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Hawaii Innocence Project Event Will Test Reliability of Eyewitness Identification

Could you be a reliable eyewitness? Want to test your skills with some expert attorneys?

eyewitnees-identification

On Tuesday, October 4, 2016, in recognition of “International Wrongful Conviction Day,” the Hawai‘i Innocence Project will challenge audience members to see how well they can identify a possible suspect in a mock exercise at the UH Law School.

The program, titled “Eyewitness Identification,” is scheduled from 12 noon to 1:15 p.m. in Classroom 2.  Lunch is available in the courtyard; donations are welcome.  Similar programs are taking place across the nation and around the world.

“Eyewitness Identification” aims to demonstrate pitfalls in the standard technique that has been used in courtrooms for decades. Documentation has begun to show that faulty eyewitness identification accounts for as much as 75 percent of all wrongful convictions, according to Innocence Project data.

The Hawai‘i Innocence Project is run by faculty members at the William S. Richardson School of Law, with assistance from community attorneys. In 2011, using advanced DNA testing technology, the Hawai‘i project succeeded in having Alvin Francis Jardine exonerated after he spent almost 20 years in prison for a rape and burglary he consistently maintained that he did not commit. The national organization has freed several hundred wrongly incarcerated people by using advanced DNA testing.

As part of the national Innocence Project network, Faculty Specialist Kenneth Lawson and Associate Dean Ronette Kawakami head the project and work with other attorneys on cases in Hawai‘i.  Said Law Dean Avi Soifer, “Our faculty and students, along with our cooperating attorneys, deserve great admiration for their passionate, tireless work to free those who have been unjustly imprisoned.”

The October 4 program will help show just how fallible eyewitness testimony can be.

Mark Alan Vocal Works Brings A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias to Hilo

Local singing students from Mark Alan Vocal Works, Mark Sheffield’s voice studio, together with singers from his UH Hilo voice studio, will present a recital of (mostly) classical songs and arias.  Together with legendary pianist Quack Moore and the new vocal ensemble VOICES, they bring their unique interpretations of classics and modern favorites to Hilo. Showtime is Friday, September 30, at 7:30 p.m. at Hilo’s Church of the Holy Cross. Admission is free.  For more information, call 238-6040.

classical-recital

A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias presents singers in various stages of vocal development – from young beginners to experienced performers – in a recital designed to showcase and celebrate their particular strengths.  Singers include RyAnne Raffipiy, Landon Ballesteros, Samantha Saiki, Rachel Edwards, Amy Horst, and Bridge Hartman, along with Mark Sheffield, who teaches the other singers. Students from Mark’s private Vocal Works studio join singers from his UH Hilo voice studio to bring to life songs of love, heartbreak, joy, and beauty.

VOICES, a new vocal ensemble also led by Mark Sheffield, joins the concert with a return to their roots. They will perform their signature motet, “The Silver Swan” by Orlando Gibbons.  The solo singers follow, celebrating classics including old Italian songs “O cessate di piagarmi” and “Caro mio ben;” while bringing to life arias such as “Si, mi chiamano Mimi” from La Boheme and Rachmaninoff’s haunting “Vocalise.” The recital earns its (mostly) classical label with the performance of pop tunes by Adele and Billy Joel, and sizzling Broadway hits including Sondheim’s great song “Being Alive.”

Mark Sheffield maintains a busy private voice studio in Hilo, where he has taught both privately and at UH Hilo for ten years. 2016 saw the inauguration of Mark’s Vocal Works program, designed to provide both individual training and theory-based practical education in the vocal arts. This year also saw the inception of VOICES, a vocal ensemble comprised of Mark’s advanced students from both his Vocal Works and UH Hilo studios. Mark is joined at the helm of this recital by Quack Moore, the Grammy-winning pianist of Hilo Palace Theater and Saturday Night Live fame, who now devotes much of her time to supporting and promoting young musicians.

