• Follow on Facebook

  • what-to-do-media
  • RSS W2DM

  • puako-general-store
  • air-tour-kauai
  • Cheneviere Couture
  • PKF Document Shredding
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    April 2017
    S M T W T F S
    « Mar    
     1
    2345678
    9101112131415
    16171819202122
    23242526272829
    30  
  • When

  • RSS Pulpconnection

  • Recent Comments

Hawaii Lawmaker Calls for University of Hawaii Consolidation of Administration

Representative Kaniela Ing, a member of the House Higher Education Committee, responded to University of Hawaii President David Lassner’s decision to end the search for a Chancellor of the University of Hawaii – Manoa campus with a call to consolidate the administrative offices.

Rep. Kaniela Ing

Ing stated that regardless of what Lassner intended, his decision to cease the search for a new chancellor raises some important questions on the efficiency and redundancy in the University of Hawaii’s administration.

“If the president or his administration can provide the services assigned to the chancellor, and the university can still function, why does the chancellor’s office even exist in its enormous capacity? This points to a probable waste of taxpayer and student tuition dollars,” Ing said.

Ing noted a stark change between his time as the Student-President of the Associated Students of the University of Hawaii (ASUH) in 2009 and his experience as a legislator today.

“I always felt that the University of Hawaii administration was top-heavy,” Ing said. “When cuts were needed, students and faculty suffer through tuition raises and slashed salaries, while the administration remained bloated. President Lassner’s leadership, through his dual-capacity as Chancellor, has resulted in much greater efficiency.”

Ing is currently writing a House Concurrent Resolution calling for a study to explore the cost savings and other benefits of consolidating the chancellor and president’s offices. Ing claims that this is how the UH administration was structured for most of its existence.

“Tuition and taxes keep rising, making it harder for everyday people to get by. I just want to make sure that working folk’s hard earned dollars are ending up where it counts, and not being wasted in redundant, wasteful, administrative expenses,” he said.

“The last full-time chancellor made nearly $439,000 dollars a year before benefits. Imagine how many students that money could help?”

UH Hilo Adds Thai University to List of Collaborators

The Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (DKICP) at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo will expand collaborative academic and research projects in Thailand with a new exchange program agreement, made effective February 8.


Khon Kaen University (KKU) in northeastern Thailand has become the fifth Thai university to sign memorandums of agreements (MOUs) with DKICP. Other Thai schools of pharmacy with similar exchange agreements include Chulalongkorn University (2011), Rangsit University (2013), Silpakorn University (2014), and Siam University (2014).

The formal arrangement between the faculty of KKU’s pharmaceutical sciences and DKICP states that the two universities will jointly develop activities based on their academic and educational needs. Collaborations may include the exchange or research materials, support for distance learning courses, organization of joint research programs and the exchange of students, faculty and staff.

“Multiple student and faculty exchanges and visiting lecturers help us broaden our reputation for global pharmacy education and helps our students gain international, inter-professional perspectives both culturally and educationally,” DKICP Dean Carolyn Ma said. “Mutual benefits include research collaboration projects, practice and innovation collaborations, and faculty and preceptor development programs.”

Ma met with officials from KKU late last spring when she was a keynote speaker at the 2016 U.S.-Thai Consortium for Pharmacy Education in Thailand. She was able to tour multiple cities there with Professor and Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Supakit Wongwiwatthananukit when they met with faculty, staff, and students from colleges of pharmacy from Thailand and the U.S.

“When DKICP became a member of the US-Thai Consortium in 2014, we committed to active involvement with colleges of pharmacy in order to give and receive the most out of our interactions,” Wongwiwatthananukit said. “It allows us not only to collaborate with our Thai partners but also to increase association with top U.S. schools, such as the University of Minnesota, University of Texas and Purdue University. The momentum we generate is a good direction for our students and faculty as well as for the visibility of UH Hilo.”

DKICP and KKU also are integrated by educational agreements with the Tsuzuki Education Group. In attending the 60th celebration in Fukushima, Japan last fall, Ma met again with KKU administrators to solidify their interest in proceeding with collaborations between the two universities.

“One great aspect about all these international ties is that we can share intellectual and professional ideas in true academic format. It helps us offer a broader global experience for everyone,” Ma said.

Inaugural Maunakea Speakers Series Begins

The Office of Maunakea Management (OMKM), in collaboration with ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center and University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Department of Physics & Astronomy, is launching a new monthly lecture series giving community members unprecedented access to scholars and their knowledge-based work. The Maunakea Speakers Series brings scholars to Hilo to present on diverse subjects including fauna, biodiversity, climate change, botany, geophysics and other topics; all components of the immense resource diversity found on Maunakea.

“Our intent is to provide thought-provoking lectures and presentations while deepening our collective knowledge and understanding of the resources on Maunakea and strengthening educational opportunities —goals we all share,” said OMKM Director Stephanie Nagata.

Birds of Paradise Lost: Evolution, Extinction and Conservation of Hawai‘i’s Birds

The first program under the Maunakea Speaker Series kicks off with a one-hour presentation, Birds of Paradise Lost: Evolution, Extinction and Conservation of Hawaii’s Birds by Dr. Rob Fleischer, Senior Scientist, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park. Dr. Fleischer will discuss Hawai‘i’s native birds and how he and his colleagues use DNA methods to study evolutionary relationships, population genetics, diet, and the impacts and mitigation of introduced disease.

Dr. Fleischer’s Smithsonian research involves application of DNA and genetic analyses to studies in conservation, evolution and animal behavior. His research often focuses on the use of DNA and genetics to document changes in genetic variation and to study the evolutionary interactions between hosts, vectors and infectious disease organisms (such as introduced avian malaria in native Hawaiian birds).

The Birds of Paradise Lost presentation will be held on Thursday, February 9 from 7:00 to 8:00 pm at the UH Hilo Science & Technology Building auditorium (Room 108) and is free and open to interested community members. On-campus parking is available without charge.

The Maunakea Speaker Series is a monthly scholar-focused presentation in partnership with the Office of Maunakea Management, ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center and the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Department of Physics & Astronomy. For more information visit malamamaunakea.org or call 808-933-0734.

University of Hawaii Keeping Close Watch on Impact of U.S. Travel Restrictions

University of Hawaiʻi President David Lassner and the chancellors of the 10 campuses shared a message on January 30 to UH students, faculty and staff.

