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Banyan Drive Art Stroll Schedule of Artists, Demonstrations and Entertainment Announced

The Banyan Drive Art Stroll on Saturday, January 14, runs from noon until 6 p.m. Art exhibits are open at the Grand Naniloa Hotel, Castle Hilo Hawaiian Hotel, and Banyan Gallery. People’s Choice ballots may be cast at the Grand Naniloa until 6 p.m.

From noon until 3 p.m. painters will be in Lili`uokalani Gardens. In addition to en plein air, the following schedule of demonstrations will happen in the square roof pavilion near the red bridge: 12 noon Valentina Montoya, 12:45 p.m. William Wingert, 1:30 p.m.  Peter Heineman, and at  2:15 p.m.  F Scott Cahill

  • Noon to 1 p.m. Christy Lassiter Trio (Christy Lassiter, J.J. Ahuna, and Kyle Kaaa) plus hula will perform at Grand Naniloa. Copies of the CD “Le`ale`a” will be available for purchase.
  • 2 p.m. Paradise Helicopters will award grand prize in the calendar contest at Banyan Gallery
  • 2 to 3 p.m. Puna Taiko will play at the old sumo area near the tea house.
  • 3-4 p.m. Brandon Tengan will demonstrate gyotaku (fish printing) at Suisan Fish Market.
  • 3-4 p.m. Puna Taiko will play outside Banyan Gallery, pupu will be served.
  • 4:00 p.m.  Ken Charon drawing demo at Grand Naniloa.
  • 4-5 p.m. Desmon Haumea and Bambu will play at Hilo Hawaiian, pupu will be served. Copies of the CD “Des and BAMBU – Maui Style will be available for purchase.”
  • 5-6 p.m. Desmon Haumea and Bambu will play at Grand Naniloa, pupu will be served. Copies of the CD “Des and BAMBU – Maui  Style will be available for purchase.”

The Banyan Drive Art Stroll is the first in a series of events to celebrate the centennial of Lili`uokalani Gardens. For further information, see the Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens page on Facebook or contact K.T. Cannon-Eger by email kteger@hawaii.rr.com or cell phone (808) 895-8130.

Hawaii Wood Guild 31st Annual Exhibition

Hawaii Wood Guild will have the opening and reception for its 31st annual show on January 14th at Isaacs Art Center from 5pm to 7pm.  The show will run through February 24th.  Isaacs Art Center is open Tuesday thru Saturday from 10am to 5pm. Every Saturday several artists will sit at the show to give you an opportunity to ask questions about all the different aspects of woodworking or to meet some of your favorite woodworkers.
This year they have invited 20 Master woodworkers to exhibit in Joinery, Turning, Sculpture and any combination of skills working in the medium of wood. The show will consist of 58 works that will please all that enjoy the many different ways of creativity expressed through wood. 

Everyone will have the opportunity to vote for their favorite piece in selecting the winner of the people’s choice award. The winner of this award will be announced on the Hawaii Wood Guild Facebook page at the end of the show.

 

For more information, contact the gallery at 885 5884 or email  marcuscastaing@aol.com.

Gyotaku Demonstration at Suisan

Brandon Tengan has a love affair with the ocean as a surfer, fisherman, and fish print artist.

He will demonstrate gyotaku, the art of fish printing, at Suisan Fish Market on Lihiwai Street, Saturday January 14, from 3 to 4 p.m. as part of the Banyan Drive Art Stroll.

An exhibit of Brandon Tengan gyotaku

As stated on his web site, Prior 2 Pupu Productions, “The Japanese Art of Gyotaku…most simply translated as “gyo”—fish, and “taku”—rubbing or impression; a technique developed to accurately record a fisherman’s prized catch, prior to eating it.  Fish are caught, painted with a non-toxic ink, and imprinted on shoji (rice) paper.  When peeled back, the paper is left with an impression yielding the exact size, shape and ultimately – the fisherman’s story.  The prints are then painted, remembered and shared.  Most importantly, the fish is then washed clean and prepared as a meal.”

Tengan was raised in Kaneohe, Hawaii. He said his, “love and passion for the ocean first began with surfing.  However, when the surf got flat, he slowly took up diving and fishing and once he started…he got hooked.  Brandon considers himself blessed and fortunate to have been taught by many skilled fisherman and dive partners, continuing to learn each time he heads out.  Initially taught gyotaku by a family friend, what started as a small backyard hobby is now a fun business endeavor.”

Brandon Tengan and a tako catch

Locally Tengan’s work is carried by Banyan Gallery, located near the Hilo Hawaiian Hotel. Banyan Gallery will feature an exhibit of photographers’ images selected for a calendar of Lili`uokalani GArdens during the Banyan Drive Art Stroll.

The event is free and open to the public, children welcome.

This is the first of a series of events to celebrate the centennial of Lili`uokalani Gardens, which is bounded by Lihiwai Street and Banyan Drive on the Waiakea peninsula in Hilo.

Filmmaker to Present Award-Winning Documentary at UH Hilo

Japanese filmmaker and educator Miho Aida presents her award-winning documentary film, “The Sacred Place Where Life Begins: Gwich’in Women Speak,” at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo on Wednesday, January 11 at 5:30 p.m. in University Classroom Building Room 100. The event is free and open to the public.

The Gwich’in is an Athabaskan-speaking First Nations of Canada and an Alaska Native people. The documentary explores the coastal plain of Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge that has been eyed for oil and gas development since 1986. In the film, Gwich’in women speak out for their sacred land.

The film was named the top documentary at the 2015 Central Illinois Feminist Film Festival, received the Audience Choice Award at the 2014 Earth Port Film Festival, and was nominated for Best Documentary Short at the 2013 American Indian Film Festival. Following the screening, Aida will discuss the film and her new video series, “Standing Rock Women Speak,” along with her efforts to save the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North and South Dakota.

The event is sponsored by the UH Hilo Japanese Studies Program, Gender and Women’s Studies Program, Humanities Division, College of Arts and Sciences, and International Student Services and Intercultural Education Program.

For more information, contact Professor Yoshiko Fukushima at yf83@hawaii.edu or 932-7213. For more information about the film and filmmaker, visit http://mihoaida.com/gwichin.

