Lava Flow Continues to Advance – Gets Closer to Residents

The June 27th lava flow continues advancing eastward, with lava plunging into another ground crack

Click to enlarge

This wide view, looking west, shows the position of the June 27th flow front relative to the nearby Kaohe Homesteads subdivision. The front of the flow is moving through thick forest, and its position can be seen by the plumes of smoke above the center of the photograph. Near these active surface flows, there was also steaming from a ground crack, resulting from lava deep in the crack. The farthest point of this steaming was 1.7 km (1.1 miles) west of the boundary of the Kaohe Homesteads subdivision.

The June 27th lava flow remains active at its leading edge, where lava is spreading out slowly into thick forest and also plunging into one of the many deep ground cracks that form Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone. This Quicktime video shows the activity near the eastern edge of the flow. This swiftly moving stream of lava was about 2 meters (yards) wide, and was visible down to about 30 meters (100 feet) depth in the crack, where it disappeared from view.

Click to view movie

The Quicktime video above begins with a view of the steaming ground crack, where lava is moving deep within the crack. As the view rotates west, lava can be seen on the surface burning thick forest. Finally, the camera focuses on the eastern edge of the flow, where lava is plunging into the deep ground crack. This swiftly moving stream of lava was about 2 meters (yards) wide, and was visible down to about 30 meters (100 feet) depth in the crack, where it disappeared from view.

Commentary – Central Federal Lands Highway Division’s Lack of Transparency

The Central Federal Lands Highway Division has partnered with the Hawaii Department of Transportation to do improvements to eleven bridges statewide, along with three upcoming Daniel K. Inouye Highway phases (SR200(3),  Daniel K. Inouye Highway Extension and west side Daniel K. Inouye Highway runaway escape ramps).

Mrs. Irene Inouye, Governor Neil Abercrombie and Hawaii County Mayor Billy Kenoi dedicate the former Saddle Road as the Daniel K. Inouye Highway.

Mrs. Irene Inouye, Governor Neil Abercrombie and Hawaii County Mayor Billy Kenoi
dedicate the former Saddle Road as the Daniel K. Inouye Highway.

This CFLHD/HDOT partnership has already resulted in much-needed improvements to 40.27 out of 45.97 miles to the Daniel K. Inouye Highway. This is something everyone involved can be proud of. However, the HDOT and CFLHD need to do a better job engaging the public. These
agencies have done a poor job thus far. I had to get updates through the project engineer between 2004-2011 because the CFLHD’s Daniel K. Inouye Highway project website was never updated.

Dave Gedeon, the said project engineer up until late 2011, then passed me off to Mike Will. He and Mark Lloyd provided updates up until mid-2013. Then he stated I had to go through the Hawaii Department of Transportation public affairs office for any additional updates. I had to go through other sources since then, as its nearly impossible to get any response from the HDOT public affairs office.

I escalated my complaints to Anthony Foxx, the Secretary of Transportation and Gregory Nadeau, the acting FHWA administrator, recently. Mr. Nadeau reiterated that I should go through the HDOT public affairs office and told me the CFLHD’s Daniel K. Inouye Highway website would be updated on a regular basis.

I highly doubt the CFLHD or HDOT will follow through on Mr. Nadeau’s promises, which is why I am writing this commentary. The CFLHD and HDOT need to do a better job engaging the public’s participation in these projects.

Aaron Stene
Kailua-Kona

Lava Flow Map Updated – Flow Advances/Cascading Into Deep Crack

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of September 1, 2014.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

The area of the flow as mapped on August 29 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of September 1 is shown in red. The only place where lava significantly widened the margin was at the distal end of the flow, where lava in the forest had reached 12.6 km (7.8 miles) from the vent. Most lava at the far end of the flow, however, was cascading into a deep ground crack (brown line), which was steaming at the surface. The most distant steam, which may represent the leading end of the lava in the crack, was 12.9 km (7.9 miles) from the vent and 1.7 km (1.1 miles) from the east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray; the yellow line within the flow marks the lava tube.