When asked how he came to create A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias, Mark said, “For a decade now, my students have performed in joint studio recitals given by my wife, piano teacher Katie Sheffield, and I. Beyond this, my students have performed to acclaim in shows locally and around the country, as they pursue studies, work, and dreams of Broadway success. Now we invite our friends and our community to a recital of our very own.  Thank you, Hilo, for supporting vocal music. We look forward to singing for you.”

A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias comes to Hilo September 30, 2016, at 7:30 p.m. at Hilo’s Church of the Holy Cross for one show only.  Admission is free.  Call 238-6040 for more information.

UHH Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy 8th Annual Health Fair

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy presents its 8th Annual Health Fair on Saturday, October 22, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Prince Kuhio Plaza in Hilo.

(l-r) Late Sen. Gilbert Kahele, a big supporter of the pharmacy college, stands with Class of 2016 students Josen Ho, David Ung and Miraya Talavera, who were tending a booth at the fair in 2014.

(l-r) Late Sen. Gilbert Kahele, a big supporter of the pharmacy college, stands with Class of 2016 students Josen Ho, David Ung and Miraya Talavera, who were tending a booth at the fair in 2014.

More than 150 student pharmacists will host education booths, health screenings, and giveaways. There also will be live demonstrations, entertainment, and a keiki poster contest for elementary- and middle-school students.

Participating organizations include Aloha Care, Bone Marrow Registry, Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes, Crisis Line of Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi Island Diabetes Coalition, Hawaiian Islands AIDS and HIV Foundation, HMSA, Hui Malama Hawaiʻi, Medical Reserve Corps, NAMI – National Alliance of Mental Illness – Big Island, Partners in Developments, Senior Medicare Patrol, The Arc of Hilo and The Food Basket.

For more information, contact Tracey Niimi at 933-7663 or tniimi@hawaii.edu.

Zika Video Released by University of Hawaii’s National Disaster Preparedness Training Center

The National Disaster Preparedness Training Center (NDPTC) at the University of Hawaiʻi focuses on natural hazards like climate change and other threats to coastal and island communities.

Under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency, NDPTC has developed a short video in partnership with the State of Hawaiʻi Department of Health and the University of Hawaiʻi as part of its Just-in-Time Training initiative to promote awareness and deliver basic information about the Zika virus. The center has developed other Just-in-Time Training on tsunamis, volcanoes, and other emerging threats and hazards.

In this video, Sarah Park, state epidemiologist and chief of the Hawaiʻi Department of Health’s Disease Outbreak Control Division, provides key information about the virus including its potential for spreading from an infected pregnant woman to her fetus causing birth defects and transmission via mosquitoes and through sexual contact.

Zika has been found in the Americas, Oceania/Pacific Islands, Africa and Asia. According to the Center for Disease Control, travel-associated cases of the Zika virus have been found in every U.S. state except Alaska and Wyoming, and in every U.S. territory except Guam and American Samoa. Locally acquired cases have been found in only Florida, American Samoa, Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands. It is spread by the bite of an infected Aedes species of mosquito (Aedes aegypti and Aedis albopictus). With the impact of climate change there has been a growth in regions that support mosquito habitats worldwide, increasing the world’s vulnerability to mosquito-borne diseases.

Aedes species of mosquito

Aedes species of mosquito

“We are particularly concerned about Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases because of their potential impacts on vulnerable, at-risk populations,” said Karl Kim, professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and executive director of the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center. “We need to increase awareness of the disease but also work towards effective strategies for monitoring as well as combating Zika. As a global visitor destination, Hawaiʻi needs a multi-pronged approach involving health care providers, urban planners, emergency responders, as well as households and businesses is needed to manage this health threat.”

Homeowners and businesses need to protect themselves against mosquitoes and implement effective programs for mosquito control. Training and education is needed to increase preparedness as well as response and mitigation capabilities.

