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93 Confirmed Cases of Dengue Fever – More Community Meetings Scheduled

This is a Dengue Fever information update for Tuesday November 24th at 2:15PM.

The State Department of Health continues to work with other state and county agencies on the issue of the Dengue Fever outbreak. As of 10:00 this morning the Department of Health has reported 93 confirmed cases originating on Hawaii Island. These cases include 80 residents and 13 visitors.

Mosquito Bite

Community Information Meetings on the Dengue outbreak will be conducted at the following locations:

  • Tonight at 6:30 PM at the Mountain View School Cafeteria
  • Friday November 27th at 6:00PM at the Ocean View Community Center
  • Monday November 30th at 6:00PM at the Waimea Middle School Cafeteria
  • Tuesday December 1st at 6:30PM at the Kohala High School Cafeteria
  • Thursday December 3rd at 6:30 at the Pahoa High School Cafeteria

TOMORROW – Free Thanksgiving Luncheon For the People of Puna

A FREE Thanksgiving luncheon will be held for the Puna Community tomorrow at the Pahoa Community Center.

Thanksgivng 2015Sponsors and members from Hope Services Hawaii, Aloha Lehua Cafe, Kalapana Mauna Kea Church and Puna New Hope will be providing free thanksgiving dinners from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm.

12th Annual Kona Surf Film Festival Accepting Submissions

The 12th Annual Kona Surf Film Festival presented by ALTRES is in prep phase and is accepting films, art, music, and interested companies!

Kona Surf Film Festival 2016The Festival is Hawaii’s premiere international surf film showcase, running Jan. 30th 2016 from 3:30 – 10pm at the Courtyard Marriott King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel, Kailua-Kona Hawaii .

The 12th Annual promises to be another awesome year of surf movies, art, live music, and good people.  Submission deadline is Christmas, 2015.  Check the website for more info:www.konasurffilmfestival.org.

Tickets range from $12-$30

Operation Compassion Collects Over 70 Kits for Abused Children and Victims of Domestic Violence

The Big Island Substance Abuse Council’s CEO, Dr. Hannah Preston-Pita and her daughter, Deannah Che Preston worked for two months on project, Operation Compassion to help collect therapeutic kits for abused children and victims of domestic violence.

This mother and daughter team with the help of the Big Island Substance Abuse Council successfully collected over 70 completed kits. Each backpack included a blanket, stuffed animal, hygiene kits, coloring books, notebooks, pencils, crayons, and a storybook.

This mother and daughter team with the help of the Big Island Substance Abuse Council successfully collected over 70 completed kits. Each backpack included a blanket, stuffed animal, hygiene kits, coloring books, notebooks, pencils, crayons, and a storybook.

High School senior, Deannah Che wanted to make a difference in children’s lives.  “It really saddens me when children have to experience abuse, especially alone.”  Her purpose was to show them that they are not alone and that people care.  Together, they have seen the outpouring of support.  “We are so fortunate to live in a community that everyone pulls together to inspire change and we are humbled and grateful for all the support” says, Dr. Hannah.

Due to this support, BISAC will continue this as an annual campaign to benefit the Children’s Justice Center a program which provides support to abused children and victims of domestic violence.

Since 1964, the Big Island Substance Abuse Council has been inspiring individuals and families to reclaim and enrich their lives.  “These kits will continue our mission and hopefully make a difference in our community” says, Dr. Hannah.    If you want to donate please contact 969-9994 ext. 827.

HELCO Announces Scheduled Power Outage for North Hawaii

Hawaii Electric Light Company announces a scheduled power outage that will affect customers in Hawi and Kapaau. This temporary outage is necessary to allow Hawaii Electric Light personnel to safely upgrade equipment at the Hawi Substation to improve system reliability. The outage will be from 11 p.m. on Wednesday, November 11, to 5 a.m. on Thursday, November 12, 2015.

The affected areas are Mahukona along Akoni Pule Highway to Old Mill Stack Road, including Hawi Road Makai and the mauka side of Kahei Houselots, as well as Akoni Pule Highway from Hawi Road to Kapaau Road (see map below).

Hawi NoticeHawaii Electric Light advises affected customers to keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed and unplug sensitive equipment prior to the outages. Customers who depend on medication or life support equipment should make arrangements for a back-up power supply or transportation to a facility outside the affected area.

Hawaii Electric Light regrets any disruption this outage could cause and thanks customers for their patience and understanding. If there are any questions or concerns, please call 969-6666.

