HELCO Thanks Folks Who Shared Ideas for Protecting Utility Poles

The June 27 lava flow is spurring innovation and promoting collaboration despite its threat to the Puna community and the utility infrastructure that lies in its path.

Hawaii Electric Light would like to thank the many people who shared their ideas for protecting utility infrastructure from the lava’s extreme heat. The design process started in late August and involved numerous drafts. Multiple factors were considered, and the final design was a collaborative effort between Hawaii Electric Light, the University of Hawaii at Hilo, and the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. The partnership was instrumental in helping the company understand the characteristics of lava and how to best reduce the short and long-term heat impact to the infrastructure. Our partners continue to assist us with post-impact evaluations. The key contributors were:

Hawaii Electric Light

  • Michael Iwahashi, Assistant Superintendent, Construction & Maintenance
  • Construction & Maintenance Division

University of Hawaii at Hilo

  • Dr. Kenneth Hon, Professor of Geology

U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

  • Tim Orr, Geologist
  • Matthew Patrick, Geologist

Among those submitting a pole protection design was Hawaii Academy of Arts and Science (HAAS) Public Charter School in Pahoa. Although the design was not used, Hawaii Electric Light recognizes their innovation which paralleled the efforts of experienced professionals.

The design was created by high school students in the school’s Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (STEM) program. Their assignment began with a question: “What can you do to help the community?”

“Our STEM class firmly feels necessity is the mother of invention,” said Eric Clause, lead STEM instructor. “When the students designed the power pole barriers, we looked at using materials that were ready and available and would work under the harsh conditions a lava flow would pose. We were really stoked when HELCO released similar design plans.”

PHOTO (L-R): HAAS STEM students Chalongrat Boat Prakopdee, Michael Dodge, Logan Treaster, Maya Anderson, and Jordan Drewer. Photo credit: Hawaii Academy of Arts & Science PCS

PHOTO (L-R): HAAS STEM students Chalongrat Boat Prakopdee, Michael Dodge, Logan Treaster, Maya Anderson, and Jordan Drewer.
Photo credit: Hawaii Academy of Arts & Science PCS

The students are Maya Anderson, Michael Dodge, Jordan Drewer, Henry LaPointe, Lyric Peat, Chalongrat Boat Prakopdee, and Logan James Treaster. In addition to the pole protection design, the STEM students designed an air purifier that can filter hydrogen sulfide, a heat resistant bridge that is cooled by flowing clean water, and a desalinization system that can provide quality drinking water. Some students also are involved in the Hope for HAAS project using social media to raise funds to help HAAS accommodate displaced students in areas affected by the flow.

“Hawaii Electric Light applauds the students at HAAS for their innovation, creativity, and foresight,” said spokeswoman Rhea Lee. “With a lava flow headed their way, they responded proactively and not only developed a conceptual design to help protect power poles, but searched for other ways to help the community in which they live. These are qualities that we value and look for in our employees.”

Albizia Tree Presentation at UH Hilo

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Faculty Congress and the College of Continuing Education and Community Service (CCECS) invite the public to a free presentation on the invasive Albizia trees. The presentation will be held on Wednesday, September 17, from 6:30-7:30 p.m. in the University Classroom Building (UCB) Room 100.

Workers clear Albizia trees from a road following Hurricane Iselle.

Workers clear Albizia trees from a road following Hurricane Iselle.

“The fast-growing Albizia trees have had a serious ecological impact on native forests,” said Springer Kaye, Big Island Invasive Species Committee (BIISC) Manager. “They also pose a real and immediate threat to the public’s safety and welfare as we saw in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Iselle.”

Kaye and Dr. Flint Hughes, research ecologist, of the USDA Forest Service Institute for Pacific Islands Forestry, will discuss community-based efforts involving State and local agencies, lawmakers, Hawai’i Electric Light Company, and other stakeholders to remove hazardous trees, and deploy field staff and volunteers to manage non-hazardous trees. Other topics of discussion include lessons learned and future steps to achieve long-term hazard mitigation.

Parking on the UH Hilo campus is free after 4 p.m. A map of the campus can be found online at http://hilo.hawaii.edu/uhh/maps.php.

For more information, call 974-7664 or email ccecs@hawaii.edu. For disability accommodations, call (808) 974-7664 (V) or (808) 932-7002 (TTY).

Governor Releases $39 Million for Facility Improvements at UH Campuses

As the fall semester kicks off, Gov. Neil Abercrombie today announced the release of $39 million to the University of Hawaii (UH) System for capital improvement projects (CIP) at various campuses.

abercrombieheader“These projects, at campuses from Lihue to Hilo, are long-term investments in our state university system, an anchor of our island community,” Gov. Abercrombie said. “They address needed repairs, maintenance and upgrades to ensure functional academic environments and accessible, affordable higher education opportunities for the people of Hawaii.”

$29,000,000 – Systemwide Health, Safety and Code Requirements, statewide – Construction funds for health and safety projects at UH Manoa and UH Hilo. Projects at UH Manoa include accessibility improvements, sewer and storm drain upgrades, health and safety improvements at Lyon Arboretum, and walkway upgrades. Projects at UH Hilo include a lead roof replacement of Hale Kehau, a Kawili Street pedestrian overpass, an emergency shelter, traffic safety improvements at Panaewa Farms, sidewalk/crosswalk upgrades at Kapiolani and Lanikaula Streets, and emergency generators.