NDPTC is committed to provide relevant and up-to-date training and education on the latest threats to our society.

UH Hilo Graduate Receives Fulbright Award

A recent graduate of the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo has been awarded the 2016-2017 J. William Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship (ETA) Award to teach English to seventh, eighth and ninth grade students at Bongseon Middle School, located in Gwangju, South Korea.

Chelsea Sato

Chelsea Sato

Chelsea Sato graduated from UH Hilo in Spring 2016 with bachelor’s degrees in chemistry and mathematics, along with certificates in global engagement and mathematics STEM research honors. Sato was a Chancellor’s Scholarship recipient, who studied abroad at Korea University in 2013 and was a member of the Vulcan tennis team.

The Fulbright ETA Award was established by Senator J. William Fulbright in 1946 to fund student exchanges designed to promote international good will and understanding between the United States and the world. More than 360,000 students in over 160 countries have participated in the program since its creation. Fulbright alumni include ambassadors, members of Congress, university presidents, heads of corporations, and more.

UH Hilo graduates seeking more information on the Fulbright Program can visit
http://us.fulbrightonline.org/applicants/application-checklists/eta-applicationchecklist or contact the Center for Global Education and Exchange at 932-7488.

UH Manoa Student Wins EPA Grant to Study Coral Resiliency

Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced more than $1.6 million in Science to Achieve Results (STAR) graduate fellowships for 13 students at universities in Arizona, California, Hawaii, and Nevada. The fellowships, which will allow these students to further their education while conducting environmental research, were part of over $6 million awarded to 52 students across the nation.

“Through EPA’s funding, the STAR fellows will pursue innovative research projects while attaining advanced academic degrees,” said Alexis Strauss, EPA’s Acting Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “The work these students are doing is inspirational, and will help address environmental challenges in fields such as atmospheric chemistry, green energy, hydrogeology and toxicology.”

Since 1995, the STAR fellowship program has awarded nearly 2,000 students a total of more than $65 million in funding. Recipients have engaged in innovative research opportunities, with some becoming prominent leaders in environmental science. This year’s STAR fellows are poised to become the next generation of environmental professionals who can make significant impacts in environmental science and beyond.

EPA Grant

University of Hawaii, Manoa: Christopher Wall

Project Title: The Dynamic Interaction of Nutrient Pollution and Seawater Temperature on Reef Corals: Is Nutrient Enrichment Undermining Coral Resilience?

Award Amount: $132,000

Objective:

Local nutrient pollution and global ocean warming threaten coral reefs by disrupting the symbiosis between reef corals and their symbiont algae (Symbiodinium spp.). Nutrient pollution alters the exchange of metabolites between host and symbiont and can increase the sensitivity of corals to thermal stress, thereby affecting the ability for corals to respond to regional and global environmental change. This research will use field and laboratory experiments to test for nutrient and temperature effects on the performance, bleaching, and nutrition of reef corals and Symbiodinium to offer insights on the response of corals to changing environmental conditions.

Approach:

I will use carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (d13C, d15N) to test for effects of temperature and nutrient on reef coral nutrition and the autotrophic performance of genetically distinct Symbiodinium types. In a field experiment I will test for nutrient effects on the nutritional modes of corals across a gradient of human impacted reefs in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. I will then design a laboratory experiment to test for nutrient and temperature effects on the fixation, exchange, and storage of autotrophic metabolites among coral species and Symbiodinium clades. Data will be used to construct mass balanced carbon budgets, stable isotope mixing models, and trophic relationship for corals under changing environmental conditions.