Friends of the Natural Energy Laboratory Hawaii Authority Names New Executive Director

Candee Ellsworth is the new executive director of the Friends of the Natural Energy Laboratory Hawaii Authority (FON). A new Hawai’i Island resident, Ellsworth most recently worked as executive director of the Nature’s Nursery Center for Wildlife Rehabilitation & Conservation Education in Ohio.

Candee Ellsworth

Candee Ellsworth

The Midwest native also served 16 years as conservation coordinator of the Toledo Zoo and was a graduate program adjunct professor at Miami University. Ellsworth has a master’s degree in biology from Miami University and a bachelor’s degree in zoology from The University of Findlay.

As executive director, Ellsworth will oversee the organization’s operations, which includes weekday public tours and presentations focusing on cutting edge renewable energy and aquaculture at the ocean science and technology park. Tour volunteers are needed; phone 329-8073 for details.


FON is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization providing education and outreach at NELHA for the responsible and sustainable use of renewable resources for energy, aquaculture and ocean technology. It offers weekday tours and presentations headquartered from NELHA’s Gateway Visitor Center—a LEED Platinum, sustainable, zero-net energy facility located in Keahole-Kona on Hawai‘i Island. www.FriendsofNELHA.org


Dengue Fever Information Update – Public Meetings Begin Tonight

This is a Dengue Fever information update for Monday November 9th at 10:30AM.

The State Department of Health continues to work with other state and county agencies on the issue of the Dengue Fever outbreak.  As of 12:00 noon Friday the Department of Health has reported 23 confirmed cases originating on Hawaii Island.  These cases include 15 residents and 8 visitors and across multiple areas of the island.  An update of the number of cases will be made later today.


Dengue fever is a virus that is transmitted or spread by infected mosquitoes and is not transmitted directly from person to person.  Dengue Fever is not endemic or common to Hawaii and the source or origin of this outbreak is likely due to an introduction of the virus by a person who may have contracted the virus while in another area of the world and who became infectious while in Hawaii.

Because the only mode or method of transmission is through mosquito bites there are actions being taken to reduce the risks and include the spraying or treating of areas of high mosquito presence that are also areas of possible contact with infected people. This includes areas around residents of confirmed cases.

Although spraying or treating of areas is ongoing, the most effective method of reducing the spread and possibly eliminating Dengue is to minimize or prevent the possibility of being bitten by an infected mosquito.  Wearing clothing that minimizes exposed skin, use of mosquito repellant and avoiding activities in areas of high mosquito concentration during the early morning and late afternoon periods when mosquito activity is greatest.  In addition, persons feeling ill and having a fever should remain indoors to prevent the possibility of being bitten and infecting mosquitoes.

Public Information Meetings will be held at the following locations:

  • Tonight Monday November 9th at the Yano Hall in Kona
  • Tomorrow Tuesday November 10th at the Naalehu Community Center
  • Thursday November 12th at the Konawaena High Cafeteria
  • Friday November 13th at the Hohokaa High Cafeteria
  • Monday November 16th at the Hilo High Cafeteria
  • Tuesday November 17th at the Keaau High Cafeteria

All meetings will begin at 6:00 PM each evening and the community is encouraged to attend.

For additional information on Dengue Fever and preventing the spread of Dengue Fever, go to health.hawaii.gov or call the Department of Health at 974-4000, extension 68362.

23 Cases of Dengue Fever – Hawaii State Senator Urges Awareness and Action

The growing number of confirmed cases of Dengue fever (23 as of today) has State Senator Josh Green (Dist. 3 – Kona, Ka‘u) calling on constituents within his district and across the entire Big Island to take extra precautions to stem the spread of the virus.  


“As a State Senator and a Big Island physician, I’m concerned not only about the immediate well-being and safety of our residents and visitors, but also the real long term health and economic impacts an outbreak like this can have on the state,” said Sen. Green.  “Unless people become aware of the seriousness of this virus and take action, I’m worried the infection will spread and impact will grow,” said Sen. Green. “There may likely be more confirmed, as well as real but unconfirmed, clinical cases in the coming weeks. However, Dengue can be stopped if we all do our part to reverse the outbreak.”

The Senator has personally seen and treated patients in recent weeks he is concerned may have Dengue fever and is working with hospitals and schools on Hawai‘i Island to ensure there is proper communication to report suspected cases of Dengue. He notes that any constituents who have concerns that they might have acquired the virus should contact their local healthcare provider and the DOH infectious disease branch (808-586-4586). In addition, any calls or email to Senator Green (sengreen@capitol.hawaii.gov) will be placed in the hands of top DOH officials for immediate action.