$10,000,000 – Minor CIP Projects for Campuses of the Community College System, statewide – Design and construction funds for capital renewal and deferred maintenance projects of UH Community College (CC) campuses, including the renovation of the cafeteria at Honolulu CC, refurbishment of Ohia Auditorium at Kapiolani CC, renovation of the Diamond Head portables at Leeward CC, renovation of storage space to science lab/classroom at Hawaii CC, renovation of the former Ceramics Building at Maui CC, and renovation of the Fine Arts I Building at Kauai CC.

UH Hilo Announces Trumbo, Santos & Sing Chow to Vulcans Athletic Hall of Fame

Congratulations to the Vulcans 2014 Athletic Hall of Fame class: former Athletic Director Bill Trumbo, tennis player Arthur Santos and softball pitcher Leo Sing Chow.
UH Hilo Moniker
Sing Chow (2003-07) was a 4-time all-conference, all-region and National Fastpitch Coaches Association Scholar/Athlete selection. During her career, the Vulcans won two Pacific West Conference championships and appeared in three NCAA Regionals. She currently coaches the Hilo High School softball team. Sing Chow was nominated by Joey Estrella.

Santos (1975-79) was a 4-year player and won the 1975 Hawaii State Collegiate Singles title. While a student, he started and coached the Waiakea High School tennis program. Since leaving UH Hilo, he has conducted prison and wheelchair tennis programs in Hawaii and Wisconsin. He has competed nationally with singles and doubles titles in the Caribbean, Middle East and Austria. He is a member of the Peter Burwash International Tennis Specialists. Santos was nominated by Kip Koross.

Trumbo (1990-2000) guided the athletic department through the transition from the NAIA to the NCAA. Along the way, he secured corporate sponsorships for various programs, founded and built the Vulcans Athletic Hall of Fame, created multiple top-level collegiate basketball tournaments and engineered nine Vulcans Athletic Scholarship Fund Drive. Trumbo was nominated by Ray Fornof.

This year’s induction ceremony will be held on:
Wednesday, August 27, 2014 at 5:30 p.m.
Nani Mau Gardens
$50 per person

Reservations can be made by calling HOF coordinator Joey Estrella at 808-895-5977. Corporate tables of eight are also available.

UH Hilo Trio Receive Scholarship Honors

Three University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo students, including a pair of incoming freshmen, are among the 2014 recipients of two prestigious UH System scholarships.

UH Hilo Moniker

Brenna Usher and Ashley Laybon received the Regents Scholarship, which is awarded to 20 outstanding freshmen who earn minimum combined scores of 1950 on all three sections of the SAT test or 29 on the ACT, maintain at least a 3.5 GPA in academic subjects in high school, and whose extracurricular achievements are shown to be remarkable.

Usher, a Hilo High School graduate from Kea’au, maintained a 3.70 GPA and will major in Linguistics. Laybon, who will major in Biology, graduated from Kamehameha Schools – Kapalama, where she earned a 3.91 GPA.

Kendra Fujioka of Kurtistown is among this year’s recipients of the Presidential Scholarship, presented to 10 college juniors with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.7 for all college-level work, a record of sustained progress in academic courses, and evidence of superior academic achievement or creative endeavor.

Fujioka graduated from Hilo High School in 2012 with a 4.03 GPA and has maintained a 3.91 GPA at UH Hilo. She enters the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program in the fall.

Both awards include full tuition waivers and $4,000 a year for the length of the scholarship, along with a one-time travel grant of $2,000. The Regents Scholarship is a four-year award, while the Presidential Scholarship is for two years.

Statement From University of Hawaii President David Lassner

As a matter of policy and in accordance with Hawaii public records law, university personnel matters are confidential and we abide by that commitment to confidentiality out of respect for our employees. Experience teaches that personnel issues are best addressed in private, and when a change in leadership is necessary, it is best accomplished with as much dignity as the circumstances permit.

David Lassner

David Lassner

It is my job as President to hold the executives who report to me accountable for their performance and the effectiveness of their leadership. At UH, this is a holistic process that spans the full range of the executive’s duties and responsibilities, not a reaction to specific incidents. I have maintained confidentiality both to provide the chancellor the privacy and dignity that any of us would want for ourselves in a difficult personnel situation, as well as to attempt to avoid disruption to the university’s critical work of teaching, learning, scholarship and service.

Unfortunately, many statements are circulating and the privacy I had hoped for has been compromised with a mix of truths and rumors from many sources. I regret that my attempt at maintaining privacy and dignity has been perceived by some as lacking transparency and accountability. And I am truly sorry this has become a public spectacle.

UH Manoa is Hawaii’s only research university and the flagship campus of our UH System. I am committed to fully supporting our UH Manoa students, who work every day to develop the knowledge and skills for success in their careers and as contributing citizens in our communities. I am committed to supporting our superb UH Manoa faculty members, who teach and mentor students every day and engage in scholarship to advance human knowledge and address the challenges and opportunities facing our communities. And I am committed to supporting our hardworking UH Manoa staff and administrators who every day balance the complexity of multiple missions and expectations from internal communities and external stakeholders.

At this time we all need to focus on polishing our crown jewel in the new financial environment faced by UH and public higher education across the country. The financial conditions that have developed at UH Manoa over the past two years must be addressed with thoughtful leadership and deep collaboration. I am committed to embracing this broader challenge with effective campus leadership in a considered, open and collegial manner with the faculty, students, and staff of the UH Manoa campus and our stakeholders across the State of Hawaii.