Civil Defense Update – Lava Advances 200-300 Yards from Yesterday

Daily helicopter over flights and assessments of the eruption are being maintained.  This morning’s assessment showed that surface activity is continuing however is very slow and does to pose an immediate threat to neighboring areas.  The surface flow has advanced approximately 200-300 yards since yesterday morning.

Thermal image of Pu'u O'o now.

Thermal image of Pu’u O’o now.

Although the burning of vegetation is limited, due to the light winds and a noted inversion this morning, smoke conditions in some areas have been moderate to heavy.  Those conditions are expected to improve as the winds pickup and the inversion is lifted. There is not brush fire or wildland fire threat at this time.

Presently, the current activities and flow does not present with an immediate or imminent threat to area communities.

The location of the surface flow is approximately 1.3 miles southwest or upslope of the Wao Kele Puna Forest Reserve boundary.  Eruption activity will be monitored and additional updates will be provided.

Area residents are encouraged to continue to review their emergency plans in the event conditions change and should an evacuation be necessary.  As stated, the current flow activity does not present with an immediate or imminent threat.  This update is to keep area residents informed of current observations.

The public is advised that the flow cannot be accessed and is not visible from any public areas.  Please do not attempt to access the area as there are many cracks and dense vegetation.  In addition please refrain from attempting to do so through the Kaohe Homesteads subdivision and respect the privacy of area residents.  Enforcement officers of the State Department of Land and Natural Resources will be conducting patrols and reminding persons in the area of the restricted access.

Civil Defense Update – Lava Flow Extends From Crack Entry

Daily helicopter over flights and assessments of the eruption are continuing.  This morning’s assessment showed that there is currently some surface activity.  The current flow had entered a crack system earlier this week and there is some evidence to indicate subsurface lava activity.  The surface flow has extended approximately 200-300 yards from the crack entry.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Presently, the current activities and flow does not present with an immediate or imminent threat to area communities.

As the surface flow moves through the vegetation, smoke conditions may increase and fluctuate with changes in wind conditions.  There is no brush fire or wildland fire threat at this time and all burning is limited to the perimeter of the flow.

The location of the surface flow is approximately 1.4 miles southwest or upslope of the Wao Kele Puna Forest Reserve boundary.  Eruption activity will be monitored and additional updates will be provided.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Area residents are encouraged to continue to review their emergency plans in the event conditions change and should an evacuation be necessary.  As stated, the current flow activity does not present with an immediate or imminent threat.  This update is to keep area residents informed of current observations.

The public is advised that the flow cannot be accessed and is not visible from any public areas.  Please do not attempt to access the area as there are many cracks and dense vegetation.  In addition please refrain from attempting to do so through the Kaohe Homesteads subdivision and respect the privacy of area residents.  Enforcement officers of the State Department of Land and Natural Resources will be conducting patrols and reminding persons in the area of the restricted access.

Candidate Accused of Fraud States Surf Shop Has Living Quarters

The following was posted by Hawaii County Council Candidate Tiffany Edwards Hunt regarding allegations of voter fraud that have been posted in the Hawaii Tribune Herald and other places such as Puna Web in a few different forums.

I can’t imagine living in a surf shop when you have two other places to live… but if this is your excuse that you want to publish publicly to attempt to avoid prosecution then so be it.

Lately, there have been press reports calling into question my voter registration history and suggesting that I might be guilty of some sort of voter crime. It is becoming increasingly obvious that these reports and the source(s) of them are politically motivated.

I am a resident of Puna Council District 5, and have been for over 90 days before the primary election. Under the Hawaii County Charter, any voter and candidate for office must be a resident of the district for at least ninety (90) days before the primary election.

I am currently registered to vote in Puna Council District 5, residing with my husband at our family home in Hawaiian Acres.