Banyan Drive Art Stroll – Montoya Recognized with Juror’s Choice

Valentina Montoya’s art work was selected for Juror’s First Choice by art competition judge Dick Nelson of Kula Maui. The watercolor, pen and ink, image will appear in the Banyan Drive Art Stroll on Saturday, January 14, from noon until 6 p.m.

Original art by Valentina Montoya

Montoya is a graduate of the State University of New York at New Paltz with a BA degree in visual Arts. She moved to Hawaii Island in August 2016 and, “I was struck by the beauty of Lili`uokalani Gardens. When I moved here, I connected with the art community through the UH-Hilo art club page on Facebook. I learned of the Banyan Drive Art Stroll competition through that connection.”

All art work that met the criteria of the theme “Celebrating Lili`uokalani: the Queen and her Legacy” will be on display at the Palm Room in the Grand Naniloa Hotel, lobby level, and will be available for voting for People’s Choice awards on Saturday.

Of Montoya’s art work “Queen Lili`uokalani and her Gardens,” Nelson said the artist depicted “a regal queen in a setting of unabashed color fitting for any garden celebration and created with aesthetic competence.”

Other exhibits will be in the Hilo Hawaiian Hotel and Banyan Gallery. Demonstrations of painting will be in Lili`uokalani Gardens from noon until 3 p.m. Gyotaku demonstration with Brandon Tengan will take place at Suisan from 3 to 4 p.m.

The Banyan Drive Art Stroll is the first 2017 event in a series to celebrate the centennial of Lili`uokalani Gardens. The land was dedicated in honor of the Queen in early 1917 and construction on the Japanese-style landscape began in the fall of 1917.

For further information, see the Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens Facebook page.

6th Big Island Chocolate Festival Celebrates the History of Chocolate

With the theme, “Worth Its Weight in Gold: The History of Chocolate,” the sixth annual Big Island Chocolate Festival is April 28-29 with events headquartered from the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel. Indulge in the alluring, rich taste of chocolate—in both its sweet and savory forms—while participating in delicious, fun and informative chocolate-themed activities.

The “must-attend” festival gala—featuring food booths, unlimited wine and beer pours, silent auction, dancing and more—is 5-9 p.m. Saturday, April 29. Early Bird and VIP tickets are on sale now at http://www.bigislandchocolatefestival.com/buy-tickets/.

Presented by the Kona Cacao Association (KCA), event proceeds annually benefit a variety of local non-profits yet to be selected for 2017.

“Chocolate has an amazing history and it will be fun to share it at this year’s Big Island Chocolate Festival,” says KCA President Farsheed Bonakdar.

The two-day chocolate extravaganza includes a cacao plantation tour at Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory, a college culinary competition and several public foodie and agriculture-themed seminars. Activities culminate 5-9 p.m. Saturday, April 29 with the indoor-outdoor festival gala—enjoy a host of sweet and savory culinary stations presented by top isle chefs, chocolatiers and confectioners. Fun chocolate activities include a live chocolate sculpture and chocolate body painting.

Culinary participants will depict this year’s historical theme at their booths and be judged on originality. Chocolate hails from Meso-America where cacao beans were brewed to make a drink or fermented into an alcoholic beverage. Highly valued, the bean was used as currency. The Mayans and Aztecs believed cacao was divine, including it in rituals. Once fashioned into a bar, chocolate became valued in America. During wartime it was included in soldiers’ rations and went to the moon with the Apollo astronauts.

Culinary stations will also be vying for awards in a variety of categories judged by a panel of celebrity chefs: “best” bonbon, savory, bean-to-bar, plated dessert and Hawaiian cacao. Attendees can get in on the friendly voting by casting a ballot for two People’s Choice Awards: Best Savory and Best Sweet.

General admission tickets to the gala are $79 presale and $100 at the door.

Find ticket info at www.BigIslandChocolateFestival.com. Special room/ticket packages for two start at $375 at the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel and can be conveniently booked at http://www.bigislandchocolatefestival.com/buy-tickets/ and through the Festival website under “Tickets.”

The Big Island Chocolate Festival is presented by the Kona Cacao Association, Inc. The mission and goal of KCA is to promote the cacao industry on the Big Island of Hawai‘i by presenting BICF as an educational and outreach opportunity for local cacao farmers, the hospitality industry and cacao enthusiasts. For information, visit www.bigislandchocolatefestival.com. @BIChocoFest

Holiday Visitation Surges at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

Park visitation surges during the holiday travel season and this week is no exception with parking lots at popular destinations like Nāhuku (Thurston Lava Tube), Jaggar Museum and Kīlauea Visitor Center at capacity.

NPS Photo

And, with Kīlauea erupting from two locations, the park remains a powerful draw for visitors who want to see volcanic activity. As a result, the park is very crowded, especially during peak hours between 9 a.m. and 8 p.m.

“We’ve had some visitors wait up to an hour to park, and we have park rangers working in traffic control. We remind everyone to please be patient and treat rangers and other drivers with respect and aloha,” said Chief Ranger John Broward.

Park rangers offer these tips so all visitors have a positive and memorable time in the national park:

  • Plan to arrive early and explore Nāhuku (Thurston Lava Tube) before 9 a.m. Not only is parking available, but the lava tube is often empty of people. Birdwatching at Nāhuku is best in the early morning.
  • Want to hike Kīlauea Iki Trail? This four-mile trek is one of the most scenic and popular trails in the park. Plan to hit the trail by 7 a.m., and be out by 10 a.m.
  • Drive and explore Chain of Craters Road. This historic and scenic road originates at the summit of Kīlauea and stretches 19 miles to Hōlei Sea Arch. Many overlooks, pullouts, and lesser-known hikes (Mauna Ulu, Pu‘uloa Petroglyphs) abound – and it’s an ideal way to avoid the crowds and see more of what the park offers. The Coastal Ranger Station at the end of Chain of Craters Road is the starting point for a 10-mile roundtrip hike to see lava enter the ocean at Kamokuna.
  • Night owl or early riser? The best time to observe the glow from Halema‘uma‘u is before sunrise, or after 9 p.m., when most visitors have left. The park is open 24 hours a day. You can see what Kīlauea is doing before you arrive by checking the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory webcams.
  • Jaggar Museum is the closest visitors can get to the summit eruption’s glowing lava lake, and it’s the park’s most popular spot after 5 p.m. (More than 8,000 people were counted one evening at Jaggar Museum earlier this week.) If you can’t avoid peak hours, consider observing the glow from a less-crowded location, like Keanakāko‘i, ‘Akanikōlea (Steam Vents), or Kīlauea Overlook. From Kīlauea Overlook, it’s a short walk to Jaggar Museum along Crater Rim Trail, but bring a flashlight and a jacket.
  • Mauna Loa Road is well worth exploring during peak hours, especially in good weather. Kīpukapuaulu offers an easy, forested hike, and the views and birdwatching are excellent along the way to the Mauna Loa Overlook at 6,662 feet.
  • Visit Kahuku. Kahuku is free, never crowded, and is open to the public every Friday, Saturday and Sunday of the month. Located on the mauka (inland) side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5 in Ka‘ū.