UH President David Lassner

To our UH System ʻohana:

With the issuance of the recent Executive Order on travel, our first concern is for our impacted students, faculty and staff who are currently abroad or have plans to travel abroad. The situation is fluid as courts weigh in and different guidance is provided to holders of green cards. Out of an abundance of caution, the best advice as of this writing is that individuals with immigrant or non-immigrant visas or with green cards who are originally from the seven named countries (Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen) should defer travel outside the U.S.

Our international students and scholar support offices are already reaching out directly to the impacted students and faculty we know of with additional support and guidance. Faculty and scholars from across the UH System with specific questions and concerns about their situation can reach out to our Faculty and Scholar Immigration Services office. Students who have specific questions should reach out to their campus international student service office.

More fundamentally, we stand in support with the broader higher education community in our concern over the impact of this restriction on the free flow of information and ideas that is enriched by our international students and scholars. The University of Hawaiʻi, State of Hawaiʻi and our nation have been immeasurably strengthened through the diversity of the students and faculty we attract. The fundamental values of our nation and our state have long supported the welcoming of others to our shores and embracing them into our communities.

Diverse knowledge, ideas, cultures and perspectives enrich us immensely as we work toward a better future for all. We will support our professional associations and colleagues who are working to promote more effective solutions to keeping our nation safe.

Aloha,
President and Chancellors

Invasive Beetle Species in Hawaii Can Now Be Identified Faster With New Genetic Test

Researchers at the University of Hawaii have developed a new genetic-testing method for identifying the invasive coconut rhinoceros beetle, which promises to be much faster than existing physical identification methods. The new tool, reported in the Journal of Economic Entomology, could be a significant step toward keeping the species–a damaging pest to coconut palm trees that was first seen in Hawaii in 2013–from becoming widespread.

Coconut rhinoceros beetle and a similar species, oriental flower beetle, are nearly indistinguishable until they’ve grown to their later life stages, which makes early detection difficult. Currently, egg or larvae samples from the field had to be raised in a lab until their third life stage, which could take several weeks, before insect scientists could determine which species they were looking at.

However, a genetic testing method known as a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, can be used to identify the species with genetic material extracted from samples of the beetles’ eggs, larvae, or excrement. Researchers Shizu Watanabe, Ph.D., and Michael J. Melzer, Ph.D., of the Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, at UH identified genetic markers in the beetles’ DNA that can be used for differentiation via the test. Once samples are received in the lab, the PCR assay can be conducted in just a few hours, Melzer says.

The new method will help “ensure that eradication efforts are being directed at coconut rhinoceros beetle and not oriental flower beetle. This assay will help to prevent any misidentification in the field,” Melzer says. “Such misidentifications might result in resources targeting oriental flower beetle, or worse, ignoring a coconut rhinoceros breeding site because the specimens discovered were identified as oriental flower beetle.”

“For species that require highly technical expertise for identification, molecular assays represent a reasonably straight-forward approach for identification, either as stand-alone assays or in parallel with morphological identification,” Watanabe and Melzer write in their article. “For pests of regulatory concern, rapid and accurate insect identification is essential, and molecular assays can address these needs.”

UH Hilo International Nights 2017

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo International Student Association presents International Nights 2017 on Friday, February 10, and Saturday, February 11, at 7:30 p.m. in the UH Hilo Performing Arts Center. This annual event features performances from around the world and is a favorite among students, the community, and visitors.
This year’s shows feature 15 performances spanning Asia, the Pacific, Europe and the Americas. Crowd favorites such as Tupulaga O Samoa Mo a Taeao representing Samoa, and Taishoji taiko representing Japan, are back. Other performances showcase the unique cultures of the Philippines, France, Micronesia, Ireland, India, Kiribati, Palau, the Marshall Islands, and the US.

Tickets are $12 for General admission and $5 for students, children, and senior citizens. Tickets may be purchased with cash or checks at the PAC Box Office from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Tuesday through Friday, or at the door if tickets are still available the night of the shows. Advance ticket purchase is recommended as tickets typically sell out prior to the shows.

For ticket information, contact the PAC Box Office at 932-7490. For more information, visit http://hilo.hawaii.edu/international/IN.php.

UH Announces Finalists for Dean of the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources

Three finalists have been identified for the position of dean of the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) and director for Research and Cooperative Extension. The three finalists are scheduled to participate over a three-day period of visits on the Mānoa campus and the island of Hawaiʻi. The visits include department discussions; meetings with senior administrators, faculty, staff, students and internal and external constituents; and a public presentation.

Nicholas Comerford, William Randle and Alan Sams

Campus and community members, as well as the general public, are encouraged to attend.

Campus visit schedule:

Nicholas Comerford, January 30–February 1

William Randle, February 6–8

Alan Sams, February 13–15

“We were fortunate to have received a strong pool of qualified candidates. I would like to thank the search advisory committee for their outstanding work in identifying these three finalists from the pool, and for their efforts and commitment to the search,” said Interim Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Vice Chancellor for Research Michael Bruno. “As always, we encourage UH faculty, staff, students and the public to come out and meet the candidates, and we look forward to receiving their input to assist in hiring the best person for the position.”

For more information about the search process, including a list of the members of the search advisory committee, the campus visit daily schedule and the candidate biographies, see the search website.

Film Festival Health Documentary to be Shown at UH Hilo

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo hosts a public screening of the documentary film “Ola–Health is Everything” on Thursday, January 26, at 5 p.m. in Wentworth Hall Room 1.
The documentary, which premiered at the Hawaiʻi International Film Festival in April 2013, highlights the power of communities to heal themselves, explores how society must rethink what it means to be healthy, and features individuals who bring hope to communities across Hawaiʻi. A Question & Answer discussion with Director Matthew Nagato will follow the screening.

“This film is so important and valuable because it highlights some of the protective factors present in our communities and relevant ways to foster health and healing,” said Dr. Yolisa Duley, East Hawaiʻi Suicide Prevention Task Force Chair and co-chair of UH Hiloʻs Suicide Prevention Committee. “Sadly, suicide is a leading cause of death in our state, and messages of hope such as those portrayed in ‘Ola’ can help people identify ways to reach out and seek support and a pathway to healing.”

The presentation is co-sponsored by the East Hawaiʻi Suicide Prevention Task Force, UH Hilo Student Health & Wellness Programs, and the UH Hilo Nā Kiaʻi O Ke Ola (Guardians of Life) Suicide Prevention Committee.

