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Two Many Sopranos Brings Vocal Concert to Hilo

The vocal duo Two Many Sopranos, consisting of singers Amy Horst and Erin Smith, will bring their unique interpretations of classics and new favorites to Hilo. The duo’s pianist is Walter Greenwood. Joining them are Douglas Wayman, Cathy Young, and members of the Orchid Isle Orchestra. Showtimes are Saturday, June 10, at 7:00 p.m.; and Sunday, June 11, at 2:30 p.m. at the East Hawaii Cultural Center.  Admission is $15.00 general / $10.00 students and seniors. Tickets will be available at the door. For more information, call 640-2898.

The evening’s program, entitled Two Many Sopranos, presents music for duet and solo voices both with piano and with strings.  From songs which may be new to the audience to beloved classics of stage and screen, the concert brings to life old favorites and new gems. With composers as varied as Stephen Sondheim and Bob Dylan, and songs as varied as the sacred Pie Jesu by local favorite Pedro Ka‘awaloa and I Love a Piano by Irving Berlin, the concert promises something for every fan of vocal music. Solos and duets intermingle with featured guest performers, including Douglas Wayman as Janelle Nieman and Cathy Young in a viola solo, to provide variety and interest.

Amy Horst

Amy Horst and Erin Smith, local stage and concert performers, have worked together in Wayman’s Palace Theater Vaudeville Variety Shows and in the Palace’s production of Mary Poppins, where Horst played the title role and Smith played the lead role of Mrs. Banks. Both singers have also performed to acclaim in Hilo as soloists, onstage, and in concert.  This concert brings them together to sing duets and solos that showcase their particular talents.

Erin Smith

Smith and Horst are joined by local performer and drag queen Douglas Wayman, best known to Hilo audiences as Albin/Zaza from the Palace Theater’s production of La Cage Aux Folles; and as Janelle Nieman in his Vaudeville Variety Shows at the Palace Theater. The duo is also joined by local string player and orchestra leader Cathy Young, who has created an original string arrangement to accompany the haunting “What Makes a Man a Man,” to be sung by Wayman. Walter Greenwood, popular local pianist, organist, conductor, composer, and arranger, accompanies the concert.

Asked about how they came to create Two Many Sopranos, Horst said, “Erin and I have wanted to perform together in concert for several years. This program takes us and the audience on a journey through songs we want to share with our audience, songs we have been planning for a long time. We are excited that the time has finally come to sing together for you!” Smith continued, “This concert is the culmination of several years of dialogue and several months of planning, and we are happy to bring not only ourselves, but the redoubtable Walter Greenwood as pianist, and our featured performers Douglas Wayman and Cathy Young, to our audience. This concert is suitable for all ages and so we say – e komo mai!”

Two Many Sopranos comes to Hilo June 10 at 7:00 and June 11:00 at 2:30 p.m. at the East Hawaii Cultural Center for two shows only.  Admission is $15.00 general / $10.00 students and seniors. Tickets will be available at the door. For more information, call 640-2898.

“Obon in the Gardens” at Lili`uokalani Gardens

Keith Haugen will speak on the background and history of obon traditions during Sunday’s 5/28 “Obon in the Gardens.” The event is sponsored by Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens from 1 to 4 p.m. in the small parking lot near Shoroan, the Urasenke tea house in Lili`uokalani Gardens.

Haugen was a teenage soldier stationed in Japan in the 1950s. He recalls “donning a yukata, tying a tenugui around my head, and learning to dance the Tanko Bushi. Nobody seemed to mind that I was a foreigner or that my ancestral home was in Norway.

“Thousands of miles away, on the island of Maui, my future wife was learning the same song in the multi-cultural community where she was born and raised. Residents of Hawaii, just like the residents of Japan, take the summer obon dances for granted. But where did they originate, and why? What are all those folk songs used year after year?”

Keith wrote and produced an obon special for Hawaii Public Radio more than10 years ago dealing with the background, meaning, and history of obon dances. His continuing presentations state-wide are in demand.

“Obon began as a Buddhist tradition and evolved into a cultural and community event now held annually all over Japan, in Hawai`i, California, Canada, South America, and other places Japanese settled.

“There are perhaps more than a thousand of these traditional Japanese folk songs, called minyo. About 100 of them are extremely popular and have been since the 1800s,” Haugen explained. “There are songs about fishing and seagulls; pretty girls and flowers; even pride in great liquor stores. Some tell of rice and herbs, the moon and winds, and of men riding logs down the river. Others tell of drinking sake, and of courtship.”

Born in Minnesota and resident in Hawaii since 1968, Keith recently taught Hawaiian language and music at Star of the Sea School in Honolulu.

“My earlier education was in journalism and I worked for many years as a writer/reporter, editor, columnist, photographer, bureau chief at several daily newspapers including the Honolulu Star-Bulletin (1968-77), where I was State Editor when I was appointed by Gov. George Ariyoshi to be State Director of Information. For more than 10 years, I doubled as a lecturer and instructor, teaching Hawaiian music and language night classes at the UH College of Continuing Education, now called UH Outreach College.

“For most of my adult life, I maintained a second career as an entertainer, songwriter, recording artist, and record producer, radio producer and host. My wife Carmen and I performed together in Waikiki and all over the world for nearly 40 years.”

Keith and Carmen are familiar to HPR listeners as the hosts of Music of Hawai`i. Keith was the creator of Ke Aolama, the first Hawaiian language newscast on radio, and the Hawaiian Word of the Day.

For further information on Obon in the Gardens and other centennial events, please refer to the Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens page on Facebook.

Ka’u Coffee Festival Underway – Jami Beck Crowned Miss K’au Coffee

The ninth annual Ka‘u Coffee Festival is in full swing with newly crowned Miss K‘au Coffee Jami Beck of Wai‘ohinu presiding at a host of upcoming events. The UH-Hilo student swept all pageant categories, winning career outfit and interview, evening gown and swimsuit trophies, plus the titles of Miss Popularity, Miss Photogenic and Miss Congeniality.

Photo of Miss Ka’u Coffee Jami Beck by Pamela Taylor

Upcoming festival fun includes a Pa‘ina and Open House today, May 19 at Pahala Plantation House and the Ka’u Coffee Recipe Contest Sun., May 21 at the Ka‘u Coffee Mill. Java jumping activities continue Mon., May 22 with Ka’u Star Gazing and May 24-25 with Ka‘u Mountain Water Systems Hikes.

The festival percolates on Sat. May 27 between 9 a.m.-5 p.m., inside and out of the Pahala Community Center at the free Ka‘u Coffee Festival Ho‘olaule‘a. Enjoy a full day of live music; Hawaiian performing arts; keiki activities; broke ‘da mouth local food, crafts, product and informational booths; plus barista-guided coffee tastings. Guided farm tours with van transport are $20. On Sun., May 28 at 9 a.m, The Ka’u Coffee College features local and visiting coffee industry experts offering seminars focused on enhancing coffee quality and best farm management techniques.

Enter the “Buy Local, It Matters” contest for a chance to win! Simply visit festival sponsors and redeem purchase receipts, product labels and business cards at the ho‘olaule‘a for chances to win cash and prizes.

All activities are open to the public; for details on ticketed events and full festival info, visit www.KauCoffeeFest.com.