Makana and John Cruz Concerts Raise Money For Education Programs

Kahilu Theatre announces two Kahilu Gold Concerts to raise money for its Arts Ed @ Kahilu education programs. The concerts, held at exclusive and intimate off-site venues, will feature celebrated Hawaiian musicians Makana and John Cruz.

Makana

The idea behind the fundraising concerts is to have exceptional artists performing in beautiful and intimate locales on Hawai‘i Island, providing event goers with an upscale and truly unique experience set against a backdrop of night skies, ocean breezes, and island style living. Included the in the ticket price are heavy pupu and libations.

John Cruz

“The Kahilu Gold Concert series allows us to extend our reach to a new audience and bring attention to a resource people may not have even known existed,” said Deb Goodwin, Executive Director for Kahilu Theatre.

This is the second season of Gold Concerts. During its 2015/16 Presenting Season, Kahilu Theatre presented Lisa Hopkins Seegmiller, Amy Hanaiai‘i, and Dirty Cello.

“As we move forward, our focus is on strengthening our education programs: expanding our role in local schools, ensuring we offer a comprehensive performing arts education program at the Theatre, continuing to bring young students to the Theatre for shows with the artists in our season, and effectively marketing our programs so more of our community can benefit from the arts,” Kahilu Theatre Board President Mimi Kerley said.

The Kahilu Gold Concerts also provide the Theatre a platform to showcase its education programs, as students from the Kahilu Performing Arts Classes (KPAC) will perform routines during both concerts.

The Makana Gold Concert will take place Friday, February 10 at 6 pm. The John Cruz Gold Concert will take place Sunday, March 12 at 6 pm.

Tickets are $150 and available for purchase online at www.kahilutheatre.org, by calling (808) 885-6868, or at the Kahilu Theatre Box Office, at 67-1186 Lindsey Road, Kamuela, HI 96743, Monday-Friday, from 9 am to 1 pm.

Cherry Blossom Festival Names 2017 Honorees

The 24th Waimea Cherry Blossom Heritage Festival honors long-time festival contributor Roberts Hawaii and Guinness World Record holder Betty Webster. The honorees will each be recognized at the festival’s opening ceremony. Time is 9 a.m., Saturday, Feb. 4 on the entertainment stage at the rear of Parker Ranch Center.

Roberts Hawaii

Roberts Hawaii provides complimentary shuttle transportation among a host of festival venues for those wishing to ride, rather than walk, to the many activities. The statewide company provides transportation, tours and entertainment by employees who strive to perpetuate the unique culture of Hawaii. The company’s core values are lokahi (teamwork), kinaole (flawless) and haaheo (pride).

Employees at Roberts are tasked to perform their jobs with a sense of ownership and commitment to the community and to each other. The company takes pride in offering transport and fun in a “safe and service-focused manner.”

“We’re very honored to receive this wonderful recognition by the Waimea Cherry Blossom Heritage Festival,” said Percy Higashi, president and COO of Roberts Hawaii. “We’ve enjoyed being a part of this special annual event, not only because it celebrates a centuries-old cultural tradition, but because it’s a fun and festive gathering made possible by the community, for the community. Our very best wishes to the 24th annual festival, and a warm mahalo to its many organizers and contributors.”

Betty Webster

“Aunty” Betty Webster of Waimea has the world’s largest sunglass collection according to Guinness World Records. She boasts over 1500 pairs and is known around town for her sunny disposition and love for life. The octogenarian has had numerous stints as a Waimea restaurant hostess and started wearing zany sunglasses “as a conversation piece.”

“I am very proud to be an honoree participating in our upcoming Cherry Blossom Festival,” notes Webster. “I have always enjoyed making people smile and laugh and it is my hope by representing the community at this event I can make that happen. The Waimea Cherry Blossom Festival is a wonderful event that brings together our community and visitors to enjoy entertainment, food, culture and historic activities.”

An avid festival attendee, Webster will be participating with the Waimea Seniors Citizen Club. Wearing a pair of her signature “shades,” she’ll be serving cherry pie at the Senior Center Hall on the Waimea Historic Corner.

The Waimea Cherry Blossom Festival annually celebrates the Japanese tradition of viewing the season’s first blooms, a celebration called “hanami,” which literally translates to hana, “flower” and mi, “look.” Held the first Saturday of February, the festival includes a variety of activities 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at multiple venues throughout Waimea. Look for pink banners identifying site locations throughout town.

Spend the day to experience an all-day lineup of Japanese and multi-cultural performing arts, plus hands-on demonstrations of bonsai, origami, traditional tea ceremony, fun mochi pounding, plus a host of colorful craft fairs, a large quilt show and food booths. Enjoy free shuttle transportation among most venues. For info, 808-961-8706.

Circus Comedy Coming to UH Hilo

Virtuoso clown Jamie Adkins will bring his one-man circus comedy “Circus Incognitus” to the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Performing Arts Center on Thursday, January 26, at 7:30 p.m.

In “Circus Incognitus,” Adkins wanders on stage to perform his new show, but struggles to build the scene around him using everyday objects. Things go awry with his props proving to be most unhelpful: his ladder disintegrates under his foot, he wrangles an animated chair, tussles with a pesky hat, negotiates a precarious slack wire, and juggles almost everything. Theater goers even get involved in the endeavor by tossing lemons for him to catch on a fork, held between his teeth.

