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11th Annual Peace Day Parade & Festival Schedule

On September 23, 2017, the 11th annual Peace Day Parade & Festival in Honoka‘a town joins millions of people across the planet, to honor the values of peace, compassion and global interdependence.

Photo by Evan Bordessa

This year’s theme, “Together for Peace,” echoes the United Nations’ theme for Peace Day, “Together for Peace: Respect, Safety and Dignity for All.” On September 23, 2017, the 11th annual Peace Day Parade & Festival in Honoka‘a town joins millions of people across the planet, to honor the values of peace, compassion and global interdependence.

Expressing serious messaging in creative, colorful, and ultimately positive ways, these events use music, dance, drumming, acrobatics and more to bring community together. The Peace Day Parade steps off down Mamane Street at 11 a.m., and the Peace Festival starts immediately afterward, with live entertainment, a large community Bon Dance, food booths and keiki activities.
The adoption of the UN’s theme—intended to focus on refugees around the world—gives Honoka‘a and Hawai‘i Island the opportunity to stand with other global communities supporting peace locally. In light of recent events that further divide a troubled world, it also takes on new relevance.

“In times of insecurity, communities that look different become convenient scapegoats,” said Secretary-General António Guterres in a statement. “We must resist cynical efforts to divide communities and portray neighbours as ‘the other.’ Discrimination diminishes us all. It prevents people, and societies, from achieving their full potential… Together, let us stand up against bigotry and for human rights. Together, let us build bridges. Together, let us transform fear into hope.”

Related Peace Day events take place throughout the month, September 14-30 (see schedule below). For more information and updates, please follow Peace Day Parade on Facebook, visit www.PeaceDayParade.org or email info@peacedayparade.org.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

STUDENT PEACE POSTER CONTEST

This year’s theme, “Together for Peace,” echoes the United Nations’ theme for Peace Day this year. Cash prizes will be awarded to the winners in various categories. Open to all ages, all grades, all school students and homeschoolers. Details and entry forms are available at www.peacedayparade.org. Or contact Alicia Glover at 808-724-3373, heavenonearthgirl@gmail.com. Free.

READ FOR PEACE

Thursday, September 14, 5-6 p.m., “Read for Peace” in the Honoka‘a Library, presented by Friends of the Libraries. All are invited for an engaging conversation about the book “The Tiger: A True Story of Vengeance and Survival” by John Vaillant, an international bestseller that has been translated into 15 languages. Film rights have been optioned by Plan B, Brad Pitt’s production company.

Publisher’s Weekly has said, “Over millennia of shared history, the indigenous inhabitants had worked out a tenuous peace with the Amur, a formidable hunter that can grow to over 500 pounds and up to nine feet long, but the arrival of European settlers, followed by decades of Soviet disregard for the wilds, disrupted that balance… {the book} leads readers into the lair of the tiger and into the heart of the Kremlin to explain how the Amur went from being worshipped to being poached.”

Additional books in the project are “The Book of Joy” by the Dalai Lama and “The Wise Heart” by Jack Kornfield. Kornfield was teacher of Mary Grace Orr, who will lead the September 30 Day of Mindfulness. Readers are welcome to bring their favorite books that further the discussion of attaining peace.

199,000 CRANES

The Peace Committee has reached its goal of gathering a “flock” of 199,000 origami cranes, one representing each victim of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. They are now working on a unique three-dimensional interactive exhibition of the cranes, to share with the public as part of the Peace Day events. Still in the planning stages with a community of artists and creatives, the ultimate goal is to take the exhibit to Hiroshima as a gift. Extra hands are welcome to string the cranes in groups of 50: at the Hawaiian Cultural Center of Hāmākua on First Friday, at Hāmākua Harvest, 10 a.m.-12 p.m., and September 22, 7-9 p.m. at Sea Dandelion Cafe ($10 dinner special).

CHALK THE WALK

Thursday, September 21, 3:30-5:30 p.m., at the Honoka‘a public library. Young artists are encouraged to come and express themselves on the sidewalks. A free activity for youth presented by the Friends of Honoka‘a Library; all materials provided. Free.

WINE AT 5

Friday, September 22, 5 p.m. at Cafe Il Mondo. The Blue Zones’ concept of “Wine at 5” suggests that people live longer when they take time out of their schedule to de-stress and enjoy socializing with friends in the community with good food and a relaxing drink. Cafe Il Mondo supports this concept with a special edition of their daily “Wine @ $5,” offering three select wines for $5 each, from 5-6 p.m., plus free samplings of wines from Blue Zones regions of the world, while they last. Entertainment will include the New Dharma Band as well as local favorites Sergio Ramirez and Robin Jensen.

PEACE DAY PARADE & FESTIVAL

Saturday, September 23, the 11th Annual Parade & Festival for the United Nations International Day of Peace steps off at 11 a.m. Mamane Street will be closed for this colorful and entertaining celebration, with Taiko drumming, hula, and all kinds of music. The Peace Day Festival follows immediately, with food booths, a variety of music, Bon Dance, Silent Auction and more.