Expected Results:

The interaction of nutrient pollution and temperature stress affects the function of the coral-algae symbiosis and shapes ecological outcomes for coral reefs. Nutrient pollution destabilizes reef corals by favoring the retention of autotrophic metabolites by the symbiont at the expense of the host, while temperature stress disrupts symbiont photosynthesis and drastically reduces autotrophic nutrition available to the host. Corals display alternative strategies for coping with environmental stress, including shifting modes of nutrition (autotrophy vs. heterotrophy) and associating with stress tolerant and functionally distinct Symbiodinium partners. However, the capacity to be flexible in nutrient acquisition or in symbiont partnerships is not shared among all coral taxa. By evaluating nutritional flexibility and autotrophic performance among reef corals and symbiont types it will be possible to identify whether nutrient and temperature effects on reef corals are conserved or dependent on species or host-symbiont combinations.

Hawaii International AgriTourism Symposium

Hawai‘i AgriTourism Association (HATA) will host the state’s first Hawai‘i International AgriTourism Symposium on October 15, 2016 at the College of Hawaiian Language: Ka Haka ‘Ulu O Ke‘elikōlani, in Hilo. Industry experts from Hawai‘i, New Zealand and Japan will share their forecasts, trends and tips on how they compete on a global stage. They will share what visitors from their regions are looking to experience in AgriTourism, as well as perspectives on how they have diversified agricultural operations in innovative ways to increase profitability, reduce risk, and protect rural communities.

agritourism symposium

This global symposium aims to help people get on trend with the connections between agriculture and travel/tourism. The industry is an “economic multiplier” that impacts restaurants, lodging, health, and education. For every dollar spent at an AgriTourism farm, an additional $2.25 is spent within the community in food, fuel, and retail.  The ripple effect continues with home based and small businesses that create value add products from the farm crop such as jams, baked goods, and beauty or health products.

As a popular and highly marketable segment of Hawai‘i’s $10-billion dollar visitor industry, AgriTourism is poised to take off in the next decade. It’s not only a viable part of the economy; it’s also an important way to preserve our island lifestyles and culture.

AgriTourism offers farmers and small businesses an incredible opportunity to expand their business using creative approaches, and innovative partnerships. This symposium will show how the state’s largest economic industries, tourism and agriculture, merge to create economic diversity and innovation that visitors will pay for.

Farmers who include an AgriTourism component in their marketing plan can see substantial financial benefits. AgriTourism can provide the difference between a profitable and an unprofitable farming operation, and between a sustainable and an unsustainable agricultural region. With the potential of this niche market expanding at such a fast pace, there has never been a better time to learn more about AgriTourism.

Online Registration for Hawai‘i’s International AgriTourism Symposium is open at www.hiagtourism.org.  Vendors who wish to sell products at the Hawai‘i Marketplace may also register online as well.  For more information, please contact Lani Weigert, lani@hiagtourism.org.  Space is limited, early registration encouraged.

All University of Hawaii Facilities on Big Island Announces Closure in Advance of Hurricane Madeline

All University of Hawaiʻi facilities on Hawaiʻi Island will be closed for all students and non-essential personnel starting Wednesday, August 31, in advance of Hurricane Madeline.

UH Hilo Moniker

This includes UH Hilo, Hawaiʻi Community College, Hawaiʻi Community College-Palamanui, ʻImiloa Astronomy Center, North Hawaiʻi Education and Research Center, Hale Pohaku – Onizuka Center for International Astronomy and food and lodging facilities, all UH Mānoa College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) facilities, and all UH Mānoa Institute for Astronomy (IfA) facilities.

The Hale Kehau dining room will remain open on a weekend schedule for on-campus residents.

Please follow the National Weather Service Central Pacific Hurricane Center and local agencies and media for the latest weather news. Please sign up for UH Alert for text message updates. Notifications affecting UH campuses will be posted at the UH System Emergency Notifications.

UH Hilo Students to Participate in Conservation Congress Gathering

Four cohorts of students from the Kūʻula Integrated Science class in the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Marine Science program have been invited by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Marine Program to open the Marine World Heritage Reception on September 5. The reception is part of the Internal Union of Conservation of Nature World Conservation Congress (IUCN WCC) that will be held in Honolulu September 1-10.