The Senator is reminding residents and visitors to take measures to avoid the spread of Dengue Fever on Hawai‘i Island including: 

  • Applying mosquito repellents on exposed skin and clothing
  • Wear long sleeves and pants, and lighter colored clothing, to limit exposure to mosquitoes
  • Eliminate standing water around the place of residence to reduce mosquito breeding 
  • Repair screens and jalousie windows

Some key symptoms of Dengue include sudden onset of high fever (in some case over 103 degrees Fahrenheit) severe headaches especially behind the eyes, joint and muscle pain, and rash. It is rare, but bleeding can also occur with severe forms of Dengue fever and is a medical emergency.  “Anyone who believes they may have contracted Dengue should see a doctor immediately,” said Sen. Green. “People should take Tylenol for high fevers that may stem from Dengue fever and NOT aspirin or ibuprofen, that can add to complications of this disease.”

“Preventing Dengue Fever from becoming endemic in Hawai‘i will require a prolonged response from DOH, the county and state but most importantly, take good care now and call a healthcare provider if you feel sick,” Green concluded.

The latest information on the state’s efforts to control the spread of Dengue fever can be found on the DOH website www.health.hawaii.gov.

Community Meeting with Lawmakers Draws Large Attendance in Puna

Representative Joy San Buenaventura (Puna) and leaders from the Hawaii State House of Representatives held a Lawmakers Listen session at the Pahoa Community Center last night where they heard a wide range of concerns from residents in the area. Puna Meeting

Discussions at the meeting were on a number of topics including managing invasive species, the rat lungworm parasite, homelessness, medical care, the public hospital system, infrastructure concerns, and the lack of broadband internet service in the region.

Puna Meeting 3Members of the community were invited to share their questions and concerns directly with Rep. San Buenaventura, Speaker of the House Joseph M. Souki, Majority Leader Scott Saiki, and House Finance Chair Sylvia Luke. The group was also joined by Hamakua Representative Mark Nakashima. Puna Meeting 2

‘Lawmakers Listen’ is an ongoing series of community town halls across the state with district Representatives, members of the House Leadership, and Committee Chairpersons.  The purpose of the meetings is for legislators to listen to the concerns of area residents and to discuss solutions.

Two Hawaii Island Properties Added to the National Register of Historic Places

Two well-known and popular community locations in Honokaa, Hawaii were recently added to the National Register of Historic Places:

Hotel Honoka‘a Club

The Hotel Honoka‘a Club, dating to about 1927, is a two story-wood frame commercial building located at 45-3480 Māmane Street in the historic plantation town of Honoka‘a. It is an example of “plantation” style of architecture and method of construction, with a main floor, a rear second story addition, and basement.

Hotel HonokaaThe hotel/club functioned as a local gathering place that provided guest accommodations for travelers and temporary sales space for the display of commercial samples and wares by traveling salesmen. It includes a dining room and bar facility which has served numerous local social occasions from the 1920s to the present.

It began as a social gathering place for large numbers of unmarried males seeking entertainment after a long day’s work. It became U.S. Department of the Interior hotel accommodations, resting place and headquarters for sales personnel/drummers who traveled the island peddling their wares. Its bar operations were boosted by lack of liquor establishments in nearby Waimea town, and the alcohol needs of World War II soldiers. Wedding receptions and high school gatherings at the Club have knit the Honoka‘a community together for generations.

Honoka‘a People’s Theatre

The Honoka‘a People’s Theatre also fronts Māmane Street, the main street traversing Honokaʻa, a town of almost 3,000 people. The classical revival building is characterized by its symmetric facade with pilasters, cornice and false front parapet.

Honokaa Peoples Theater Historic

It sits on a concrete foundation, which is raised toward the rear, and has a corrugated metal, front facing, gable roof with overhanging eaves and exposed rafter tails. The Honoka‘a People’s Theatre has been a center of community life since its opening in 1930. Its ability to accommodate both live and moving picture entertainment has led to extensive use as a multipurpose facility. Generations of audiences and performers have here experienced ethnic dances, music festivals, plays, and cultural exhibitions. The theater has been a venue for political/economic speeches and rallies. Its size and facilities, as the largest theater on the island outside of Hilo, attract people to Honokaʻa.