In 2012 I was registered to vote in what is now Puna Council District 4, and listed my residence at my husband’s Pahoa home and surf shop, which has a living quarters.

Shortly after the 2012 election I was nominated to serve on the Windward Planning Commission. After being nominated to the commission for District 4, I learned that I should be registered in District 5 in Mountain View. I declined the nomination and updated my voter registration residency address for the next election.

I welcome any legitimate investigation regarding this issue.

After I learned of a potential pending investigation by police, I immediately contacted the responsible officer but I have not yet received a response.

I am properly registered as a voter and candidate in District 5.  I look forward to serving the people of this Puna district, if elected.

Tiffany Edwards Hunt

Lava Flow Reactivates – Spills Out of Steaming Crack

Far end of June 27th lava flow reactivates, lava spills out of steaming crack

The steaming ground crack observed yesterday suggested that lava was close to the surface within the crack, and today lava in the crack reached the surface and began spilling out into the thick forest. The leading edge of the lava today was near the abandoned well site (cleared area at left). This farthest lava was about 11.9 km (7.4 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō (visible on horizon) and 2.6 km (1.6 miles) from the eastern boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna forest reserve.

A closer view of the pad of lava that emerged from the ground crack earlier this week, which had renewed surface flows today. At the east end (upper left in photograph) of the lava pad new breakouts spilled into adjacent ground cracks, and lava was visible within the ground crack extending farther to the east (visible by line of smoke extending towards upper left portion of photo). Heiheiahulu is visible in the upper right.

A wide view of the leading edge of the June 27th lava flow, looking east down Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone. The main body of the June 27th flow ends near the center of the photograph, where lava poured into a deep ground crack. After traveling along the ground crack, lava emerged at the surface earlier this week, creating an isolated pad of lava (where the thick smoke is just above the center of the photograph). This pad of lava had renewed surface activity today, with lava filling and spilling out of a ground crack extending farther to the east of the lava pad.
 Another wide view of the leading edge of the June 27th lava flow, again looking east. This shows the east end of the isolated lava pad. The thick smoke originates from lava filling a deep ground crack up to the surface. The smoke partly obscures the abandoned well site.

At the site of the isolated pad of lava near the leading edge of the June 27th flow, renewed surface flows today resurfaced the existing lava flow and also spilled into nearby ground cracks. In this photograph, two large streams of lava plunge into a crack that is a couple meters (yards) wide.

At the far end of the lava-filled crack, lava spilled out towards the north a very short distance. In this view from a thermal camera, the small lobe of lava moving north is easily visible. The trees surrounding the crack show brighter colors as they are heated by the lava flow, but not to the point of combustion.

The vent for the June 27th lava flow is on the upper northeast flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The vent area is now covered by lava, but the lava tube that carries lava to the flow front is easily visible by the line of blue-colored fume. In the lower right, two skylights can be seen.

Repairs To Begin At Keauhou Small Boat Harbor On Remaining Tsunami Damage

The Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) on Wednesday, Sept. 3, will begin construction at Keauhou Small Boat Harbor on repairs to the last remaining areas damaged by the 2011 Japan tsunami.

Kailua-Kona-Pier-Repair

Construction is scheduled through Jan. 7, 2015.Project contractor is Drayko Construction, Inc. The total cost of this project is $428,000.

Below are the proposed dates and affected areas of the harbor. Dates are subject to change due to weather or other factors.

Boat Launch Ramp and Wash Down Area work to be done:

Sept. 3 –Oct. 31, 2014: Contractor to remove existing asphalt pavement/install new concrete pavement and drainage improvements on mauka side of boat launch ramp and wash down area. During this time the trailer parking next to the boat ramp and the boat wash down area will be closed. Both lanes of the boat ramp will remain open.

Oct. 6 –Dec. 3, 2014: Repairs to the rock revetment, loading dock, fenders and cleats on the left hand side of the boat ramp; and removal of existing asphalt paving and installation of new concrete pavement fronting the left hand side of the boat ramp. The left hand lane of the boat ramp will be closed. The right hand lane of the boat ramp will remain open.