UH Hilo College of Business and Economics Announces Dean’s List

UH Hilo Moniker

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Business and Economics announces its Dean’s List for the Spring 2014 semester:

Amerfil Grace Acob, Scott T. Ashida, Stacy C. Aurway, Marisa R. Baptista, Heather K. Bartlett, Andrew D. Bayang, Julianna K.T. Blair, Debra H. Cannoles, Dylan M. Collins, Lorena A. De La Cruz, Lilly P. Dorr, Carole J. Duquette, Robert W. Fellhauer, Silmai Uchellaz D. Fritz, Hannah M. Furumo, Jerome G. Gemine, Shantel L. Geringer, Kamaile R. Henriques, Justin K. Hirako,

Summer K. Llac-Wong, Melanie C. Isa, Aisha K. Izuno, Donald R.H.L. Jobe, Yvonne S. Johnny, Aysia K.M. Kaaumoana, Dajeong Kim, Joohyeon Kim, Kyli K.Y. Kim, Hitomi Kitade, Eunah Kong, Corey K. Kozuma, Laura Lanwehr, Nanncy Leao, Han Sang Lee, Suna Lee, Xiaoting Liu, Emerson Jake T. Llaguno, Cheyenne M. Losalio, Gareth K. Makino, Kerson T. Mariur, Aquilla Masami, Dilrae U. Mechol,

Eve Hida Morei, Raeann M. Mukini, Kelly A.A. Nakamichi, Alexandria J. Nakao-Eligado, Paolo A. Navalta, Claire-Ann H. Niibu-Akau, Kin B. Oshiro, Geraldine D. Padilla, Carissa N. Pajo, Kenny Paul, Nicole J. Perea, Lindsey F. Poulsen, Rosalie G. Roberts, Rachel J. Roorda, Andres Sanchez Gonzalez, Kyle R. Schulte, Aaron H. Sugimoto, Jade L. Thomas, Peleiupu M. Thomas, Cody J. Ventura, Maria L. Vicente, Rowell V. Villanueva, Hokuloa K. Waahila, Risa Watabiki, Aaron M. Zackoski, and Xiaoqing B. Zheng.

Permanent Building Helps College of Pharmacy Receive Extended Accreditation

In a report to the Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, the national accreditation body has extended the accreditation of the only pharmacy school in the Pacific region, reversing an earlier noncompliance finding.

UH Hilo Inouye College of Pharmacy

The American Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) has now found DKICP compliant with all of the 30 standards that it uses to evaluate colleges of pharmacy.

The main issue considered by the ACPE was compliance with the standard concerning physical facilities. In May this year, State House and Senate budget conferees agreed to fund a building to house the College on Hawaiʻi Island.

Chancellor Donald Straney: “I was secure in the knowledge that our community knew the value of the College of Pharmacy to the future, to the economy and to the general well-being of our State. I want to thank everyone involved for their continued support that led to the funding of a permanent building.”

In 2013, ACPE declared DKICP was out of compliance with the standard concerning physical facilities after which, without promise of a permanent building, could ultimately lead to probation. Founding Dean John Pezzuto said probation could have signaled the end of the College.

“If we had followed the path we were on just a year ago, I could be saying that we have been placed on probation, which would’ve been disastrous for the future of the College,” Pezzuto said. “It is heartening that our accreditation is once again secure, but we all must remain diligent and prepare for the next steps.”

The College now must complete a self-study due by September, to be followed by an on-site visit in October 2014. The results of the site visit and continuation of accreditation will be reviewed at the next ACPE Board meeting, to be held in January 2015.

UH Hilo College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resource Management Announces Dean’s List

UH Hilo Moniker

The following students in the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resource Management are recognized as Dean’s List recipients for spring 2014:

Jean Marie Acuna, Harmony Aiona, Kevin Alison, Peter Angeleo, Juan Avellaneda, Joshua Boranian, Ashley Borja-Roese, Whitney Boteilho, Elizabeth Capron, Sarah Chard, Shannon Correia, Wehart Daniels, Noel Dickinson, Alexandra Doi, Robert Dundas, Yasha Eads, Bryan Epes, Adrian Frazier, Kyle Frazier, Esther Frost, Alyssa Fujii, Kawaikapuokalani Genovia, Colin Hart, Pavel Havlicek,

Terence Hedtke, Ashli Hirai, Kelly Hodson, Oliver Jimenez Prado, Laura Kelly, Tiffany Kotani, Kuilei Kramer, Martin Alfonso Ledesma, Jordan Lee Loy, Daisy Maher, Jordyn Mansinon, Chantelle Mashreghy, Jade Miyashiro, James Moore, Ron O’Brien, Michelle Ono, Mariah Potts, Hannah Reid, Tara Renkes, Jake Rodrique, Johnathan Shestokes, Heather Stever, Michael Sthreshley, William Trammell, Lehua Wall, Noelani Waters, and Stephen Zilch.