For more information about the event, email yolisaduley@hawaii.edu or call 932-7848.

UH Researcher: “Marijuana Compounds Show Promise in Treatment of Cardiac Disease”

A Nevada company is hoping to develop new medicines for heart failure using compounds in marijuana and a novel therapy identified by a University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa researcher.

Dr. Alexander Stokes in his JABSOM laboratory.

Dr. Alexander Stokes, assistant research professor in the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology at the UH John A. Burns School of Medicine, obtained a U.S. patent for his novel therapy in 2015.  The patent claims the cannabinoid receptor TRPV1 can be regulated therapeutically by plant-based cannabinoids.

Cannabinoids include psychoactive and non-psychoactive compounds derived from marijuana, both of which have medicinal properties. They exert their effects inside cells after binding to receptor proteins in the cell membranes, such as TRPV1 and the classical cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2.

Pharmaceutical development company GrowBlox Life Sciences LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of GB Sciences Inc., obtained the license for Stokes’ intellectual therapy last December from Makai Biotechnology LLC, a Hawaiʻi-based cardiovascular therapy company founded by Stokes.

“Cardiovascular disease is the leading global cause of death, accounting for more than 17.3 million deaths per year, a number that is expected to grow to more than 23.6 million by 2030,” said Dr. Stokes. In the U.S, he explained, this equates to one in three deaths, about one every 40 seconds, and costs the country approximately $316.6 billion a year.

Patients urgently need new drugs that can prevent or reverse the stages of cardiac disease and heart failure, according to Dr. Stokes. He further explained that TRPV1 is clearly a major cellular receptor involved in the progression to heart failure, and there is great potential for the new, proprietary mixtures within the GB Life Sciences portfolio to regulate the TRPV1 cannabinoid receptor.

GB Sciences said licensing the TRPV1 patent is a major step in its commitment to discovering new drugs that interact with the non-classical cannabinoid receptors, in addition to binding to the better characterized CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors.

“Our vision of novel, patentable cannabis-based formulations in the treatment of major diseases is now married with a proven drug target for modulation of adverse outcomes in cardiovascular disease,” said Dr. Andrea Small-Howard, Chief Science Officer of GB Sciences.

Cannabinoids in native plant extracts exerted a more significant effect on TRPV1 receptors than purified cannabinoids in published research reports.

“GB Sciences believes its cannabis-plant-based approach may provide additional clinical benefits to patients due to the ‘entourage effect.’ In addition, the side effect profiles of cannabis-based therapies have generally been well tolerated,” said Dr. Small-Howard. The “entourage effect” refers to the theory that some cannabis compounds have greater effects on the human body when combined with other compounds than when given alone.

Said GB Sciences CEO John Poss, “This license is an important step in our company’s march to successful drug discovery.  We are very proud of Dr. Small-Howard and her team, and we expect results from this effort that will enable the company to do well by doing good for literally millions of cardiac patients around the world.”

UH Hilo College of Arts and Sciences’ Fall 2016 Dean’s List

The following students in the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Arts and Sciences received Dean’s List recognition for the Fall 2016 semester:

Shannon Abarra, Jozie Acasio, Kendra Adams, Madeleine Adler, Hildhang Adona, Clifford Agcaoili, Reygan Agcaoili, Keinan Agonias, Sherry Agonoy, Princess Agtang, Breanna Aguiar, Rhonda Akano, Leahi Akao, Eric Alabanza, Jeannelle Alejo, Alia Alvarez, Catherina Amantiad, Austin Anderson, Brian Anderson, Keion Anderson,

Kinsley Anderson, Li Ju Anderson, Harrison Andina, Nicole Antonio, Kamalani Aona, Zion Apao, Shannon Apostol, Ralph Aquino, Kathleen Aragon, David Arakawa, Justin Araki-Kwee, Jodi Ariyoshi, Keanu Arke, Kapuanani Arsiga, Nicholas Asuncion, Toshonnie Baker, Sharlene Bala, Kayla Balezentis, Valerie Balken, Kellsie Ballesteros,

Jill Banach, Kaitlin Barcoma, William Barden, Ashley Barhite, Benedick Baris, Ruth Bascar-Sellars, Joshua Bass, Daniel Baumgartner, Natalie Baus, Crystal-lynn Baysa, Anya Benavides, Chase Benbow, Cynthia Benevides, Chakra Best, Jahnu Best, Marjorie Betiong, Daniel Bilafer, Kateleen C. Bio, Victoria Birrenbach,

Kalaiakea Blakemore, Casey Blanchette, Chloe’ Blandino, Chelsea Blaquera, Sierra Bloomer, Hannah Blue, Marcia B. Blyth, Thomas Bolton, Stephen Bond, Jonathan Botticelli, Andre Brouillette, BreAnna Brown, Eleanor Brown, Laurel Brown, Matthew Brown, Rachel Bruck, Kathryn Brunk, Kailah Buchanan, Amberly Buer, Malia Byram, Ridge Cabaccang, Sydney Cabanas, Cheyrub Cabarloc, Riley Cabarloc,

Jerold A. Cabel, Leischene Calingangan, Chriztalee Calpito, Litah Campbell, Amanda Canda, Kirsten Cannoles, Terra Carden, Sheila M. Cariaga, Sheryl L. Cariaga, Tiari Carreira, Nicholas Carrion, Anne Carsey, Briauna Carter, Micah Carter, Kanoeuluwehianu Case, Gisele Cassarotti Prescott, Keenan Castro, Kahana Cazimero, Isabella Cebreros, Roget Chan, Andy Chang, Cheuk W. Chiu, Soo B. Choi,

Pono Christianson, Victor Ciaramitaro, Jessica M. Clark, Lautisha Cleavenger, Heather Coad, Ramzen Coakley, Zoe Coffman, Michael Coombs, Alysha Cosier, Clarence Cottrell, Celeste Cox, Seneca Cox, Rose Criscione, Tifaine Crivello, Trixie A. Croad, Callie Crowder, Kawelina Cruz, Ryan Cruz, Justin Cueva, Kendrick J. Dalmacio,