Dec. 4, 2014 –Jan. 2, 2015: Removal of existing asphalt paving and installation of new concrete pavement fronting right hand side of boat ramp. The right hand side of the boat ramp will be closed. The left hand lane of the boat ramp will remain open.

Mauka Parking Area / Bulkhead:

Nov. 12-19, 2014: Removal and replacement of existing asphalt paving on mauka parking area/bulkhead (where Fairwinds, etc. load/unload passengers). Vessels may use the loading pier to load/unload passengers during this time.

Nov. 24-25, 2014: Striping at the mauka parking area/bulkhead. Vessels may use the loading pier to load/unload passengers, etc. during this time.

More Community Meetings Announced to Update Folks on Lava Flows

Civildefense

Hawai’i County Civil Defense and the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory will host additional community meetings on Tuesday, Sept. 2 and Thursday, Sept. 4 to update residents on the lava flow in the Wao Kele O Puna area.

The briefings will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday in the Pahoa High School Cafeteria.

Civil Defense Lava Flow Update

Daily helicopter over flights and assessments of the eruption are continuing.  This morning’s assessment showed that there is currently some surface activity.  The current flow had entered a crack system earlier this week and there is some evidence to indicate subsurface lava activity.  The surface flows remain on the existing flow area and has not extended beyond or further than the location where it had entered a crack. The evidence is limited to steam plumes along the area of the crack.

HVO121

Presently, the current activities and flow does not present with an immediate or imminent threat to area communities.

The location of the crack and areas of the steam is approximately 1.6 miles southwest or upslope of the Wao Kele Puna Forest Reserve boundary.  Eruption activity will be monitored and additional updates will be provided.

Area residents are encouraged to continue to review their emergency plans in the event conditions change and should an evacuation be necessary.  As stated, the current flow activity does not present with an immediate or imminent threat.  This update is to keep area residents informed of current observations.

The public is advised that the flow cannot be accessed and is not visible from any public areas.  Please do not attempt to access the area as there are many cracks and dense vegetation.  In addition please refrain from attempting to do so through the Kaohe Homesteads subdivision and respect the privacy of area residents.  Enforcement officers of the State Department of Land and Natural Resources will be conducting patrols and reminding persons in the area of the restricted access.

Where the Lava is Now – Live Camera Views of Current Lava Flow

If you look at the top right of this picture (near the ocean) you can see that the lava and steam has increased above Kaohe Homestead.

Picture taken a few minutes ago.  Click to enlarge

Panorama of Puʻu ʻŌʻō North Flank from the North Rim, Picture taken a few minutes ago. Click to enlarge

The steam is just barely visible in the top right but it’s still not a good sign.  It means the Lava has not stopped flowing towards Pahoa.

To view other live cameras of this flow… you can click here: HVO Webcams

 

Lava Flow Update – Steam Suggests Flow Advancing Again Towards Pahoa

Steaming extends northeast along ground crack, suggesting lava is advancing again along the crack

Steaming (center of photograph) was reported this morning east of the small pad of lava (just above center) that emerged from a ground crack this past week. This renewed progression of steaming suggests that lava is again continuing to advance beneath the surface, along these ground cracks. On our afternoon overflight, the farthest point of steaming was near an abandoned well site, which serves as a convenient landmark in this broad expanse of forest. The farthest steaming was 11.9 km (7.4 miles) northeast of the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and 2.6 km (1.6 miles) from the eastern boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna forest reserve. In the top portion of the photograph, numerous plumes of smoke originate from scattered surface flows burning vegetation. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen on the horizon.