UH Hilo College of Hawaiian Language Announces Dean’s List Spring 2014

UH Hilo Moniker

Ke kūkala aku nei ko Ke Kulanui o Hawaiʻi ma Hilo Ka Haka Ula O Keelikōlani i nā inoa o nā haumāna kaha oi no ke kau Kupulau 2014 (<a href="http://hilo.hawaii.edu">University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo</a> Ka HakaUla O Ke`elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language announces its Dean’s List for the Spring 2014 semester):

Jai Ho Choi, Samuel Clubb, Dillon Dominguez, Brandi Dugo, Shari Frias, Philip Gamiao, Alexander Guerrero, Kayla Ing, Linda Ixtupe, Erika Jardin, Kamalani Johnson, Tiphani Kainoa, Kamaleiku`uipo Kalehuawehe-Valentine, Micah Kealaiki, Jacqueline Kinge, Maile Kipapa, Gail Klevens, Dylon Koehn, Ciera Lamb, Hannah Lockwood, Daniel McDonald, Candice Miner-Ching, Lilia Misheva, Samantha Pa, Christopher Ramos, Kapuaonaona Roback, Koa Rodrigues, Ronald Santos, Nelli Semenko, You Jin Shin, Eric Taaca, Gabriel Tebow, Lindsay Terkelsen, Randall Yamaoka, and Cheyne Yonemori.

UH Hilo College of Arts and Science Announces Spring 2014 Dean’s List

The following students in the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Arts and Sciences have been named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2014 semester.

UH Hilo Moniker

They include:

Leilani Maijastina Abaya, Janjake Z. Abedania, Jenna Louise Acia, Nicholas Jack Ackerman, Anthony A. Actouka, Melissa Ellen Adams, Robert Wallace K Adviento, Breanna Teiko Ann Aguiar, Brittany Rachael Ahn, Ka’alalani Wilson Ahu, Jessica Ann Akiona, Alston Alika Albarado, Erica Kathleen Amundson, Tiani Arlana Sachiko Anang-Shimabukuro, Keehinani Mikiala Victoria Andrade, Anshuka Anshuka, Brandi J. Antonio, Krista Natsuko Aoki, Shanley Apele, Brandon Scott Tsuyoshi Arakaki, David James Arakawa, Justin King Shan Tooru Araki-Kwee, Megan Lilinoe Araujo, Jamie L.H. Araujo-Rosa, Kana Asama, Colleen Marie Aubrey, Heather Rae Bailey, Christan Sadao Balicoco, Paul Jacob Barch, William Judson Barden, Sydney Lee Barney, Ashley Alexa Bass, Peter Charles Bennett,

Lars Arthur Bergstrom, Alyssa Ann Berry, Jahnu D. Best, Aaron James Bishop, Kalaiakea Mary Blakemore, Alize Marie Blas, Kyra Lynn Blue, Lindsey Siqian Bohnert, Casey William Bolger, Audrey Claire Bonk, Jocelyn Anne Borek, Zachary Edward Boysen, Sari Anne Breitenfeldt, Anashe Brooks, Chanelle Marie Brooks, Kavan Peter Brown, Benjamin Garrett Browning, Kevin Alexander Bruce, Ashley Dawn Buasriyottiya, Kailah Michelle Buchanan, Sydney Maemi Cabanas, Blythe Sierrah Cabanting, Kacie R.K.K. Cabarloc, Goody Butay Cacal, Joseph Kuali’i Lindsey Camara, Vada Grace Cambio, Sheryl Lyn Ubaldo Cariaga, Imelda Auxiliadora Da Conceicao Carlos, Sean Leo Carlos, Devin Lee Kaikane Carlson, Renee Francis Carlson, Vanessa Lynn Carlson, Christina Noel Cauley, Tani K. Chamberlin, Emily Jane Puamahina Charman, Matt Chen,, Katlin J. Chesney, Marymargaretrose Cheung-fuk, Alexis Yuk Lan Ching, Kealii Andrew Cho, BoRam Choi, Skyler L.H. Chun-Ming, Kobie Lehua Clarke, Jordan Bledsoe Concannon, Nicole C. Conley, Taylor Alexandra Coons, Caitlyn Nicole Corfey, Renee Lynn Corpuz, Elyssa Rae-Ann Correia, Alysha Ann Kehaulani Cosier, Leanne Elizabeth Crain, Trixie Alice Croad, Angel Lee Cruz, Angeline Marie Cruz, Andrea Kae Dacar, Chelsey Mae Dahl,

Alric Alvarez Dalere, Angelo Davis, Victoria Gladys Davis, Theodore Joseph Maka’iwi DeRego, Liliana Gene DeSmither, Megan Piilani Noelani Decoito, Axel Junior Defngin, Thomas M. Dela Cruz, Kanoelani Kikue Delatori, Dustin Casey Kuikahi Delima, Kasen Kamuela Delos Reyes, Cassidy James Puuone Dixon, Jesse Marco Dodt, Stacie Emiko Doi, Noah Patterson Dolim, Shaylin K. Domingcil, Ryan S. Domingo, Ryder Pueo Donahue, Jason Heyes Donaldson, Pedro Dos Santos, Katrina Elise Downey,

Mike Dowsett, Kaylie Lynn Drew, Alejandra Evajean Duarte, Julie Padua Duhaylongsod, Sarah Itai Dunaway, Aubrie Elaine Eaton, Jacqueline Frances Economy, Louise Marie Economy, Rachel A. Edwards, Tiffany Marie Epping, Tiffany Grace Erickson, Chelsey Hali’ilaulani Erickson-Vierra, Richard M. Esterle, John Richard Evans, Zachary Chung Everett, Christina Marie Evert, Maria Carla Sampang Felix, Rachel Anne Sampang Felix, Emily Fernandes, Sharrylei Fernandez, Erik Daniel Ferreira,