“This is a fun family show and a great way to start the new year,” said PAC Manager Lee Dombroski.

Tickets are reserved seating and priced at $20 General, $15 Discount and $10 UH Hilo/Hawaiʻi CC students (with a valid student ID) and children, up to age 17, pre-sale, or $25, $20 and $15 at the door.

Tickets are available by calling the UH Hilo Box Office at 932-7490 or ordering online at artscenter.uhh.hawaii.edu.

Waimea Ocean Film Festival Unveils Films, Filmmakers, Speakers and Special Guests

The action-packed 2017 Waimea Ocean Film Festival (Ocean Film) offers a stunning lineup of films, special guests, intimate coffee talks, Q&As, exhibits, receptions and morning activities, running non-stop January 2-10. The annual event opens the morning of January 2, with films playing simultaneously January 2-5 at multiple venues in Waimea (Kahilu Theatre, HPA Gates, Parker Theatre) and at The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i. On January 6, the festival moves to Four Seasons Resort Hualalai.

Ocean Film brings over 60 films to the big screen this year—most of which are world, U.S., Hawai‘i or Big Island premieres—with many filmmakers in attendance to answer questions following the showing of each film. The format of this dynamic festival immerses participants in a greater understanding and awareness of the ocean and island culture through exceptional films, talks, exhibits and activities. Films fall into the basic categories of ocean experience (such as surfing and paddling); ocean environment—including things we do on land that impact the sea—and island culture. Inspirational, thought-provoking films and those that shed light on who we are infuse the program, sharing the extraordinary.

Former U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Dr. Titley, Ph.D., joins the festival for discussion following the showing of the film The Age of Consequences, in which he is featured.

Retired Rear Admiral in the U.S. Navy, Director for the Center for Solutions to Weather and Climate Risk and former commander of the Naval Meterology and Oceanography Command, Dr. David Titley will be offering discussions at the Waimea Ocean Film Festival in conjunction with the film, “The Age of Consequences.”

Dr. Titley’s career as a naval officer included duties as commander of the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command; oceanographer and navigator of the Navy; and deputy assistant chief of naval operations for information dominance. While serving in the Pentagon, Dr. Titley led the U.S. Navy’s Task Force on Climate Change. Dr. Titley also gives a Breakfast Talk and presentation on the topics of climate as a security risk, the military’s clean energy revolution and the opportunities the U.S. has to take the lead for climate change.

Producer Adam Leipzig joins the festival for discussion following A Plastic Ocean and a talk sharing what it takes to have a movie made. A former president of National Geographic Films and a senior vice president at Walt Disney Studios, Leipzig’s film credits include March of the Penguins, Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, Dead Poets Society and Titus. His movies have won or been nominated for numerous accolades, including 10 Academy Awards.

The Oscar-winning producer of “Spotlight,” Blye Faust, discusses the importance of investigative journalism today. NBC News Producer Mario Garcia shares stories behind the scenes from the production of Dateline NBC: On Assignment at Palmyra Atoll and from his 20 years at NBC News, during which time he covered stories on all seven continents and earned three National Emmys for outstanding coverage in broadcast news.

BBC film director Tom Mustill returns to this year’s festival with the BBC production Giraffes: Africa’s Gentle Giants and again brings the festival’s 2016 Director’s Choice Award winner, Bat Man of Mexico. Director of the festival’s 2016 People’s Choice winner, Unbranded, Ben Masters also returns to the festival, sharing stories about his cattle roundup with Parker Ranch cowboys following the festival last year, along with three short films.

Harold Mintz, right-hand man to previous festival guest Tom Shadyac, shares the inspiring film 1.800.Give.Us.Your.Kidney, which tells his story and how he opted to become a living kidney donor to an unknown person in need. Mintz speaks to high school students around the country, with the title reflecting the humor he brings to his talks. Producer Marty Syjeco brings the ultimately uplifting Almost Sunrise to the festival, as it follows two Iraq War veterans, Tom Voss and Anthony Anderson, as they embark on an extraordinary journey—a 2,700-mile walk across the country—to find answers for themselves, and others, on the way.


From the film “Beneath the Surface,” Andrew Cotton surfing the west coast of Ireland. Photo:Olaf Pignataro/Red Bull ContentPool

For the dramatic surf line-up, Beneath the Surface and Red Chargers feature big wave surf partners Andrew Cotton and Garrett McNamara as they seek ever-larger swells in the Atlantic and at Nazaré, Portugal. It was Andrew Cotton who towed Haleiwa-raised McNamara into what became verified as the world record for the largest wave surfed, at 78 feet. McNamara also signs copies of his memoir, HOUND OF THE SEA: Wild Man. Wild Waves. Wild Wisdom.

Mark Healey heads to the festival for a few surf film Q&A sessions, a preview of his next surf film and a talk about how different ocean communities can help move ocean stewardship forward. Filmmaker Curt Morgan of Brain Farm brings View From a Blue Moon, sharing perhaps the most beautiful surf film cinematography yet to be seen. Applying Brain Farm’s signature high-action sports techniques to the natural history genre, Morgan also brings Nat Geo Wild’s Wild Yellowstone: Grizzly Summer to the festival. The film features never-before-seen footage of the park, along with a storyboard of funny, cute and harrowing encounters among the animals that reside there.

Bud Browne Film Archives’ Linked In provides a window into surfing in the 60s. Rarely shown, and only screened live in a few locations, the Waimea Ocean Film Festival is one of a handful of viewing locations chosen by Bud Browne Film Archives to showcase these heritage films. Anna Trent Moore, curator of the collection, also presents the film, Bud Browne’s People, along with the book she penned, Going Surfin’, and a book signing follows. Moore also awards the second annual Bud Browne Surf Film Award, the first was awarded to Garrett McNamara for the film Nazaré Calling during the festival last year.

Dr. M. Sanjayan, Ph.D, an Emmy nominated news contributor and executive vice president for Conservation International, brings a virtual realty presentation to the festival, featuring an immersive experience in the reefs of Raja Ampat. Sanjayan speaks about the making of the film for a few select group showings. Conservation International also staffs a virtual reality booth where the film can be viewed.

