Keaʻau Christmas Lighted Parade, Dec. 9

The 14th annual Keaʻau Christmas Lighted Parade is scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 9, 2017. This year’s theme is A Paniolo Christmas.

The night will commence with pre-parade Christmas caroling through the village beginning at approximately 5:30 p.m., followed by the parade at 5:45 p.m. Come and enjoy an evening of music, bright lights and fun for all.

Parade space is still available.

For more information, contact Monica at (808) 895-6288 or email monmac@hawaii.rr.com.

Waiānuenue Resurfacing Begins Nov. 13

Resurfacing work on Waiānuenue Avenue will start from Kamehameha Avenue intersection and proceed to Ka‘iulani Street beginning on Monday, Nov. 13, 2017.

Motorists heading in the mauka direction from Kamehameha Avenue to Kino‘ole Street will be redirected to Wailuku Drive as a one-way travel pattern on Waiānuenue Avenue in the makai direction will be in effect.

Motorists are advised to drive with caution as emergency response vehicles will be allowed to travel in both directions through the work zone at all times.

Travel lanes from Keawe Street to Wailuku Drive will remain open.

The one-way travel restriction will be in effect from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, and travel in both directions will be restored at the end of the workday. Normal traffic patterns in this area will be restored once the project has proceeded past the Kino‘ Street and Waiānuenue Avenue. intersection.

Special off-duty police officers will be in the area to facilitate traffic movement during the lane closures and lane shifts. Motorists are advised to expect delays and are encouraged to use alternate routes.

Questions or concerns, contact Information and Education Specialist Barett Otani at (808) 961-8787.

Aloha From Lavaland Documentary Debuts Online

Courtesy image

Hawaiian anthropological documentary Aloha From Lavaland is scheduled to be released on Amazon and iTunes on Nov. 15, 2017. The film follows the aftermath of the 2014 eruption of Hawai‘i’s Kilauea volcano, which sent a flow of lava directly toward the center of Pahoa, a small rural town on Hawai‘i Island.

Hard to predict and impossible to stop, the flow threatened to cut off the town’s only access road, leaving the residents of this remote community to rely heavily on one another as they prepare for possible isolation.

Produced in conjunction with Gift Culture Media, Larkin Pictures and Pure Mother Love, this 55 minute documentary explores an inner community perspective of the lava flow, following residents as they ask and answer important questions about community, sustainability, harmony, and what it really means to live in such an unpredictable paradise.

In addition to street interviews and news coverage, the documentary follows a local Hawaiian kumu (healer), a sustainability expert and the leader of a sovereign Hawaiian community over a period of seven months as they attempt to prepare for the unpreparable.

“Puna is unlike any place I’ve ever lived,” says co-director Suzenne Seradwyn, who has created films in Los Angeles, New Mexico and Hawai‘i. “The people here have different values because of the natural elements at play and the rich cultural history surrounding those elements. There is a very important message to share about what happens when you allow yourself to trust these elements.”

“This film is important for anyone living in a state of change, whether it be due to external elements or an internal shift,” says the film’s co-director, Phillips Payson. “Part of what this film explores is how one’s attitude toward change can make all the difference.” Before moving to the Big Island, Payson worked in the film industry in New York and Los Angeles. This is his fourth film.

Aloha from Lavaland premiered at the Hawai‘i International Film Festival and has won three awards including Best Hawai‘i Film at the Honolulu Film Awards.

To view the Aloha from Lavaland trailer, click here. You can also learn more about the film online.

 

Big Island Robotics Team Wins Sportsmanship Award at 2017 Pan Pacific VEX Championships

Na Paniolo, a robotics team from Kohala High, took home the Sportsmanship Award at the 2017 Pan Pacific VEX Robotics Championship.

Na Paniolo, a robotics team from Kohala High, took home the Sportsmanship Award at the 2017 Pan Pacific VEX Robotics Championship, photo credit: Art Kimura

Robotics teams from Sacred Hearts Academy and Pearl City High School won their respective competition “Excellence Awards” at the 2017 Pan Pacific VEX Robotics Championships, qualifying both to participate in the 2018 VEX World Championships to be held next April in Louisville, Kentucky. Seventy-nine teams from Hawaii, California and China participated in the weekend tournament sponsored by the Hawaiian Electric Companies and Okinawa Enetech with the support of the Engineers’ Council – University of Hawaii and Hawaii Space Grant Consortium.