CommUNITY Dance Party – Dancing Together for Peace

Saturday, September 23, 6:30-9:30 p.m. at Hawaiian Cultural Center of Hāmākua.  A commUNITY gathering to embrace music and dancing as the perfect way to reduce stress and increase energetic vibrations of positivity into our lives. DJ RajaSick will be sharing a huge selection of tracks, including dance classics and musical vibes from all over the world. (Requests can be sent in advance to DJRajaSick@gmail.com). Admission is $5 (cash only) and keiki are free. Fresh Hawaiian ‘awa & Big Island Booch will be available for sale at $4. This is a family friendly event produced by Sea Dandelion Cafe. Plant-based vegetarian potluck dishes are welcome.

A DAY OF MINDFULNESS

Saturday, September 30, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. (registration at 9:30 a.m.), located in the Social Hall, Honoka‘a Hongwanji Buddhist Temple. Participants will experience guided sitting and walking meditation with Mary Grace Orr, a Dharma discussion with Q&A and a mindful, silent meal. Please RSVP to honokaamindfulness@gmail.com, or call 808-775-1064.

The Day of Mindfulness is free, and donations, or Dana, as offerings of generosity and gratitude for the teachings, will be gratefully accepted. No prior meditation experience is necessary. Participants are asked to bring their own lunch and a cushion. Chairs and additional meditation cushions will be available. For more information and updates, please follow Peace Day Parade on Facebook, visit www.PeaceDayParade.org or email info@peacedayparade.org.

Mayor Harry Kim Opposed to Permanent Cap on Counties’ Transient Accommodation Tax


Testimony by Harry Kim, Mayor, County of Hawai’i before Senate Ways & Means Re: SB 4:

The County of Hawai’i opposes the permanent cap on the counties’ share of the Transient Accommodation Tax (TAT). This cap is unnecessary to achieve all other aspects of the bill to finance Honolulu’s rail. The bill proposes to finance rail by extending the General Excise Tax (GET) surcharge period to 12/31/2030, increasing the share of the surcharge that goes to rail by decreasing the administrative charge retained by the State, and increasing the TAT rate by 1% and dedicating all of that increase to rail. There is no reason related to rail financing to cap the share of the TAT to the counties.

A cap on the counties’ TAT share is contrary to the Legislature’s own working group report and the original intent of the TAT tax summarized as follows:

  • Working Group Recommendation. The working group recommended the Tourism Special Fund receive $82 million in FY 2016 and increase in subsequent years in line with the Consumer Price Index for Honolulu, $31 million constant for the Convention Center-Turtle Bay-Special Land Develop Fund, and the remainder split between the State and counties at 55% for the State and 45% for the counties. Based on total TAT revenues in 2016 of $444 million, the $103,000,000 cap represents 31% of the remainder of the TAT after allocations to the Tourism Special Fund ($82 million) and the Convention Center-Turtle Bay-Special Land Development Fund ($33 million). As a result of the cap, the counties’ share will only get worse as tourism grows.
  • Nexus to Tourism Services. The incidence of the TAT is primarily on visitors, so the TAT tax revenues should fund public services which benefit visitors. The UH Economic Research Organization (UHERO) estimated that the counties pay for 53% of the services for which visitors directly benefit (UHERO Working Paper No. 2016-4). These services include police and fire protection, rescue, parks, beaches, water, roads, and sewer systems.
  • Act 185 (1990). Recognizing that “many of the burdens imposed by tourism falls on the counties,” the legislature created the TAT as a “more equitable method of sharing state revenues with the counties” (Conference Committee Report 207 on HB No. 1148). The legislature deemed at that time that the fair allocation was 95% of the total TAT revenues to the counties.

The State has multiple sources of revenues. The counties only have property tax, motor vehicle weight tax, and public utility franchise tax. Our out-of-control homeless problems are a symptom of the soaring cost to rent or own a home in Hawai’i. And you want to offer us the power to increase the GET tax, the most regressive form of taxation that impacts the lower income the greatest. We already had to increase our property tax to make ends meet. With the collective bargaining decisions dominated by the State, we again will face possible increases. We ask only for our fair share as recommended by the Working Group, to maintain quality services that uphold the tourism industry and affordability for our people.

Big Island Workshops on the Legislature – Make Your Voice Heard

You can add your voice at the State Capitol! Tell legislators what you want them to focus on when Regular Session begins in January and be ready to offer your testimony when things get rolling. To help, the Legislature’s Public Access Room (PAR) is offering “Your Voice,” a free 1- hour workshop at numerous locations on the Big Island.

Topics include understanding the legislative process, deadlines, and power dynamics, as well as tips on effective lobbying, testifying, and communicating with Senators and Representatives. “How-To” guides, informational handouts, and other resources will be available.

“Your Voice” – Free One-hour Workshops:

  • Mon Sept 11 6:00 p.m. Kailua-Kona – West Hawai’i Civic Center Community Hale; 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Highway
  • Tue Sept 12 6:00 p.m. Waimea- Thelma Parker Memorial Library; 67-1209 Mamalahoa Highway
  • Wed Sept 13 5:30 p.m. Hilo Public Library; 300 Waianuenue Ave.
  • Thu Sept 14 5:30 p.m. Pahoa Community Center; Kauhale Street

For additional information, or to ask about additional workshops during this visit, contact PAR ─ 808/587-0478 or par@capitol.hawaii.gov.