Considered pre-eminent among underwater filmmakers, Howard and Michele Hall answer questions following Ocean Stories: Howard and Michele Hall. Howard also worked as director of underwater cinematography and Michele as location manager and underwater still photographer for MacGillivray’s Freeman Films’ feature, Humpback Whales—one of the all-time audience favorites shown at the festival and winner of the 2016 Best Film-Ocean Environment award. With the Halls present to answer questions, and whale season as the backdrop, Humpback Whales will be shown at the festival again in 2017, providing an up-close look at how and why humpbacks communicate, sing, feed, breach, play, take care of their young and migrate nearly 10,000 miles each year.

Dr. Drew Harvell, Ph.D., Cornell University professor and curator of the Blaschka Marine Invertebrates collection, brings A Fragile Legacy, which visualizes the story of the 1885 Cornell University purchase of over 500 Blaschka Glass models of marine invertabrates for use in teaching marine biology. Forgotten, the collection is now helping scientists try to understand the changes occuring in the ocean.

Released in the spring of 2016, Harvell’s book, A Sea of Glass, has been featured and reviewed by Discover, Scientific American, The Guardian, The New York Times and Nature, with full chapters excerpted in Natural History and American Scientist. It recently won the National Outdoor Book Award for Natural History Literature and was picked as one of the best eight “Art Meets Science” books of 2016 by Smithsonian magazine. Dr. Harvell will be on-hand for discussion of the project and book signing.

In seeking solutions, the E2 series, which shares solutions to energy issues, returns with episodes Melbourne-Reborn and Seoul. Melbourne Reborn chronicles the transformation from dying city to vibrant, livable streets, walkways and community as a result of visionary leadership and the conversion of alleys to walkways and highways to light rail and pedestrian streets, along with policy designed to green buildings. Seoul traces the project to demolish a downtown freeway to uncover and restore the ancient Cheonggyecheon stream that once flowed beneath it, now again a vital part of the city’s commercial and tourism sectors.

For a taste of adventure, Eric Bendick shares the beautifully filmed Forgotten Coast: Return to Wild Florida, featuring the cinematography and work of renowned photographer Carlton Ward, Jr. U.S. Skijor team co-captain Kale Casey brings the dog-powered sports of skijor to life with Dog Power. Harlan Taney offers the BBC production, Operation Grand Canyon with Dan Snow, as the BBC works to re-create the experience of the Powell expedition through the Grand Canyon in 1869. An American Ascent chronicles the efforts of the first African American team to tackle Denali, as team members seek to become role models encouraging other African Americans outdoors.

Sure to be in the running for the festival’s Audience Choice award this year, The Weekend Sailor brings the exciting tale of the first Whitbread Round the World Yacht Race, now the Volvo Ocean Race, when self-made Mexican businessman Ramon Carlín bought a boat, assembled a crew and entered the race. Director Bernardo Arsuaga attends to answer questions.

Producer Phil Arnone returns with the KGMB production, Jim Nabors’ Impossible Dream, detailing the story of the Hawai’i resident known to millions as Gomer Pyle. Im/Perfection shares the story of Oʻahu architect Hitoshi Hida, whose work graces the cityscapes of Honolulu and who remains one of the few architects to do pencil renderings by hand. Oʻahu based filmmaker Kimberlee Bassford brings films with Hawai‘i roots: Winning Girl, Lotus Root: A Great Granddaugter’s Journey and Patsy Mink: Ahead of the Majority. In addition, Mele Murals shares the background of the mural painted last year on the side of Waimea’s Kahilu Theatre.

This year, Hokule‘a sailed the Atlantic Ocean for the first time, touched land in South America, and sailed as far as Nova Scotia. The Voyager Exhibit, on display at Kahilu Theatre, shares the story with up-to-the minute images of the 2016 voyage. The exhibit, including the 8×13-foot world map developed as part of the festival to highlight the Worldwide Voyage (WWV) route, opens at Kahilu Theatre with a blessing and ceremony 4 p.m. January 2. Master (Pwo) Navigator and Makali‘i Captain Chadd Paishon leads a discussion sharing background about the journey 10 – 11 a.m. January 2-5 in front of the WWV map in Kahilu Theatre.

Big island-raised Alison Teal returns to the festival with another episode of Alison’s Adventures.

Art weaves its way throughout the 2017 festival. Bonnie Cherni offers classes in ocean-inspired origami January 2-5 at The Fairmont Orchid and January 7 at Four Seasons.

Painter Sophie Twigg-Smith Teururai, granddaughter of noted artist William Twigg-Smith, presents a full exhibit of recent works at The Fairmont Orchid January 2-5 and at Four Seasons Resort January 7. Teururai provided the cover art for the festival program this year.

Tiffany’s Art Agency exhibits the work of noted local artist Mary Spears and photographer Cathy Shine January 2-5 at The Fairmont Orchid and January 7 at Four Seasons Resort.

Puako-based painter Christian Enns displays his artistry at the new Enns Gallery in the lobby at the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel and offers the chance to observe him in action to gain a sense of his process, 5-7 p.m. January 2-5 at the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel with a Meet the Artist reception 5 p.m. January 5.

From the film, “Making An Ancient Forest.” Photo: ©Rita Schlamberger

Selections and film synopsis from the 2017 film lineup include:

The Accord (Iceland/RC Cone)

The Age of Consequences (USA/Jared P. Scott)•

Alison’s Adventures: British Columbia (USA/Alison Teal)•

Almost Sunrise (USA/Michael Collins)•

An American Ascent (USA/Andy Adkins, George Potter)

Atlantic (Ireland/Risteard O’Domhnaill)

The Bat Man of Mexico (UK/Tom Mustill)•

Beneath the Surface (UK/Mikey Corker)•

Bud Browne’s Surfers (USA/Anna Trent Moore)•

Call Me Peg Leg (UK/Josh Hine)

The Canary Islands-World of the Fire Mountains (Austria/Michael Schlamberger)

Catching the Sun (USA/Shalini Kantayya)

Con Amor Yago (Brazil, Gabriel Novis)

Dateline NBC: On Assignment at Palmyra Atoll (USA/Mario Garcia, Julie Kim)•

Distance Between Dreams (USA/Rob Bruce)