Ka‘u Coffee Festival: Founded in coffee traditions hailing to the 1800s—plus the hard work of former sugar plantation workers—Ka‘u coffee burst onto the specialty coffee scene by winning numerous coffee quality awards. These accolades highlight the unique combination of people and place that makes Ka‘u coffee a favorite across the globe. The festival’s mission is to raise awareness of Ka‘u as a world-class, coffee-growing origin. For more information and festival updates, visit kaucoffeefest.com, follow Ka‘u Coffee Festival on Facebook and @kaucoffeefest on Twitter, or call 808-929-9550.

37th Annual Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Cultural Festival & BioBlitz

Save the date for the free 37th annual Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Cultural Festival & BioBlitz, Saturday, July 8, 2017, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Kilauea Military Camp.

The festival’s theme, Hilina‘i Puna, Kālele iā Ka‘ū, (Puna leans and reclines on Ka‘ū), celebrates the two land districts that comprise the national park. People of all ages and districts are invited to enjoy a day of traditional mele (music), hula, and Hawaiian cultural demonstrations, crafts, and games. This year’s festival will again include a “BioBlitz,” a chance to join scientists and cultural practitioners in the field and discover the diversity of biology, geology and culture of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

The 37th annual cultural festival showcases an extraordinarily talented line-up of local performers. Hālau Ulumamo o Hilo Palikū will dance their powerful hula kāhiko, and kūpuna hula group Haunani’s Aloha Expressions also take the stage. Renowned solo musicians Kenneth Makuakāne and Lito Arkangel will sing and play instruments, and the “Songbird of Miloli‘i,” Aunty Diana Aki, closes the festival.

Keiki to kupuna can participate in authentic Hawaiian cultural activities like ku‘i kalo (pounding poi), lomilomi (massage), ‘ohe kāpala (Hawaiian bamboo stamping), play Hawaiian games, discover lā‘au lapa‘au (medicine from plants), make a small kāhili (feather standard), weave lei, and more. All cultural festival activities are located at the grassy lawn and ball field area at Kilauea Military Camp.

The BioBlitz expert-led field inventories will be offered, and include Birds of Kīlauea by Sight and Sound; Nā Mea Kanu o Ka Hula (Plants of Hula); an ADA-friendly inventory, Hawaiian Adze Production, and more. Free registration will soon be available through the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park website, www.fhvnp.org. Visitors can learn more about conservation and biodiversity through fun, interactive exhibits sponsored by many of Hawai‘i’s leading conservation organizations on the festival grounds.

The BioBlitz field inventories run from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., and the cultural festival is from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., on Saturday, July 8. Entrance into the park and all events are free.

Make sure to wear sunscreen and a hat. Bring water, rain jacket, and ground mat or chair. No pets. Lunch and beverages will be available for sale.  This wonderful family experience is a drug- and alcohol-free event.

Drinks, Food, Flowers, Fun at Orchid Show Preview Party

On June 1, the Hilo Orchid Show kicks off with a gala Preview Party from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the Edith Kanaka‘ole Stadium.  All ticket proceeds benefit the non-profit Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center.

“The evening gala is a truly a ‘fun’-raiser.  People drink, eat, socialize, and have the first chance to shop for beautiful, unique, and rare orchid plants,” said Ku‘ikahi Executive Director Julie Mitchell.

“This year we’ve added reserved tables for 5 or 10 people, which are available at platinum, gold, silver, or bronze sponsorship levels,” noted Mitchell.  “We hope the community will come out to enjoy a fun party and support the cause of ‘Finding Solutions, Growing Peace.’”

The benefit party features a selection of beverages, catered food, live music, and orchid pre-sales.  The event is zero waste, with eco-friendly eating utensils, plus recycling/composting stations.

Each party-goer receives a souvenir glass, in order to enjoy the libations and take home after the event.  A wide variety of fine wines, beer on tap from Kona Brewing Co., gourmet lilikoi and dragon fruit juices, and coffee from Hilo Coffee Mill are served.

Hilo Orchid Show Gala Preview Party is Thursday, June 1 at the Edith Kanaka‘ole Stadium

Pupu, dinner, and dessert buffets are compliments of Island Naturals Market & Deli and AJ & Sons Catering, featuring the food stylings of Dean Shigeoka and Audrey Wilson, the food columnist for the Hawaii Tribune-Herald.

On the menu are bacon, lettuce, and tomato rolls; gingered chicken; orange cream roasted duck on won ton chips; fried adobo chicken; house made “spam” with Hilo fried rice musubi; and sous vide short ribs with ginger gems.

Also served are quinoa kale salad, ulu salad with apples, cobb salad, and hydroponic greens with lilikoi dressing.  Pupu include various types of sushi including vegetarian; assorted cheeses, breads, and olives; and hummus and olive caper tapenade.  And for dessert are assorted fruits, panna cotta with fruit compote, and haupia with toasted coconut topping.

Tickets for the Preview Party are $70 (of which $25 is tax deductible) and may be purchased in advance from The Most Irresistible Shop, Hilo Coffee Mill, Day-Lum Properties, and Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center.  For reservations or sponsorship opportunities, contact Jenifer at (808) 935-7844 x 1 or jenifer@hawaiimediation.org.  Tickets are also available at the door.

“Mediation is an empowerment model for shared decision-making.  Mediation encourages self-determination and provides a safe space for all voices to be heard,” Mitchell shared.  “We need more peace building programs on Hawai‘i Island.  Funds raised at this event make that happen.  Please join us.  Change a life.”

10 Top Chefs & Fireworks Star at Hawaii Food & Wine Festival Summer Opener

The Hawai‘i Food & Wine Festival (HFWF) will launch its seventh year with a bang on June 2, 2017 at The Kahala Hotel & Resort. The seafood-themed kickoff event, Cuisines of the Sea features ten of the State’s best chefs and a fireworks finale to celebrate the talent lineup announcement for #HFWF17, happening October 20-November 5 on Maui, Hawai‘i Island, and O‘ahu.


“We aim to elevate the experience for guests at the Hawai‘i Food & Wine Festival every year,” says HFWF Chief Executive Officer Denise Yamaguchi. “To kick off our seventh year, we’ve invited ten of the Islands’ top chefs to craft some of the most mouthwatering dishes under a showering of fireworks at The Kahala Hotel & Resort.”

Cuisines of the Sea features James Beard award-winning HFWF Co-Founders Alan Wong and Roy Yamaguchi along with The Kahala’s Executive Chef Wayne Hirabayashi, Arancino Executive Chef Daisuke Hamamoto, Vikram Garg, Chris Kajioka, Michelle Karr-Ueoka, Mark Noguchi, Sheldon Simeon, and Lee Anne Wong. The event showcases seafood from our waters such as Kualoa shrimp, oysters, and ahi along with locally raised Ni‘ihau lamb and pork belly. Dishes will be paired with coveted wines such as Caymus, Insignia, Kosta Browne, Opus One, and Silver Oak and creative cocktails by Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits.

Tickets for Cuisines of the Sea are priced at $175 per person. To purchase tickets, please visit: www.HFWF.me. The grazing event is the grand finale for a five-day Culinary Journey of farm tours and unique experiences that will be covered by national media to shine a spotlight on Hawai‘i’s dynamic culinary scene. At Cuisines of the Sea, the themes, talent, and wineries for the Fall Festival will be announced.

“We’re thrilled to be the host resort of the second annual HFWF Launch event, Cuisines of the Sea at our Kahala oasis,” said Gerald Glennon, General Manager, The Kahala Hotel & Resort. “The HFWF organization is aligned with our corporate philosophies of community, sustainability, Hawaiian culture and educational programs and we’re proud to be a partner and presenting sponsor.”

#HFWF17 will welcome more than 100 culinary masters, 50 wine makers, and a dozen mixologists to events on Maui, Hawai‘i Island and O‘ahu from October 20-November 5, 2017. The participating chefs are personally recommended and invited by the Festival’s co-founders. “We try to invite chefs who have the same kind of passion as we do for food and sustainability,” shares Roy Yamaguchi. “Our job is to really promote the State of Hawai‘i to the rest of the world through food and the chefs become our ambassadors.”

Alan Wong recalls the festival’s beginnings, saying “We started as a three-day event in Waikiki with only 30 chefs. Now we have three events on Maui, one event on the Big Island, and five days on O‘ahu. The spotlight is put on Hawai‘i for three weeks on our people, our culture, our food, what we grow here. It’s a win win win.”

The Festival boosts Hawai‘i’s reputation as a culinary destination with prominent national media coverage valued at $12 million and attendance that’s grown to nearly 8,000. The HFWF mission is to showcase Hawai‘i’s food, farms, and young chef talent. Since its 2011 launch, HFWF has donated $1.7 million to community organizations that support sustainability, culinary programs and agriculture. Festival proceeds benefit the Culinary Institute of the Pacific, Hawai‘i Agricultural Foundation, Hawai‘i Community College Culinary Arts Program, Hawai‘i Farm Bureau, Hawaii Seafood Council, IMUA Family Services, Leeward Community College Culinary Program, Maui County Farm Bureau, Maui Community College Culinary Arts Program, ment’Or BKB Foundation, Paepae o He‘eia, and Papahana Kuaola.

Stay connected with the Hawai‘i Food & Wine Festival via www.HFWF.me or follow HFWF on Twitter/Instagram @HIFoodWineFest and Facebook at hawaiifoodandwinefestival.

First Annual Roundup at the Ranch

The date for the First Annual Roundup At The Ranch, which will be held at the Waiki’i Ranch Clubhouse, has been announced as July 15, 2017.

The BBQ and dance will run from 6pm – 10pm, with live music by Patio Productions.  Silent and live auction items include stays at vacation homes in Montana, Utah and Volcano Village, hotel and golf packages, brunch for 12 at the Mauna Kea Polo Club, sporting clays shoot for 5 at Parker Ranch, and jewelry.  The committee welcomes other auction donations.

Roundup at the Ranch

Tickets are $125 per person, of which $70 is tax deductible.  Seating is limited to 100. Tickets can be purchased online:  http://www.danielsayrefoundation.org/

Proceeds from the Roundup At The Ranch will help the Daniel R. Sayre Foundation support The Hawaii County Fire Department, including 9 Bravo Volunteer Fire Company. The Hawaii County Fire Department is a well-trained and managed force whose mission is to protect life and property on our island.  While the regular crews are very capable and quick to respond in emergencies, the size of the island requires more resources to complete the work.  That is why the Volunteer Fire Companies are important.

In North Hawaii, the Hawaii County Fire Department has five permanent Fire Stations.  These facilities are staffed continuously, and are called upon as soon as an emergency occurs.  But they can’t be everywhere.   Hawaii County Fire Department Stations 8 (Honokaa), 9 (Waimea),14 (South Kohala), 15 (North Kohala) and 16 (Waikoloa) attempt to protect all of North and South Kohala and some of Hamakua.  The volunteer groups, which are located between the stations, provide critical extra help.

The Waiki’i Ranch community’s own volunteer fire department, 9 Alpha, has worked in partnership with the 9 Bravo team on many occasions to assist the Waimea Fire Department in battling fires throughout the region.  The Roundup At The Ranch is a neighbor-to-neighbor effort to honor and support all of our local firefighters, whose hard work and dedication help to protect our homes and communities.

The Daniel R. Sayre Memorial Foundation

The Daniel R. Sayre Memorial Foundation is a volunteer-run, non-profit organization dedicated to providing essential equipment and training to the Hawaii Island Fire Department who serves the Hawaii community, and more than 1.5 million visitors per year from around the world.
Over one million dollars in donations and pledged equipment have been raised since its inception in 1997.  100% of the donations go to funding rescue equipment and training vital to saving lives. The Foundation is a registered 501(C)(3) non-profit organization.

9 Bravo Volunteer Fire Company

9 Bravo is a Volunteer Fire Company located roughly halfway between the Waimea and the South Kohala fire stations. The surrounding open pastures and wind-swept fields are often the location of large wild fires, some of which threatened homes and businesses.  9 Bravo has almost a dozen trained and capable firefighters, and two tank trucks that can negotiate rough roads and open fields.  The company is called on regularly, with over 30 major emergencies in 2016, including several recently adjacent to Waiki’i Ranch.

When 9 Bravo started up in 2009, the department provided training and some equipment, including personal protective gear.  A small brush truck with a 300 gallon water tank was assigned, but it was old and broke down frequently.  As homes were built in Kanehoa and Anekona, the owners wanted to assist the volunteers by providing more than the department could afford.  That was the start of a nonprofit company named Anekona Ouli Kanehoa VFD Company (“AOK”).

AOK got its tax exempt status with help from The Daniel R. Sayre Memorial Foundation.  AOK is focused on supporting 9 Bravo, and through fundraising by donations, purchased personal gear, equipment and a 5 ton cargo truck that carries a 1200 gallon water tank.  This truck is a valuable asset which has assisted in many off-road wildfires.

Seeing that the trucks and equipment were kept by the volunteers, with Captain Mike Shattuck’s garage full of hoses and other gear, and the trucks in his front yard, AOK has undertaken to build a permanent facility for 9 Bravo.  In the past few years, with plenty of volunteer help from the community, AOK has obtained a site to build a basic equipment garage, and has recently completed design work, obtained permits, and commenced construction.  Although donations from the local community have been helpful, and local contractors and suppliers have been generous in providing in-kind contributions, AOK is still about $50K short of cash needed to complete construction of the equipment garage.

Auli’i Cravalho to Perform National Anthem at PBS’ Memorial Day Concert

Hawai‘i’s own Auli‘i Cravalho, star of Disney’s Moana, is scheduled to open this year’s National Memorial Day Concert on PBS with a performance of “The Star-Spangled Banner.” The concert will be broadcast from the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol.

Auli‘i Cravalho

PBS Hawai‘i will air the National Memorial Day Concert Sunday, May 28 at 7 pm, with an encore broadcast at 9 pm. It will also be live streamed online on Facebook Live and www.pbs.org/national-memorial-day-concert and available as Video on Demand for a limited time only, May 28 to June 10.

Oscar nominee and Emmy and Tony-Award winner Laurence Fishburne will join Tony Award-winner Joe Mantegna to host the 28th annual edition of the PBS broadcast, which regularly ranks among the public television network’s highest-rated programs.

For almost three decades, PBS has presented this night of remembrance dedicated to the country’s men and women in uniform, their families at home and all those who have given their lives for our country. Emmy Award-winner Gary Sinise, who has co-hosted the concert for the past eleven years, will present a 75th anniversary salute to the Doolittle Raiders, the aviators who changed the course of World War II in the Pacific.

The all-star line-up for the event includes: General Colin L. Powell USA (Ret.); Renée Fleming; Vanessa Williams; Scotty McCreery; John Ondrasik of Five for Fighting; John Ortiz; Christopher Jackson; Ana Ortiz; Ronan Tynan; and Russell Watson, in performance with the National Symphony Orchestra under the direction of top pops conductor Jack Everly. Additional performers to be announced.

The program is a co-production of Michael Colbert of Capital Concerts and WETA, Washington, D.C.  Executive Producer Michael Colbert has assembled an award-winning production team that features the top Hollywood talent behind some of television’s most prestigious entertainment awards shows including the Grammy Awards, Country Music Awards, Tony Awards, Saturday Night Live and more.

Worldwide Voyage: Hawai’i Shares its Culture With the World Exhibition

Volcano Art Center is proud to announce the exhibition Worldwide Voyage: Hawai’i Shares Its Culture With The World.  This fine art exhibition presents the navigational story of the Hōkūleʻa’s Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, told through photographs, cultural items and art inspired by the voyage.  The exhibit will be open to the public on May 20th through July 2nd at the Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.

Star Compass by David Reisland

The Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage has taken the iconic sailing canoe Hōkūleʻa around the Earth, and her sister canoe Hikianalia around the Pacific, to promote a global movement toward a more sustainable world. The Mālama Honua (caring of Island Earth) mission seeks to engage communities worldwide in the practice of sustainable living while sharing Polynesian culture, learning from the past and from each other, creating global relationships, and inspiring action to care for and discover the wonders of  Earth.  Since departing Hawaiian waters in May 2014, Hōkūle‘a will have sailed approximately 60,000 nautical miles and made stops in 27 countries and 100 ports, weaving a “Lei of Hope” around the world.

During the voyage, Hōkūleʻa and her crew have been greeted and visited by global peace and ocean conservation leaders such as His Holiness The Dalai Lama, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki­moon, Dr. Sylvia Earle, Jackson Brown, Sir Richard Branson and Republic of Palau President Tommy Remengesau, Jr.

Hōkūleʻa in New York Harbor

The exhibition on display consists of a collection of mounted photographs, cultural items, and art curated by Gary Eoff.  The photographs, provided by the Polynesian Voyaging Society, offer a first-hand account of the navigation, ports visited and the stories of the individual navigators. The cultural items, made by Ed Kaneko and his students, as well as Gary Eoff illustrate primitive wayfaring methods and supplies used on ancient voyages.  A few of the items traveled on the canoe to The Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History as part of the voyage.  Art work including a star compass table by David Reisland and wood bowls by Cliff Johns will also be on display.

Guided By The Stars by Gary Eoff

“Volcano Art Center wishes to extend a huge mahalo the Polynesian Voyaging Society, the ‘Oiwi Television Network and the individual photographers for sharing the visual story with us,” states Gallery Manager Emily C. Weiss.    “Their mission to perpetuate the art and science of traditional Polynesian voyaging and the spirit of exploration through experiential educational programs that inspire communities to respect and care for themselves, each other, and their natural and cultural environments, is truly something we support”, continues Weiss.

“Volcano Art Center and the artists we represent have been inspired by the courage of this voyage.  Navigating using only ancient wayfinding practices, without modern instruments, using stars, winds and waves is remarkable.  While most people are turning to technology for everything, it is absolutely refreshing to witness the opposite.  Timing the exhibit with the completion of the actual voyage is no accident. We hope to honor the homecoming by sharing with the canoe and crew just how much their strength, determination and knowledge has inspired us.”

Volcano Art Center is a 501(c) 3 nonprofit organization created in 1974 whose mission is to promote, develop and perpetuate the artistic, cultural and environmental heritage of Hawaii through arts and education.  The exhibit is sponsored by the Hawai’i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts. Please visit www.volcanoartcenter.org for more information.

Big Island Chocolate Festival Names Winners

Culinary entries from Maui and the Big Isle were tapped winners at last night’s Big Island Chocolate Festival gala. A sold-out crowd of 600 attendees sprawled inside and out of the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel for the sixth annual fundraiser to benefit four island non-profits.

The event theme “Worth Its Weight in Gold-The History of Chocolate” was depicted at culinary stations and the Four Seasons Resort Hualalai was tapped Best Decorated Booth.

From Left: Big Island Chocolate Festival founder Farsheed Bonakdar presented the professional culinary winners with their plaques: Michelle Yamaguchi of Wailua Estate for Best Bean-to-Bar, Chef Dayne Tanabe of Hilton Waikoloa Village for Best Savory, Chef Donald Wressell of Guittard Chocolate Company for Best Plated Dessert and People’s Choice Best Sweet, Chef Eddie Enojardo for Best Bonbon and Chef Alan Heap, Mara Masuda and Albert Asuncion of Huggo’s for People Choice Best Savory. Photos by Kirk Shorte

Creations by chefs, chocolatiers, college and high school culinary students were critiqued on taste, texture, appearance and creativity by a team of celebrity judges at competitions during the two-day festival.

Gala winners were Chef Dayne Tanabe of Hilton Waikoloa Village for Best Savory, Chef Donald Wressell of Guittard Chocolate Company for Best Plated Dessert, Chef Eddie Enojardo of Hilton Waikoloa Village for Best Bonbon and Michelle Yamaguchi of Wailua Estate for Best Bean-to-Bar Chocolate.

People’s Choice Awards went to Chef Alan Heap of Huggo’s for Best Savory and Guittard for Best Sweet. In the farm awards division, Gini Choobua of Likao Kula Farm earned Best Cacao while J. Bennett of Nine Fine Mynahs took Best Criollo.

Gini Choobua of Likao Kula Farm in Kona earned Best Cacao.

Six high school culinary teams participated in the gala with Kea‘au High School winning first, followed by Waiakea in second and Konawaena in third.

Earning first place in the high school culinary division were students from Kea‘au High School.

Students at Waiakea High School placed second in the high school culinary division.

Taking third place in the high school culinary division was the Konawaena team.

Three students earning culinary scholarships were Hannah Norman and Mina Acosta-Cabamungan of Waiakea and Rhoma Dai of Kea‘au.

From Left: High School scholarship winners included Hannah Norman and Mina Acosta-Cabamungan of Waiakea and Rhoma Dait of Kea’au.

For Friday’s college competition, UH-Maui College took first and second while UH-Palamanui came in third. Due to a mix up in the judging process, the incorrect winners were named during the gala and the judges later made the correction.

The team of judges for the various competitions were Chef Donald Wressell of Guittard Chocolate Company, Chef Alicia Boada of Cacao Barry, Paul Picton of Maverick Chocolate, Chef Elizabeth McDonald of B3 a Beach Bunny Bakery, Chef Ricky DeBoer of The Fairmont, Kea Lani; Chef Yoshikazu Kizu of Ritz Carlton Kapalua, Chef Teresa Shurilla of UH-Maui College, Chefs Connor Butler and Frank Kramm of the Kona Butcher Shop, Chef Krista Garcia of UH-Maui College, Chef Stephane Treand, Nat Bletter, Neal Campbell, Weston Yap, Paul Picton, Farsheed Bonakdar and Chef Bruce Trouyet of Four Seasons Resort Maui at Wailea.

The real winners of the annual festival are the four beneficiaries: the ACF Kona Kohala Chefs Assn., Kona Dance & Performing Arts, Kona Pacific Public Charter School and Waimea Country School’s Na Keiki Aloha ‘Aina.

Presented by the Kona Cacao Association, the Big Island Chocolate Festival not only heralds Hawai’i’s growing cacao industry, but also the professional and student culinarians who masterfully create foods featuring chocolate.

In addition to last night’s gala, the festival offered a full lineup of chocolate decadence from planting to plating: a Kona cacao farm tour, plus growing and processing seminars and how-to culinary demonstrations by chocolate industry experts.

Visit www.bigislandchocolatefestival.com for updates on next year’s event.

The Big Island Chocolate Festival is presented by the Kona Cacao Association, Inc. The mission and goal of KCA is to promote the cacao industry on the Big Island of Hawai‘i by presenting BICF as an educational and outreach opportunity for local cacao farmers, the hospitality industry and cacao enthusiasts. Mahalo to 2017 event sponsors Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel, Guittard Chocolate Company, Prova, Valrohna USA, Cacao Barry, Barry Callebaut, ChoiceMART, Kona Auto Center, Dolphin Journeys, Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory, Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union, Amoretti, Cocoa Outlet, Kona Brewing Company, Young’s Market, Waialua Estate Coffee & Chocolate, XPress Reprographics, The Spoon Shop, Island Asphalt Maintenance, DHX, Island Air, Republica Del Cacao, The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i, Pivotal Shift Consulting Group, Hawaii Coffee Connection and TheWave@92FM.  www.bigislandchocolatefestival.com. #BIChocoFest, #ChocolateGold

VOICES Brings Vocal Ensemble Concert to Hilo

The ensemble VOICES, led by local voice teacher Mark Sheffield under the auspices of his Mark Alan VocalWorks studio, will bring their unique interpretations of classics and new favorites to Hilo. The group’s pianist is Kanako Okita. Showtimes are Friday, May 12, and Saturday, May 13, at 7:30 p.m. at the First United Protestant Church.  Admission is free and by donation, with a suggested donation of $10.00. For more information, call 238-6040.

Mark Sheffield

The evening’s program, entitled That’s Life, presents music for ensemble and solo voices both a capella and with piano, especially chosen to highlight the seasons of the year and the seasons of life.  From songs which may be new to the audience to beloved classics of stage and screen, the recital brings to life old favorites and new gems. With composers as varied as Eric Whitacre and Lili Boulanger, and songs as varied as the sacred My Song in the Night by Mack Wilberg and Africa by Toto, the concert promises something for every fan of vocal music. Solos and small ensembles intermingle with full ensemble numbers to provide variety and interest.

Mark Sheffield, Tenor and Voice Teacher, began his studio in Hilo over a decade ago. In that time he has given students success in local theater productions and concerts. He has also sent students to further study and to careers in professional theater and music. His work as a voice teacher has been highly regarded for his skill in bringing each singer’s true voice forward. Now, his students make up the personnel of his new group VOICES.

VOICES, a vocal ensemble consisting entirely of students in Sheffield’s Mark Alan VocalWorks studio, gives Sheffield’s advanced students the additional challenge of learning and performing challenging ensemble music within the context of Sheffield’s instruction in vocal technique and interpretation. Last year’s debut concert of the group included staged theatricality as well as new interpretations of songs from classic to modern. VOICES has also performed on the UH Hilo Performing Arts Center stage, featured in recent UH Hilo choral concerts. Beyond this, VOICES and its less formal predecessor has a decade-long history of performing to acclaim at the annual Keaau Christmas Parade.

Asked about how he came to create That’s Life, Sheffield said, “I was inspired by the seasons of life, and how they fit with the four seasons of Spring, Summer, Fall, and Winter. This program takes VOICES and the audience on a life journey through youth to maturity and venerable age. We end with a note of hope and timelessness that surpasses all seasons, whether of weather or life. The concert includes songs in a rich variety of styles designed to showcase the brilliance of the ensemble as well as the theme of the evening.” Sheffield continued, “This concert is our second full-length concert, presented as a gift to our community. We appreciate your support, we welcome your donations toward our future endeavors, and we look forward to seeing you at That’s Life. Please do come and join us in this evening of vocal excellence.”

VOICES: That’s Life comes to Hilo May 12 and 13, 2017, at 7:30 p.m. at the First United Protestant Church for two shows only.  Admission is free and by donation, with a suggested donation of $10.00. Donations accepted at the door. Call 238-6040 for more information.

Carrying On with Tradition with Robert Cazimero on the Big Island

Saturday, May 13 at 7 pm, Hawai‘i’s most revered and loved Kumu and singer, Robert Cazimero, returns to Kahilu Theatre to carry on with an unbroken 32-year-old tradition – celebrating May Day in Waimea.

Robert’s beautiful voice is so distinctive that whether he performs on piano or with his brother Roland as the Brothers Cazimero, people recognize him instantly and are compelled to listen.

Robert has been a part of close to forty full album projects; many considered classics in the history of Hawaiian music. The popular success of the music he has made and participated in has been recognized through dozens of awards, performances on the world’s most prestigious stages and the millions of albums that have been bought by people around the world.

Robert has studied the art of hula for decades and has been an essential player in the evolution of modern Hawaiian music. His passion and talent have played a huge role in taking Hawaiian music and dance to stages all over the globe. Robert’s kane of Na Kamalei were overall winners at the 2015 Merrie Monarch Festival.

“Waimea is one of my favorite places in Hawai`i, and it’s always such a pleasure to perform for the folks (many I consider family),” says Robert. “It wouldn’t be spring without this concert, and I relish our time at Kahilu Theatre, one of the best venue’s in Hawaii!”

Doors open at 6 pm for the performance on Saturday, May 13, at 7 pm, with snacks and beverages available for sale at the Kahilu Theatre bar.  In the Kahiu Galleries, a Climate of Change juried exhibit is on display in the Kohala Gallery, and Dance of the Bees – The Exhibit is on display in the Hamakua Gallery.

Tickets are $68 / $58 / $48 / $20 and available for purchase online at www.kahilutheatre.org, by calling (808) 885-6868, or at the Kahilu Theatre Box Office, at 67-1186 Lindsey Road, Kamuela, HI 96743, Monday-Friday, from 9 am to 1 pm.

This performance is made possible by sponsorship from Marianne Maynard, Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, and Kona Brewing Co.

Hawaiian Airlines and KAPA Radio sponsor the 2016/17 Hawaiian Series.

Navy Attending Merrie Monarch Festival, Will Join in Royal Parade

The U.S. Pacific Fleet Band will march and perform in the 54th annual Merrie Monarch Royal Parade on April 22. Capt. James Jenks, Chief of Staff, Navy Region Hawaii, will also attend the festivities.

HILO, Hawaii (April 26, 2014) Under the direction of Lt. Patrick K. Sweeten, the Pacific Fleet Band marches in the 51st annual Merrie Monarch Festival Parade. The parade is the culmination of a week-long festival featuring an internationally acclaimed hula competition and a grand parade through the heart of Hilo. (U.S. Navy photo by Musician 2nd Class Andrea Sematoske/Released)

Capt. Jenks will attend the Hula Kahiko competition on Friday, April 21. He will also attend the Group Hula ʻAuana & Awards and participate with the U.S. Pacific Fleet Band in the Merrie Monarch Royal Parade on Saturday, April 22 at 10:30 a.m. along downtown Hilo.

The Navy recognizes that the Merrie Monarch Festival honors the legacy left by King David Kalākaua, who inspired the perpetuation of Hawaiian traditions, native language and arts. King Kalākaua negotiated a treaty with the United States that led to the Navy’s presence at Pearl Harbor.

“We appreciate King David Kalākaua’s commitment and legacy,” Jenks said. “King Kalākaua supported the Navy and provided the opportunity to establish a coaling station at Pearl Harbor more than a century ago. He was a big supporter of education, which is something we all value today; especially in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math.”

Members of the U.S. Pacific Fleet Band have been on Hawaii Island this week, working with local school bands, reinforcing STEM education and providing community outreach.

Multi-Media Dance Show – “Dance of the Bees”

Saturday, May 6, at 7 pm, and Sunday, May 7, at 4 pm, Kahilu Theatre presents Dance of the Bees, a multi-media dance show that examines the life and plight of honeybees. Director Angel Prince is collaborating with local beekeepers to create an artistic and educational show based on a topic that is both relevant, and urgent. Over 100 students from the Kahilu Performing Arts Classes (KPAC), ages five to adult, will come together in this original Kahilu Production.

Photos by Evan Bordessa

“The subject of the honeybee, an insect of which the future of our species is intrinsically tied too, is an urgent matter,” says Angel Prince. “The concept of the show is to elevate the life of the honeybee to a stage performance, in part to raise awareness of the honeybee, and perhaps to soften their image. This show is both entertaining and exuberant and showcases the talented youth and choreographers of the Big Island.”

Dance of the Bees includes contemporary dance, trapeze, aerial silks, hip-hop and breakdancing, and features choreography by Angel Prince, Lynn Barre (Kona), Elizabeth McDonald, Mana Ho‘opai (Hilo), and Kat Reuss, with exciting and eclectic music from Mum, Zoe Keating, Jon Hopkins, and more.

Dance of the Bees will also play for local schools and children in two youth Shows on Wednesday, May 3rd at 9 am and 10:30 am. For more information about the Youth Shows offered at the Theatre please contact Education Coordinator Lisa Shattuck at youth@kahilutheatre.org.

Doors open at 6 pm for the performance on Saturday, May 6, at 7 pm, and at 3 pm for the performance on Sunday, May 7 at 4 pm. There will be snacks and beverages available for sale at the Kahilu Theatre bar. In the Kahiu Galleries, a Climate of Change Juried Exhibit is on display in the Kohala Gallery, and Dance of the Bees – The Exhibit is on display in the Hamakua Gallery. Both exhibits run through May.

Tickets are $38 / $28 / $22 / $16 and available for purchase online at kahilutheatre.org, by calling (808) 885-6868, or at the Kahilu Theatre Box Office at 67-1186 Lindsey Road, Kamuela, HI 96743, M-F 9 am to 1 pm.

This Kahilu Production and these performances are made possible by sponsorship from Terry & Michael Cromwell, Mimi & Brian Kerley, and John & Anne Ryan.

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor Hosts Dinner & Veterans to Commemorate 50th Anniversary of Vietnam War

In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War, Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor is hosting a Welcome Home Banquet on Thursday, May 25 to honor POWs, Medal of Honor recipients, Gold Star families and all returning Vietnam veterans. Highlights of the patriotic evening will include a welcome by Medal of Honor recipient Major General Patrick Brady, distinguished military guests, and celebrity appearances.

NBC journalist David Price will emcee a program that recreates and honors the legacy of Bob Hope, who entertained U.S. troops wherever they were stationed around the world, especially at Christmas, for more than 50 years. USO videos will showcase Hollywood celebrities and entertainers keeping the spirits of U.S. troops flying high and reminding them of home. The evening will include a guest appearance by actress, singer and dancer Ann-Margaret and a special performance by recording artist and entertainer Tony Orlando with his band.

Festivities begin at 4:00 pm with a reception and viewing of 14 Vietnam-era aircraft on the apron fronting the Museum’s historic Hangar 79. Cost is $25 each for veterans and their guest tickets, $125 for the general public, with sponsor tables available.

Reservations are required and can be made at PacificAviationMuseum.org/WelcomeHome. For more information, contact: Jobeth.Marihugh@PacificAviationMuseum.org;
808-892-3345.

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor is located on Historic Ford Island, where bombs fell during the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. Visitors to the Museum can see remnants from that day of infamy, including the 158-foot tall, red and white iconic Ford Island Control Tower, Hangars 37 and 79, and bullet holes in Hangar 79. Through its preservation and restoration of World War II fighter planes and accompanying artifacts in the Museum’s historic hangars, Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor shares the story of the vital role aviation played in the winning of World War II, and its continuing role in maintaining America’s freedom.

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor is a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization. Its mission is to develop and maintain an internationally recognized aviation museum on Historic Ford Island that educates young and old alike, honors aviators and their support personnel who defended freedom in The Pacific Region, and to preserve Pacific aviation history. Contact:
808-441-1000; Marketing@PacificAviationMuseum.org

Horror Movie Filmed in Puna Now Available Online – “Green Lake”

An award winning film that was filmed at “Green Lake” in the Puna District of the Big Island of Hawaii is now available online:

(Release) Industry hasn’t destroyed all the sacred spaces in the world. In Hawai’i pockets of magic still exist. And so do those that protect them.

GREEN LAKE draws inspiration not only from the beauty and mysticism of Hawaii, but also from B-horror/monster movies, The Twilight Zone and The X-Files. It’s a micro-budget Creature from the Black Lagoon meets Picnic at Hanging Rock.

DIRECTOR’S STATEMENT – Derek Frey
I am fascinated with the supernatural aspect to Hawai’i and the tales found in Glen Grant’s Obake Files. I also love horror films and in 2010 created a short on the Big Island: The Curse of the Sacred Stone. It was a horror/comedy that lightly depicted the implications of disturbing sacred land when an unsuspecting tourist removes a lava rock from a sacred site.

I still felt the impulse to create more of a straightforward horror film on the Big Island. Since my first visit to Hawai’i in 2001, I had heard about Green Lake, an unspoiled fresh body of water located in a crater within a mountainous rainforest in Kapoho. Green Lake is the larger of only two lakes in Hawaii. Allegedly Jacques Cousteau conducted a diving expedition in the 1970’s and couldn’t find the bottom. We don’t know if this is true, but one thing is certain, the towering walls of the crater make the lake seem bottomless. Discussion of Green Lake is almost one of urban legend. The fact is many people who live in Hawai’i have never visited the lake, though the land manager is very inviting and enthusiastic about the lake and its surrounding land.

My first visit to Green Lake, a few years ago, was incredibly inspiring. It’s one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever been to. Accompanying that beauty is a deep and powerful mystical vibe. This place demands that you respect it and it feels like there are protective energies present. During that initial visit a group of us ventured onto the lake via a small paddleboat and our first jump into the water was met with excitement, exhilaration and downright fear. The water is dark and though we know there are no snakes or other predators to fear in Hawai’i it certainly feels as though something lurks below.

From that visit the seed for a film was firmly established and I returned the next year with the Green Lake script in hand. Thus began a grueling 9 day shoot, pulling upon friends from the Big Island I’ve made over the years to play the roles and double as crew. Our core group of 6 played multiple roles in front of and behind the camera, weathering the elements, without sleep to the point of exhaustion and mental breakdown – all for the sake of creating. Green Lake was my mini-Apocalypse Now. It was the most challenging shoot I’ve ever been part of but also the most rewarding and I’m so proud of the result. Green Lake is more than your typical horror film, it’s a warning to everyone that we must maintain our balance with and respect nature, or face the consequences.

A special mention must be expressed to the wonderful music that accompanies the film. Big Island bands Technical Difficulties and Delight Talkies provide songs written specifically for the film. Matthew Reid’s terrific original score is more than I could have ever hoped for.

Enjoy the swim and remember “Horror Dwells Deep”!

GREEN LAKE – Directed by Derek Frey (HD) from Derek Frey on Vimeo.

-FESTIVALS

American Grindhouse Film Festival
Best Cult Creature

Big Island Film Festival

Bloodstained Indie Film Festival

Crimson Screen Film Festival
Nom: Best Short, Director

Dazed 4 Horror
Best Short

Best Shorts Competition
Merit Award

Diabolical Horror Film Festival

F.A.S.H.
Nom: Best Short

FEARnyc

Fright Night Film Festival

Grindhouse Planet Film Festival

Harrisburg-Hershey Film Festival

Hollywood & Beyond Film Festival
Best Short Film

Hollywood Horror Fest

Hollywood Intl Moving Pictures Film Festival
Best Director, Short, Score, Editing, Sound
Nom: Song

Honolulu Film Awards
Gold Kahuna Award: Best Short

Horror Hotel Film Festival
Honorable Mention

Hot Springs Intl Horror Film Festival

IndieFEST
Best Short, Score, Sound, Editing, Leading Actress, Song, Makeup, Cinematography

The Indie Horror Film Festival

Lake View Intl Film Festival
Best Director

LA Shorts Awards
Best of the Fest, Director, Cinematography, Actress, Makeup, Screenplay, Lighting

LA CineFest
Best Poster
Nom: Best Score, Song

LA Horror Comp.
Best Short, Director, Score, Actress, Lighting, Cinematography

LA Independent Film Festival Awards
Best Horror, Original Song

Motor City Nightmares Intl Film Festival

NEPA Horror Film Festival

NYC Indie Film Awards
Best Short, Director, Actress, Cinematography, Score, Editing

Prague Independent Film Festival
Best Score
Nom: Best Short, Horror

RIP Horror Film Festival
Nom: Best Short, Cinematography, Score

Roswell Film Festival
Nom: Best Cinematography

Russian Intl Horror Film Awards

Scare-A-Con Film Festival

Shiver Intl Film Festival
Best Cult/Weird/Experimental Film, Creature

Spotlight Horror Film Awards
Gold Award

StarGate Galactic Intl Sci-Fi Fantasy & Horror Film Festival

Swapping Dead Film Festival

Taupo Halloween Film Festival

Terror Film Festival
Best Cinematography
Nom: Score, Editing, Screenplay

United Intl Film Festival
Award of Merit

Hawai’i Students Nab 20% of Awards at National Student Video Competition

Students from Hawai‘i schools returned to the Islands with 20 percent of the 196 total awards given out at the 14th annual Student Television Network (STN) Convention in Anaheim, CA, held March 28-31. The complete list of Hawai‘i results is included below.

All but one of the Hawai‘i schools that took home awards are public schools. Kamehameha Schools Maui, which won two awards, was the sole Hawai‘i private school in attendance. All of them participate in PBS Hawai‘i’s HIKI NŌ student news network.

Approximately 3,000 middle and high school students from across the U.S. gathered to compete in on-site, time-restricted contests in video journalism, television production, filmmaking, music videos, commercials, and public service announcements.

As in the last few STN competitions, the number of awards won by Hawai‘i schools was notably high in comparison to states with larger populations, such as California, Florida and Texas.

Two neighbor island middle schools led the Hawai‘i awards count – Kaua‘i’s Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School and Maui Waena Intermediate School, with seven awards each. Veteran student video production high schools Moanalua and Wai‘anae took home wins in major overall categories.

“Without a doubt, the stellar performance by Hawai‘i schools at STN is due to the work our schools have done with HIKI NŌ and PBS Hawai‘i,” said Kevin Matsunaga, Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School media teacher and STN regional board member. “Our Hawai‘i media teachers have worked tirelessly, as well, and the outstanding work their students have done at these competitions is proof that HIKI NŌ is making a huge difference in the lives of our students.”

“HIKI NŌ offers students the ideal preparation for this national competition and it also readies them for different professional paths – by teaching them to work their way through challenges and deliver quality work on tight deadlines,” said Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawai‘i President and CEO.

“This national recognition is yet another testament of the quality work being produced by our HIKI NŌ students and the dedication of their media teachers and mentors,” stated Kathryn Matayoshi, Hawaii State Department of Education Schools Superintendent. “These opportunities would not be possible without the commitment and partnership with PBS Hawai‘i. The teamwork and use of technology needed to create these quality productions align with the Department’s mission to help our students connect with their communities and be lifelong learners.”

2017 Student Television Network – Hawai‘i Winners:

CONVENTION RE-CAP

  • 1st Place – Moanalua High School
  • 2nd Place – Waipahu High School
  • Honorable Mention – Maui High School

SPOT FEATURE—MIDDLE SCHOOL

  • 2nd Place – Maui Waena Intermediate School
  • 3rd Place – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School

MOVIE TRAILER—MIDDLE SCHOOL

  • 2nd Place – Maui Waena Intermediate School
  • Honorable Mention – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School

“TELL THE STORY”

  • Honorable Mention – Waiakea High School
  • Honorable Mention – Wai‘anae High School

NAT. SOUND PACKAGE—MIDDLE SCHOOL

  • 1st Place – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School
  • Honorable Mention – Maui Waena Intermediate School

NAT. SOUND PACKAGE—HIGH SCHOOL

  • Honorable Mention – Moanalua High School
  • Honorable Mention – Wai‘anae High School

COMMERCIAL—HIGH SCHOOL

  • 3rd Place – Moanalua High School

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT—HIGH SCHOOL

  • 1st Place – Maui High School
  • 3rd Place – Moanalua High School
  • Honorable Mention – McKinley High School

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT—MIDDLE SCHOOL

  • 2nd Place – Wai‘anae Intermediate School
  • 3rd Place – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School
  • Honorable Mention – Maui Waena Intermediate School

WEATHER REPORT—HIGH SCHOOL

  • 2nd Place – Kapolei High School

SILENT FILM—MIDDLE SCHOOL

  • 3rd Place – Maui Waena Intermediate School
  • Honorable Mention – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School

ACTION SPORTS—HIGH SCHOOL

  • Honorable Mention – Kamehameha Schools Maui High

ANCHOR TEAM—MIDDLE SCHOOL

  • 3rd Place – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School

MUSIC VIDEO—MIDDLE SCHOOL

  • 2nd Place – Maui Waena Intermediate School
  • Honorable Mention – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School

CRAZY 8s BROADCAST NEWS MAGAZINE—MIDDLE SCHOOL

  • 1st Place – Maui Waena Intermediate School
  • 2nd Place – Kamehameha Schools Maui Middle
  • 3rd Place – Wai‘anae Intermediate School

CRAZY 8s BROADCAST NEWS MAGAZINE—HIGH SCHOOL

  • Honorable Mention – Wai‘anae High School

CRAZY 8s SHORT FILM DOCUMENTARY—HIGH SCHOOL

  • 3rd Place – McKinley High School

CRAZY 8s SHORT FILM FICTION—MIDDLE SCHOOL

  • 2nd Place – Ewa Makai Middle School
  • 3rd Place – Wai‘anae Intermediate School

FILM EXCELLENCE BEST WRITING

  • Waipahu High School

FILM EXCELLENCE BEST EDITING

  • Moanalua High School

FILM EXCELLENCE BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

  • Moanalua High School

FILM EXCELLENCE BEST ANIMATION

  • Wai‘anae High School

MONTHLY BROADCAST EXCELLENCE AWARD

  • Wai‘anae High School

Aerial Show Coming to Hilo for First Time Ever

For the first time, an aerial show is coming to Hilo town! “Take Flight: An Evening of Aerial” will show for one-night only at the historic Hilo Palace Theater on Friday, May 12. Produced by Mirabilia Aerial Co. and Puna Aerialists, the 90-minute show features 10 artists performing 15 different acts on aerial silks, lyra, rope, hammock, and pole.
The show spotlights an international lineup with artists from Columbia, Germany, Italy and Sweden, as well as several Big Island-born aerialists. While the Palace Theater has featured singular aerial acts at various events in the past, never before has it housed an aerial-only show.