This figure compares the photo above with an equivalent view from a thermal camera. The plumes of smoke mark the farthest active lava on the surface (small, scattered lobes of pāhoehoe), which are also shown as small hotspots in the thermal image. The pad of lava that emerged from the ground crack earlier this week was inactive at the surface but still quite warm (high temperature patch in center of image). East of this pad of lava, steaming (just below the center of the photograph) has appeared over the past day, suggesting that lava is continuing to advance below the surface along a ground crack. Direct views into the crack were not possible due to thick vegetation, but close views of the steaming areas with the thermal camera reveal temperatures up to 190 C (370 F). These high temperature are further evidence of lava moving through the crack.

A closer of the new steaming. The thick vegetation obscures direct views of the ground crack, and only a line of steaming and browned vegetation is evident at the surface.

Slow-moving pāhoehoe advances through thick forest northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The pāhoehoe lobes surround, and burn through, the base of the trees. By the time the trees topple over, the lava surface temperature has cooled sufficiently that the downed trees do not completely burn through, leaving a field of tree trunks on the recent lava surface. One tree in the center of the photograph is completely surrounded by active lava, and likely on the brink of toppling over.

Another view of the lava expanding into the forest.
Closer to the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō, one of several skylights provides a view of the flowing lava stream within the lava tube. This lava tube supplies lava from the vent to the active surface flows near the flow front.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

New Lava Flow Map Released – Lava Flow Once Again Advancing

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 28, 2014:

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

The area of the flow as mapped on August 27 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 28 is shown in red. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow.

The only place where lava significantly widened the margin was at the most distant surface breakout, which was 8.6 km (5.3 miles) from the vent. The brown line at the far end of the flow marks the ground crack that channeled lava to the east, where it later emerged to form a new pad of lava.

Yesterday, there was no surface activity there and no indication that lava was continuing to advance within ground cracks. This morning, however, steam was rising above a crack extending east beyond the end of the lava pad, suggesting that lava was once again advancing within a crack below ground.

The most distant steaming area was 11.9 km (7.4 miles) from the vent and 2.6 km (1.6 miles) from east boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna Forest Reserve.

Mayor Kenoi Statement on FEMA Denial of Funds for Iselle Victims

Hawai’i County Mayor Billy Kenoi issued the following statement in response to the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s denial of the state’s request for individual assistance:

“We are very disappointed in FEMA’s decision to deny the state’s request for individual assistance for the victims of Tropical Storm Iselle. Our residents and families suffered destroyed homes, property losses and many other impacts from this historic storm. For many people, their lives have still not returned to normal, and the federal government must help our communities. We strongly urge Governor Abercrombie to appeal the FEMA decision directly to President Obama. We hope the president will recognize that the residents of Puna need his help, and deserve all the support and assistance that we can give them.”

Puna Officer Named East Hawaii “Officer of the Month”

The Aloha Exchange Club of East Hawaiʻi recognized Officer Dwight Walker on Thursday (August 28) as East Hawaiʻi “Officer of the Month” for August.

Hilo Exchange Club President Andy Iwashita presents an 'Officer of the Month' award to Officer Dwight Walker.

Hilo Exchange Club President Andy Iwashita presents an ‘Officer of the Month’ award to Officer Dwight Walker.

Walker, a Puna Patrol officer, was honored for a theft investigation that led to the arrest of a man suspected of multiple crimes.

In July, Walker responded to a report of a theft of fishing items from a garage in the Ainaloa subdivision. Early in the investigation, he canvassed businesses until he was able to identify a suspect and a vehicle description, including a license plate.

A few days later, police received a tip that the suspect’s car was near the scene of the initial theft. When Officer Walker arrived at the scene, the suspect fled into the bushes. The victim’s items were visible in his car, so Walker began the process of obtaining a search warrant for the vehicle.

Other officers conducted a lengthy search in the heavy brush and located the suspect, who was in the possession of hydrocodone pills and marijuana. He was arrested on two outstanding warrants and charged with theft and drug offenses as well as burglary for another break-in earlier that day and for an unrelated case involving a stolen car. His bail was set at $38,000.