North Hawaii Community Hospital Adds New Pharmacy for Hospital Inpatients

After more than two years of planning, North Hawai’i Community Hospital pharmacy staff has moved into a new location within the hospital. Prior to the move in, employees joined together in a blessing by Kahu Billy Mitchell and NHCH Board of Trustees member. President Cindy Kamikawa and Pharmacy Director Anthony Fazio welcomed employees and Liana Honda, Native Hawaiian health manager presented a Hawaiian oli/chant.

Pharmacy Director Anthony Fazio (L) with NHCH President Cindy Kamikawa (R)

The new pharmacy is not open to the public but instead serves all of the pharmacy needs of patients staying overnight at the hospital. “The new pharmacy provides us with more space and upgraded technology, offering enhanced safety for both patients and staff,” said Pharmacy Director Anthony Fazio. “In addition, the new pharmacy will assure that we are ready for new regulations related to pharmaceuticals and medication in the future.”

“The completion of this project reflects the commitment of The Queen’s Health Systems to the provision of quality care to the people of North Hawai’i,” said Cindy Kamikawa, RN, and President of North Hawaii Community Hospital. The last significant renovation project at North Hawai’i Community Hospital was the MRI suite in 2001.

Hawai‘i Fest at Queens’ MarketPlace

The works of heart, hands, hula and Hawaiian music make Hawai‘i Fest a unique celebration, Saturday, September 9 at Queens’ MarketPlace, 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Admission to Hawai‘i Fest is free and the community is invited to enjoy aloha-filled Hawaiian music by some of the Island’s top entertainers, and explore an extensive art and craft fair with numerous artists and producers of handmade treasures. Top island entertainers Kainani Kahaunaele, Darlene Ahuna, Lito Arkangel, John Keawe and some of the Island’s favorite hula hālau will perform throughout the day, on two stages, at the Coronation Pavilion and by the “Town Clock.”

Hawaii Fest is a first time collaboration with Nā Mākua Designs and Queens’ MarketPlace.

“Nelson and Kainoa Makua of Nā Mākua, who also produce the annual Merrie Monarch Invitational Hawaiian Arts Fair, have done an amazing job of bringing together some of the most popular and skilled crafters that people want to see,” said Margo Mau Bunnell, Sales & Operations Manager. “Hawai‘i Fest will feature a unique selection of many different items— jewelry, fine art, made-in-Hawai‘i food products, hula implements, aloha wear by Simply Sisters, Living Hula, and more. And of course, everyone looks forward to the newest designs and casual Hawaiian wear from Nā Mākua Designs.”

Hawai‘i Fest is the shopping center’s celebration of ten years in the community, and the Queens’ MarketPlace family of shops and restaurants will also participate in the festivities with a variety of tasty food booths and vendor displays from Hawaiian ‘Ukulele and Guitar, Pacific Nature, and more.

“We wanted to do something that would let people continue to celebrate our beautiful Hawaiian culture throughout the day,” said Bunnell. “It is our way to round out the Hawai‘i Island Festival weekend. People can go to the Poke Contest in the morning, then come and check out all the craft vendors and talk to the artists, relax over lunch, then go back and enjoy all of the great talents at the Falsetto Contest. The idea is to offer a full, fun and immersive day at Waikoloa Beach Resort.”

Hawai‘i Fest is free and open to all, with free parking. For more information, visit www.QueensMarketPlace.net or call 808-886-8822.

Celebrating its tenth anniversary in the Waikoloa community, Queens’ MarketPlace in Waikoloa Beach Resort has earned a reputation among visitors and kama‘āina as “the gathering place of the Kohala Coast,” full of shopping opportunities, services and great food, along with entertainment and arts programs, movies under the stars and large-scale concerts in Waikoloa Bowl at Queens’ Gardens.

September Events at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park (ADIP) programs with the public throughout 2017. In addition, the community is invited to lend a hand to save native rainforest through the park’s Stewardship at the Summit (SAS) volunteer program and enjoy a fee-free day on Sat. Sept. 30 (National Public Lands Day).

ADIP, SAS and Hawaiian cultural programs are free, but entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Stewardship at the Summit. Volunteers are needed to help remove invasive, non-native plants that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. No advance registration is required for groups under six, and there is no cost to participate, but park entrance fees apply. Visit the park website for details.
When: Sept. 2, 9, 15, 22 and 30.
Where: Meet project leaders at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. on any of the above dates.

Ke Kāpili Manu Kahiko: Traditional Hawaiian Bird Catching. How did ancestral Hawaiians interact with our native birds? Much has been forgotten about traditional Hawaiian relationships with the ‘āina. Park Ranger Noah Gomes has researched traditional Hawaiian bird catching from a variety of sources. He will share some of what he has learned through years of research in pursuit of his M.A. degree in Hawaiian language and literature from the University of Hawai‘i-Hilo. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, but park entrance fees apply.
When: Tues., Sept. 12 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Lei. Create your own beautiful lei with skilled lei maker No‘eau Kalima. Traditional lei are crafted with a variety of natural materials, including leaves and flowers. The beautiful and versatile Hawaiian lei is used for adornments, blessings, rituals, gifts, and as an expression of love and celebration. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Sept. 13, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Hālau Ke ‘Olu Makani O Maunaloa. Listen to the sweet sounds and watch the graceful dancing of Hālau Ke ‘olu Makani o Maunaloa. Led by Kumu Hula Meleana Manuel, they strive to perpetuate the native Hawaiian culture through mele (song) and hula. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free, but park entrance fees apply.
When: Wed., Sept. 20 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

HI-SEAS Mission V: What It’s Like to Live on Mars. HI-SEAS (Hawai‘i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation) is a habitat for a crew of six on an isolated Mars-like site high on the slopes of Mauna Loa volcano.