These two properties were added to the Hawai‘i Register of Historic Places in May this year. The Hawai‘i Historic Places Review Board at that time recommended that they be nominated for inclusion in the National Register.  Properties are eligible for inclusion in the Hawaiʻi register because of their association with broad patterns or events, or individuals important in the history of Hawai‘i. Inclusion in the National Register signifies that they also meet the requirements for national recognition. Places included in the registers are usually significant in architecture and design, or are likely to yield important information, and their features retain their qualifying integrity.  On October 16, 2015, the National Park Service did add the two sites to the National Register of Historic Places.

For additional information, please contact:  Megan Borthwick, 808.692.8015

No Confirmed Cases of Dengue Fever at NHCH

As of November 5, there have been a total of 15 confirmed cases of locally acquired dengue fever on the Big Island. There have been no confirmed cases at North Hawaii Community Hospital but hospital personnel are on alert for possible exposure.

Mosquito Bite

Dengue fever is a viral illness spread by mosquitoes. Dengue is not spread directly from one person to another. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as many as 400 million people worldwide are infected every year. There are not yet any vaccines to prevent infection with dengue virus and the most effective protective measures are those that avoid mosquito bites. When infected, early recognition and prompt treatment can greatly lower the risk of medical complications.

Dengue symptoms generally appear between five and seven days after a bite by an infected mosquito. Symptoms include high fever, joint and muscle pain, severe headache, eye pain, and rash. People with mild cases may have only a fever. Uncomplicated dengue cases usually resolve within two to seven days.

Individuals suspected or confirmed to have dengue are instructed to stay indoors and avoid mosquito bites during their first week of illness. Patients should be encouraged to aggressively control and eliminate mosquitoes around their homes and businesses by eliminating areas of standing water. Windows and door screens should be checked for holes and tears and repaired as needed. Individuals should use mosquito repellents containing 20–30% DEET (diethyltoluamide) and wear long sleeves and pants when possible.

If you think that you or family member may have contracted dengue, you are encouraged to call the Hawaii Department of Health Dengue Hotline (808) 586-8362 or contact your primary care physician immediately. Additional information is available at http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/dib/disease/dengue/

Shark Attacks Swimmer at Kehena Beach on the Big Island of Hawaii

Reports are now coming in that a swimmer at Kehena Beach on the East Side of the Big Island of Hawaii… was attacked by a shark today.

Kehena Beach

Kehena Beach

Kehena Beach is known to be a “clothing optional” black sand beach in the Puna District of the Big Island.

I’m still waiting for the official DLNR report to be released.

Hawaii Island Veterans Day Parade November 7th

Major General Arthur “Joe” Logan, the Adjutant General (TAG) for the State of Hawaii, will be honored as military grand marshal of the eighth annual Hawaii Island Veterans Day Parade. The Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Auxiliary to Post 3830 (Pahoa) will also be honored during this year’s parade as community parade marshal. The parade will start at 10 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 7, in downtown Hilo.

Veterans ParadeThis year’s parade theme, “Celebrate Service,” is intended to honor veterans, celebrate community service, and inspire us with many ways to serve. All veterans, businesses, community service groups, and their families are encouraged to participate or watch.

Logan was appointed as the Hawaii TAG on January 1, 2015. He is a combat veteran with over 36 years of military service, and oversees the training and readiness of 5,500 Soldiers and Airmen of the Hawaii National Guard. He also serves as the Director, Hawaii Emergency Management Agency, provides direct support to the Office of Veterans Services, and is the Homeland Security Advisor to the Governor. As a combat veteran, “Logan well understands the importance of service to the nation and its value within our communities,” said Wendell Kaehuaea, the vice chair of this annual event.

Taking over from chair emeritus Dan Kama, this year’s parade chair is Colonel (Retired) Deb Lewis. A combat veteran with nearly 34 years in uniform, she worked side-by-side with the National Guard in Iraq and in her last assignment in Washington State. Lewis shared, “It is our honor to have MG Logan as this year’s grand marshal. The National Guard, our citizen soldiers, serve our communities, state, and country in many ways. Military personnel regularly risk their lives to keep us safe from all types of manmade and natural threats, both foreign and domestic. The Guard has proudly held that tradition for almost 400 years.”

This year’s community parade marshal, the VFW Auxiliary to Post 3830, really understands the many ways each of us, separately and together, can make a difference in the lives of others. The Auxiliary works closely with many groups to assist those who need all types of support, especially veterans, who can often be the most reluctant to seek help.