UH Hilo Moniker

The Kūʻula students will present a chant and hula describing human relationships with the ocean and coral reefs. One of these chants, Uku ʻĀkoʻakoʻa, was composed specifically for Kūʻula by Dr. Taupōuri Tangarō, the director of Hawaiian Culture and Protocols Engagement for UH Hilo and Hawaiʻi Community College through the Uluākea Program. The students presented the same chant and hula to open the International Coral Reef Symposium in Honolulu attended by 2,500 people in July.

Kū’ula students integrate western and Native Hawaiian scientific knowledge and research methodologies to understand the environment of Hawai’i. Their research has enabled them to establish personal and meaningful connections to the places they study, which have included Midway Atoll and Ha’ena, Kaua’i. Most Kū’ula graduates have gone on to graduate schools or to jobs in natural resource management and education.

“This is a significant achievement for our students majoring in natural sciences, Hawaiian Studies, and social sciences, who worked together through the Kūʻula class experience,” said Dr. Misaki Takabayashi, professor, marine science. “The recognition they are receiving is well-deserved.”

For more information about Kūʻula, contact Takabayashi at 932-7095 or email
misakita@hawaii.edu.

Real-Life CSI Coming to Kona

The College of Continuing Education and Community Service (CCECS) at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo is offering a class on Introduction to Forensics: Real-Life CSI in Kailua-Kona.

CSI

Classes will be held at Kealakehe Intermediate School (Room TBA) on Tuesdays from 5 – 7 p.m., September 13 to November 22, with no session on November 8. Tuition is $150. The textbook Criminalistics: An Introduction to Forensic Science, 8th edition by Richard Saferstein is required.

This non-credit class will introduce participants to the field of forensic science. Evidence collected at a crime scene can often tell the story of a criminal act if properly interpreted. Detection and analysis of DNA traces, fiber, hair, body fluids, fingerprints, footprints, toxic substances and illegal drugs are fundamental to the forensic scientist’s craft.

The instructor is Dr. Kristal Uhl-Blacksmith, an environmental engineering consultant and former mortician, who has taught biology, anatomy and forensics.

For more information and to register, contact CCECS at 932-7830 or visit http://hilo.hawaii.edu/ccecs/.

That “KMT” Sticker on the Back of University of Hawaii Football Team Helmets

The University of Hawaii Football team will be taking on the California Bears tomorrow in a game that will be played overseas in Australia.

The team will have a special sticker on the back of the helmet that will be worn the entire the season:

Photo via Na Koa Football Club

Photo via Na Koa Football Club

The photo honors the late K. Mark Takai, US House of Representative, UH alum and Letterwinner.

Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorder Offered

The College of Continuing Education and Community Service (CCECS) at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo is offering Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) with Dr. Stephanie Dodge.

UH Hilo MonikerClasses will be held on Tuesdays from 4:30 – 6:30 p.m., September 20 – October 18, at UH Hilo’s Sciences and Technology Building (STB) 225. Cost is $75.

The series is open to anyone who would like to learn more about ASD, including parents, caregivers, educators and practitioners. It will provide an overview of diagnosis, prevalence and etiology of ASD, as well as an introduction to interventions. Also included is information about behavioral assessments and programs, assistive technology and advocacy for services.

Dodge received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from UH Manoa. She specializes in helping young children who have problems with attention, focus, following instructions, hyperactivity, impulsivity, and disobedience. She also specializes in autism treatment and is trained to administer two gold-standard evaluation tools.

For more information and to register, contact CCECS at 932-7830 or visit http://hilo.hawaii.edu/ccecs/.

Free ‘Imiloa Membership for All UH Hilo Students

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo has announced an exciting new benefit for its students. For the very first time, the University’s ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center is offering a complimentary individual membership to every student with a valid I.D. who is registered for the 2016-2017 academic year.