The Excellence Award is the highest award presented in the VEX Championships, and is presented to a team that exemplifies overall excellence in building a high quality VEX robotics program.

In the VEX IQ Championships comprised of student teams in grades 3-8, the all-girl Sacred Hearts Academy team 2437A entered the finals with their sister team 2437B as the top seeded alliance. Ultimately, team 2437A took home the “Robot Skills Champion Award” and won the “Excellence Award.” According to organizers, team 2437A’s skills score has them ranked fourth in the world after the tournament.

In the VEX VRC Championship comprised of middle and high school students, Pearl City High School’s team 4142A earned the “Design Award” for their organized and professional approach to the design process, project and time management, and team organization, which are all program elements that helped them win the “Excellence Award.” This is the second consecutive year that Pearl City High School qualified for the VEX Worlds through their win at the Pan Pacific VEX.

Other top awards were handed to the Kailua-based Huakailani School for Girls and an independent team (Phoenixbots) from Mililani, which together earned the 2017 Pan Pacific VEX IQ Teamwork Champion Award for their two-team alliance.

A three-team alliance of Molokai High School, Waialua High & Intermediate School and the Rolling Robots from Rolling Hills Estates, California was named the 2017 Pan Pacific VEX VRC Tournament Champions.

Full results of the 2017 Pan Pacific VEX Robotics Championship can be found at www.robotevents.com.

Half of Hawaii’s Coral Bleached in One Year

Scientists estimate that beaching affected 56 percent of the coral around the Big Island, 44 percent of that along West Maui and 32 percent around Oahu over a one-year period spanning 2014-2015.

Researchers recently completed an 88-day expedition aboard the NOAA Ship Hi’ialakai to survey two remote regions in the Pacific. First, they traveled to the islands of Jarvis, Howland, Baker and Wake, all part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. Then they traversed to the Mariana Archipelago, working their way up the island chain from the populated islands in the south to remote locations in the north.

map of mission area

During the expedition, researchers collected data to evaluate climate and ocean change, coral ecosystem health, and the extent of coral bleaching. Scientists with NOAA, the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, San Diego University, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution participated in the mission.

1. Coral Bleaching in the Pacific

The Pacific Islands experienced unusually warm ocean temperatures in the last few years, during the longest global coral bleaching event on record to date. Prior to the bleaching event, Jarvis Island had very high coral cover. Preliminary surveys in 2015 and 2016 indicated that most coral colonies died due to coral bleaching. While at Jarvis in 2017, researchers surveyed these coral reef communities and assessed the recovery potential from the thermal stress that caused the coral to bleach.
All images courtesy of NOAA:
Coral reef colonies near Jarvis Island; Image credit:Tate Wester

2. Bumphead Parrotfish

The giant bumphead parrotfish is an amazing fish that can live to be 40 years old, growing up to four feet long and 100 pounds. They use their large head bumps to literally bump heads during competitive displays, when large numbers of fish aggregate to spawn on a lunar cycle. Researchers saw many bumpheads during their first day at Wake Island. The bumphead parrotfish has been heavily targeted by fishing throughout much of it’s range and is now considered globally rare by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
The giant Bumphead parrotfish; credit: Andrew E. Gray
 3. Reef Life

On the east side of Agrihan Island, an octopus takes off across the rocky reef after being discovered by a diver. All reef life is important, including this clever invertebrate. These fascinating creatures can rapidly change color to blend in with their surroundings, making them difficult to spot.

octopus near Agrihan Island; credit Louise Giuseffi)
 4. Crown-of-thorns Sea Stars

The scientists found many crown-of-thorns sea stars at Alamagan Island. These prickly invertebrates feed on coral tissue. Here, the sea star leaves only the skeleton of this Acropora coral in its wake. In large numbers, they can do significant damage to coral reefs, but in small numbers, they are a natural key component of the coral reef ecosystem.

Crown-of-thorns sea stars at Alamagan Island; credit: Keisha Bahr
 5. A Rare Sighting

An extremely rare sighting at Farallon de Pajaros, scientists found this female angelfish after completing their fish survey. Little is published about this species beyond aquarium enthusiast blogs. Some describe it as being endemic to the Bonin or Osagawara Islands just south of Japan, although the researchers discovered this fish within the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument waters during their expedition.