Chelsea Kahealani Field, Tiffany Danielle Fisk, Doug Walter Fitzpatrick, Hannah Louise Flanery, Carlee Hope Fleck, Kayleigh Elizabeth Flynn, Joseph John Fontana, Amber Rose Fontes, Amanda Kathleen Ford, Amber Marie Forrestal, Cory Aikau French, Joshua Allen Fuentes, Kana Fujihira, Kendra Akemi Fujioka, Keri Reiko Fujiwara, Ashley Ayaka Fukuchi, Ryder Kaleikoa Furukado, Summer Galon-Mizusawa, Geralynn Cadelina Gamayo, Dayna Lynn Pu’unani Ganigan, Jeremy Ramos Ganir, Desha Ann Hiroko Napua Gapusan, Grace Christina Garberson, Jonathan Robert Garnett, Wilfred Tyler Gee,

Zachary Geisterfer, Emma-Lei Ohalani Gerrish, Hattie Le`a Gerrish, Tuan Giai Giang, Rachel Michelle Gorenflo, Kiersten Gabrielle Gormeley, Lauren K.A.H Grace-Finley, Christine Louise Gray, James Cecil Green, Rachel Grace Greenbach, Ava Shruti Kartik Greenwood, Amanda Lee Grelock, Jessica Lynn Griffiths, Kylie Judith Grogg, Kalai Kamalanai Michiko Grothmann, Ole Christian Hagestad, Rebecca Ann Hahn, Brittany Krystal Hale, Ivana Mahealani Hall, Jamaica Ann Hancock,

Kawehiokaiulani Mieko Elizabeth Hanohano, Jenna M. Harburg, Margaret Alyse Harris, Shane Allen Harrison, Alexander Dean Hedglen, Jordan Kekoa Esprecion Heltz, Zachary David Kahue Heltz, Karl Robert Hennen, John Gregory Herman, Alexandria Aspen Herring, Brad Pono Higa, Caitlin Rose Higa, Garret Hayato Ly Hino, Iris Hsing Mei Hirayama, Karlie Marie Hoekstra, Rebecca K. Hogan, Corinna Marie Holfus, Emily Kuho’oki’eki’e Ferreira Holt, Eric Miller Holub, Blake Y. Honda, Brock G. Honda,

Tiana Nanayo Kuuleialoha Honda, Alyssa Michelle Hoshide, Asia Carolynne Howe, Samantha Ai Howell, Christina Huckfeldt, Adrian Takeo Huff, John Mead Hunter, Laura Elizabeth Ibbotson, Zachary Kanoeau Vili Ifo, Kai Aaron Igarashi, Kadi Mie Igawa, Chihiro Inaguma, BeeJay Idian Ines, Kevyn-Bren K. Inouye, Carrie Ga lai Ip, Kelsey Kazuyuki Ito, Linda Gabriela Ixtupe, Rina Mae Vinluan Jabilona, Jessica Jacobs, Erika Rose Jardin, Alyssa Patricia Jasso, Joahnna Javaluyas,

Haley Sue Jerman, Michael Jerry, ShoaAxum Salasse William Johnson, Casey Marshall Jones, Kyle Kepano Jones, Mikayla Jade Jones, Kaycie Chiemi Jyo, Jarin S. Kadooka, ‘I’inimaikalani Keali’ikua’aina Kahakalau, Morrisa Shaye Kahakui, Kawena Kuulei Kahui, Ayaka Kajiura, Kaimipono Shane Kajiyama, Tira Makanamaikalani Kamaka, Cami Chieko Kanahele, Tia Lee Kauiheleole Kanoe, Kawehi Mariko Kanoho-Kalahiki, Noelani Satsuki Kansaku, Evianne Elise Keeney, Marina J. Kelley, Ashley Irene Kennedy, Richard Maxwell Kerr, Ada Kettner, Ara Kim,, Duk Hwan Kim, Hyelim Kim, Macie Yoshiko Kim, Peter Allen Kim, Mary Louise Yasuko Kimura, Satoko Kin, Gavin Cole Kinoshita, Rachel Alana Kishimoto, Christopher Zdenek Kluzak, Amber L. Koker, Eivind Kolaas, Hyesun Kong,

Daniel Jacob Konkler, Nada Kotaishova, Kristen Rachel Krieger, Kealiiahonui Alik Kuikahi, Johann Wei-Xin Kuipers, Luke Andrews Kupcha, Franchael K. Laimana, Meadow Rose Lambert, Amy Gaylene Landers, Brittney M. Lane, Tynan Cody Lazarus, Junbeom Lee, Robert A.F. Lee, Shanda Leilani Lee, Jobe Kekoa Angel Leialoha, Meredith June Lenz, Cynthia Marie Lilleston, Hannah Ida Lipman, Sarah Anne Lips, Elijah C.R. Livingston, Danalynne Ki’ilani Llacuna, Kawehi Marie Kane Lopez, Michael Ryan Lovell, Alyssa Kealohi Loving, Chari-Ann G.. Luis-Calvo, Blaine CM Luiz,

Kristy Lynn Lungo, Alayna Rachelle Leilani Machacek, Meghan Bailey Makanani, Ian Tadashi Makida, Kate Manzano Malasig, Ashley Alohilani Alyce Maldonado, Kayla Anne Malott, Amber K. Manini, Kerson Tachedesel Mariur, Keelee Jade Martin, Shae Alexandria Massie, Anna Claire Masuda, Amber Sunshine Masulit, Carle-Ann Kaiulani Mata, Sheena Eulani Mathews, Kelley Kurt Matsumoto, Evan Seki Matsuyama, Mathew Robert Mauldin, Joseph Edward Maxwell, Meghan Renee Meier McGrath, Angelo Alcino Menezes Guterres Aparicio, Chad Ethan Miguel-Harris, Bryce Evan Miles-Leighton, Thane Bryan Milhoan, Francis Blake Miller, Jessica Aurora Miller, Maikai Koonohiokala Miller,