Lewis and husband Doug Adams (a veteran and parade secretary) were introduced to the Auxiliary at a breakfast right before Adams finished an 18,067 mile bike ride to all 50 states in one year- the Duty, Honor, America Tour – to honor veterans and families. “Most people want to help. Sometimes they are unaware how easy it is for them to improve the quality of life of others in important ways. Teaming up with the VFW Auxiliary and other community-based or veteran support organizations is a great way to benefit everyone,” said Adams.

“We are calling for all veterans to join the parade on Nov. 7, and inviting our island community – businesses, service groups and their families – to participate and be inspired in some way to Celebrate Service,” said Lewis.

Be sure to check out our parade plans, find out about our talented parade units, and the many ways you can “Help Our Heroes” at www.HIVetParade.org

All Veterans, bands, horses, floats, military vehicles and community groups will form up at the staging area near the King Kamehameha statue on Bishop Street. After the helicopter orchid drop, the roaring thunder of parade motorcyclists will lead off the parade shortly after 10 a.m.

The parade route in Hilo will start makai of Pauahi Street and travel mauka to Kilauea Avenue. Next, it will travel north through downtown Hilo until it reaches Waianuenue Avenue and then makai until Kamehameha Avenue. Traveling along Hilo Bayfront, it will return to the starting point. A large American flag and the official reviewing stand will be along Kamehameha Avenue near the soccer field road entrance.

“The Veterans Day Parade can only be held with the generous support of local business and individuals, and through fundraising efforts,” said Kaehuaea. “Our committee members are strictly volunteers who give of their time and efforts to support and organize this parade because of the importance to recognize our Hawaii Island veterans and ohana.” For more information, call Kaehuaea at 640-1435 or email him at bivetparade@yahoo.com.


Rep. San Buenaventura Hosting Community Meeting With House Leadership in Pahoa

A community meeting hosted by Representative Joy San Buenaventura and joined by State House leadership and Big Island representatives will be held on Thursday, November 5, 2015 from 5pm – 7pm at the Pahoa Community Center.
Joy Meeting
Representatives that are scheduled to appear and hear feedback on issues that matter to their constituents are:

  • Rep. Joy San Buenaventura
  • House Speaker Joe Souki
  • Vice Speaker John M. Mizuno
  • Majority Leader Scott Saiki
  • Majority Floor Leader Cindy Evans
  • Finance Chair Sylvia Luke
  • Rep. Mark Nakashima
  • Rep. Richard Creagan

The Community Center is located at 15-3016 Kauhale Street in Pahoa.

Lawmakers Visit Big Island – Focus on Agriculture, Medical Care and Economic Development

Members of the House Finance Committee, chaired by Representative Sylvia Luke, toured various sites on Hawaii Island to view first hand several projects and programs supported by the Legislature. The site visits provided committee members first hand insight into the status of ongoing projects and on other needs of the district.

House Finance Committee visits Waimea.  Photos Courtesy of House Majority Communications

House Finance Committee visits Waimea. Photos Courtesy of House Majority Communications

Representatives Richard Onishi and Nicole Lowen who serve on the Finance Committee were joined by fellow Big Island lawmakers Clift Tsuji, Mark Nakashima, Cindy Evans and Richard Creagan on a wide range of activities that included a status update and site visit of Hilo Medical Center.

Committee members visit Ookala Dairy Farm.  Photos Courtesy of House Majority Communications

Committee members visit Ookala Dairy Farm. Photos Courtesy of House Majority Communications

The committee visited Hamakua Mushrooms, Ookala Dairy Farm, Big Island Beef and met with Kamuela farmers to discuss and learn about their issues and concerns.  The legislators also received a briefing by Hawaiian Homestead farmers participating in the Waimea Regional Community and Economic Development Program.

In Kona the committee toured projects at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii including the Taylor Shell Fish Farm and Cyanotech.

Zonta Service Project Presents $10K to Neighborhood Place of Puna

The Zonta Club of Hilo organized a Halloween party—“Halloween Madness”—for more than 125 individuals at the Neighborhood Place of Puna (NPP) on October 24.