Rare anglefish species; credit: NOAA, Andrew E. Gray)
 6. Volcanic Vents

Underwater volcanic vents near the Maug Islands release carbon dioxide gas that cause surrounding waters to acidify—a localized example of how carbon dioxide emissions in our atmosphere cause global climate change and ocean acidification. Maug’s carbon dioxide vents occur near coral reef ecosystems, allowing scientists to glimpse the future of these ecosystems along a naturally occurring gradient of changing ocean chemistry conditions.

Maug's underwater volcanic vents; credit: Kaylyn McCoy)
 7. Bubble Coral

Despite their appearance, these Plerogyra corals, also known as bubble coral, are actually a type of Scleractinian, or hard coral. The tissue is soft and bubble-like, and hides the hard skeleton underneath.

Bubble coral; credit: Tate Wester
 8. Colorful Nudibranch

Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS) uncover many beautiful creatures, including this nudibranch. a nudibranch; credit: Ingrid Knapp)

9. Healthy Coral

Corals at Pagan Island seem to have fared much better than other areas hit hardest by the recent global coral bleaching event. Here is a close-up of an Acropora coral (typically more susceptible to bleaching events), which appears to be doing just fine.
healthy coral in Pagan; credit: Ingrid Knapp
 10. Stars in the Sand

If you look closely in the sand, sometimes you can find “star dust,” or the star-shaped skeletal remains of Foraminifera, microscopic unicellular organisms that form an important part of the marine food chain.

Star-shaped skeletal remains of Foraminifera, microscopic unicellular protists; credit: Louise Giuseffi)

Town Hall Meeting on Healthcare Set for Puna District

Pāhoa Community Center. Big Island Now Photo

The East Hawai‘i Regional Board of Directors of the Hawai‘i Health Systems Corporation will hold its annual community meeting on Thursday, Nov. 9, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Pāhoa Community Center.

The Board and Regional Administration will provide an overview of the operations and financial condition of all of the facilities, as well as a view toward the future.

“The East Hawai‘i Regional Board is looking forward to hearing your input and ideas for healthcare in the Puna District,” said Dr. Dan Belcher, Chair of the East Hawai‘i Regional Board of HHSC.

Members of the community are invited to share their perspectives and concerns regarding access to healthcare services.

The East Hawai‘i Regional Board of Directors was created by the Hawai‘i State legislature under Act 290 in 2007.

For more information contact Terry Larson, Regional Board Secretary at 932-3103.

The Pāhoa Community Center is located at 15-3022 Kauhale Street.

New State Highway Data Now Available on HDOT Website

The Hawaiʻi Department of Transportation Highways Division recently added useful datasets to its website.

Screen shot image of HDOT map. Hawaii Department of Transportation.

The public can now view pavement conditions and average annual daily traffic volume for state roads on all islands, and view the locations of fatal traffic crashes from 2012 to 2016. The new data also provides monthly updates on current and future road projects.

In July, HDOT released a user-friendly map that shows the schedule, scope, and estimated cost for all current State Highways projects as well as all projects planned to begin construction in the next two years.

“We’re sharing the data we’ve collected with the public in the interest of transparency,” said HDOT Deputy Director for Highways Ed Sniffen. “Now members of the public can easily access highways safety and other helpful information that is used to guide our programs.”

The new data shows Average Annual Daily Traffic as the total volume of vehicle traffic over a road over the course of a year divided by 365 days. HDOT gathers AADT through a combination of permanent, in-ground traffic counting stations, overhead cameras, and temporary traffic counters or tubes.

The Fatal Crash data is compiled from completed traffic investigation reports. To be considered a motor vehicle fatality in the state of Hawaiʻi, a fatal crash must involve a motor vehicle traveling on a traffic way customarily open to the public and must result in a death of at least one person (occupant of a vehicle or a non-motorist) within 30 days of the crash. The data is provided for highway safety and educational purposes only.

According to the data, 495 fatal crashes occurred in the state of Hawaiʻi between 2012 to 2016. The primary contributing factor to 188 (38%) of those crashes was alcohol. Drugs was the contributing factor to 90 (18%) of those crashes, followed by speeding resulting in 52 (10.5%) of the fatal crashes.