Dog Power (USA/Jordan Schevene & Kale Casey)•

E2-Seoul (USA/Tad Fettig)

E2-Melbourne Reborn (USA/Tad Fettig)

Eclipse (Canada/Anthony Bonello)

Forgotten Coast: Return to Wild Florida (USA/Eric Bendick)•

A Fragile Legacy (USA/David Brown)•

Giraffes: Africa’s Gentle Giants (BBC/UK/Tom Mustill)•

1-800-Give-Us-Your-Kidney (USA/Samantha Smith)•

Hokule‘a Worldwide Voyage: New York (‘Oiwi TV/USA/Kapua Roback)•

Humpback Whales (USA/Greg MacGillivray)•

Im/Perfection (USA/Andrew Hida)

Jim Nabors’ Impossible Dream (KGMB/USA)•

The Joy of Surfing (UK/Simon Cotter)

Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story (Canada/Grant Baldwin)

Locked In (USA/Bud Browne)•

Lotus Root: A Great Granddaughter’s Journey (USA/Kimberlee Bassford)•

Making an Ancient Forest (Austria/Rita Schlamberger)

Martin’s Boat (USA/Peter McBride)•

The Marvelous Musical Report (USA/Laura & Robert Sams)

Mele Murals (USA/Tadashi Nakamura)

Merchants of Doubt (USA/Robert Kenner)

My Haggan Dream (USA/Laura &Robert Sams)

Ocean Stories: Michele and Howard Hall (USA/Patrick Creadon)•

Operation Grand Canyon with Dan Snow (BBC/UK)•

Patsy Mink: Ahead of the Majority (USA/Kimberlee Bassford)•

Peninsula Mitre (Argentina/Joaquin & Julian Azulay)

Planet Ocean (France/Yann Arthus-Betrand, Michael Pitiot)

A Plastic Ocean (USA, UK & Hong Kong/Craig Leeson)•

Pronghorn Revival (USA/Ben Masters)•

Red Chargers (USA/Rocky Romano)•

Sea Youth (USA/Chelsea Odufu)

Shorebreak: The Clark Little Story (USA/Peter King)

Sonic Sea (USA/Michelle Dougherty, Daniel Hinerfeld)

Spotlight (USA/Tom McCarthy)•

Unbranded (USA/Phillip Baribeau)•

Valen’s Reef (USA/Imraan Ismail)•

Vamizi-Cradle of Coral (Sweden/Mattias Klum)

View from a Blue Moon (USA/John John Florence, Blake Vincent Kueny)•

The Voyage of Swell (USA/Liz Clark, Teva Perrone)

Water from Stone (USA/Ben Masters)•

The Weekend Sailor (Mexico/Bernardo Arsuaga)•

Wild Horse Resolution (USA/Ben Masters)•

National Geographic Wild Yellowstone: Grizzly Summer (USA/National Geo)•

Winning Girl (USA/Kimberlee Bassford)•

  • Filmmaker/Presenter attending Ocean Film and leading discussion

For the latest updates on films and speakers, follow the festival on Facebook, www.facebook.com/waimeaoceanfilmfestival, visit www.waimeaoceanfilm.org or email info@waimeaoceanfilm.org.

The full lineup of films and the complete festival program will be available to download at www.waimeaoceanfilm.org around December 19. Festival passes can be purchased via the website or at 808-854-6095. Kama‘aina/early rates are available in advance by contacting the festival office through December 19 and gift passes are available.

The Waimea Ocean Film Festival is a 501c3 organization made possible through the support of patrons, sponsors and the community. Mahalo to the 2017 Ocean Film partners: Four Seasons Resort Hualalai, The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i, the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel, Holualoa Inn, Matson, K2 Imaging, Coast Grille, Sushi Rock, Mai Grille, Big Island Brewhaus, Big Island Traveler, Maile Charters, Mauna Lani Sea Adventures, Kamuela Inn, Starbucks Coffee, Anna Ranch Heritage Center, Hawaii Preparatory Academy (HPA), Parker School, West Hawaii Today, Hawaii Tribune Herald, Kona Law, Emily T Gail Show, The Beach FM and The Wave FM.

Black Arm Band to Perform “Dirtsong” at UH Hilo

A musical presentation celebrating the past and revolutionizing the future of Indigenous Australia will take place when Black Arm Band performs “Dirtsong” at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Performing Arts Center on Friday, January 20, at 7:30 p.m.
Black Arm Band, a collective of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (ATSI), is led by some of Australia’s foremost indigenous artists, including Emma Donovan, Fred Leone, Mark Atkins and Deline Briscoe, alongside Executive Producer Elizabeth Woollacott. Considered one of Australia’s leading performing arts companies, they have been widely acclaimed in Australia and internationally.

At the heart of their work is the group’s relationship with indigenous communities from which they draw inspiration. Their musical tradition and presentation is forged from over 40,000 years of living culture, infused with contemporary styles adopted as their own by Aboriginal Australia.

Tickets are reserved seating and priced at $30 General, $25 Discount and $15 UH Hilo/Hawai `i CC students (with a valid student ID) and children, up to age 17 pre-sale, or $35, $30 and $20 at the door.

Tickets are available by calling the UH Hilo Box Office at 932-7490 or ordering online at artscenter.uhh.hawaii.edu.

Maunalua Makes Their Kahilu Theatre Debut

On Friday, December 23, 2016, at 7PM, the award-winning Hawaiian music trio Maunalua, known for its tight harmonies, strong vocals, and slack key guitar licks makes its Kahilu Theatre debut.

A longtime favorite with audiences all over the aloha state and the continental United States, Maunalua’s always-entertaining performances range from fun high-energy songs to sweet and soulful ballads interspersed with banter between the three group members and the audience. Formed in 1993, Maunalua is comprised of Bobby Moderow, Jr. (Slack Key Guitar, Lead and Background Vocals), Kahi Kaonohi (Electric Bass, Lead and Background Vocals), and Richard Gideon (Guitar, ‘Ukulele, Lead and Background Vocals). The trio has won numerous awards over the years, with the most recent being the award for 2016 Nā Hōkū Hanohano Group of the Year.

Doors open at 6PM for the performance and there will be beverages and snacks available for sale at the Kahilu Theatre bar.