Uilani Dasalla, Stephanie Dawrs, DaShon Dean, Laura Deaton, Kaylee Decambra, Edwina Degrood, Marissa Dellomo, Audrey Deluca, Carey Demapan, Billi Derleth, Amy DeSa, Maluhia Desha, Leialii Dias, Stephi Dickinson, Savannah Directo, Danielle Dodge, Amelia Dolgin, Lorelei M. Domingo, Princess D. Domingo, Jasmine Donner, Sadie Dossett, Cortney Dougherty, Michael Dowsett, James Drescher,

Jordan Drewer, Jayahmie Drio, Alejandra Duarte, Jennifer Eastin, Caili Ebaniz, Raelyn Eckert, Jamie Economy, Michael Elder Waters, Meghan Elimon, Sara Ellsworth, Kenji Emerson, Remedios Epp, Tiffany Erickson, Chelsey Erickson-Vierra, Brianna Ernst, Duke Escobar, Corey Eshpeter, Raynell Espaniola, Herbert Estes, Rakeem Estrella-Clark, Meridith Farley, Jade Farmer, Sheilla M. Felipe,

Rachel A. Felix, David Finley, Amy Fischer, Rachel Fisher, Catrina Flores, Kirstie A. Flores-Oishi, Lindy Foust, Megan A. Francisco, Jeena Franco, Ella R. Fregeau-Olmstead, Dallas Freitas, Silmai U. Fritz, Esther Frost, Todd Frost, Brittany Fuemmeler, Shaylyn Fujii, Trent Furuta, Dylan Gable, Dillon-Jon Gabriel, Nicholas Galliani, Kelly Gani, April Gaoiran, Princess Gaoiran, Lehua Garcia, Nicole Garcia, Reyna Garcia Lopez, Madison Gates, Stacy M. Gelacio,

Emma-Lei Gerrish, Tuan G. Giang, Cody Gibo, Kawika Glimane, Kahri Golden, Kassidy Gonsalves, Jennifer Gonzales, Maya Goodoni, Rachel Gorenflo, Zachary Gorski, Michael Graue, Siera Green, Raymond Greene, Zechariah Greene, Rachel A. Greer-Smith, Chrisovolandou Gronowski, Rihei Grothmann, Courtney Guirao,

Katelyn Gundvaldson, Basu Guragain, Adrienne Gurbindo, Brittany Hale, Ariel Halemano, Quinn Hamamoto, Maile Hanaoka, Arielle Harnik, Katelyn Harris, Bridge Hartman, Krysten Hayashida, Kylee Hayashida, Jelyn Heaster, Alexander Hedglen, Dakota Helfrich, Jordan Heltz, Hannah Hendershot, Tessa Henderson, John Herman,

Jasmine Higa, Adam Hill, Kristie Hirai, Rachel Holmes, Tiana Honda, Lauren Hong, Alena Hookano, Alyssa Hoshide, Kainoa Howard, Karlie Howe, ZhiLing Huang, Merissa Hull, Francesca Huml, Kimberly Hutchinson, Mi Huynh, Thien Huynh, Joyce A. Ibasan, Hannah Ibbotson, Laura Ibbotson, Andi Igawa, Kadi Igawa,

Marina Ignacio, Alleonore-Destiny Iguin, Austin Inouye, Elise Inouye, Joanne Isabella, Kristen Ishii, Brian Ishola, Debby A. Itchon, Alexa Jacobs, Cyrus Johnasen, Lindsay Johnson, Kailani Jones, Kyle Jones, Mikayla Jones, Kara Jorgensen, Jaune A. Jose, Jamie Josephson, Kiilani Judd, Jessica J. Julian, Kayuri Kadoya, Janis Kaeo,

Polanimakamae Kahakalau, Kelii Kailipaka, Kahoruko Kajiya, Nainoa Kalaukoa, Ellie-Jean Kalawe, Brinell Kaleikini, Brooke Kamahiai, Keiki O Namahiai Kanahele-Santos, Stuart Kaneshiro, Tayler Kaniho, Sumire Kanno, Candace Karvas, Melvalee Kaulia, Germaine Kaululaau-Young, Martha Kawasaki, Hokuto Kawashima,

Kawena Kawelu, Jill Keely, Bianca Keohokapu, Emma Khachikian, Chantelle Kiessner, Brittany Kimball, Isaac Kimura, Mary L. Kimura, Sean Kirkpatrick, Rachel Kishimoto, Joshua Kitagawa, Keely Kitamura, Zena Kiyota, Tiana Klask, Alexandra Kler Lago, Aaron Knell, Kristi Kobashigawa, Sheena Kobayashi, Kamrie Koi, Rochelle Koi, Emilee Kojiro, Hyesun Kong, Krystle Koshiyama, Lisa Kosilla,

Joshua-Martin Kuanoni-Banagan, August Kubo, Kealiiahonui Kuikahi, Morgan Kultala, Keohikai Laikupu, Mia Lamirand, Brittney Lane, Samantha Lathrop, Brandon Lau, Luana Lavatai, Jesse Leavitt, Laurel Ledward, Robert Lee, Shalyn Lewis, Braysen Libed, Lee Linneman, Emerson J. Llaguno, Jessica Loeffler, Devynn Louie, Kristi Lovell, Noelle Lovesy, Rebekah Loving, Brittany Luna, Susanne Lyle,

Aleta Lyman, Natasha Machado, Taylor-Keahi Macomber-Cobile, Kimberly Magsipoc, Meagan Mahiko, Brandon Mahle, Wilson Malone, Natasha Manasas, Vanessa Mancera, Shelby Marhoefer, Danielle Marrufo, Dario Martin, Keelee Martin, Chanade Martins-Keliihoomalu, Mark Marzan, Shae Massie, Seth Master, Jaymie Masuda, Carle-Ann Mata, Moriah Mathson, Abcde Matias, Kasey Matsumoto, Kelley Matsumoto, Aspen Mauch, JoeAnna McDonald,

Danielle McDowell, Shaina McEnroe, Christina McIntosh, Jared McLean, Brannon McQuillan, Luana Mendiola-Smith, Ana Methuselah, Zoey Meyers, William Midgley, Anna B. Mikkelsen, Candice Miner-Ching, Zayin Minia, Jordan Mirels, Risako Mise, Philip Mitchell, Kelsy Miyake-Kamahele, Autumn Miyares-Thompson, Melissa Moats, Corrina Molina, Roseline Moniz, Brendan Moore,