Lieutenant Reed Mahuna credited Walker’s early work on the case with the successful outcome. “Although the apprehension of this suspect was the result of teamwork and persistence of many patrol officers, it was Officer Walker’s timely and thorough initial investigation that put the pieces together to build a solid case,” Mahuna said in nomination papers. “The defendant in this case is likely responsible for a rash of unsolved crimes occurring in the district and his arrest likewise reduced future crimes he would commit in the foreseeable future to support his drug habit.”

As “Officer of the Month,” Walker is eligible for “Officer of the Year.”

The East Hawaiʻi “Officer of the Month” award is a project of the Aloha Exchange Club of East Hawaiʻi.

Civil Defense Message – Eruption Information Update

This is an Eruption Information Update for Thursday August 28th at 12:30pm.

This morning’s helicopter over flight and assessment showed that there is presently no surface activity.  The current flow had entered a crack system earlier this week and there is some evidence to indicate subsurface lava activity. The evidence is limited to steam plumes along the area of the crack.

Presently, the current activities and flow does not present with an immediate or imminent threat to area communities.

Forest Legacy

The location of the crack and areas of the steam is approximately 1.7 miles southwest or upslope of the Wao Kele Puna Forest Reserve boundary.  Eruption activity will be monitored and additional updates will be provided.

Area residents are encouraged to continue to review their emergency plans in the event conditions change and should an evacuation be necessary.  As stated, the current flow activity does not present with an immediate or imminent threat.  This update is to keep area residents informed of current observations.

The public is advised that the flow cannot be accessed and is not visible from any public areas.  Please do not attempt to access the area as there are many cracks and dense vegetation. In addition please refrain from attempting to do so through the Kaohe Homesteads subdivision and respect the privacy of area residents.

Thank you and have a safe day. This is your Hawaii County Civil Defense

EPA Awards $200,000 to Children’s Defense Fund – Will Advance Environmental Stewardship on the Big Island

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded an environmental education grant of $200,000 to the Children’s Defense Fund for their “Mauka to Makai” project designed to improve environmental education in their summer learning centers and partner schools on the Big Island.
EPA LOGOThe “Mauka to Makai” (Mountain to Sea) project will incorporate environmental themes across all core and non-core academic subjects with an emphasis on resource management and habitat restoration.

“We’re pleased to be part of an environmental education effort highlighting flora and fauna found nowhere else on Earth,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “The “Mauka to Makai” stewardship will increase the protection of Hawaiian ecosystems from threats like invasive species, climate change, and habitat loss.”

Using a combination of student learning experiences, professional development for classroom educators, and strengthened partnerships linking public schools and local environmental agencies, the project will implement an environmental education model to increase community-wide knowledge of important environmental issues and foster the skills needed to help students, educators, families and the community make decisions about environmental responsibility and stewardship. The Mauka to Makai project aims to increase environmental knowledge on the Big Island by educating more than 7,000 students, providing professional development to over 100 educators, and supporting community projects through sub-awards.

The larger goal is to make the Mauka to Makai a model program that can be replicated across the nation with local partners and national experts. The project can be replicated with a similar focus on land to water resource issues or its focus can change with geographic location to highlight the regional environmental priorities of any given area.

The EPA Environmental Education Model Grants Program supports environmental education projects that increase the public’s awareness about environmental issues and provide them with the skills to take responsible actions to protect the environment. The EPA Pacific Southwest Regional Office received over 80 applications this year, and the Mauka to Makai project is one of two projects in the Pacific Southwest Region that received an environmental education grant.

FEMA Aid Denied to Hawaii and Iselle Victims

The State of Hawaii’s request for a major disaster declaration due to Tropical Storm Iselle was denied today by Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator W. Craig Fugate. The request sought Individual Assistance for individuals and households affected by the tropical storm in early August and Hazard Mitigation funds for use in statewide projects.