Tickets are $68 / $58 / $48 / $20 and available for purchase online at www.kahilutheatre.org, by calling (808) 885-6868, or at the Kahilu Theatre Box Office at 67-1186 Lindsey Road, Kamuela, HI 96743, Monday – Friday, from 9am to 1pm.

This performance is made possible by generous sponsorship from Peter Souza, Kalei Kamalani & Matthew Kamalani, Working Class Hawaii, and Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel.

The Kahilu 2016/17 Hawaiian Series is sponsored by Hawaiian Airlines and KAPA Radio.

Magic Camp in Honoka’a

The holiday season is a magical time of year, and award-winning magicians Bruce and Jennifer Meyers are celebrating with a very special four-day Magic Camp to future wizards age six and up.

A joint project of Meyers and the Peace Committee of Honoka‘a Hongwanji Buddhist Temple, Magic Camp takes place December 27-29, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and December 30, 5-7 p.m., in the temple’s social hall.

Young magicians will be taught new tricks every day of camp, including how to make things appear and disappear, levitate, switch places, and more. And, they will build their own magic kit to take home and astound their friends.

“The study of magic is educational and valuable for young people in many ways. It can boost confidence, inspire a positive attitude, and so much more,” said Meyers. “And that’s the real magic, helping the kids.”

Cost for Magic Camp is $70 per student. Please register in advance at www.BruceMeyers.com, or call (808) 982-9294.  Financial assistance will be available; please inquire.

For families unable to afford the cost of Magic Camp, the producers welcome contributions or offers to sponsor students in need.  Donations can be sent to “Peace Committee” (c/o Honokaa Hongwanji; PO Box 1667, Honokaa HI 96727).

For further information on how to donate contact: misterokumura@yahoo.com.

$3,000 Raised for the Food Basket at Taste of Mauna Lani

The 7th Annual “Taste of Mauna Lani” fundraising event to benefit Hawai‘i Island Food Basket raised 50 percent more than the 2015 event.

shops-at-mauna-lani
The Taste of Mauna Lani is held during three weeks in September, with participating restaurants offering specially discounted three-course prix-fixe dinners.  A portion of each sale is donated to Hawai‘i Island Food Basket. Tommy Bahama Restaurant & Bar at The Shops at Mauna Lani contributed over $1,000 from sales during the event.

Other participating restaurants at The Shops at Mauna Lani included Ruth’s Chris Steak House, The Blue Room Brasserie & Bar and Monstera Noodles & Sushi.  CanoeHouse at Mauna Lani Bay Hotel & Bungalow was the second highest contributor with over $500 donated to the charity.  A new participant this year was Brown’s Beach House at The Fairmont Orchid.  In addition, The Shops at Mauna Lani made a 20% matching contribution to all funds raised by the restaurants.

“With everyone’s participation in this event, a total of $3,000 was raised by ‘Taste of Mauna Lani,’ which is a significant increase over last year’s amount.” said General Manager Michael Oh. “We are always looking for ways to give back, especially to the Food Basket, who works so hard all year round to help the people who need it most in our community.”

To make a donation as an individual or business, visit www.hawaiifoodbasket.org.

Pepper to Perform at Kona Brewing Company

In honor of Kona Brewing Company’s Makana Series, the company is celebrating two successful years of fundraising with a party at the original brewery in Kona on December 17, 2016.  Pepper, a three piece band originally from Hawaii, will be headlining this special concert event.

Pepper

Pepper

WHAT:  Celebration of Kona Brewing Company’s Makana Series, featuring Pepper.  Makana Series are four limited edition, island-brewed beers, inspired by Hawaii’s landscape and made with island ingredients that tell Kona Brewing Company’s story. In the spirit of makana, a portion of proceeds of all beers sold benefit local non-profit organizations.

The event will celebrate the two years Kona Brewing Company has run the program, which has raised more than $100,000 for four non-profit organizations on the island.

Pepper will headline the special event, with opening acts including Divercité and Kimié.

WHEN: Saturday, December 17, 2016, Gates open at 6.00pm, Pepper on stage at 8.40pm

LOCATION: Kona Brewing Brewpub and adjacent Brewery Block, 74-5612 Pawai Pl, Kailua-Kona, HI 96740

COST: General Admission – $39

Tickets are on sale now from https://kiosk.eztix.co/kiosk-optimised/297242.

Kona Brewing Company has been on the island for 22 years, and created the Makana Series as a way to give back and say mahalo to the island. The series is inspired by Earth [Aina], Fire [Wela], Water [Kai] and Wind [Makani]. Proceeds from the sale of these brews benefit local nonprofits committed to the islands’ natural wonder: Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii, Malama Maunalua, Surfrider Foundation Hawaii and Hawaiian Legacy Reforestation Initiative.

Eric Chang, Hawaii Market Manager, Kona Brewing Company, said: “Kona Brewing Company has always made it a priority to help support those who help pave the way for a sustainable future for our planet. For the last two years, we have taken that further by supporting and highlighting four other local charities that share our passion for sustainability and the environment through the Makana Series.

“We’re thrilled to be celebrating two years of giving with this special event, and are honored that the local friends from Pepper are able to join us.  “We hope to see many of our ohana here to celebrate with us.”

Crazy for the 80’s Benefit Concert

A benefit concert for the Big Island Substance Abuse Council featuring 80’s pop stars “Lisa Lisa” and “Shannon” will be held on February 25th, 2017 at the Edith Kanakaole Stadium.

crazy-for-the-80s

Hawai‘i County’s Magic of the Season Open House

The public is invited to Hawai‘i County’s Magic of the Season Open House that will be held 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, December 12, through Friday, December 16, at the Hawai‘i County Building in Hilo.

christmas-at-the-county-2016County volunteers will provide refreshments and light pupu, offer holiday activities, and spread cheer so families may enjoy a safe, community-oriented event. Nā Hōkū Hanohano award-winning performers Mark Yamanaka and Darlene Ahuna will be joined by the Hawai‘i County Band, hula dancers and other exciting performers.

The Magic of the Season also features dozens of trees that County employees have decorated. Members of the public are encouraged to stop by the County Building, located at 25 Aupuni Street in Hilo, weekdays from at 8 a.m. to enjoy the festive trees.

All activities and entertainment are free.