Ariyana Moran, Jasmine Morikami, Lindsey T. Morin, Juliann Morris, Marilyn Motoishi, Shane-Earl Naeole, Amber Nagata, Lorelei Nakagawa, Robynn A. Namnama, Monnisa Nash, Jordan L. Nauka, Christopher Nelson, Cameron Nicholson, Richelle G. Nicolas, Karen Nishimoto, Allen G. Y. Nitura, Aaron O’Connor, Nai‘a Odachi, Amy Odaira, Dianna Oh, Morgan Olson, Ryder Oshiro, Cheynielle Pacheco, Lorelei T. Padasdao, Shandyn Pahia, Matthew Paio, Isaac Pang,

Jessica Pang, Stephanie Pasco, Taylor Patrick, Tyson Pavao, Jordan Pedersen-Fukunaga, Bryson Pedro, Leomanaolamaikalani Peleiholani Blankenfeld, Ulupuamahinamaikalani Peleiholani-Blankenfeld, Graham Pernell, Trevor Perry, Brenden Peterson, Michele Peterson, Mark Petner, Sharon Petrosky, Michelle Phillips, April Pinyerd,

Terri Pinyerd, Sarah Pitman, Debra Potter, Michelle Proue, Theodore Pruyne, Danielle Pulido, Froile Queja, Jasmin M. Quiamas, Natalie Quinajon, Sheri Quon, Crystal Rances, Skye Rances, Duchess Rapoza, Kaydee Rapozo, Evangeline Raza, Jeff M. Regalario, Karl Reid, Venesha Rems, Marleah Renti Cruz, Sharnelle Renti Cruz, Emily Risley, Anne Rivera, Johnvie Rivera, Joshua Robinson, Arlene Roche,

Alicia Rodriguez, Nikola Rodriguez, Janalynn Rollins, Ashley Romero, Jerome Romero, Shyla Ronia, Norie-Anne Rosal Calit, Megan Rose, Nickolas Rosenberg, Hannah Rosenow, Meghin Russell, Tahaanuiiterai Rutkowski, Nina Sabahi, Josiane Saccu, Melanie Sacro, Julie A. Sagabaen, Ruby A. Sales, Ilysia S. Sana, Gabriella Sanchez, Shelbi Santiago, Ryan T. Sasaki, Jacey Savage,

Kristen Savea, Blessing Savusa, Kimberly Schmelz, Dehrich Schmidt-Chya, Jacquelyn Schoenherr, Artem Sergeyev, Elisha Sevareid, Vanessa Shaffer, Ang Sheng, Laura Shepherd, Leah Sheppard, Jeffrey Shikany, Albert Shim, Jaci Shinoda, Keani Shirai, Dominique Shirazi, Jaylen Shiroma, Sheldon Shishido, Keian Shon, Ululani Siangco, Aimee-Joyce Silva, Malia Silva, Lindsay Simmons,

Heather Simon, Solomon Singer, Summer Singer, Hazel F. Sivila, Trevor Slevin, Alexa Smiley, Clara Smith, James Smith, Nicole Smith, Jonathan Snyder, Kiana Soloria, Vincent Soriano, Kalena Spinola, Ashlin Stahlberg, Maria Steadmon, Kyle Steckler, Phillip Steering, Luke Steinbach, Marguerite Stith, Jeremiah Storie, Oliver M. Strachan, Tiffany Stranathan, Marley Strand-Nicolaisen, Jamie Sugai,

Kylee Sullivan, Taliesin Sumner, Tyler Sumner, Tevis Swain, Kaylah M. Swanson, Randolph Tafua, Yaeko Tagami, Ryan Taifane, Marina Takada, Melia Takakusagi, Shania Tamagyongfal, Sophia Tang, Victoria Taomia, Morgan Tate, Taavili Taylor, Temau Teikitekahioho-Wolff, Allicyn Texeira, Gin Tezuka, Travis Thieme, Nicolette Thomas,

Kori Todd, Jodie Tokihiro, Julie Tom, Jeffrey Tomas, Kaycie Tomei, Ashley C. Tomori, Brandon Tomota, Kaye-Karren Topenio, Ryotaro Toshima, Cao-Minh Tran, Hulali Trask, Dominick Trevino, Kasey A. Udan, Lavin Uehara, Mary-Fem Urena, Nicholas Vallatini, Nicolas Vanderzyl, Ja’ie Victorine-Dyment, Aundrea Vidal, Yesenia Villafuerte, Audrey Villanueva, Fred Visaya, Nelson Vo, Lily Voitek,

Ashley Vongsy, Cecile Vulliet, Amirah Waite, Wailana Walker, HeNaniNoOeKaWahineUioIkePono Wandasan, Kenton Wandasan, Vernon Warnock, Sondra Warren, Misa Webber, Tino Wells, Zoe Whitney, Kaira Whittington-Ramirez, Brian Wild, Vanessa Winchester-Sye, Jade Wong, Tiana Wong, Selisa Wright,

Sharmaine Yacavone, Kazuma Yamaguchi, Marilyn Yamamoto, Lia Yamashiro, Yuto Yamauchi, Jia Hao Yao, Phillip Yawata, Shaniah Yogi, Ivana Yoon, Deanna Young, Jenna Yugawa, Justme Yulian, Luana Zablan, Turfa Zaman, Xiaoqing Zheng, Matthew Zizzi, Gregory Zukeran.

Filmmaker to Present Award-Winning Documentary at UH Hilo

Japanese filmmaker and educator Miho Aida presents her award-winning documentary film, “The Sacred Place Where Life Begins: Gwich’in Women Speak,” at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo on Wednesday, January 11 at 5:30 p.m. in University Classroom Building Room 100. The event is free and open to the public.

The Gwich’in is an Athabaskan-speaking First Nations of Canada and an Alaska Native people. The documentary explores the coastal plain of Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge that has been eyed for oil and gas development since 1986. In the film, Gwich’in women speak out for their sacred land.

The film was named the top documentary at the 2015 Central Illinois Feminist Film Festival, received the Audience Choice Award at the 2014 Earth Port Film Festival, and was nominated for Best Documentary Short at the 2013 American Indian Film Festival. Following the screening, Aida will discuss the film and her new video series, “Standing Rock Women Speak,” along with her efforts to save the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North and South Dakota.

The event is sponsored by the UH Hilo Japanese Studies Program, Gender and Women’s Studies Program, Humanities Division, College of Arts and Sciences, and International Student Services and Intercultural Education Program.