Emily Hannah Minakin, Amanda Joan Minney, Ashley Masae Minobe-Nacua, Norman Zuniga Mogote, Celina Ilikea Monge, Ariel Kahoniahiku Moniz, Sherise-Charity Moani Keala o ka awapuhi Moniz, Hannah Moore, Michael J.M.K. Mulkey, Koran Nichole Munafo, Lindsey Kealohalani Elilai Muranaka, Kenneth Kansuke Nagata, Angela Fumiko Nakamura, Richard Toshi Nakamura, Kerri Mika Nakatsu, Remi Nakaza, Robynn Ailynn Ines Namnama, Cameron Robert Nance, Kirstie Kanoelani Akemi Naone, Byers Hoapili Naope, Allyssa Leilani Nau, Jordan Lyle Keoni Nauka, Kara Marie Nelson,

Anjenette Viernes Nicolas, Jaysen Christopher Niedermeyer, Scott Laurence Nielsen, Nina Kawehi Nihipali, Mikiko Ninomiya, Anela Lani Nishimoto, Lindsey Lani Nishimura, Allen Gail Yvette Niere Nitura, Nicole Chelsea Jean Nonies, Rochelle N. Nowaki, Angelica M. Nuyen, Daniel Bernard O’Halloran, Michelle Rico Odasco, Steven Mitsuaki Ogi, Zechary Palaina Okamoto, Stephanie-Leanne Shigeko Okumura, Helio Miguel Arcanjo Oliveira De Araujo, Jenae Marie Olson, Morgan Olson, Karen Konohikiokalani Ota, Hiroyuki Otsubo, Evan Kauanoe Oue, Jamie Jungeun Ouye, Wesley Dean Owens,

Aimee Lynn Leinaala Pacheco, Cheynielle Minoakalani Pacheco, Ciera Moanilehua Pagud, Basanta Raj Pahari, Fagalima Lenell Paleafei, Bronson Paul Amio Palupe, Isaac Kuuiponohea Pang, Kirsten Leigh Pang, Jannah Gaile Pante, Marian Grace Andrada Paras, Kirsty Zeandra Parker, Kristine Pasek, Kara Lianne Paulachak, Casey Jay Low Pearring, Kristin M. Pedersen, Kori Laine Pedraja, Jessica Marie Penaranda, Elizabeth Mischell Pennock, Kahiau Raymond Tatsumi Peralta, John Henry Albert Pezzuto, Kaylie Renee Pickup, Loaa K Pine, Hye Jin Piper, Robert Frank Piper, Robert Michel Pipes,

Tyler Melvin Vermudez Pitpit, Kyle Robert Pittman, Arwen May Potochney, Zachary Alan Pratt, Stevan Premovic, Ashley Ray Pugh, Kori Gaila Quander, Vernon Kalani Quiocho, Laurel Rain, Micah Rhobelyn Tunac Ramos, Crystal Jenna Rances, Rachel Lily Rechtman, Stacey Elisabeth Reed, Jessica Ramos Regpala, Maricel Masing Reid, Chelsey Kristin Rickert, Adan William Rodrigues, Koa Henry Damien Rodrigues, Analysa G. Rodriguez, Rebecca Marie Rogers, Saul David Rollason, Gerry Abergido Romero, Kainoa Kamakani Rosa, Makoa Rosa, Kevin Lewis Rose, Robin Christian Rudolph,

Alicia Marie Ryan, Ardena M.J. Saarinen, Christa Nicole Sadler, Julie Anne Garo Sagabaen, Michelle Ruiz Sahagun, Sam Saidi,, Karl John Sakai, Francis Elliott Sakai-Kawada, Nalei Kapua’a’ala Sampson, Gabriella Martiza Sanchez, Teresinha Santos Da Costa, Christlynn Mary Sappa, Christian Keakaokalani Saragosa, Chelsea Midori Sato, Sigrid Dingle Shizuko Sato, Michael Al Seizen Sayaboc, Emily Linden Schneider, Jordan Scott Scrivner, Samantha Lee Shaw, Justin Yukio Shiigi, Albert Eugene Shim, Hyungchul Shin, Keani Keiko Kamalani Shirai, Sheldon Mitsuru Shishido,

Stephanie Lee Shor, Rebecca Nicole Short, Desiree Luana Shortt, Bennjamin Paul Siemers, Laurie Simon-Boursier, Michelle Rose Smith, Samuel Cabot Smith, Sheila M. Soledad, Sondre Solstad, Carrie Ann Soo Hoo, Ryder K. Souza, Ashley M. Spencer, Ashlin Hope Stahlberg, Ken Lloyd Stallman, Kristen Emily Stalter, James Stilley, Taylor Stokesbary, Natalie Rose Strauss, Cole M.M.M Stremski-Borero, Andrea Stroescu, Caroline Michele Stromick, Jeremy Martin Suguitan, Michael James Takeshi Suguro,