Free Imiloa
“Very few universities can boast an on-campus resource like the ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center, which showcases Mauna Kea and its cultural and scientific value, especially way-finding and astronomy,” said Chancellor Don Straney. “We greatly appreciate this gesture and encourage all of our students to take advantage of the benefits ‘Imiloa has to offer throughout the academic year.”

‘Imiloa is located on the upper campus, and housed in a striking titanium-clad conical structure. The Center is open to the public six days a week (Tuesday-Sunday). Student members will be able to enjoy four free daily shows in the full-dome planetarium, full access to the interactive exhibit hall, plus discounts on special events and purchases at ‘Imiloa’s award-winning Sky Garden Restaurant and on-site store.

For Astronomy majors Shelby Wood and Micah English, an ‘Imiloa membership is something they’ll make extensive use of.

“I’m from New Mexico, and have never been to ‘Imiloa, so I appreciate the opportunity to check it out,” Wood said. “I think it’s really great that they are doing this, because I have been to the planetarium and it was really cool,” English added.

Hawaiian Studies Major Kehaulani Esteban sees ‘Imiloa as a valuable resource for learning more about the Hawaiian culture.

“I’m really looking forward to the Mauna Kea show because we get to learn about how the Hawaiian Islands were created,” Esteban said.

`Imiloa Executive Director Ka’iu Kimura sees the memberships as an effective avenue for advancing ‘Imiloa’s mission to inspire exploration through the sharing of Hawaiian culture and science.

“One of the goals ‘Imiloa has set for our second decade is to take our programming across the island, the state and beyond. At the same time, however, we are committed to amplifying our impact here at home,” Kimura said. “What better way to inspire the next generation than to deepen our ties to UH Hilo and the community of students at our doorstep?”

Students can activate their free membership by visiting: http://blog.imiloahawaii.org/general-information/free-imiloa-membership-for-all-uh-hilo-students/.

UH Hilo Basketball Team Announces Six New Recruits

The 2015-16 University of Hawai’I at Hilo men’s basketball team won four of its last five games, just missing out on a post-season berth in the Pacific West Conference tournament.

Needing to replace three starters off of that squad and two other graduated players, head coach G.E. Coleman has accomplished that with the signing of six standout players. The list includes four transfers and two freshmen.

One of those transfers brings NCAA tournament experience to the Vulcan camp. 6’6″ wing Brian Ishola played two seasons at North Dakota State, including a freshman campaign that saw the Bison win the Summit League and advance to the Big Dance, falling to Gonzaga in the first round (86-76).

Brian Ishola

Brian Ishola

A junior, Ishola hails from Woodbury, Minnesota and prepped at East Ridge High School.

Coleman also landed three junior college players. Junior point guard Ryley Callaghan comes to the UHH campus from Peninsula Community College (Wash.), where he was named the Most Valuable Player of the North Division of the Northwest Athletic Conference (NWAC) after averaging 14.7 points a game and nearly three assists a contest.

Ryley Callaghan

Ryley Callaghan

The 6’1″ Port Orchard, Wash. native drilled 69 three-pointers on the season. He prepped at South Kitsap High School.

Wing Donavan Taylor is a 6’3″ starter from Chaffey CC (Calif.), where he averaged nine points and 6.5 rebounds a game.

Donavan Taylor

Donavan Taylor

Taylor played at Silverado High School in Compton, Calif.

Arnold Silva is a 6’5″ forward that played the past two seasons at Santa Rosa JC (Calif.), averaging 7.1 points and a team-best 7.2 rebounds a contest.

Arnold Silva

Arnold Silva

He came to Santa Rose from Healdsburg, Calif.

The most noticeable recruit is 6’11” freshman Onyx Boyd.

Onyx Boyd

The Virginia Beach native missed half of his senior season at Bishop Sullivan Catholic High School with an injury, but prior to that was on the radar of a number of NCAA Division I programs.

As a junior, he ranked sixth in the state of Virginia in scoring.