“Our aerial group has been dreaming of doing a show at the Palace Theater for over four years, and we’re very excited it’s finally happening,” says show producer Zoe Eisenberg, who is co-producing the event alongside Bella O’Toole, an aerial instructor who teaches aerial classes twice a week at Pacific Gymnastics’ facility in Hilo.

This is not the first show put on by Eisenberg and O’Toole. The pair, who will appear in a duo lyra act, produced a 2015 show at Kalani Retreat Center in Kalapana.

“We encourage all our artists to choreograph their own routines, which inspires more creativity and diversity in the show,” explains O’Toole, founder of Mirabilia Aerial Co. Acts will range in emotion from dramatic to soulful and even comedic.

The show is being sponsored by Hawaii’s Volcano Circus. Tickets are $20 and can be purchased at https://takeflightaerial.eventbrite.com/ now, or at the Hilo Palace Box Office beginning April 21st.

More information can be found at the show’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1823075377718360/

For information on aerial classes in Hilo, visit bellaotoole.com.

Kupu Unveils “The ʻŌhiʻa, the Story of Hawaiʻi’s Tree” on Hawaiian Airlines

Starting this month through July, Hawaiian Airlines will air a special short film, “The ʻŌhiʻa, the Story of Hawaiʻi’s Tree,” as part of its Hawaiian Skies domestic in-flight programming. In partnership with Kupu, Hawai‘i’s leading conservation and youth education organization, USDA Forest Service and Hālau ʻŌhiʻa – Hawaiʻi Stewardship Training program on Hawai‘i Island, the video highlights the cultural and ecological significance of ʻōhiʻa and the impact of Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death (ROD).

ʻŌhiʻa are the most abundant native tree species throughout the state of Hawaiʻi and hold significant biological, cultural and economic value. (Photo by JB Friday)

“This video project presented an opportunity not only to address a major conservation issue, but also share the important work that is being done by our partners, program participants and the community on Hawai‘i Island,” said John Leong, Kupu CEO. “We need to continue to work together to increase awareness about these types of issues, while empowering the next generation of environmental stewards and leaders who will continue to protect our environment and develop more resilient and sustainable communities in Hawai‘i.”

The short film features scientists, conservationists, kumu hula, dancers and families of Hawai‘i Island’s community, who are bound by their aloha for and commitment to ʻōhiʻa. Each share personal stories about ʻōhiʻa and the vital role this tree plays in the environment, Hawaiian culture and community. Featured speakers include: USDA Forest Service Research Ecologists Christian Giardina and Flint Hughes, and Natural Resource Specialist Kainana Francisco; USDA Agricultural Research Service Plant Pathologist Lisa Keith; Hālau ‘Ōhiʻa – Hawaiʻi Stewardship Training Founder and Trainer Kekuhi Keali‘ikanaka‘oleohaililani; Kupu Interns Ardena Saarinen and Kawehi Lopez, and Program Coordinator Malia Heimuli; and Lahela Camara and her daughter Hāwelelani.

“As a destination carrier, we strive to provide our guests with warm hospitality and unique in-flight offerings,” said Renee Awana, senior manager of product development at Hawaiian Airlines. “As part of that, we also understand the importance of educating visitors about our pristine and fragile island habitat. Together with Kupu, we believe this film will shine a light on an important issue that all travelers should be aware of.”

Five species of ʻōhiʻa are endemic to Hawai‘i, one of which, Metrosideros polymorpha, is the most abundant native species in Hawai‘i, making up 80 percent of native forests. As one of the first plants to colonize an area after a lava flow, ʻōhiʻa trees are instrumental in developing soil and forming new ecosystems. They dominate old soil and most everything in between, providing critical habitats for countless native species throughout the Hawaiian Islands.

Not only is ʻōhiʻa considered one of the most ecologically significant plants in Hawai‘i, it is deeply rooted in Hawaiian culture through moʻolelo (stories), mele (song), ʻoli (chant) and hula (dance).

“ʻŌhiʻa is as old as the volcanic islands,” said Kekuhi Kealiʻikanakaʻoleohaililani of Hālau ʻŌhiʻa. “When we talk about their significance, we may talk about objects of the culture. But, what we need to begin talking about seriously, is if the ʻōhiʻa were not here, what about our lifeway might change.”

Rapid ‘Ōhiʻa Death (ROD) is a disease caused by the fungus Ceratocystis Fimbriata. Since it was discovered in 2014, ROD has wiped out ʻōhiʻa trees across 50,000 acres on Hawai‘i Island, at an average loss of 10 percent per year.

“It’s impossible for me to imagine a Hawaiʻi without ʻōhiʻa,” said Kainana Francisco of the USDA Forest Service. “Losing ʻōhiʻa would have devastating ripple effects on our forest landscapes and watersheds, the health of our islands and our communities, and Hawaiʻi culture and lifeways. So it’s important for everyone, Hawai‘i stewardship agencies and organizations, our communities, and even our visitors to our islands, to continue to work together to prevent the disease from spreading, and protect Hawai‘i’s precious natural resources and unique ecosystems.”

While the disease is currently isolated to Hawai‘i Island, it has the potential to spread to other islands and affect ʻōhiʻa and the health of ecosystems statewide. Simple ways that anyone can prevent the spread of ROD include:

  • Not moving any parts of the ʻōhiʻa plant;
  • Not transporting ʻōhiʻa interisland per the State Department of Agriculture’s quarantine rule preventing ROD from reaching other islands;
  • Avoid wounding or pruning ʻōhiʻa plants, which make them vulnerable to the fungus;
  • Decontaminate gear and tools (including shoes and clothes) before and after entering forests; and
  • Wash tires and undercarriages of vehicles when traveling off-road and to any areas affected by ROD.

For more information about ʻōhiʻa, ROD,and other updates on the work that needs to be done about ROD, visit www.rapidohiadeath.org.

“I prefer not to say Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death,” added Kealiʻikanakaʻoleohaililani. “That’s not what we want. What we want is Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Health. Without them, there is no life in the Hawaiʻi Islands.”

Upcoming HI-PAL Boxing Event

The Hawaiʻi Police Department’s Community Policing Section – Hawaiʻi Isle Police Activities League (HI-PAL) announces it’s next boxing event will be held at the Thelma Parker Gymnasium in Kamuela on Saturday, May 6, 2017.

Weigh-ins will be from 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. and the fights will start at 6:00 p.m. sharp. The event is free to the public and there will be a concession.

The HI-PAL Boxing Program targets youth ages 8-17, who are interested in an organized, full-contact sport.

“We were overwhelmed with the support of the community from the first event held in North Kohala. We want to continue to provide these events for our keiki and encourage more athletes, coaches and clubs to participate,” said HI-PAL Boxing organizer, Officer ‘KJ’ Kauahikaua. “It’s great for the kids, and even more so for the boxing spectators.”

Anyone who is interested in this program may contact Officer Kapelieli Kauahikaua Jr. at the North Kohala Police Station at 889-6540 or by email at kapelieli.kauahikaua@hawaiicounty.gov.