Gary Loui Sur, Yvonne L. Sylva, Caitlin Symons, Dillon K. Tacdol, Hazel Pontanes Tagalicud, Nako Takaki, Tara Miyoko Takamori, John James Gregorio Taman, Jove Jenn Maalihan Taman, Casey Hiroichi Tamura, Wing Sing Tang, Reuben Blake Tate, Alana K. Tavares, Ashley Carol Terrell, Sarah Rose Theesfeld, Rachel Lorraine Thompson, Natasha Marie Thorell, Tyler Thornhill, Sherise U’ilani Johanna Tiogangco, Zachary Tman, Ashley Anne Toland, Taylor Tomita, Ashley Chanel Nobuko Tomori, Jennifer Leigh Trujillo, Jonathan M. Truslow, Kyle Kenta Tsubota, Peter Aaron Tuck,

Shanece Kekainani Turner, Lincoln Moses Tyler, Michelle Emiko Uchida, Christine Joy Calabucal Ucol, Stephanie L. Valant, Korie Lihau Maelia Valeho, Keith Joseph Valentis, Sage Trinidad Van Kralingen, Mark J. Vancamp, Rosella Manja Vaughn, Sage Arianna Vecchio, Jasmine Bae Star Venegas, Shelby Ann U’ilani Vickers, Conan-Cordero Laahia Vierra, Lindsay Marie Vik, Robert Benito Villanueva, Anthony Paul Vizzone, Christopher Vito Vizzone, Nelson Vo,, Michael Edward Voight, Maria Karin Walczuk, Emily Grace Wallingford, Laurence K. Walsh, Claire Elvrum Warner, Sondra Michelle Warren, Valerie Kelly Wasser, Hunter Samuel Wilburn, Brittany Nicole Willbrand, Courtney Taylor Williamson, Joshua Aaron Willing, Henry Chico Wilson, Katherine Elizabeth Wilson,

Leah Adele Wilson, Christina Mei Lin Wine, Stacey Marie Witt, Corey George Yamaguchi, Kelli Emi Yamane, Takuhiro Yamashita, Nicholas William Yamauchi, Eddie Iosinto Yeichy, Darcy Kamalani Yogi, Nicole Michiko Yoneishi, Carl Katsumi Yoshida, Bithiah Yuan, Ye Lin Yun, Marikka Chihiro Zavas, Yuri Alexander Zhuraw, James Hugh Ziegler, Jessica Haley-Lauren Zima-Lee, and Anastasia V. Zosim.

UH Hilo Alumnus Wins National Software Competition

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo student Mike Purvis won first place in the 2013 Pearson Coding Contest and was awarded $10,000.

Purvis

The software competition is open to undergraduate students in the United States. Contestants develop relevant, innovative, creative, functional and original applications that integrate with the Pearson LearningStudio Learning Management System and/or utilize the LearningStudio application programming interfaces (API).

Purvis developed a module that integrates with existing Drupal university websites and brings in information about Pearson courses. He utilized a Twilio API to allow students to receive text messages when new course announcements or exams are created. Students can also set goals for their classes and professors can see how the class is doing at reaching their goals.

Go to the Pearson Coding Contest website for more on Purvis’ entry.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/RdfexL0u7fo]

Pearson is a learning company that partners with faculty and institutions to create innovative solutions to improve student achievement and institutional effectiveness.

Purvis was also part of the UH Hilo team that won the 2013 Microsoft Imagine Cup U.S. Finals. The team created an app called Help Me Help, which allows users to share photos and information about hazards they may encounter in emergency situations such as fires, floods or roadblocks.

Chancellor Don Straney honored Purvis at UH Hilo’s Fall 2013 commencement with the Community Spirit Award, which includes a $500 cash prize. The award recognizes students who demonstrate excellence in applied research, learning and innovation in their respective fields of study.

New Findings Show Hawaii High and Middle School Students Improve Health Behaviors

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH), Department of Education (DOE), and University of Hawaii (UH) have released new findings from the 2013 Hawaii Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) for the state and all four counties.

Department of Health

Administered to public non-charter school students in grades 6-12 throughout the state every two years, the YRBS is the only survey that monitors youth health risk behaviors on a regular basis. The next administration of the Hawaii YRBS will be conducted in spring 2015.

“The YRBS is an important tool to identify focus areas for prevention and treatment efforts,” said Health Director Linda Rosen. “The longstanding collaboration between the DOH, DOE, and UH provides an excellent data tracking system to monitor student health risk behaviors and target interventions where they are most needed,”

“Not all student health risk behaviors are obvious,” stated Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “This data provides information that our educators can use to reinforce and advise our students in making positive choices.”

Findings from the Hawaii YRBS indicate that since 2011, there have been positive changes in many student health behaviors; however, there is still room for improvement.

Physical fighting has declined, with 17 percent of high school and 22 percent of middle school students reporting that they were in a fight at least once during the past 12 months.
Marijuana use remains steady with 19 percent of high school and 8 percent of middle school students reporting use in the past 30 days.
Fewer students are binge drinking, but 25 percent of high school and 10 percent of middle school students report drinking some alcohol in the past 30 days.
The percentage of high school students who report attempting suicide in the past 12 months remains at 11 percent, while the percentage of middle school students who report attempting suicide increased to 12 percent.

For the first time, the Hawaii High School YRBS gathered information on texting and emailing by adolescents while driving. Findings indicate that the use of technology while driving continues to put youth at risk.

Among students who drove a car, 43 percent reported texting or emailing while driving during the past 30 days.

The Hawaii YRBS 2013 data also indicate varied trends in obesity-related behaviors, such as excessive screen time, physical activity, diet, and sleep.