NPS Photo

The NASA-funded project aims to help determine the individual and team requirements for long-duration space exploration missions, including interplanetary travel to Mars. Jon Mission V crew member Brian Ramos as he describes what it’s like living and working in the habitat for eight months. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, but park entrance fees apply.
When: Tues., Sept. 26 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Ku‘i Kalo Make poi, the staple food of the Hawaiian diet. The root of the kalo plant is cooked and pounded (ku‘i) to create this classic Hawaiian dish. Park rangers will share their knowledge of kalo at this authentic cultural experience. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Sept. 27, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Fee-Free Day: National Public Lands Day (NPLD). NPLD is the nation’s largest, single-day volunteer effort for public lands. Join us at Hawai‘i Volcanoes, and help ensure the future of the Hawaiian rainforest. Volunteers will help remove invasive, non-native plants that prevent native plants from growing. Meet at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. No advance registration is required. Park entrance is free, and NPLD volunteers will receive a pass to return and enjoy the park fee-free on another day of their choosing.
When: Sat., Sept. 30, 2017 at 8:45 a.m. to noon. Meet at Kīlauea Visitor Center.
Where: Participating public lands nationwide. Visit https://www.neefusa.org/ for details.

Hawaii Supreme Court Refuses to Order State to Repair Waikiki Gold Coast Seawalls

The Hawaii Supreme Court on Friday rejected a request by Waikiki apartment and condominium owners to order the State of Hawaii to pay for repairs to a damaged seawall, or for the owners’ attorney fees after 10 years of litigation, Attorney General Doug Chin announced.

The case, Gold Coast Neighborhood Association v. State of Hawaii, was initiated in 2007 by private individuals owning property situated on what is known as the “Gold Coast” on Oahu. Friday’s decision by the Hawaii Supreme Court ends the case.

The owners sued the State to repair seawalls built by private parties to protect private property from erosion and wave damage. The Supreme Court refused to issue such an order. The Court ruled the State holds an easement over the seawalls and is not liable for attorneys’ fees.

Attorney General Chin said, “We are pleased the Court affirmed our position that the courts are not the proper place to decide how taxpayer money is spent. The State will repair the seawalls if and only if money to do so is appropriated by the state legislature and allocated by the governor.”

The State of Hawaii was represented internally at all stages of the litigation. Supervising Deputy Attorney General Bill Wynhoff tried the case in circuit court and argued the State’s case in both the Intermediate Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court. The private owners were represented by the firm McCorriston Miller Mukai McKinnon LLP.

A copy of the Supreme Court’s opinion and the dissenting opinion are attached.

Officer of the Month for August: Wyatt Kaili-Leong

Officer Wyatt Kaili-Leong, a (6-year police veteran), has been named as the East Hawaiʻi Aloha Exchange Club’s August Officer of the Month.

Officer Wyatt Kaili-Leong,

On (July 14), at approximately 6:00 p.m., Officer Kaili-Leong was flagged down by a female in Keaʻau who reported the theft of a purse from her parked and unlocked vehicle. She reported that her purse contained identification cards, bank cards, a checkbook, personal items and $2,100.00 in U.S. currency generated primarily from her farmer’s market sales for the day.

Officer Kaili-Leong through his witness interviews discovered that an unidentified male wearing a baseball cap had been at the residence two days prior and sold the witness orchid plants, this same male party was seen reversing from the driveway in an older model white Saturn or Mercury just prior to the discovery of the crime.

Two days after he initiated the investigation, Officer Kaili-Leong was on patrol when observed the suspect vehicle on North Kūlani Road with an expired safety and weight tax emblem and immediately conducted a traffic stop.

Officer Kaili-Leong arrested the 38-year old male suspect and recovered numerous items taken during the theft.

He is to be commended for his work ethic and determination, keeping with the highest standards of the Hawaiʻi Police Department. Officer Kaili-Leong’s actions demonstrate his commitment to the Hawaii Police Department Core Values of Integrity, Professionalism, Compassion, Teamwork, and Community Satisfaction.

2017 Queen Lili’uokalani Festival Set for Saturday, September 9

The He Hali’a Aloha no Lili’uokalani Festival, Queen’s Birthday Celebration, will take place on Saturday, September 9, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Lili’uokalani Gardens Park in Hilo.

This year’s Festival to honor Hawai’i’s last reigning monarch is being held in conjunction with the Centennial Celebration of Lili’uokalani Gardens, and is being coordinated and sponsored in part by the Friends of Lili’uokalani Gardens.

The day-long festival includes music, hula, arts, crafts, food, demonstrations, children’s games and cultural activities.

Entertainment will include Darlene Ahuna, Taishoji Taiko, Komakakino with Halau Ha’akea a Kala, the Waiākea Ukulele Band, Tahitian by Merahi Productions, with the finale featuring Mark Yamanaka, recipient of multiple Na Hoku Hanohano Awards.