For more information, contact Professor Yoshiko Fukushima at yf83@hawaii.edu or 932-7213. For more information about the film and filmmaker, visit http://mihoaida.com/gwichin.

UH Hilo Announces Fall Dean’s Lists

The following students in the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Business and Economics received Dean’s List recognition for Fall 2016:

Eva Abraham, Amerfil Grace Acob, Caitlin Aiona, Yesica Avendano-Villanueva, Irine Diane Bautista, Andrew Bayang, Peter Betham, Courtney Ann Brock, Summer Burns, Marson Cabay, Kyan Catton, Claire Cea, Kadey Chambless, Lexi Dalmacio, Lorena Dela Cruz,

Jhoanne Domingo, Cayla Michelle Esposo, Charles Fernandez, Manuel Fernandez, Mackenzie Foley, Kai Anthony Gaitley, Francine Andrei Gallego, Darcy Gaylord, Jordan Hart, Lara Hughes, Janine Iseri, Aisha Izuno, Jordan Kamimura, Nicholas Kaya, Cherilyn Kelii,

Zoe Kimura, Kimberlee Kitano, Jessica Kolish, Kiera Kua-Ramirez, Chelsey Lai, Marissa Lai, Stephanie Letro, Anna Liu, Xiaoting Liu, Samantha Lord, Cheyenne Losalio, Kainoa Lyman, Victoria Magana Ledesma, Nicholas Martin, Seth Master, Emily Masutomi, Dilrae Mechol, Xianbin Meng, Raeann Mukini, Wyatt Nelson, Neon Nishimura, Adora Omodt, Adam Onishi, Jazzle Paraiso,

Uookjin Park, Robert Parks, Jan Paulo Pascual, Nicole Perea, Leannka Rigby, Alicia Rodriguez, Nicole Saito, Annika Schulz, Ang Sheng, Vaclav Slezak, Danielle Stover, Erin Swain, Jubylen Teehee, Jade Thomas, Ryan Torio, Calvin Uemura, Onosa’i Va’a, Maria Vicente, Kinsey Volkart, Travis Winters, Tahiya Zaman, and Yuye Zhao.

The following students from the Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo have been named to the Dean’s List for the 2016 fall semester:

Class of 2020
Joshua Dillon, Amelia Furlan, Mary Lui, Stacey Nguyen, Felix Rasgo, Robyn Rector, Shaina Saiki, Reid Shimada, Thi Hong Vo, Brandi Chun, Jensine Melody Domingo, Jhoana Paula Gonzales, Jared Toba, Jarin Miyamoto, Tony Moua, Su Hyon Kwon, Courtney Elam, Tracy Lopez, Johnny Tran, Brooke Zarriello, Brent Ocker, Thuy-Mi Tran, Joseph Tanchevski, David Cao, Anna Claire Masuda, Kamala Lizama, Stacie Waiamau, Taumie Richie, Kelsey Trujillo, Andrew Nguyen, Taylor Hori, Logan Abney, Tyler Peterson, Charles Slusher, Wilson Datario

Class of 2019
Tyler Millar, Rachel Randall, Ashley Uehara, Nancy Wong, Carrie Yeung, David Pham, Preston Ho, Kara Paulachak, Gam Phan, Rene-Scott Chavez, Tyler Hirokawa, Kate Malasig, Nicholas Tsoi, Vance Hill, Jennifer Nguyen, Veronica Wong, Deniz Bicakci, Samantha Gonzalez, Kevin Lei, Athena Borhauer, Torrence Ching, Katrina Downey, Veronica Morales Colon, Shannon Trinh, Clement Tran Tang, Leigh Heffner

Class of 2018
Cierra Gauvin, Kerri Nakatsu, Carli Owan, Lauren Skorheim, Quan Truong, Goody Cacal, Sara Evanko, Kelli Goo, Macie Kim, Vicky Nguyen, Lauren Sato, Paolo Vinh Tuan Truong, Tram Le, John James Taman, Ciara Butts, Robby-Sean Cayetano, Karen Christian, Jui-Yu Kao, Andrew Skorheim, Caroline Rhee, XuanLam Le, Joann Phan, Seungyeun Yoo, Ha Tran, Krystle Kiyuna, Niaz Nafisi, Mari Takushi, Candace Woo, Chelsea Aipoalani, Mathew Eng, Niko Pogorevcnik, Katherine Post, Jennifer Fujio, Jonathan Kataoka, Jessica Penaranda, Erik Ferreira, Katrina Kutter, Miyuki Miller, Zebedee Walpert, Phuong Nguyen, Tiffany Alberg, Nicolette Lew, Marina Ortiz, Christopher Nakagawa, Jessica Lee, Tran Pham, Joshua Belcher, Jane Choi, Megan Olaguer, Cindy Khamphaphanh

Ke kukala aku nei ko ke Kulanui o Hawai’i ma Hilo koleke ‘o Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke’elikolani, i na inoa o na haumana kaha ‘oi no ke kau Ha’ulelau 2016:
(The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke’elikolani College of Hawaiian Language announces its Dean’s List for the Fall 2016 semester):

Jainine Abraham, Destanie Alayon, Zion Apao, Laura Birse, Christopher Chow, Sophie Dolera, Kameron Ho, Bridgette Ige, Kiana Kamala, Alana Kanahele, Ashley Nakoa-Kawahakui, Alana Paiva, Isaac Pang, Moananuimaikalani Peleiholani-Blankenfeld, Kainalu Steward, Tema’u Teikitekahioho-Wolff, Vanessa Winchester-Sye,

Joshua Bass, Ramzen Coakley, Angelica Durante, Roberta Gaskin, Ezra Grace, Karise Hallsten, Yukako Iha, Mary Kealaiki, Shoichi Kitaguchi, Hyesun Kong, Ana Methuselah, Risako Mise, Haruka Miura, Lauren Mizuba, Sarah Rafferty, Josiane Saccu, Trevor Slevin, Gin Tezuka, and Ryotaro Toshima

Zika Found in Hawaii Years Before Caribbean Outbreak

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) scientists have discovered that severe birth defects related to infection with the Zika virus (ZIKV) occurred much earlier than in 2016, when the connection was first made between the virus and an increased likelihood of microcephaly during outbreaks of ZIKV infection in Brazil and Puerto Rico.