The following is the schedule of nightly performers:

Monday, December 12

  • Christy Lassiter Trio
  • Lori Lei’s Hula Studio
  • Times Five

Tuesday, December 13

  • Komakakino
  • Kolea
  • Average Joe

Wednesday, December 14

  • Randy Lorenzo & Friends
  • Vaughn Valentino
  • Mark Yamanaka

Thursday, December 15

  • Darlene Ahuna
  • Sarah Bethany Band
  • Hawai‘i County Band

Friday, December 16

  • Kris Fuchigami
  • Hālau O Kou Lima Nani E
  • Delis Estabillio & Friends

For more information, please contact Jason Armstrong, Public Information Officer, at 961-8311 or Jason.Armstrong@hawaiicounty.gov.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park to Offer Free Admission on 10 Days in 2017

There are 10 more reasons to enjoy Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park in 2017! The park will offer free admission to all on 10 days in 2017.

Visitors observe the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u Crater from the Jaggar Museum observation deck at dawn.  NPS Photo/Janice Wei

Visitors observe the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u Crater from the Jaggar Museum observation deck at dawn. NPS Photo/Janice Wei

The 2017 entrance fee-free days are:

  • January 16: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
  • February 20: Presidents Day
  • April 15-16 & April 22-23: National Park Week Weekends
  • August 25: National Park Service Birthday
  • September 30: National Public Lands Day
  • November 11-12: Veterans Day Weekend

“We encourage everyone to take advantage of the free entry days, and come visit Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park,” said Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando. “The park is a World Heritage Site and International Biosphere Reserve, and is easily explored on foot or by vehicle,” she said.

Usually, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park has an entrance fee of $20 per vehicle and the pass is good for seven days. (The entrance waiver does not include camping fees). Park visitors can also purchase the annual Tri-Park Pass for $25 and enjoy Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park, and Haleakalā National Park for less than seven cents a day. The annual Tri-Park Pass, which is good for one year from the date of purchase, is available at the entrance stations of all three parks.

An NPS report shows that 1,832, 660 visitors to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park in 2015 spent $151,246,200 in communities near the park. That spending supported 1,834 jobs on island, and had a cumulative benefit to the local community of $189,391,100.

December’s Centennial Events at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park celebrates its 100th anniversary throughout 2016, and continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park (ADIP) programs with the public in December.

All ADIP and Hawaiian cultural programs are free, but park entrance fees apply for programs in the park. Programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Hawai‘i Nei Saturday. Come “Find Your Park” in Hilo and enjoy artwork that celebrates the native plants and animals of the five national parks on Hawai‘i Island, and the human connection to these special places. The “National Parks Preserving Pilina” category celebrates the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, and features artwork from talented Hawai‘i Island artists, including a painting titled “Lava Coming to Life on the Coastal Plain,” by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Ranger Diana Miller! Hawai‘i Nei is an annual juried art show that is not to be missed. Visit www.hawaiineiartcontest.org for more information. Free.

  • When: Sat., Dec. 3 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Where: Wailoa Center, 200 Piopio Street, Hilo

Gorillas, Volcanoes and World Heritage of Virunga National Park. Founded in 1925, Virunga National Park became the first national park on the continent of Africa. Join travel writer and Virunga advocate, Kimberly Krusel, as she takes us on a virtual visit to what has been called “the most biologically significant park in Africa.” Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.

  • When: Tues., Dec. 6 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kapa Making. Feel the unique texture and beautiful designs of Hawaiian bark cloth created by skilled practitioner Joni Mae Makuakāne-Jarrell. Kapa is the traditional cloth used by native Hawaiians for clothing. Kupu kapa, the skill of creating kapa, is rarely seen today and requires years of practice and labor to master. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

  • When: Wed., Dec. 7 from 10 a.m. to noon
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

After Dark in the Park: Kīlauea Military Camp, Once a Detainment Camp. Most people are unaware that Kīlauea Military Camp in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park was used as a Japanese detainment camp during World War II.

Soldiers outside Building 34 in Kīlauea Military Camp during the 1940s. Photo courtesy of Kīlauea Military Camp.

Soldiers outside Building 34 in Kīlauea Military Camp during the 1940s. Photo courtesy of Kīlauea Military Camp.

Park Archeologist Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura will discuss the experience and subsequent detention of Japanese-Americans here following the Dec. 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. The last After Dark in the Park Centennial series presentation of 2016! Free.

  • When: Tues., Dec. 13, 2016 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Centennial Hike: Kīlauea Military Camp. Park staff will lead a revealing walk through Kīlauea Military Camp, used as a Japanese detainment camp during World War II. About an hour. Free.

  • When: Sat., Dec. 17, 2016 at 10:30 a.m.
  • Where: Meet at the flagpole at Kīlauea Military Camp

Kahuku ‘Ohana Day. Calling keiki 17 and younger and their families to journey into the past on the new Pu‘u Kahuku Trail in the Kahuku Unit in Ka‘ū. Create your own piece of Hawaiian featherwork on this day of fun and discovery. Call (808) 985-6019 to register by December 2. Bring lunch, snacks, a reusable water bottle, water sunscreen, hat, long pants and shoes. Sponsored by the park and the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Enter the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on the mauka (inland) side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5, and meet near the parking area. Free.

  • When: Sat., Dec. 17 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Register by Dec. 2.
  • Where: Kahuku Unit

Find Your Park on the Big Screen: Acadia National Park. Acadia and Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Parks are thousands of miles apart, but they have much in common. Both parks turned 100 this year, and both are on islands defined by their indigenous host cultures, fascinating geology, and intriguing biodiversity. Learn about Maine’s iconic national park in the new film, “A Second Century of Stewardship: Science Behind the Scenery in Acadia National Park,” by filmmaker David Shaw. Free.

  • When: Tues., Dec. 20, 2016 at 7 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kenneth Makuakāne in Concert. Enjoy the melodies of multiple award-winning artist Kenneth Makuakāne. His accolades include 15 Nā Hōkū Hanohano awards and six Big Island Music Awards. A prolific songwriter, Kenneth’s compositions have bene recorded by artists such as The Brothers Cazimero, Nā Leo Pilimehana, and many more. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.

  • When: Wed., Dec. 21 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium