UH Hilo Student Gets in Fight With Step-Father at School – Both End Up in Hospital

The following assault was reported on the University of Hawaii Hilo crime logs.

UH Hilo Moniker

A male student engaged in a verbal disagreement with his Step-Father which escalated into a physical altercation which resulted in serious injuries. Both were transported to Hilo Medical Center for treatment. Hawaii Police Department, Fire, and EMT responded. HPD and Security initiated reports.

The incident occurred between 8:23 AM and 9:02 AM on Thursday, February 13, 2014 at the College Hall Parking lot located on Lanikaula Street.

Balancing Budget on Backs of UH Students Ill-Advised, Senate President Kim – Officials Blame Deficit on Miserable Football Season

Senate President Donna Mercado Kim is strongly urging University of Hawaii officials not to balance a potential $2 million budget deficit by raising student fees. Through a senate resolution, she points out the already high student fees per semester that amount to $1,400,000 per year to the UH Athletics Department. Students currently pay a $50 mandatory fee per semester.

Donna Mercado Kim and son Micah

Donna Mercado Kim and son Micah

Officials have blamed the deficit on a disappointing 1-11 football season with low ticket sales and the inability to meet a $1 million fundraising goal. However, although acknowledging these facts, the resolution also points out that the discontent and dissatisfaction of some longtime financial supporters with the leadership and transparency of the Board of Regents and the President, and their public statements on no longer contributing funds.

“University officials made bad leadership decisions and now we are seeing the result of them,” said Kim. “Why are we asking our students to pay for the shortfalls of university decision makers? We shouldn’t allow students to shoulder the burden of the UH Athletics Department or any other department.”

According to the resolution, student fees should be based on an objective criteria or an appropriate formula rather than an apparently arbitrary amount decided by the University. It goes on to say that if fees are raised to close a budget deficit, once it is balanced, those fees should be reduced accordingly.

“This is not what we want to teach our future generation of leaders,” she added. “By passing the buck to them, we’re saying ‘Look, if you make a mistake and don’t meet expectations, you can just force someone else to deal with it.’”

Candidate Advisory Council Presents UH Board of Regents Finalists

The Candidate Advisory Council for the Board of Regents of the University of Hawaiʻi has presented a list of candidates to Governor Neil Abercrombie to fill three City and County of Honolulu seats and one student seat on the University of Hawaiʻi Board of Regents for terms beginning July 1, 2014.

UH Logo

The regents whose terms will end on June 30, 2014 are Student Regent Jeffrey Acido and City and County of Honolulu Regents John Holzman and James Lee. In addition, Regent Jeffrey Portnoy is currently serving on an interim appointment and, if confirmed by the Hawaiʻi State Senate, will also serve through June 30th.

The Board of Regents is the governing body of the University of Hawaiʻi and consists of 15 members. Representation includes 7 from the City and County of Honolulu; 2 from the Hawaiʻi County; 2 from the Maui County; 1 from the Kauaʻi County; 2 At Large and 1 University of Hawaiʻi student.

The Candidate Advisory Council was created after the passage of the Hawaiʻi Board of Regents Candidates Act, a 2006 legislatively-referred constitutional amendment. Hawaiʻi voters overwhelmingly cast their votes to require the governor to select Board of Regents candidates from a pool of qualified candidates screened and proposed by the Candidate Advisory Council.

All candidate lists are compiled only after the Candidate Advisory Council completes its comprehensive review and selection process, which is solely and exclusively merit-based. The council adheres strictly to procedures that are set forth in either state statutes or the council’s administrative rules.

The Candidate Advisory Council began this recruitment cycle during early fall 2013. Council members personally recruited candidates and contacted and encouraged government, business, and community leaders to nominate regent candidates. The council placed print advertisements and issued press releases encouraging applications.

The finalists for the Board of Regents seats are as follows:

City and County of Honolulu Seat (currently filled by John Holzman)

  • Peter Adler
  • Russel Nagata
  • Stanford Yuen

City and County of Honolulu Seat (currently filled by James Lee)

  • Walter Kirimitsu
  • James Lee
  • Lee Putnam
  • Keith Vieira

City and County of Honolulu Seat (currently filled by Jeffrey Portnoy)

  • Brian Panik
  • Jeffrey Portnoy
  • Eric Seitz

Student Seat (currently filled by Jeffrey Acido)

  • Jori-Anne Jasper
  • Priya Rashid
  • Michelle Tagorda

Candidate Advisory Council Chair Thomas Ramsey expressed his appreciation to the many individuals who applied during this recruitment period and encourages those not selected to re-apply during future recruitments.

Members of the Board of Regents as well as the Candidate Advisory Council serve voluntarily and are not paid.

Man Gets Assaulted and Photographed in UH Hilo Bathroom

According to the University of Hawaii Hilo Crime records, a man was assaulted and had pictures taken of him inside a bathroom at K-Hall.

UHH Bathroom assault

You can read the full release here: Assault at UH Hilo Bathroom.

In other UH Hilo news:

A female reported her math book was stolen by a student while she was waiting for class on Thursday.

The Bad Boys of Dance Returns to UH Hilo

Rasta Thomas’ Bad Boys of Dance performs once again at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Performing Arts Center in one performance only on Tuesday, February 11 at 7:30 pm.

Rasta Thomas’ Bad Boys of Dance

Rasta Thomas’ Bad Boys of Dance

“Back by popular demand, the Bad Boys of Dance is comprised of the most talented and versatile young male dancers in the world today,” said PAC Manager Lee Dombroski. “Each Bad Boy is selected based on his extraordinary physical abilities and artistry; the talent of the Bad Boys is unparalleled in the industry.”

Founded by the dance world’s very own Bad Boy Rasta Thomas, “we show the world what great male dancing looks like, and to make dancing fun, entertaining and accessible to a whole new generation.”

Tickets are reserved seating and priced at $25 General, $20 Discount and $12 UH Students/Children. Box Office hours are Tuesday – Friday, 9 a.m. -1 p.m.

For more information and to purchase tickets, call 932-7490 or order online at artscenter.uhh.hawaii.edu.

Man Flees Police After Pissing on State Vehicles at UH Hilo

The following crime was reported by the University of Hawaii Campus Security department:

UH Hilo Moniker

Saturday, January 25th, 2014

(Harassment)

Report Status: Pending.

Location: Hale Ikena parking lot.

Time Reported: Saturday, January 25, 2014 at 1:46 AM.

Incident Start: Saturday, January 25, 2014 at 1:46 AM.

Incident End: Monday, January 27, 2014 at 2:00 PM.

Crime Details:
Intoxicated male observed urinating on state vehicles in the Hale Ikena parking lot. HPD called, and male fled rapidly on foot before HPD arrival.

UH Hilo Presents International Nights 2014

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo International Student Association presents International Nights 2014 on Friday, February 7 and Saturday, February 8 at 7:30 p.m. in the UH Hilo Performing Arts Center.

Hilo International Night

This annual event features performances from around the world and is a favorite among students, the community, and visitors.

This year’s shows feature performances from Samoa, the Philippines, Solomon Islands, Germany, Micronesia, Japan, Tahiti, Kiribati, China, Tonga, West Africa, Palau, Timor-Leste, the Marshall Islands, and the United States.

Tickets are $10 general admission and $5 for students, children, and seniors. Tickets may be purchased at the UH Hilo Box Office from 9-1 p.m., Tuesday-Friday, or at the door. Advance ticket purchase is recommended. For ticket information, call 932-7490.

For more information, visit http://hilo.hawaii.edu/international/IN.php.

UH Football Player in Fight Surrounded – Another UH Football Player Ends Up With Concussion

According to the crime beat of the University of Hawaii Manoa School paper Ka Leo a member of the University of Hawaii Football team was in a fight and got surrounded by 20 males.  Another football player attempted to help out when he fell and hit his head suffering a concussion.

UH HelmetHere is the report from the student paper :

Staff reported the incident at 12:01 a.m. According to a witness two men —  one who was a UH Mānoa football player — were fighting and were surrounded by a group of 20 males. According the Campus Security report, a fellow football player ran towards the fight, tripped, hit his head on the ground and suffered a concussion. This case has been referred to Student Housing Services

And in other bizarre UH Manoa news:

Harassment at Moore Hall

At 3:59 p.m. a member of staff received a disturbing, sexual message from an anonymous caller. According the the victim the suspect said, “I want to (expletive) your tight (expletive).”

Harassment at Hale Aloha Mokihana

A student reported that he was harassed between 2:30 and 3:30 p.m. The suspect allegedly tried provoke the victim in regards to a legal case which both are involved in, a Campus Security report said.

Waterfalling Estate to Host UH-Hilo Tennis Exhibition

It’s a sporting venue like no other.  On February 8, athletes from the UH-Hilo Tennis team will put their skills to the test in exhibition matches held on a cliff-side court overlooking thundering waterfalls and panoramic ocean vistas.

Waterfalling Estate Tennis Court

Hosted at the 8-acre Waterfalling Estate in Ninole, the expo serves as a benefit fundraiser for the Richard and Ruth Matsuura Vulcan Tennis Endowed Scholarship.  The scholarship was named after the late state senator and his wife, a local pediatrician, in appreciation for their generous contributions to athletics and education on Hawai`i Island.

Waterfalling Estate
Senator Matsuura was a key figure in Hawai`i politics during the 1980s and 1990s, helping to promote geothermal energy in Puna, and the Natural Energy Lab in West Hawai`i. Though the senator passed away in 1997, Dr. Ruth Matsuura and her children have continued to play an active role in the Hilo community.
Richard and Ruth Matsumura

Richard and Ruth Matsuura

 The Matsuuras were key donors in the construction of the Haili Tennis Courts located at Hilo Intermediate School, and according to UH-Hilo tennis coach Karl Sloss, were “instrumental” in supporting the university’s tennis program in recent years.
“This endowment will help us work toward a fully-funded future for Vulcan Tennis,” said Sloss, who is also a volunteer member of Hui Kako`o Kenika, a nonprofit organization that promotes tennis on the Big Island.
The event, which runs from 3 pm to 6 pm, will feature a “best of five” world team tennis competition, along with light pupus, and live music by Lito Arkangel.
Waterfalling Estate Piano Room
Tickets are $25, and can be purchased in advance from the UH athletics ticket office or at the door. For more information, contact Karl Sloss at (842)-922-7221 or at ksloss@hawaii.edu.

Fulbright Visiting Scholar to Speak at UH Hilo

UH Hilo Moniker

Dr. Sethuraman Paramasivan, a Fulbright Visiting Scholar from India, presents a public lecture on Functional Foods – Development, Marketing and Consumption in India at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo on Tuesday, January 28, 6:30 – 9 p.m. in University Classroom Building (UCB) Room 100.

Paramasivan is senior scientist at the Central Tuber Crops Research Institute, Indian Council of Agricultural Research in Trivandrum, India and current Fulbright-Nehru Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Psychology at Florida State University in Tallahassee. His specialty is the psychology of eating and his work focuses on how psychological and health factors influence the choice and consumption of foods.

Paramasivan’s visit is underwritten by the Outreach Lecturing Fund (OLF), which allows Fulbright Visiting Scholars who are currently in the United States to travel to other higher education institutions across the country. The event is also sponsored locally by the UH Hilo College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management (CAFNRM).

For more information, contact CAFNRM at 932-7691.

Talk Story at UH Hilo Featuring Senator Brian Schatz

The University of Hawaii Hilo Political Science Club presents a talk story session with Sen. Brian Schatz on Friday, January 24th from 12:00 to 1:00.

Schatz UHH

Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikolani College of Hawaiian Language Fall 2013 Dean’s List

Hawaiian Language College

The following students in Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikolani College of Hawaiian Language at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo received Dean’s List honors for the Fall 2013 semester:

Alexandria U`ilani Agdeppa, Ka`alalani Wilson Ahu, Corey Thomas Bell, Samuel Frances Clubb, Dillon Keane Dominguez, Brandy Dugo, Martin Keone Ennis, Alexander Kawika Guerrero, Kana Hayase, Stacy Caruth Joel, Kamalani M Johnson, Aleysia-Rae K Kaha, Kamaleikuuipo Kalehuawehe-Valentine, Micah Leialoha Kealaiki, Emma Nohea Laurel Aika Koa, Dylon Garreth Koehn, Monique Lee Komoda, Ciera Mae Lamb, Yixiao Li, Daniel William McDonald, Hokulani Bennett Mckeague, Maranda Dawn Mumm, Amanda Rose O’Farrell, Angela Ann F Pastores, Natalie Laua`e Poy, Christopher Bryan Ramos, Ronald Kaipo Santos, Noriko Sato, Nelli Vyacheslavovna Semenko, Jennifer Ku`uipo Thomson, Teren Nahelenani Travaso, Kellie Chiemi Yagi, Cheyne Isao Yong Yonemori, and Abcde Kawehi Zoller.

UH Hilo Sophomore Awarded Gilman Scholarship

University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo sophomore Jimmee Makamae Silva-Naone has received a Spring 2014 Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship to study abroad.

Gilman

Silva-Naone was awarded $3,000 to continue her second semester at the University of Waikato in Hamilton, New Zealand. A Hawaiian studies and anthropology major, Silva-Naone looks forward to learning how Maori youth view their presence in a growing Western society. Upon her return, she hopes to share how young Maori balance their role in society with cultural preservation.

The Gilman program was established to promote interest in non-traditional study abroad destinations and to support students traditionally under-represented in study abroad activities. The scholarship also helps to promote multi-cultural fluency through exchange opportunities, which is a key objective of the UH Hilo Strategic Plan.

For more information, contact the Center for Global Education and Exchange, at 932-7488 or www.hilo.hawaii.edu/studyabroad.

Hawaii Court Interpreters Wanted: Once a Year Opportunity

The Hawaiʻi State Judiciary Office on Equality and Access to the Courts will hold an informational session on its Court Interpreter Certification program on the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo campus. The session will be held Thursday, January 16, at 6:00 p.m. in Campus Center Room 306. The event is free and open to the public.

Court Interpreters are independent contractors and earn $25 – $55 per hour for a minimum of two hours a day. The session provides a once-a-year opportunity for individuals who speak English and a second language to take the first step toward becoming an interpreter.

All individuals must meet mandatory minimum requirements to become qualified as a state court interpreter, which include: submission of a Court Interpreter Certification Program Application Form (available online at www.courts.state.hi.us/courtinterpreting), attending a two-day Basic Orientation Workshop offered statewide in February – March 2014, passing Written English and Basic Ethics Exams, and clearing a criminal background check.

Click for more information

Click for more information

For more information, contact the Office on Equality and Access to the Courts at (808) 539-4860, email oeac@courts.hawaii.gov or visit www.courts.state.hi.us/services/court_interpreting/court_interpreting.html

New Home for College of Hawaiian Language Officially Opens – Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language

Cultural tradition and modern architectural design were on display today at the bilingual blessing and official grand opening of Hale`ōlelo, the new home of the University of Hawai` at Hilo’s Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language.

Hawaiian Language College

The ceremony featured a formal `Oki Piko ceremony, which symbolized the cutting of the umbilical cord to separate the new building from its birth mother to begin its life. Representatives of Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikōlani’s consortium of `Aha Pūnana Leo, `Imiloa Astronomy Center, and Nāwahīokalani`ōpu`u School offered tributes in Hawaiian and presented their heahea, or calls of welcome.

The formal program also included remarks from dignitaries, including representatives from the University, UH System and elected officials, mixed in with hula and musical performances. Festivities concluded with gifts and congratulatory presentations and guided tours of the facility.

“The faculty and staff of Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikōlani has worked long and hard to establish the College as a leader in indigenous language and cultural revitalization,” said Chancellor Don Straney. “At long last, they have a permanent home in a facility that is worthy of the quality programs that have earned them international recognition.”

The $21 million complex on Nowelo Street in the University Park of Science and Technology was designed by WCIT Architects of Honolulu, led by Rob Iopa, a graduate of Waiākea High School. The structure was built by Jacobson Construction of Salt Lake City, Utah. Key features include spectacular landscape, mountain and ocean views and designs that reflect native Hawaiian culture and Hawaiʻi Island’s natural resources that tie together the naming of the College and the building where it resides.

“The high roof design was inspired by the pili grass thatched home of Princess Ruth Ke`elikōlani, for whom the building of the College is named,” explained Dr. Larry Kimura, assistant professor, Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikōlani. “Her home, on the grounds of Hulihe`e Palace in Kailua-Kona, was known as Hale`ōlelo, or House of Language, which now becomes the home for the College of Hawaiian Language.”

In addition to being a cultural and architectural landmark, the two-story complex is also a highly functional facility, spanning 36,760 square feet. Among its key features is a Performing Arts Auditorium that can be sub-divided. Special-use rooms include a library, curriculum and media resource room, tutorial, archive and telecom conference rooms, a computer lab, student and faculty meeting rooms, and 30 offices.

More importantly, Hale`ōlelo consolidates most of the College’s programs and operations formerly scattered throughout the campus while providing needed infrastructure to address the needs brought about by its growth and development. Since achieving collegiate status in 1997, it has experienced a surge in enrollment while introducing new degrees that produced UH Hilo’s first Master’s and Ph.D. recipients.

“It’s been a long time coming, but the wait has been worth it,” noted Keiki Kawai`ae`a, director, Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikōlani “This facility addresses many of our growing pains, and will enable expansion of our graduate and undergraduate programs in increasingly impactful ways for our State. We want to thank everyone throughout the community who supported this initiative and made it a reality.”

The College will be looking to build on its existing body of work that has earned it critical acclaim from indigenous people who look to its programs as potential models for language revitalization in their communities. Just last November, it received the 2013 William Demmert Cultural Freedom Award from the National Indian Education Association (NIEA) for its work in P-20 Hawaiian language revitalization and its positive impact on native student academic achievement.

Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikōlani and Hale`ōlelo will be front and center on the international stage only days after the grand opening when the College hosts the 2014 Stabilizing Indigenous Languages Symposium (SILS) in mid-January. The agenda includes visits to language immersion programs from preschool to the doctorate level and post-visitation discussion groups, with special focus on issues such as government testing, developing curricula and parental involvement.

“Events like SILS provide the College a great opportunity to raise its international profile by bringing important players from around the world to UH Hilo to discuss both the challenges that exist and the successes we’ve had in revitalizing indigenous language,” said Hiapo Perreira, associate professor, Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikōlani. “With Hale`ōlelo, we now have an ideal venue to showcase our programs and further advance the position of Hilo as ‘an international go-to destination’ for indigenous language revitalization.”

Idea Improv – Bring Your Own Questions

Got questions about running a business, recording an album or publishing a book? Then you won’t want to miss this one of a kind event. Think TEDx meets Improv. No scripted talks. No PowerPoints. Just you (the audience) asking questions (about anything) and receiving solutions and ideas (that will amaze you). Each of our speakers brings years of expertise to the stage and a willingness to share their knowledge with others. Join us for an evening that will be entertaining as well as educational.

Click to learn more

Click to learn more

If you live on the Big Island, you won’t want to miss this event.

University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resource Management Announces Dean’s List

UH Hilo Moniker

The following students in the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resource Management received Dean’s List honors for the Fall 2013 semester:

Jean Marie Acuna, Harmony Aiona, Kevin Alison, Calvin Arca, Amber Au, Whitney Boteilho, Cody Butler, Elizabeth Capron, Sarah Chard, Megan Clowe, Shannon Correia, James Darden, Noel Dickinson, Alexandra Doi, Robert Dundas, Yasha Eads, Martin Ennis, Shawntiarre Faumui, Alyssa Fujii, Sydney Gamiao, Rachel Gorenflo, Kristin Hardy, Pavel Havlicek, Terence Hedtke, Ashli Hirai, Kelly Hodson, Amy Horn, Kayuri Kadoya, Aleysia-Rae Kaha, Lukas Kambic, Cornel Kea, Anna Kimball, Tiffany Kotani, Kuilei Kramer, Jordan Lee Loy, Daisy Maher, Jordyn Mansinon, Samuel Meleisea, Jade Miyashiro, James Moore, Ron O’Brien, Wesley Piena, Hannah Reid, Jake Rodrique, Jessica Scott, Johnathan Shestokes, Michael Sthreshley, William Trammell, Kirsti Vedenoja, Lehua Wall, Noelani Waters, Shohei Yamaki, and Stephen Zilch.

UH Hilo Honors Individuals with Special Awards

University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Chancellor Don Straney honored two individuals with special awards presented during UH Hilo’s Fall 2013 commencement.

Team Poliahu - Featured from left to right: Ryder Donahue, Kayton Summers, Wallace Hamada, Professor Edwards and Mike Purvis.

Team Poliahu – Featured from left to right: Ryder Donahue, Kayton Summers, Wallace Hamada, Professor Edwards and Mike Purvis.

Mike Purvis, a senior computer science major, received the inaugural Community Spirit Award, which includes a $500 cash prize. The award was established this past September by Edward Yamasaki, a member of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team in World War II, and recognizes students who demonstrate excellence in applied research, learning and innovation in their respective fields of study. Purvis is team captain of UH Hilo’s Team Poli`ahu that won the 2013 U.S. Microsoft Imagine Cup Championship and participated in the Imagine Cup Worldwide Finals in St. Petersburg, Russia.

Team Poliahu in front of Alexandrinsky Theatre for the awards ceremony

Team Poliahu in front of Alexandrinsky Theatre for the awards ceremony

The Chancellor’s Special Recognition Award was presented to Dr. David Hammes, professor of economics, who retired at the end of the Fall 2013 semester. Hammes received the UH Board of Regent’s Teaching Excellence Award in 2003. In addition to his teaching, he has conducted a number of economic feasibility and cost-of-living studies for UH Hilo and the UH System.

Hammes also serves on the Board of Directors for Hospice of Hilo and was Treasurer during the successful fund-raising drive that led to construction of a new care facility near the University campus.

Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle Detected on Oahu

Another new invasive pest has been detected on Oahu, one that damages coconut trees and other palm plants. The Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle (CRB) was detected at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam on Dec. 23, 2013 during routine surveys conducted under a cooperative agreement between the University of Hawaii at Hilo and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Plant Protection & Quarantine (USDA-PPQ). Samples of the suspect beetle were sent to the USDA entomology laboratory in Miami and confirmation of CRB, Oryctes rhinoceros (L.), was received on Jan. 3. 2014.

Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle

Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle

Coincidentally, the discovery of the CRB happened on the same day that Little Fire Ant (LFA) was discovered on hapuu (Hawaiian tree fern) at a garden shop on Maui and subsequently confirmed on Oahu. LFA had previously been established on Hawaii Island.

Since the discovery, the Hawaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA) and the USDA-PPQ have been working jointly with the military and the University of Hawaii (UH) to survey and conduct trapping activities in the Pearl Harbor – Hickam area to determine the extent of the infestation. So far, nine adult beetles have been trapped.

It is a major pest of palms in India, the Philippines, the Palaus, Fiji, Wallis, Nukunono, American and Western Samoa and Guam. It is not known exactly how the beetles arrived in Hawaii.

“The threat of the coconut rhinoceros beetle has been a growing concern in Hawaii since it turned up in Guam in 2007,” said Dr. Neil Reimer, administrator for HDOA’s Plant Industry Division. “We have initiated the strong, coordinated efforts among HDOA, USDA, UH and other partners that will be required to effectively manage this invasive pest.”

CRB is mainly a pest of coconut and oil palms, but may also attack other palm species. Adult CRB are dark brown in color and measure 1 ¼ to 2 ½ inches long. CRB larvae are white in color with a brown head. (Photos attached)

They damage palms by boring into the center of the crown where they injure young, growing tissue and feed on the sap. As they bore into the crown, they cut through developing leaves, causing damage to the fronds. V-shaped cuts in the fronds and holes through the midrib are visible as leaves mature and unfold.

CRB is native to the Asian tropics, but was accidentally introduced to western and central Pacific islands.

Natural enemies of CRB include pigs, rats, ants, and some beetles, which may attack CRB eggs, larvae, pupae and adults. They may also be killed by two diseases, a fungus and a virus; however, both are not known to occur in Hawaii.

Suspected CRB on coconut and palm plants on all islands should be reported to HDOA’s PEST HOTLINE – 643-PEST (7378). This is also a toll-free number for neighbor islands.

UH Hilo Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Finalist for Chancellor Position at Louisiana State University of Alexandria

UH Hilo Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Luoluo Hong, is a finalist for the Chancellor position at Louisiana State University of Alexandria.

UH Hilo Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Luoluo Hong

UH Hilo Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Luoluo Hong

The Associated Press reports:

Louisiana State University of Alexandria needs a chancellor who can help the school boost enrollment and develop its identity in Central Louisiana. That’s the view of some involved in the search for a chancellor, as well as some faculty members.

Charles Weems III, LSUA Foundation Board chairman and search committee co-chairman, tells The Town Talk (http://townta.lk/1dfkgGI ) he isn’t sure there is a “magic number” for enrollment but said a population of more than 3,000 students would be beneficial for the university and community.

The finalists are Daniel Howard of Jonesboro, Ark.; Andrew Leavitt of Dahlonega, Ga.; and Luoluo Hong, of Hilo, Hawaii.

Interviews with the three finalists will be conducted over the next three days.

The new chancellor will replace Paul Coreil, who has served as interim chancellor since February.