Rounding out the class is freshman Eric Wattree, a 6’3″ wing from South Kitsap, Wash.

Eric Wattree

Eric Wattree

Wattree, a former high school teammate of Callaghan, averaged nearly 25 points a game and three assists a contest for the Wolves. His father Eric, Sr., was a collegiate standout at Wyoming and Azusa Pacific.

“This is a great recruiting class for us,” Coleman said. “We’ve added height and talent, and I feel like we finally look like a full-fledged Division II team. That’s a start for where we need to be, because we play in what I think is the toughest D-II league in the country in the Pacific West Conference.”

The Vulcans will open the 2016-17 season on the road, taking on west region schools Simon Fraser (Nov. 11), Seattle Pacific (Nov. 12) and Saint Martin’s (Nov. 15). UHH will also play sister school and 2015-16 NCAA tournament squad UH Manoa, at the Stan Sheriff Center on Nov. 22.

University of Hawaii Law Students Getting New Building

University of Hawaii law students are getting a new $7.4 million dollar building to work on projects.

law buildingConstruction will begin in October on the William S. Richardson School of Law’s new Clinical Building at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. It’s expected to be complete in July 2017.

“We are extremely pleased that this much-needed and long-awaited project is actually under way,” said Dean Avi Soifer. “Our law school is uniquely involved with, and committed to, the community. This Clinical Building gives us vital professional space for our students to be prepared for trial practice and advocacy.  Additionally, it is significant for reaccreditation and also helps us remain on par with other law schools around the country that have recently upgraded their facilities.”

Maui-based F&H Construction is scheduled to break ground late September. The building design has already qualified at the LEED Silver level as a green building and may attain Gold status.

More here: University of Hawaii Builds New Clinical Building

Governor Ige Community Connection Meeting Tomorrow in Hilo

Governor  David Ige will be having a Community Connection meeting tomorrow.  He will talk briefly about his Administration’s strategic initiatives and more importantly, to listen and engage in conversations about top-of-mind issues for the people of East Hawai’i.

Statewide engagement and collaboration with our Island communities are essential for creating positive and lasting changes within our State.  Representatives will also be present from the following departments:  Department of Land and Natural Resources, Department of Agriculture, Department of Health, Department of Transportation and Governor’s Leadership on Homelessness:

The meeting will be held on Tuesday, August 9, 2016 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at University Classroom Building (UCB) 301, Room 100

As you enter the main entrance off of West Kawili Street, the flag poles will be straight ahead and the building will be on the left side.  The building name is UCB 301 and Room 100 is on the first floor.

As you enter the main entrance off of West Kawili Street, the flag poles will be straight ahead and the building will be on the left side. The building name is UCB 301 and Room 100 is on the first floor.

After the General Session, breakout sessions will provide you with an opportunity to focus on your area of interest.  The room assignments are as follows:

  • Department of Land and Natural Resources:  UCB 301, Room 100
  • Department of Agriculture/Department of Health:  Campus Center Building, Room 301
  • Department of Transportation:  UCB 301, Room 127
  • Governor’s Leadership on Homelessness:  Campus Center Building, Room 306

If you have time in your schedule, we hope you can attend the Governor’s Community Connection meeting.

For additional information, please contact the Governor’s East Hawai`i office at 974-6262.

 

Commentary – Call for State Audits of UH Hilo Campus Center

Former UH Hilo Student Association (UHHSA) Senator Jen Ruggles met with UH Hilo Chancellor Don Straney, UH System Chief Financial Officer Kalbert Young, and Senator Russell Ruderman today, July 28 at 11am at the Hawaii State Building to call for state audits of Campus Center.

UHSU

The meeting came out of Senate Resolution 73, a Hawaii Senate Resolution submitted by Senator Ruderman on March 11, 2016. On March 16 the Hawaii Committee on Higher Education instructed Ruderman to call for a meeting with parties from UH and Ruggles. Hawaii Tribune herald wrote an article on April 11.

