural and historical subjects. It is a gift from the Society to the community that has supported it for so long and it is presented in cooperation with the County of Hawaii. The lectures are free of charge and open to all, residents and visitors alike.

Kona Historical Society is a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Smithsonian Museum affiliate that has spent the past four decades collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.