Hula is the major focus of the Festival and each year, festivities are kicked off with a mass hula featuring more than 250 hula dancers throughout the Park performing a traditional mele.

Dancers from throughout the State will dance together, symbolizing the Queen’s vision of sharing Hawai’ian culture with the rest of the world.  During this performance, more than 50,000 orchid blossoms will rain from the skies above the park.

Activities include Japanese Tea Ceremony, a Jumping Castle and Water slide, Coconut Weaving, Hawai’ian Printing & Stamp Pads, Hawai’ian Herbs, Hawai’ian crafts, and children’s coloring activities designed to provide historical information about the garden.

Community and educational organizations will be on hand to offer information on available services for families on Hawai‘i Island.

A bountiful variety of local foods will be available for purchase.

Admission to the Festival is free of charge.  Additional public parking is available at the Afook Chinen Civic Auditorium and Hawai’i County Mass Transit will be providing free shuttle service from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The County of Hawai’i is proud to partner with the Queen Lili’uokalani Trust, Pacific Radio Group, Hilo Fire Extinguishers, Blue Hawai’ian Helicopters, Grand Naniloa Hotel, KWXX, Honolulu Skylark Productions CJ Promotions, the Hawai’i Tropical Flowers Council and the Friends of Lili’uokalani Gardens to present this cultural experience to residents and visitors.

For more information, please call the Department of Parks and Recreation’s Culture and Education Section at 961-8706.

Coffee With a Cop Day

Today (August 22), from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. South Hilo Community Police Officers partnered with Zippy’s Restaurant in Hilo for Coffee with a Cop. The event allows members of the public to speak to officers in a relaxed setting, building partnerships between law enforcement and the community. Throughout the morning officers spoke to over 20 citizens on a variety of topics.

Pictured are officers with the South Hilo Community Police Unit, Neighborhood Watch Liaison-Bobbye St. Ambrogio, along with Zippy’s employees at Zippy’s Restaurant.

The 2nd Annual National Coffee with a Cop Day is (October 4). Officers with the Hawaiʻi Police Department will be at the Puainako Starbucks in Hilo from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. that day.

North Kona Water Restiction Update – Spare Motor Defective and Cannot Be Used

This is an Emergency Water Restriction update for North Kona. The Department of Water Supply’s (DWS) Honokohau Deepwell is out of service. Therefore, ALL residents and customers in North Kona must immediately restrict water use to health and safety needs (drinking, cooking, and hygiene purposes) only. Cease all landscape irrigation activities.

During today’s work, it was discovered that the spare motor is defective and cannot be used. DWS is now working on several options to obtain another spare motor before resuming the installation work. The updated repair schedule is to be determined.

DWS appreciates the community’s efforts to restrict their water use during this time. Government agencies, businesses, and other customers that use recycled wastewater or reclaimed water, in lieu of potable water, for their daily operations are to be commended. Adjustments were made to the water distribution system and a minimum level of water service is being maintained.

However, without everyone’s continued cooperation, there will be areas that will experience periodic loss of water service or lower water pressures. We also recommend that residents store a sufficient amount of water for basic household needs, such as drinking, cooking, and hygiene purposes, in the event of service disruptions.

For your use, potable water can be obtained from a water tanker located on Hina Lani Street between Anini Street and Manu Mele Street as well as water spigots on a fire hydrant along Ane Keohokalole Highway, between Kealakehe Parkway and Kealakehe High School. Please bring your own drinking water containers to fill.

For more information visit our website at www.hawaiidws.org. To report any observed wasteful use of water call 961-8060 during normal business hours or email dws@hawaiidws.org. For after hour emergencies call us at 961-8790.

Forever In Our HeARTS – In Honor of Stephanie Becher

Forever In Our HeARTS: A night of scenes, songs, memories, love and laughter in honor of Stephanie Becher.

The variety show will be at Hilo’s Historic Palace Theater, Thursday August 24, 2017 at 7:30pm. Stephanie Becher was a mother, friend, attorney, and beloved member of the Hilo theatre community. Sadly we lost her after complications of a necessary heart surgery in July 2017. This concert will be performed in her memory by her many friends in the theater community.

The show will feature scenes, songs, and dances from a variety of shows in which Stephanie has performed. This evening of laughter and loving memories will honor Stephanie and help to raise funds for her husband and two young sons.

Please join us in remembering Stephanie for all of the brightness she brought to our world through the arts. A $20 donation is suggested; all proceeds benefit the Becher ‘ohana. Tickets are available in advance from performers and at the Palace Theater box office in Hilo and remaining tickets will be available at the door. For ticket information, call the Palace Theater at (808) 934-7010.

North Kona Emergency Water Restrictions Update

This is an Emergency Water Restriction Update for North Kona District customers for Wednesday August 16 at 3:45 PM.

The Department of Water Supply reports the North Kona emergency water restriction continues. North Kona customers in the area from Keauhou to Keahole and Honalo to Makalei must restrict water use to health and safety needs only. This means use water for drinking, cooking, and hygiene purposes only. Cease all other water use including all irrigation and washing of vehicle and boats.

Extraction of the Honokohau Deepwell pump and motor is now complete. After an inspection of the well, the spare pump and motor will be connected and reinstallation work will continue through the holiday weekend.