UH scientists published their findings in December in the scientific journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, adding to the potential evidence of a link between ZIKV infection and microcephaly, a congenital condition associated with incomplete brain development and characterized by an abnormal smallness of the head.

Patient information and blood samples were collected voluntarily from mothers in Honolulu who delivered babies between 2007 and 2013 at the Kapiʻolani Medical Center for Women and Children, a Hawaiʻi Pacific Health hospital affiliated with JABSOM. The samples were collected and stored at the UH Biorepository (UHB) after obtaining written informed consent from the mothers.

“As per the information in the UHB, no mothers gave birth to babies with microcephaly in 2007 and 2008,” said Vivek R. Nerurkar, chair of the Department of Tropical Medicine, Medical Microbiology and Pharmacology. “However, from 2009 onwards, we identified six mothers who gave birth to babies with microcephaly. Of the six, ZIKV antibodies were detected in three, fifty percent, of the mothers who delivered babies with microcephaly, suggesting presence of positive Zika virus cases and associated microcephaly in the United States as early as 2009.”

Potential changes to women’s health practices

Nerurkar believes the growing evidence of an association between ZIKV infection and the devastating brain damage in infants justifies a new practice in women’s health.

“We need to be more proactive in tracking pregnant women and testing for the ZIKV ahead of time (before birth),” he said. “It may be time for health care professionals to routinely caution newly pregnant mothers (or those planning to become pregnant) about the ZIKV, and offer pre-natal tests to detect for the presence of the virus.”

Ideally, Nerurkar said, families can plan for safe pregnancies by avoiding travel to areas of known ZIKV outbreaks. In 2016, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization have issued travel alerts about locations with confirmed, locally acquired Zika virus infections.

The UH researchers expressed their gratitude for the women who agreed to voluntarily donate blood and placenta samples to build the UH Biorepository archive. “This has been an indispensable resource in our research,” said Nerurkar.

Nerurkar leads a team of scientists at UH working to develop a vaccine for ZIKV infection as well as robust diagnostic assays to rapidly detect ZIKV and other mosquito-borne viral infections. After the award of a Zika emergency response grant this year from the National Institutes of Health, his team members are also working to understand how ZIKV infection in men makes them susceptible to transmit the virus to their sexual partners, even though the men may appear symptom-free.

Circus Comedy Coming to UH Hilo

Virtuoso clown Jamie Adkins will bring his one-man circus comedy “Circus Incognitus” to the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Performing Arts Center on Thursday, January 26, at 7:30 p.m.

In “Circus Incognitus,” Adkins wanders on stage to perform his new show, but struggles to build the scene around him using everyday objects. Things go awry with his props proving to be most unhelpful: his ladder disintegrates under his foot, he wrangles an animated chair, tussles with a pesky hat, negotiates a precarious slack wire, and juggles almost everything. Theater goers even get involved in the endeavor by tossing lemons for him to catch on a fork, held between his teeth.

“This is a fun family show and a great way to start the new year,” said PAC Manager Lee Dombroski.

Tickets are reserved seating and priced at $20 General, $15 Discount and $10 UH Hilo/Hawaiʻi CC students (with a valid student ID) and children, up to age 17, pre-sale, or $25, $20 and $15 at the door.

Tickets are available by calling the UH Hilo Box Office at 932-7490 or ordering online at artscenter.uhh.hawaii.edu.

Black Arm Band to Perform “Dirtsong” at UH Hilo

A musical presentation celebrating the past and revolutionizing the future of Indigenous Australia will take place when Black Arm Band performs “Dirtsong” at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Performing Arts Center on Friday, January 20, at 7:30 p.m.
Black Arm Band, a collective of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (ATSI), is led by some of Australia’s foremost indigenous artists, including Emma Donovan, Fred Leone, Mark Atkins and Deline Briscoe, alongside Executive Producer Elizabeth Woollacott. Considered one of Australia’s leading performing arts companies, they have been widely acclaimed in Australia and internationally.

At the heart of their work is the group’s relationship with indigenous communities from which they draw inspiration. Their musical tradition and presentation is forged from over 40,000 years of living culture, infused with contemporary styles adopted as their own by Aboriginal Australia.

Tickets are reserved seating and priced at $30 General, $25 Discount and $15 UH Hilo/Hawai `i CC students (with a valid student ID) and children, up to age 17 pre-sale, or $35, $30 and $20 at the door.

Tickets are available by calling the UH Hilo Box Office at 932-7490 or ordering online at artscenter.uhh.hawaii.edu.

UH Hilo Receives OHA Grant Funding

Na Pua No`eau- The Center for Gifted and Talented Native Hawaiian Children has announced that the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo has received funding from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) `Ahahui Grants program. The funds support UH Hilo’s strategic goal to strengthen its impact on the State of Hawai’i by working in partnership with other UH campuses to deliver joint program events or activities.

On February 23, 2017, Na Pua No`eau will present “E Ho`okama`aina” at the University of Hawaiʻi Maui College (UHMC). OHA awarded a total of $5,300 for this event, which will invite high school juniors and seniors to engage and learn about the various degree programs from faculty and program coordinators to inspire them to enter into higher education and further their career aspirations.

“Ma Uka a i Kai Akamai Engineers” will be held on April 3, 2017 at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mänoa. OHA awarded $1,950 to invite K-12 students and their `ohana to explore how the different types of engineering (mechanical, electric, civil, etc.) were applied during the days of their kupuna. The Native Hawaiian Science and Engineering Mentorship Program is a partner in the event, which will include games and work on projects that provide hands-on learning about the field of engineering.

`Ahahui Grants support community events that meet at least one primary strategic result. The events will address OHA’s Exceed Education Standards and UH’s Hawai’i Graduation Initiative (HGI). For more information, contact Nä Pua No`eau Director Kinohi Gomes at kinohi@hawaii.edu.

Hula to be Featured at UH Hilo Fall Commencement

Fall commencement at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo takes on a different look this year, reflecting the view of higher education through an indigenous lens promoted by the UH System’s Hawaiʻi Papa O Ke Ao initiative. The program will feature a student speaker, a hula presentation about learning and growth, and the awarding of degrees on Saturday, December 17 at 9 a.m. in Vulcan Gym.
uh-hilo-moniker
A total of 242 students have petitioned for 318 degrees and/or certificates from the colleges of Arts and Sciences (233), Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management (21), Business and Economics (30), Pharmacy (6) and Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language (7), while 21 others are candidates for various post-graduate honors.