Various types of trees, including the invasive Allbizia were knocked down by the winds of hurricane Iselle as it landed on the eastern coast of Hawaii island on August 8, 2014.    Photo by Division of Forestry and Wildlife.

Various types of trees, including the invasive Allbizia were knocked down by the winds of hurricane Iselle as it landed on the eastern coast of Hawaii island on August 8, 2014. Photo by Division of Forestry and Wildlife.

Administrator Fugate’s denial letter states: “it has been determined that the damage from this event was not of such severity and magnitude to be beyond the capabilities of the state, affected local governments, and voluntary agencies.”

The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency (HI-EMA), formerly known as State Civil Defense, continues to work with federal and county officials on an application for assistance to rebuild public infrastructure.

People still in need of assistance following Iselle should call Hawaii County at (808) 935-0031 or the volunteer request line at (808) 464-3175.

The American Red Cross and the Hawaii State Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters continues to take donations to help those affected by Iselle. Donations can be made through the following channels:

American Red Cross (Hawaii Chapter), Phone: (808) 734-2101 http://www.redcross.org/hi/honolulu

Hawaii State Voluntary Organizations Active in Disasters

Hurricane Iselle Long-Term Relief and Recovery Fund

Iselle donations may be dropped off at any American Savings Bank.

https://hivoad.communityos.org/cms/contact_hi

 

Updated Map of Lava Lava Flow Approaching Pahoa

Map showing the June 27th flow in Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone as of August 27, 2014.

Click to enlarge map

Click to enlarge map

The area of the flow as mapped on August 25 is shown in pink, while widening and advancement of the flow as of August 27 is shown in red. The brown line marks the ground crack that channeled lava to the east, where it emerged to form a new pad of lava over the past couple of days.

The distal tip of this new lava pad is 11.5 km (7.1 miles) east-northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and 3.0 km (1.9 miles) from the edge of the Wao Kele O Puna Forest Reserve. However, the tip of the flow was inactive today and there was no indication that lava was continuing to advance within ground cracks.

The most distant active flows were 8.5 km (5.3 miles) from the vent. All older lava flows (1983–2014) are shown in gray. The thin yellow line marks a portion of the lava tube feeding the flow.

Lava Flow Update – Activity at Flow Front “Appears” to Stall But Surface Flows Remain Active

The June 27th flow remains active, but surface flows at the very farthest reaches of the flow appear to have stalled today.

lava flow 827

Click to Enlarge

The lava flow front consisted of an isolated pad of lava that emerged from a deep ground crack several days ago. Today, this pad of lava appeared inactive at the surface, with no sign obvious activity in the adjacent crack. On today’s overflight, the farthest active surface flows were on the main body of the June 27th flow, and were 8.5 km (5.3 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō, or about 6 km (3.7 miles) from the eastern boundary of the Wao Kele o Puna forest reserve.

A closer view of the southern lobe of the June 27th lava flow. Smoke plumes originate from active surface breakouts, the farthest today reached 8.5 km (5.3 miles) from the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō. The spot at which this lobe plunged into a deep ground crack last week can be seen near the bottom of the photograph. In the upper right portion of the photograph, smoke originating from active breakouts on the northern lobe can be seen.

A comparison of the normal photograph (see above) of the south lobe of the June 27th flow with an equivalent view from the thermal camera. The thermal camera clearly shows the extent of the farthest active breakout, which was relatively small.

Top: Another view of the south lobe of the June 27th flow, which plunged into a deep ground crack last week (this spot is visible at the right side of the photograph). This wide view, looking west, also shows another deep crack nearby, a short distance to the south of the active flows (which are producing the smoke plumes). This immediate area contains many ground cracks, which are part of Kīlauea’s East Rift Zone. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen in the distance.

Bottom: The isolated pad of lava that emerged from the deep ground crack several days ago did not have any active breakouts at the surface today, but incandescent lava could be seen in numerous cracks on the surface. This likely represents lava that had ponded within the flow and remains hot, but immobile.