Zonta Club of Hilo president, Tonya Ozone, presents $10,000 Weinbeg Foundation grant award to Paul Norman of Neighborhood Place of Puna.  Photo by Jenna Roussy

Zonta Club of Hilo president, Tonya Ozone, presents $10,000 Weinbeg Foundation grant award to Paul Norman of Neighborhood Place of Puna. Photo by Jenna Roussy

“Halloween Madness” was done as part of The Harry & Jeannette Weinberg Foundation’s Weinberg Friends Program, which gave the Zonta Club’s chosen non-profit $10,000 upon completion of a sweat equity project. The Halloween-themed event was the Zonta Club of Hilo’s 2015 project.

Hilo Zontians kicked off the event with direct work activities including installing curtain rods and curtains to help cut glare in NPP’s multipurpose room, and creating 20 holiday readiness cleaning buckets as well as 200+ personal hygiene kits for families in need.

Following the work session, 25 client families with four to six children ranging in age from months to 12-years-old, were invited to make healthy snacks including a vegetable witch’s broom and Oreo cookie spider; visit the craft station and create monster magnets, decorate trick-or-treat bags or fold origami; and select an outfit from the costume closet. Target Hilo donated $400 worth of Halloween costumes to help fill the closet.

“It was the Zonta Club of Hilo’s absolute pleasure to support the good work Neighborhood Place of Puna does to empower area families with knowledge and resources,” said Julie Tulang, organizer for event. “Hilo Zontians and volunteers found it very rewarding to be able to interact with the families in the spook-tacular spirit of Halloween.”

After the morning’s work and Halloween activity sessions, Zonta Club of Hilo president, Tonya Ozone, presented a $10,000 grant award to NPP Executive Director, Paul Norman, to support Neighborhood Place of Puna’s “Kamalama Parenting Project,” a parenting curriculum to help area families raise healthy children in a safe, stable home environment.

Queens and princesses from Lehua Hawaii Productions (LHP) were on-hand to volunteer at “Halloween Madness.” Prior to the event, LHP in partnership with Zonta Hilo, hosted a costume and personal care items drive to secure donations.

For the last 17 years, the Zonta Club of Hilo has taken part in The Harry & Jeannette Weinberg Foundation’s Weinberg Friends Program.

Community Forum on Invasive Species and Plant Pest Issues in West Hawaii

Hawaii House Representative Nicole Lowen is hosting a public forum for West Hawaii residents on Tuesday, November 10th to learn more about invasive species issues that are affecting homes, agriculture, and native forests on Hawaii Island.


Topics will include fire ants, coqui frogs, coffee berry borer beetle, ohia wilt, and other invasive species and plant pest issues.

A panel of experts will include representatives from the Department of Agriculture, the Invasive Species Council, the Coordinating Group on Alien Pest Species, and the University of Hawaii. Panelists will each give a brief presentation, followed by an opportunity for moderated questions from the audience.

Panelist include: Neil J. Reimer, Ph.D., Robert T. Curtiss, Christy Martin, J.B. Friday Ph.D., and Springer Kaye and will be held at the West Hawaii Civic Center – Council Chambers (Building A) from 6:00p.m. – 7:30 p.m. with the doors opening at 5:30.

Public Meeting To Address Improvements To Hapuna Beach State Recreation Area

Planned improvements to Hapuna Beach State Recreation Area in Waimea between Kawaihae and Puako, are the subject of a community meeting taking place from 5 to 7 p.m. on Thursday, October 29, 2015, at the mauka dining hall in the park.

Hapuna Beach

Hapuna Beach

The Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of State Parks is interested in receiving community thoughts, concerns and issues in regards to the following:

  • Park improvements of existing facilities in the makai and mauka sections of the park, including the Waialea park section – these improvements are currently in design.
  • Obtaining Old Puako Road from the County of Hawai‘i – the County roadway bisects through the park and obtaining this property will allow for security and safety measures and appropriate roadway improvements to be implemented by State Parks.
  • Future directions and improvements at the park.

Future planned renovations will include:

  • Installation of photo voltaic panels on the makai comfort stations and mauka comfort stations and dining hall – augment energy cost servicing these facilities.
  • Renovations of the mauka structures – A-frame comfort station and dining hall:  new fixtures, floor repairs, shower replacements, accessible spaces and new plumbing lines in the comfort station; new appliances, new pantry storage, new countertops and sink, drainage improvements, new wind screens, new barbecue, new lighting and accessible space improvements for dining tables.

In 2013, parking improvements were constructed for the Hapuna Beach and Waialea sections.

Historic Conservation Agreement Forever Preserves North Shore Coastline

Land conservation history was made today as Turtle Bay Resort and a collaboration of entities led by the State of Hawai‘i, completed an agreement to preserve in perpetuity almost 630 acres of open space along O‘ahu’s North Shore coastline. The transaction was recorded in the State’s Bureau of Conveyances as Escrow No. 210-15066667.

“Today marks the formal beginning of a partnership that will forever preserve this precious stretch of land for generations to come,” said Gov. Ige.

Gov. Ige signed into law Senate Bill 284 on June 12, 2015, following the initiative of the Hawai‘i State Senate and the State House of Representatives which created legislation supporting this historic agreement. The details of the agreement were approved by the State Board of Land and Natural Resources on September 25, 2015.

The property protected by this conservation agreement covers more than four miles from Kahuku Point to Kawela Bay and represents nearly four percent of O‘ahu’s coastline.

The agreement between Turtle Bay Resort, the State of Hawai‘i, City and County of Honolulu, U.S. Army and The Trust for Public Land is supported by a host of community groups and stakeholders, including the North Shore Community Land Trust.

North Shore Community Land Trust

The land acquired by the City and County of Honolulu under its Clean Water Act grant funding is located in Kawela Bay near a 4.9 acre site that will be dedicated as a public park for recreational use by residents and visitors.

 “Today is a victory for everyone who believes in private public partnerships and the ability to find solutions that fairly and wisely balance the interests of landowners, the environment and the community. We are very grateful to Gov. Ige for his leadership and partnership, and are thankful for all the support from our state and county lawmakers and community residents. This settles decades of disagreement on the future of Turtle Bay Resort. Everyone wins with this conservation agreement,” said Drew Stotesbury, chief executive officer for Turtle Bay Resort.

The U.S. Army, in partnership with The Trust for Public Land, contributed $2.5 million toward the conservation agreement via the Army Compatible Use Buffer Program (ACUB), which preserves land around military installations. The Army’s Kahuku Training Area is its largest on O‘ahu and is used by all of the military services for ground and aviation training.

At the grassroots level, the North Shore Community Land Trust (NSCLT) was vital in providing Turtle Bay Resort officials with both perspective and guidance from the Ko‘olauloa and North Shore communities on the need to reach an agreement acceptable to residents’ interests.

Scott McCormack, vice president, Turtle Bay Resort noted that the resort’s remaining development rights – 725 units, or 20 percent of what was allowable before this agreement – represent an opportunity to create much needed employment for area residents, while also conserving massive amounts of open space. Moreover, gaining approval of this residual development plan from key stakeholder groups was key to the agreement.

Reactions to the closing

U.S. Senator Brian Schatz

“This is a victory for the community that has fought for so long and so hard to ‘keep the country country’. More than 600 acres of conservation land will be preserved in perpetuity. This historic agreement is the result of a collaborative effort by many to reach a resolution on the future of one of the last undeveloped coastlines on Oahu. I thank Governor Ige, Mayor Caldwell, other State, City and County officials, and conservation leaders who came together to protect the natural beauty of Kawela Bay. This agreement ensures the availability of healthy coastline that is home to monk seals, sea turtles, whales and other fish and wildlife unique to our state. It also provides community access to the area so that it can be enjoyed for generations.”

U.S. Senator Mazie K. Hirono, member of the Senate Armed Services and Energy and Natural Resources Committees

“The preservation of nearly five miles of coastline along O‘ahu’s north shore ensures that this open space will be enjoyed by future generations. Today’s agreement reinforces the value of public-private partnerships coming together to find meaningful solutions that benefit the community. I appreciate the work of the Ige administration, City and County of Honolulu, Turtle Bay Resort, the North Shore community, and the U.S. Army through its program to protect habitat and buffer training.”

U.S. Representative Tulsi Gabbard

“This collaboration between state and local government, the North Shore community, and private businesses is what made this historic agreement possible.  The preservation of one of our most iconic and precious resources – O‘ahu’s North Shore coastline – is something that current and future generations will benefit from.”

U.S. Representative K. Mark Takai

“I would like to applaud Governor Ige, Turtle Bay Resort, the City and County of Honolulu, US Army, The Trust for Public Land and the North Shore Community Land Trust for their work on securing this public-private venture that is good for the community, good for conservation efforts, and good for the U.S. Army. This is a win-win deal that allows the Hawaii tourism industry to thrive, allows the Army to continue much-needed training, all while protecting and preserving the natural beauty for those that live in the community and that attracts many to vacation in the Turtle Bay area.”