Ruggles and members of The Student Union, a registered independent student organization (RISO) at UH Hilo, requested various documents from UH Hilo Campus Center pertaining to how student life was managed by Campus Center at UH Hilo during a 10 year time period.

Campus Center Director Ellen Kusano did not provide requested records of 11 months of student fee financial records as well as records of, “The Campus Center Fee Board” a board of which allocates hundreds of thousands of UH Hilo student fees annually.

“We have discovered that records and student fees are unaccounted for. Students and parents have a right to know how and where the mandatory student fees are being spent.” Ruggles said.

In addition to the financial audit Ruggles will also call for a management audit of Campus Center due to numerous complaints and lawsuits of Campus Center employees. See audit overview here.

Certified Public Accountant Jim Buck will also be in the meeting.

For more information contact Jen Ruggles at: 808-464-2015

Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp Moving to UHH Gym Due to Tropical Storm Darby

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation will move next week’s Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp to the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Gymnasium.

Yagi

All children participating in the camp should report to the UHH Gym, located at 200 West Kāwili Street in Hilo, at 8 a.m. Tuesday, July 26, for registration and the opening day of the camp.

The new venue will replace the Afook-Chinen Civic Auditorium, which has been reserved for another event that must be postponed to protect attendees from the anticipated impacts of Tropical Storm Darby.

The Department of Parks and Recreation thanks the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo for allowing its gymnasium to be used for the Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp. The department also apologizes for any inconvenience the venue change may cause and thanks camp participants and their families for their understanding.

For more information, please contact Jason Armstrong, Public Information Officer, at 961-8311 or jarmstrong@hawaiicounty.gov.

Early Registration Fee for Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp Extended

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation is extending the discounted early-registration fee for its 4th Annual Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp that returns to Hilo July 26-29.

Yagi

Parents who have not yet signed up their keiki may still take advantage of the reduced $60 per-child entry fee that was to have expired July 13.   New registrations will be accepted up until the first day of camp July 26.

Registration forms are available at the Department’s Recreation office located within Aunty Sally Kaleohano’s Lū‘au Hale at 799 Pi‘ilani Street in Hilo, county gyms, and online at http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation/.

Please make checks payable to the “County Director of Finance” and include the note “Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp.”

The Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp is named in honor of the legendary former UH-Hilo men’s basketball coach who helped guide the Vulcans-Hawai‘i Basketball School for 37 years. Open to boys and girls 9 to 17 years old, the camp will be held at the Afook-Chinen Civic Auditorium and the Pana‘ewa Covered Play Courts, which feature new flooring.

A team of coaches will instruct and supervise campers as they practice agility, ball-handling and other drills during morning skill sessions.
Following a lunch break, players will showcase what they’ve learned by competing in games expected to last until about 3:30 p.m. each day. Special awards will be presented to outstanding participants at the close of the four-day camp.

FREE to First 120 Children – ‘Aha Pai’ea Keiki Sports Challenge at UH Hilo

The annual ‘Aha Pai’ea Keiki Sports Challenge is slated for Saturday, August 27 at the University of Hawai’i at Hilo Athletic complex.
Keiki Challenge at UHH
Hosted by the UH Hilo Vulcan Athletic Department and the Vulcan Booster Club, the challenge runs from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. It is FREE and limited to first 120 children 7-12 years old to register. Lunch, beverages and a t-shirt will be provided.

Registration forms are available by clicking on link below, emailing vulcansathletics@gmail.com or calling Vulcan Booster Club ‘Aha Pai’ea Coordinator Ed Torrison at 808-987-3215.

Through the course of the day, participants need to be prepared for vigorous physical activity and should bring a water bottle, running shoes and wear comfortable attire. Various activities are scheduled in baseball, basketball, soccer, softball, tennis and volleyball.

For more information call 808-987-3215.

Registration form