The Department of Water Supply sincerely appreciates the community’s efforts to restrict water use during this time. Adjustments have been made to the water system and a minimum level of water service is being maintained. However, without everyone’s continued cooperation, there will be areas that will experience periodic loss of water service or lower water pressures.

For your use, drinking water is available from a water tanker located on Hina Lani Street between Anini Street and Manu Mele Street as well as from a water spigot along Ane Keohokalole Highway, between Kealakehe Parkway and Kealakehe High School. Please bring your own drinking water containers to fill.

For after hours emergencies, or to report any observed wasteful use of water call the DWS at 961-8790. During normal business hours, call 961-8060.
This email account will be kept updated and you will be informed of any conditions that may affect your safety.

Merrie Monarch Festival – RE: Halau Overnight Stay at Parks & Recreation Facilities

2017 Hula Kahiko from the Merrie Monarch Website

Hawaii County Mayor Harry Kim sent the following letter on August 9th, 2017 to the President of the Merrie Monarch Festival, Aunty Luana Kawelu:

Dear Ms. Kawelu:
RE: Halau Overnight Stay at Parks & Recreation

As you know, historically, the Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) has allowed overnight stays at Kawananakoa Gym, Papa`ikou Gym, Waiakea Recreation Center, and Waiakea Uka Gym by halau participating in the annual Merrie Monarch Festival (MMF). According to the MMF website, the 2017 festival included a total of 23 halau, 21 of which were not Hilo-based. The breakdown of people overnighting in the various County Department of Parks & Recreation (DPR) facilities are as follows:

  • Kawananakoa Gym – 24 people housed for one night and 25 people housed for 8 nights
  • Papa`ikou Gym – 35 people housed for 4 nights
  • Waiakea Recreation Center – 25 people housed for one night
  • Waiakea Uka Gym – 51 people housed for 4 nights

This year, the Hawaii County Fire Department (HFD) alerted DPR of specific Fire and Building Codes that are being violated by allowing this practice. To immediately address these violations and allow overnight stays at this year’s MMF, DPR required, per Fire Code and exemption, an approved fire watch at each facility. Following the conclusion of this year’s MMF, at my instruction, DPR conducted an extensive study of DPR Administrative Rules, and Hawaii County Building and Fire Codes, to ascertain whether this practice should be allowed to continue.

DPR’s findings are as follows:

While there are no DPR Administrative Rules that explicitly prohibit overnight stays at DPR facilities, pertinent excerpts from Chapter 15 of the Hawaii County Code indicate/state:

  • Section 15-3 defines “Camper’— means any person who remains in a park area between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m., and “Camping” – means the act of remaining in a park area between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m.
  • Section 15-8 designates the authority of the Director to establish visiting hours and states in part: “all persons shall observe and abide by the officially -posted signs and designated closed areas and visiting hours.”
  • Article 4, beginning with Section 15-39 and continuing through Section 15-48, designates Camping and all rules associated, including the names of the parks where camping is allowed.

Based on these DPR Administrative Rules, overnight stay at the facilities listed above are prohibited.

With respect to the Hawaii County Building Code, fire sprinklers and/or alarm systems are required for any facility used for sleeping, with the R-1 designation as described below.

County gyms can possibly be evaluated as transient accommodations, but must meet the standards of this section of the code:

302.1 General. Structures or portions of structures shall be classified with respect to occupancy in one or more of the groups listed below. A room or space that is intended to be occupied at different times for different purposes shall comply with all of the requirements that are applicable to each of the purposes for which the room or space will be occupied. Structures with multiple occupancies or uses shall comply with Section 508. Where a structure is proposed for a purpose that is not specifically provided for in this code, such structure shall be classified in the group that the occupancy most nearly resembles, according to the fire safety and relative hazard involved.

The current occupancy type of a gymnasium is Assembly Occupancy. Use of
gymnasiums for sleeping would change the occupancy type to R -I Occupancy.

  • Fire Sprinkler Requirement. R-1 Occupancy in Section 903.2.7 of the Building Code requires a fire sprinkler system; therefore, a gym or other facility used for sleeping shall have a fire sprinkler system.
  • Fire Alarm Requirement. R-1 occupancies in Section 907.2.8 of the Building Code require a Fire Alarm system and smoke alarm system.

The restriction/constraint regarding the use of a gym as a sleeping space is the need for fire sprinklers. The codes also require audio/visual fire alarms. These are not commonly present in older buildings, and therefore, upgrades would be required to accommodate sleeping.

HFD has allowed sleeping in these facilities under the exemption found in the NFPA 1, Uniform Fire Code, Hawaii 2006 Edition, regulation 20.2.3.6 Use of School Facilities for Sleeping, which reads:

“Educational occupancies that allow sleeping on a temporary basis shall prohibit smoking or open flames, and shall be provided with one of the following:

  1. Smoke alarms shall be provided in the designated sleeping area. When the facility is provided with a fire alarm system, the smoke alarms shall be connected to the fire alarm system, or
  2. An approved fire watch shall be provided.”

None of the DPR facilities above are school facilities, with the exception of perhaps Kawananakoa Gym, which is also governed by rules included in the lease agreement with the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands (DHHL).