According to HDOT data, on Hawaiʻi island there were 112 fatal crashes that occurred between 2012 and 2016. Alcohol was the primary factor in 41 (36.6%) of the fatalities, followed by drugs with 26 (23.2%).

Pavement condition data is gathered through Laser Crack Measurement System, a remote sensing method that compiles three-dimensional information, such as cracking or rutting, on roadways. The LCMS data HDOT uses is gathered by a vehicle mounted unit that drives over state roads on a biennial basis (each individual road under state jurisdiction is surveyed once every other year).

The majority of roads on Hawaiʻi island were considered fair.

Datasets such as the pavement conditions and average annual daily traffic figures will be updated on an annual basis. HDOT says fatal crash data is updated as traffic incident reports are finalized and the last year of available data is 2016.

The ESRI powered map is currently optimized for the Chrome browser. Questions or comments on the map may be sent to DOTPAO@hawaii.gov

North Kona Water Restriction Update

The County of Hawai‘i Dept. of Water Supply has announced that as of mid-October, Honokōhau deep well has been repaired and is currently operational.

However, DWS officials say Hualālai and Keahuolū deep wells went offline the first and second weeks of October, respectively.

At this time, DWS says four of thirteen wells are out of service in the North Kona area leaving the DWS’s 25% Water Restriction in effect.

Kona water tank levels have been and continue to remain stable. The DWS is constantly monitoring the water system and making adjustments as necessary.

The DWS appreciates the community’s efforts to reduce their water usage. For more information visit  www.hawaiidws.org, or call (808) 961-8060 during normal business hours or email dws@hawaiidws.org. For after hour emergencies, call (808) 961-8790.

Kolten Wong Meet and Greet at Jamba Juice Hilo

Kolten Wong. Photo Courtesy

Hilo-native and St. Louis Cardinals second baseman Kolten Wong will make a homecoming appearance at Jamba Juice in the Prince Kuhio Plaza on Friday, Nov. 3.

Fans will have the opportunity to take pictures with the major leaguer and have autographs signed from 7:30 to 9 a.m.

Attendees will also be able to try in-store samples and win many prizes including free Jamba Juice for a year, a free 15-pack smoothie pack and more.

Wong graduated from Kamehameha High School on Hawai‘i Island, and also attended and played ball for the UH Manoa Rainbow Warriors. He has been playing Major League baseball with the St. Louis Cardinals since 2013.

This past season Kolten batted .285, his highest batting average in the big leagues.

Also on hand will be The Beat FM 95.9 East Hawai‘i and 93.9 West Hawai‘i for a live broadcast.

Jamba Juice Hilo is located at 111 Puainako Street.

Puna Man Arrested in Connection With a Shooting Incident

The Hawaiʻi Island Police Department have arrested a Puna man in connection with a shooting incident.

Yesterday, Oct. 29 at 2:23 p.m., officers responded to a North Road residence in Mt. View for a report of a man who had been shot. The 24-year-old victim, who lives at the residence, was found in the yard with a gunshot wound to his head. A firearm was recovered at the scene. The victim was transported by ambulance to the Hilo Medical Center and later flown to O’ahu in critical condition.

Mahdi Hemmat. HPD Photo

At 2:45 p.m., 28-year-old Mahdi Hemmat, who also resides at that address, was arrested at the scene and taken to the Hilo cellblock while detectives with the Area I Criminal Investigation Section continue the investigation that has been classified as a second degree attempted murder.

Anyone who may have any other information about this incident it is asked to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at (808) 935-3311 or Detective Grant Todd of the Area I Criminal Investigation Section at (808) 961-2381 or Grant.Todd@hawaiicounty.gov.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000.00. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers does not record calls or subscribe to any Caller ID service. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

This information was provided by the authorities. All suspects are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

Kahilu Theatre Presents Glenn Miller Orchestra Live at the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel

Sunday, November 12, 6:00 PM, Kahilu Theatre is holding their 3rd Swing Spectacular featuring the World Famous Glenn Miller Orchestra. The event takes place in the grand ballroom of the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel. Tickets are $45 per person, General Admission, and $75 per person, for VIP seating. A no host bar and themed cuisine will be on offer. Proceeds from this event benefit the Kahilu Theatre’s education program scholarship fund.

Says Kahilu Theatre Board President Mimi Kerley, “This is a wonderful opportunity for our island community to gather, to enjoy some of the best music from the ages, to dance to our heart’s content, and to honor our veterans. We encourage everyone to get in the mood and don their swing-era best! It will be an evening to remember – including prizes and surprises. ”

The Glenn Miller Orchestra is responsible for creating the most recognizable music in modern history, and has been hailed by some as the greatest band of all time. During the 1940’s Glenn Miller had more hit records than Elvis Presley and the Beatles, the Orchestra was truly a worldwide phenomena.

Led by Musical Director Richard Gerber with special guest appearance by members of The Moonlight Serenade Singers, Mark Kopitzke and Natalie Angst, all of the famous Glenn Miller classics will be performed at this Kahilu Presents event, showcasing the original music arrangements of timeless icons of American culture from the 1930s and 1940s, including Chattanooga Choo-Choo, A String of Pearls, Tuxedo Junction, Moonlight Serenade, Little Brown Jug and the Greatest Miller hit of all time, In The Mood.

Bandleader and musician Glenn Miller inspired the World War II generation and boosted morale with his many popular songs. He formed the Glenn Miller Orchestra in 1937, and a series of recordings followed. In 1942, at the peak of his civilian career, Miller decided to join the war effort. At 38, Miller was too old to be drafted, however, he persuaded the United States Army to accept him so he could, in his own words, “be placed in charge of a modernized Army band.”

In 1944, Glenn Miller mysteriously disappeared in flight over the English Channel from London to Paris.

His original recordings continue to in the sell millions. His legacy as the most influential and famous bandleader of all time and the icon of the golden swing era continues to inspire the current Glenn Miller Orchestra and its members.
Kahilu Theatre will present a special tribute to our Veterans at the event on November 12th. Dance performances from The Swing Kittens and the Kona Dance Academy will also add to the evening’s festivities.

Tickets are available online at www.kahilutheatre.org, by calling (808) 885-6868, or at the Kahilu Theatre Box Office, at 67-1186 Lindsey Road, Kamuela, HI 96743, Monday-Friday, from 9am to 1pm.

This performance is made possible by sponsorship from Nancy Lematta and the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel.

Big Island Police Asking Public’s Assistance in Identifying Pahoa Theft Suspect

Hawaiʻi Island police are asking for the public’s assistance in identifying a suspect from a theft that occurred in Pāhoa on (October 2).

Have you seen this man?

The male suspect is shown in the photo wearing a black ball cap, black T-shirt, and jeans.

Police ask anyone with information on this individual to call Officer Terrance Scanlan at the Pāhoa Police Department number (808) 965-2716 or the departments non-emergency line at (808) 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at (808) 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers does not record phone calls or subscribe to caller ID. Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Additional ‘Alalā Released Into Natural Area Reserve

Second Group of Rare Crows Joins First Group in Native Forests of Hawai’i Island

Five young ‘alalā, two females and three males, were released into Pu‘u Maka‘ala Natural Area Reserve (NAR) on the Island of Hawai‘i on Wednesday, October 11th.  This second group of birds joins a previous group that had been released into the forest at the end of September.  These eleven birds represent what conservationists hope will be the beginning of a recovered population of the endangered crow species on the island.

The ‘alalā, or Hawaiian crow, has been extinct in the wild since 2002, preserved only at the Keauhou and Maui Bird Conservation Centers managed by San Diego Zoo Global’s Hawaii Endangered Bird Conservation Program.

“Our efforts to bring this species back from the brink of extinction have been tremendously bolstered by our ability to protect a small population of ‘alalā in a conservation breeding program in Hawai‘i,” said Michelle Bogardus, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Geographic Team Leader for Maui Nui and the Hawai’i Islands.  “Now that we have built up the population to more than 125 birds at the Hawaiian Bird Center we can begin the long road to recovering this incredible species in its native habitat.”

The first group of ‘alalā released into the forests of Hawai‘i in late 2016 encountered predation pressures from the native Hawaiian hawk, or `Io.  Surviving birds from this first group were brought back into aviaries while a team of conservationists looked at ways to improve their chances in the next reintroduction.

“Knowing that there is a high mortality rate associated with releasing species into the wild, particularly in a situation like this where the species has been absent from native habitats for close to two decades, the ‘Alalā Working Group looked closely at how to improve the many factors that might affect the success of these two groups,” said Jackie Gaudioso-Levita, Project Coordinator of the ‘Alalā Project. “The team developed new strategies that took into account outcomes from the last release, while adapting management techniques to improve successful transition to the wild.”

The concerted reintroduction efforts, funded by the State of Hawai’i Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR), San Diego Zoo Global, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have addressed challenges by changing the timing of release to avoid the peak of winter storms, changing the release site location, releasing mixed-sex cohorts with established social associations, and enhancing the “antipredator training program” to reinforce the instinctual behaviors for responding to predators like `Io.

“The first group has stayed together, foraging close to the release aviary and creating social groups with each other similar to what we expect for young birds of this species,” said Joshua Pang-Ching, Research Coordinator for the Hawai‘i Endangered Bird Conservation Program.  “We also observed some alarm calling showing us that these individuals are very aware of their surroundings and are learning to respond to the natural threats that may occur in their environment.”

The team will continue to monitor the group of eleven birds in the NAR for years to come.  The NAR is an area that The Three Mountain Alliance and DLNR have worked for decades to preserve, protecting native plants and species, and it represents one of the types of habitat where ‘Alalā originally lived before their numbers began to decline.

‘Alalā have a legacy of being an integral part of the life of the Hawaiian forest, as they eat and assist with the dispersal of native plant seeds. ‘Alalā are not only ecologically significant as dispersers of Hawai’i’s native plants, but they are significantly revered in Hawaiian culture.  The reintroduction of this species is expected to play an important part in the overall recovery of native ecosystems.

Big Island Police Searching for 18-Year-Old Puna Man Wanted in Burglary Investigation

Hawaiʻi Island police are requesting the public’s assistance in locating an 18-year-old Puna man wanted in connection with a burglary investigation.

Donald Kepner

Sought is Donald Kepner, described as Caucasian, 5-feet-10-inches, 150 pounds, blue eyes and blonde hair. Kepner is known to frequent the Puna area.

Police ask anyone with information on his whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at (808) 935-3311 or Detective William Brown at (808) 961-8883 or William.brown@hawaiicounty.gov

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at (808) 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

End of an Era – Keaau Village Market Demolished

I just drove by Keaau Village Market and was stunned to see it getting demolished.

I spoke with a lady at 7-11 across the street and she said that there was going to be a CVS Longs Market moving into the parcel.

Hawaii Electric Light Company was on scene today removing it’s electrical equipment from the premise.

Businesses were given 30 days to move out of the location and October 15th was the last day tenants were able to remove their stuff.
The Hawaii Tribune heard rumors that Walgreens might be opening in the location and when I called Bill Walters of Shipman Park to confirm whether it would be CVS Longs or Walgreens he declined to comment and said an announcement would be forthcoming from the store themselves and not Shipman Park.

Walters did confirm that the Sakata Statue that was placed there in 2006 to celebrate the Filipino culture and the people of the area will remain in place and will be kept up by the new tenant.

The new store will begin construction soon and as soon as I confirm which store it is… I will let folks know.

 

Kona Coffee Cultural Festival Seeking Volunteers

The Kona Coffee Cultural Festival is looking for friendly, reliable volunteers of all ages to help with events throughout the ten days of Festival fun. Interested individuals, local businesses and community service groups are welcome and encouraged to participate.

Festival volunteers can assist the Festival in a variety of ways, including event set up, execution and breakdown, survey taking, greeters, traffic control, venue maintenance and post event clean-up.

The 47th Annual Kona Coffee Cultural Festival starts brewing Friday, November 3 through Sunday, November 12. Volunteer positions are available starting Monday, October 30 and continue throughout the Festival.

All interested volunteers are asked to email jkadooka@twc.comor phone 808-936-8320.

The award-winning Kona Coffee Cultural Festival is recognized as the oldest and one of the most successful food festivals in Hawaii. The 2017 Festival, November 3 through 12, includes 10 days of events that promote Hawaii’s unique culture and diversity and supports the Festival’s mission to preserve, perpetuate and promote Kona’s unique coffee heritage.

The Kona Coffee Cultural Festival is supported as a Signature Event by Hawaii Tourism Authority, and is made possible through the support of UCC Ueshima Coffee Co., Ltd., Kamehameha Schools, Alaska Airlines, Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union, Kawakami Family of Captain Cook Fund of the Hawaii Community Foundation and numerous other corporate and community donors.

Visit konacoffeefest.com for detailed Festival information. Connect with us on social media @konacoffeefest and #konacoffeefest

8th Annual UNCORKED Food & Wine Festival to Benefit Visitor Aloha Society of Hawai’i Island (VASH)

The Shops at Mauna Lani’s “Uncorked” Food & Wine Festival is an experience in great taste—from rich jazz to fine wines and delicious gourmet foods—on Saturday, November 11, from 6 to 8 p.m. The annual event is a benefit for the Visitor Aloha Society of Hawai‘i Island (VASH) which assists Hawai‘i visitors touched by adversity during their stay, from lost tickets to medical emergencies.

The evening stars multitalented vocalist Binti Bailey, whose diverse musical skills slide effortlessly from blues to classical, jazz to soul and more. A performer in-demand in Kona clubs and music venues, Bailey will release her premiere CD, “Honestly,” this year.

“I’ve been singing for as long as I can remember,” she said. “I started in the church, and much of my exposure was in my household. My dad used to sing with us a lot and we would listen to artists like Sam Cooke and Pavarotti, so it was nice and diverse. He took us to Broadway and to Sweet Honey in the Rock. We were always exposed to music.”

Binti Bailey

As if exposure to Binti’s music wasn’t enough, Uncorked guests can savor food tastings from the “izakaya-style” menu of Monstera, European flavors of The Blue Room, upscale vegan cuisine from Under the Bodhi Tree, contemporary island style by Tommy Bahama Restaurant & Bar, and the traditional sizzle of Ruth’s Chris Steak House.

In addition, acclaimed Kohala Coast restaurants will share samples of their specialties, including Mai Grille by Chef Allen Hess, Roy’s Waikoloa Bar & Grill, Sansei Seafood Restaurant & Sushi Bar, Sushi Shiono, Pueo’s Osteria, The Fairmont Orchid and others, with libations by Southern Wine & Spirits, Kona Brewing Company and more.

Uncorked attendees also get the chance to bid for bargains in the upscale silent auction, featuring wine tours and travel packages, golf, dining, island adventures and beautiful items from the The Shops’ stores. As a special bonus, ticket holders will receive great offers from participating stores and restaurants at The Shops at Mauna Lani on the night of the event with a “VIP Shopping & Dining Discount Card” valued at over $100 for future visits.

Tickets are $65 in advance or $80 on the day of the event, and may be purchased online in advance at www.Uncorked2017MaunaLani.bpt.me. Additional event parking will be available.

For more information, call 808-885-9501, or visit www.ShopsAtMaunaLani.com.

Roadway Resurfacing Work on Kīlauea Avenue

The County of Hawai‘i Highway Maintenance Division will begin resurfacing work on Kīlauea Ave. from the 4-mile bridge to Hale Manu Dr. on Wednesday, October 18, 2017, and is estimated to be completed by Friday, October 20, 2017. Working hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., weather conditions permitting.

Motorists are advised to expect delays and to drive with caution as heavy vehicles and machinery will be in the work zone. One lane closures, alternate lane closures, lane shifts will be in effect and at a minimum, one lane of travel (for two way traffic) will be provided at all times through the construction area. The lane closures are necessary to complete the roadway resurfacing work in a timely manner and for the safety of the workers and the traveling public.

The County of Hawai‘i Department of Public Works apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause and thanks the community for their patience and understanding.

If there are any questions or concerns, please contact Barett Otani, Information and Education Specialist at 961-8787.

Big Island Police Searching for Man Wanted for Sexual Assault and Outstanding Warrants

UPDATE: Hawaiʻi Island police have located 30-year-old Jesse Coley who was wanted on outstanding warrants. He arrested this afternoon, (October 16), and taken into custody.

Hawaiʻi Island police are searching for 30-year-old Jesse Coley of Kapaau who is wanted for sexual assault and outstanding warrants.

Jesse Coley

He is described as Caucasian, 5-feet-8-inches, 180 pounds with blue eyes and dark hair.

Police ask anyone with information on his whereabouts to call the Police Departments non-emergency line at (808) 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at (808) 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Bayfront Highway Still Closed

As of 10:30 today, Bayfront Highway remains closed between Pauahi Street and Waianuenue Avenue due to high waves washing debris on highway.

Use Kamehameha Avenue as an alternate route.