Gil Riviere, Senator, District 23, O‘ahu’s North and Windward Shores

“The people of Hawai‘i and our visitors will forever enjoy the beautiful Kawela Bay and miles of pristine coastline because of this landmark agreement. The Senate is pleased to have helped make this land conservation plan a reality under the leadership of Governor Ige and with the cooperation of so many diverse parties.”

Joseph M. Souki, Speaker, State House of Representatives

“This is a day to celebrate. Kawela Bay is now preserved for future generations thanks to the efforts of the many who recognized its importance to the community.”

Kirk Caldwell, Mayor, City and County of Honolulu

“This is the successful result of an effort that has spanned decades, with the kokua of government, the private sector, and community organizations. The fact that over 600 pristine acres are being preserved forever is a testament to the North Shore community and a tremendous gift to future generations of residents and visitors. This historic agreement is proof that great things are possible when everyone works together with aloha.”

Ernest Martin, chair, Honolulu City Council

“The Honolulu City Council, which committed the first investment in this endeavor through a $5 million budget appropriation in 2014, is very pleased with the result. The recordation today concludes a long and complex process. The real winners in this are the people, who can now rest assured that this land will be forever preserved and protected in its near pristine form. Future generations will be able to experience this unique area in the same manner as we are able to today. The City looks forward to its role in this historic partnership and develop the planned park and recreational area for all to enjoy.”

Col. Richard Fromm, commander, U.S. Army Garrison-Hawai‘i

“For the Army, these kinds of partnerships are a necessity. We have to preserve our soldiers’ ability to train, and ACUB projects allow us to do that in a way that benefits the community and the military.”

Gregg Takara, chair of The Trust for Public Land’s Hawaiian Islands Advisory Board

“Conserving this land would not have been possible without the North Shore community’s decades long commitment, the strong support of our congressional delegation for buffer funding, and the U.S. Army Garrison Hawai‘i’s coordination with public agencies and community organizations on its buffer program. Mahalo to the governor, the legislature, the mayor, the city council, the landowner Turtle Bay Resort and the thousands of people who made phone calls, sent emails and testified in support of saving this land for our children and generations to come.”

Doug Cole, executive director, North Shore Community Land Trust

“The community is forever grateful to everyone who helped us preserve one of the island’s only remaining undeveloped shorelines. This is a wonderful example of how much can be accomplished when government, community and the private sector all work together. Thanks to this excellent collaboration, future generations will enjoy this special place forever!”

Men in High Heels Raise Awareness of Sexual Assault In Hawaii Island’s Fifth Annual “Walk A Mile in Her Shoes”

YWCA Hawaii Island hosts the fifth annual “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” fundraiser Saturday, October 24 at 7:30 a.m.  In East Hawaii, the one-mile march begins at the YWCA Ululani Street campus. In West Hawaii, the march will be at the Kona International Market. October is Domestic Violence Awareness month, a call to end sexual assault, rape and gender violence in the community.

Mayor Kenoi and his shoes that he wore in 2012

Mayor Kenoi and his shoes that he wore in 2012

Mayor Billy Kenoi and radio personality Darrin “DC” Carlson will lead the march from Hilo. The Sex Assault Response team, including Captain Chad Basque from the Hawaii Police Department (HPD) will lead the Kona march. Also joining the march and leading the HPD team is Deputy Chief Paul Ferreira.

All proceeds from the event directly benefit the YWCA Hawaii Island Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS) program, the only 24-hour, 7-days a week rape crisis center for the island. SASS services are free and include crisis counseling, therapy for assault victims and their families, forensic evidence collection and violence prevention education for schools and the community.

“We know that nationally, one of four women and one of six men are sexually assaulted by the time they are 18. That’s unacceptable,” said Kathleen McGilvray, CEO of YWCA Hawaii Island. “On our island, about 50 percent of our SASS clients are 18 and under. ‘Walk a Mile’ is a chance to see what is like to literally walk in women’s shoes. Every dollar raised by walkers helps survivors address and move through the trauma of sexual assault.”

The event is sponsored by KTA Super Stores, The Gas Company, Hemic, National Fire Protection, Kinetic Learning, Atlas Insurance and First Hawaiian Bank.

March participants are asked to report to the kick-off sites by 7:30 a.m. to register, select their shoes and warm up for the walk. All participants must complete an entry form and submit a $10 fee. The community is invited to participate in the event and help raise funds to meet the $25,000 goal. For more information, call the YWCA Hawaii Island office at 935-7141 x111 or email events@ywcahawaiiisland.org.