Kyle James Davis, an agriculture major, will represent the graduating class as student speaker. Davis, who will receive a BS in tropical horticulture, has maintained a cumulative GPA of 3.48. His academic achievements include being named to the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management Dean’s List in 2013 and 2015. Davis also earned a Semester at Sea Scholarship and spent spring 2014 studying aboard the MV Explorer in nearly a dozen countries.

Davis is an ordained minister, who served five years in the US Army, including over two and a half years in Iraq as a combat medic. His commencement address will draw from his numerous life experiences and will include a call for his fellow graduates to broaden their horizons.

The chant- hula will be performed by UNUKUPUKUPU, Indigenous Leadership through Hula Program under the directorship of Pele Ka`io, Hawaiian Protocols Committee chairperson, and Dr. Taupōuri Tangarō, director of Hawaiian Culture and Protocols Engagement, at UH Hilo and Hawaiʻi Community College.

Organizers anticipate a dynamic performance, with at least 50 individuals representing UH Hilo, HawCC, and Waiākea High School. Gail Makuakāne-Lundin, interim executive assistant to Chancellor Donald Straney, director of Kīpuka Native Hawaiian Student Center, and a member of UNUKUPUKUPU, will introduce the chant-hula, entitled ʻUlei Pahu I Ta Motu, which was composed more than 200 years ago and documents the evolution of world view.

The chant-hula will be preceded and followed by the sounding of 20 pahu (drums) and 20 pū (conch-shell trumpets). The 20 pū will also sound honoring Moana-nui-ākea (large and broad oceans) that connect Hawaiʻi to the world. The performance concludes with the presentation of Paʻakai (sea-salt) to honor the profound intersection where the learner transitions to graduate.

Straney said fall commencement provides a unique opportunity to showcase the UH Hilo – Hawaiʻi Community College Papa O Ke Ao collaboration, which seeks to make the UH campuses leaders in indigenous education.

Seventy-Two Youths Participate in HI-PAL Youth Volleyball Clinic

Seventy-two youths participated in the HI-PAL Youth Volleyball Clinic held December 1 at the new Kaʻū District Gym in Pāhala. The free clinic was held in partnership with the UH-Hilo Vulcan Women’s Volleyball Team, County of Hawaiʻi Department of Parks and Recreation and the Hawaiʻi Police Department’s Community Policing Section-Hawaiʻi Isle Police Activities League (HI-PAL).

UH-Hilo Vulcan Coach Tino Reyes demonstrates ‘bump’ form.

UH-Hilo Vulcan Coach Tino Reyes demonstrates ‘bump’ form.

“We wanted to bring the Vulcan athletes out to Kaʻū to share their knowledge and skills with our keiki and are very fortunate to have this brand new, three-court facility that could hold such an event,” said Kaʻū Community Police Officer Blaine Morishita.

Participants learned skills and were able to talk story with the college athletes. Afterward, participants were treated to dinner, which was served by community volunteers, P&R staff and police officers.

For information on HI-PAL activities in West Hawaiʻi, you may contact the Kona Community Policing Section at 326-4646, extension 259, or your nearest police station.

TMT Hosts International Workshop For Future Science and Technology Leaders in Hilo

Astronomy and engineering graduate students from the TMT international partnership countries are gathering in Hilo for a future leaders workshop this week through Wednesday, December 7. The scientific/technical workshop with an emphasis on international collaboration focuses on project management and other professional skills with the intention of training TMT’s future leaders.

The Institute for Scientist & Engineer Educators has been training graduate students and postdocs, and has partnered with telescopes for more than 15 years. ISEE is located at the University of California Santa Cruz, which is the headquarters of UC Observatories and the center for the University of California’s participation in the TMT. ISSE is developing a new program for TMT, which will be designed to engage the full international partnership of TMT science and technology development.

The Institute for Scientist & Engineer Educators has been training graduate students and postdocs, and has partnered with telescopes for more than 15 years. ISEE is located at the University of California Santa Cruz, which is the headquarters of UC Observatories and the center for the University of California’s participation in the TMT. ISSE is developing a new program for TMT, which will be designed to engage the full international partnership of TMT science and technology development.

“TMT is hosting 40 graduate and post doctorate students from Hawaii, Japan, China, India, Canada, University of California and Caltech to help them gain valuable technical and project management skills while collaborating with TMT staff and Mauna Kea Observatory partners. This workshop is serving as a pilot for future sessions for the TMT international training program. What better place than on Hawaii Island, in Hilo and on what many call the best site in the world to view the heavens,” said Sandra Dawson, TMT’s Hawaii Community Affairs Manager.

Participants in the workshop are gaining knowledge about opportunities for future involvement with TMT, project management skills, leadership and teamwork experience through hands-on training activities and an opportunity to help design a potential future TMT international program.

Workshop activities include a Mauna Kea summit tour, visits and interaction with scientists and engineers from Subaru Telescope, Gemini Observatory, W. M. Keck Observatory and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Participants are working with TMT staff members focusing on project management, systems engineering, science instruments, software development, safety compliance and invasive species controls.

The graduate students are also learning the history of astronomy in Hawaii, and particularly on the summit of Mauna Kea, and an overview of the cultural significance of Mauna Kea.

Participating students are from Caltech, University of California Davis, University of California Santa Cruz, University of California Los Angeles, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, University of Science and Technology of China, Dunlap Institute University of Toronto,  NRC-Herzberg, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, University of Tokyo, University of British Columbia, University of California Riverside, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan /Sokendai, University of Victoria, University of California Irvine, National Tsing Hua University, Inter University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tohoku University and the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy.

The workshop is funded by the Thirty Meter Telescope and led by the Institute for Scientist and Engineer Educators (ISEE) at UC Santa Cruz.

For more information contact Austin Barnes at isee.austinbarnes@gmail.com or visit the website at http://isee-telescope-workforce.org.

Hilo Passport Acceptance Fairs

Thinking about applying for a U.S. Passport? Don’t put it off any longer!
hilo-passport-fairApply for your U.S. Passport at a special Saturday Passport Acceptance Fair at Hawai’i Community College on December 3, 2016; April 1, 2017; and May 20, 2017.

To request an appointment, email your name, phone number, and preferred appointment date and time to PassportFair@state.gov. Walk-in customers will be accommodated as time permits.