DHHL lease agreement #44, amendment #2, with DPR, item #8, states in part: “it is agreed that for the health and safety of those using the facilities, and to address potential damages to the gymnasium, NO FOOD OR DRINK AND OVERNIGHT STAY at the facilities are allowed.” (Emphasis as it appears in document.)

The DHHL lease agreement would disqualify Kawananakoa Gym in any event,
regardless of any safety -protection systems that may be in place.

Based on this research, DPR has recommended against the continued practice of allowing overnight stays at DPR recreational facilities. However, DPR/Hawai’i County recognizes and fully supports the cultural and historical significance of the MMF, and is aware of the shortage of accommodations available for this important event. As such, every effort will be made to work with your organization to identify potential alternate sites.

DPR would like to offer the usage of the Mauna Kea Recreation Area cabins to visiting halau in 2018. There are two bunkhouses, capable of holding 24 people each, plus seven cabins, capable of holding six people each, for a total of 90 people. Each bunkhouse and cabin has its own bathroom with shower. There are potable water, a dining hall, and ample parking.

DPR is ready to assist the Merrie Monarch Festival in addressing any potential
concerns you may have with these suggested alternate accommodations, and looks forward to working with you.

Big Island Mayor Seeks to Hold Meeting with Helicopter Operators Over Noise Mitigation Options

On August 8, 2017 (not sure why memo was dated 2018) Mayor Harry Kim sent a letter to helicopter operators and tour operators on the Big Island, requesting they meet with him to discuss noise mitigation options (It is not known by me if any of the operators have responded to his request):

In response to requests for assistance from residents across Hawai’i Island, I am convening a meeting with all local helicopter tour operators and tour partners to discuss noise mitigation options. My goal is that we develop a solution that enables you to continue your profitable operations showing guests our beautiful island while respecting the communities and wildlife your operations affect.

The meeting will be held on Tuesday, August 29, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. in my Hilo
Office located at 25 Aupuni Street, Suite 2603. Please confirm your attendance with Martha Rodillas at martha.rodillas@hawaiicounty.govor at 808-961-8211. I look forward to meeting with you.

Sincerely,
Harry Kim
Mayor

UPDATE on the North Kona Water Restrictions

This is an Emergency Water Restriction update for North Kona. The Department of Water Supply’s (DWS) Honokohau Deepwell is out of service. Therefore, ALL residents and customers in North Kona must immediately restrict water use to health and safety needs (drinking, cooking, and hygiene purposes) only. Cease all landscape irrigation activities.

The contractor started removing column pipe today and expect to extract the pump and motor in a couple of days. The spare pump and motor will then be connected and reinstallation work will continue through the Admissions Day weekend.

DWS appreciates the community’s efforts to restrict their water use during this time. Government agencies and businesses that use recycled wastewater or reclaimed water, in lieu of potable water, for their daily operations are to be commended.

Adjustments were made to the water distribution system and a minimum level of water service is being maintained. However, without everyone’s continued cooperation, there will be areas that will experience periodic loss of water service or lower water pressures.

We also recommend that residents store a sufficient amount of water for basic household needs, such as drinking, cooking, and hygiene purposes, in the event of service disruptions.

For your use, potable water can be obtained from a water tanker located on Hina Lani Street between Anini Street and Manu Mele Street as well as water spigots on a fire hydrant along Ane Keohokalole Highway, between Kealakehe Parkway and Kealakehe High School. Please bring your own drinking water containers to fill.

For more information visit our website at www.hawaiidws.org. To report any observed wasteful use of water call 961-8060 during normal business hours or email dws@hawaiidws.org.  For after hour emergencies call us at 961-8790.

HELCO Conducting Aerial Line Inspections Next Week – NOT GREEN HARVEST

HILO,  – To improve system reliability, Hawaii Electric Light Company will conduct aerial line inspections of its major overhead transmission lines from Monday, Aug. 21, to Friday, Aug. 25, 2017.

The islandwide inspections are scheduled from 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. However, exact times and routes will depend on weather conditions. Inspections will be conducted in a Manuiwa Airways helicopter and require the aircraft to fly low and slow which may cause some noise disturbances.

Hawaii Electric Light apologizes for any disruption this may cause and sincerely thanks the community for their cooperation and understanding.
If there are any questions or concerns, please call 969-6666.

Kona Wine Market & Puako Provisions Present “Raise the Bar” An Urban Feast for the Senses

Kona Wine Market and Chef Noah Hester of Puako Provisions are bringing a one-of-a-kind live music event with food and drink pairings on Saturday, August 26, 2017. This event, called “Raise the Bar”, will be held from 6:30 pm to 11:30 pm in Kona at the Edible World Institute, a local non-profit and educational space supporting the food and live music scene on the Big Island. Live music will be by NOWELO, featuring Ann Hoku Lyn and Grammy award-winner John Keawe.

Chef Noah Hester is the manager and culinary talent behind Puako Provision & Catering. He was recently named one of the country’s top culinary talents for the second time by “Best Chefs America.” This prestigious honor recognizes the most brilliant cooks in the country.

Kona Wine Market, located in Aloha Plaza, offers a variety of beer, wine, spirits, cigars, gifts and gourmet food.

More information on this event is available at konawinemarket.com or call (808) 329-9400. Limited availability tickets can be purchased at the Kona Wine Market, the Music Exchange in Hilo or Kona, Puako Provisions and Catering in Puako (in The Puako General Store), and brownpapertickets.com/event/3041786.

Kahilu Theatre Hosts Talk by Nationally Recognized Artist and Hawaiian Cultural Practitioner Bernice Akamine

Kahilu Theatre presents an Artist Talk by nationally recognized artist, Bernice Akamine, on August 19, from 10:30 – 11:30am. Ms. Akamine will give a presentation describing the scope of her art practice, and will discuss how her roots as a Hawaiian cultural practitioner informs her work. The talk is being held in conjunction with her solo exhibition at Kahilu Theatre, and during the presentation Akamine will also discuss her work on display in the galleries. Coffee and light pastry will be on offer.

Bernice Akamine speaking about her installation with to Lulani Arquette , CEO of the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (NACF) Photo by Mark Ley

“Bernice Akamine is a treasure for our state, both as a contemporary artist and as a cultural practitioner, and we are delighted to bring her work to Waimea,” says Deb Goodwin, Executive Director of Kahilu Theatre. “Her installations, Hinalua‘iko‘a and Kalo, exemplify deeply engaged and profoundly moving art, creativity we aim to showcase at Kahilu Theatre, both on stage and in our galleries. At the opening reception on August 3, Bernice spoke passionately about what inspires and influences her, giving the art richer meaning for those in attendance. Kahilu Theatre is honored to offer an additional opportunity to hear Bernice speak.”

Kahilu Theatre Development Associate David Clark describes the experience of viewing Kalo and hearing Bernice speak about it at the reception. “The large field of mixedmedia taro plants that make up the installation Kalo is beautiful in its own right, but it was so much more significant to learn about it from Bernice. Each newsprint “leaf” contains the printed signatures of residents that signed the1897-98 Ku’e: the AntiAnnexation Petitions, as well as maps of the districts in which those signatories resided. Each paper kalo plant “grows” out of a pohaku, or lava rock, donated by community members from each of the main Hawaiian Islands. This layering of source material makes the installation a living invocation of past generations and serves to remind each viewer (whether resident or visitor) of their kuleana or responsibility to protect the natural environment, the cultural traditions, and the history of this special place.”

Bernice Akamine is a sculptor and installation artist based on Hawai‘i Island. She uses a variety of media to express her ideas, and recurring themes include environmental and cultural issues. She is a recognized cultural practitioner with deep roots in Kapa and waiho‘olu‘u, Hawaiian natural dyes. Her solo exhibition at Kahilu Theatre Galleries, presents two bodies of work in both galleries.

Kalo, is a mixed media installation that consists of 83 taro plants made of stone and leaves. Hinalua‘iko‘a are suspended and free standing beaded sculptures that present an immersive environment inspired by traditional Hawaiian fish traps, sea creatures, talk radio and the Hawaiian Creation Chant, the Kumulipo.

Akamine has exhibited her work in numerous solo and group exhibitions, both nationally and internationally. Her selected awards include; a 2015 Native Hawaiian Artist Fellowship from the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation; a 2012 Community Scholar Award from the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History; and a 1999 Visiting Artist Award at the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of the American Indian in New York City.

Kahilu Exhibits, the visual arts exhibition program of the Kahilu Theatre, presents solo and thematic group shows and features local and global works of art from both emerging and established visual artists.
The Akamine exhibition, organized by Sally Lundburg, is on display through September 8. The galleries are free and open to the public Monday thru Friday, from 9am – 1pm, and during all performances and events. For more information, visit http://kahilutheatre.org/Exhibits, email gallery@kahilutheatre.org, or call (808) 885-6868.

For more information about Bernice Akamineʻs work, visit https://www.nativeartsandcultures.org/bernice-akamine or contact the artist at bamakamine@gmail.com.

Another Water Pump Goes Down – North Kona Water Restrictions Mandated

This is an Emergency Water Restriction Notice for North Kona District customers for Monday August 14.

The Department of Water Supply reports Honokohau Deepwell located in North Kona is now out of service. Due to the loss of this pump this morning, North Kona customers in the area from Keauhou to Keahole and Honalo to Makalei must restrict water use to health and safety needs only. This means use water for drinking, cooking, and hygiene purposes only. Cease all other water use including all irrigation and washing of vehicle and boats.

Conserve water by flushing toilets less often and taking shorter showers.
We also recommend that residents store a sufficient amount of water (5-10) gallons for basic household needs, such as flushing toilets, hygiene and consumption in the event of service disruption.

Until further notice, the Department of Water Supply is suspending temporary service accounts and irrigation accounts in North Kona.

Department of Water Supply will be monitoring water usage and wasteful water use will be subject to further water restrictions and possible water shut off.

In order to help meet general customer demand, Water Supply has established Public Potable Water Distribution Stations at the following locations:

  • Ane Keohokalole Hwy. between Kealakehe Parkway and Kealakehe High School
  • Hina Lani between Anini St. and Manu Mele St.

For after hours emergencies, or to report any observed wasteful use of water call the DWS at 961-8790. During normal business hours, call 961-8060.
This email address will be kept updated and you will be informed of any conditions that may affect your safety.

Thank you, have a safe day, this is your Hawaii County Civil Defense.