The percentage of high school (42 percent) and middle school (41 percent) students who report using a computer for something that was not school work for three or more hours per day on an average school day has been increasing since 2007.
The percentage of high schools students who met the national recommendation for physical activity (at least 60 minutes per day on each of the past seven days) remains steady at 22 percent and the percentage of middle school students meeting this goal increased to 32 percent.
Only 27 percent of high school and 55 percent of middle school students indicate that they are getting eight or more hours of sleep on an average school night.
Soda consumption continues to decrease, with 30 percent of high school students reporting that they did not drink any sugar-sweetened soda in the past seven days.

Survey procedures were designed to protect students’ privacy by allowing for anonymous and voluntary participation. Before survey administration, active parental permission was obtained. Students completed the self-administered questionnaire during one class period and recorded their responses directly on a computer-scannable answer sheet.

The Hawaii YRBS is part of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). For a comparison of Hawai‘i data to the nation, visit http://nccd.cdc.gov/youthonline/App/Default.aspx.

For more information on the Hawaii YRBS visit http://health.hawaii.gov/school-health/health-survey/ or http://apps.hidoe.k12.hi.us/research/Pages/YRBS.aspx.

The full survey report, more detailed data reports by county, gender, grade and race/ethnicity, and the survey questionnaires are available at the Hawaii Health Data Warehouse website at www.hhdw.org.

Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy Names Spring 2014 Dean’s List

The following students from The Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo have been named to the Dean’s List for Spring semester 2014.

UH Hilo Moniker

The Class of 2014 was performing clinical rotations and therefore this designation does not apply.

Class of 2015
Brianne Blakesley*, Andrea Brauer*, Richard Cleave, Chao Cox*, Le Du, Jozelle Gabriel*, Davis Hanai*, Daniel Hasegawa*, Kelly Ishizuka*, Brian John, Tiffany Khan*, Traci Kusaka*, Daniel Leong*, Wei Lin*, Kristina Lo*, Chelsea Murobayashi, Tracy Ng*, Darian Oshiro, Alysia Osugi*, Jessica Parker, Jarred Prudencio*, Garrett Rhodes, Lindsey Takara*, Trina Tran*, Jill Anne Villarosa*, Nichole Wilson*, Akio Yanagisawa*
(* denotes achieving Dean’s List every semester since first year)

Class of 2016
Amy Anderson, Allen Bagalso, Lance Cabanting, David Choe, Chau Dang, Walter Domingo, Ornella Fassu, Bryce Fukunaga, Sisay Kenfe Girmay, Jerilyn Gudoy, Alexander Guimaraes, Samantha Hanabaga, John Hoang, Melissa Iida, Okezie Irondi, Leilani Isozaki, Blake Johnson, Micah KimHan, Thao Le, Quynh Le, Uoc Le, Nancy Le, Tina Liu, Melissa Monette, Raymond Okaniwa, Sarah Osellame, Joson Perreira, Kasia Quintal, Eric Sanders, Arnold Sano, Huong-Thy Ta, Andy Takahata, Mireya Talavera, Jynelle Tangonan, Christopher Thai, Carlo Tiano, Eric Tsuji, Brandon Tuzon, Kimberly Victorine, Kevin Wang, Andy Wong

Class of 2017
Sean Abreu, Trenton Aoki, Lena Asano, Robert Bautista, Megan Calderwood, Christopher Cao, Rhea Castro, Nicole Chin, Ronnijean Delenia, Christopher Diaz, Andy Diep, Nicholas Ferreira, Audrey Fung, Dann Hirayasu, David Khan, Shaun Lasky, Lauren Levine, Caleb Malinski, Sean Menda, Kevin Meno, Kelsea Mizusawa, Lauryn Mow, Loc Ngo, Phuc Nguyen, Kimberlee Roseman, Nadine So, Lillian Tran, Deandra Viluan, Hoa Vo, Brenda Yuen, Zi Zhang

Students Awarded Prestigious 2014 Chancellor’s Scholarship by UH Hilo

Twelve students from public and private high schools in Hawaiʻi have been awarded the prestigious 2014 Chancellor’s Scholarship by the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo.

UH Hilo Moniker

The award, valued in excess of $26,500, covers four years of tuition for students graduating from a Hawaiʻi high school who earned either a GPA of at least 3.5, a combined 1800 SAT (reading, writing, math) or a composite score of 27 on the ACT while demonstrating leadership and/or community service.

All Chancellor’s Scholars are required to enroll as full-time students and earn a minimum of 24 credits each academic year. They must also maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.25 and participate in leadership activities and/or community services with other Chancellor Scholars.

The 2014 Chancellor’s Scholarship recipients and their respective high schools include:

  • Adam Onishi, Waiakea High School
  • Casey Chow, Hawaii Academy of Arts and Sciences
  • Chrisovolandou Gronowski, Pahoa High School
  • Dustin Tacdol, Kamehameha High School-Maui
  • Jhoanne Domingo, Farrington High School
  • Melialani Agcaoili, Pahoa High School
  • Melissa Mizuguchi, Waiakea High School
  • Micah Carter, Kamehameha High School-Hawaiʻi
  • Noelle Lovesy, Kauai High School
  • Tori Nakagawa, Roosevelt High School
  • Vernon Warnock, Hilo High School
  • Zayin Minia, Waimea High School

2nd Annual Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp Information

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation invite Hawai‘i’s keiki basketball players to the 2nd Annual Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp that will be held July 21-24 in Hilo.

County of Hawaii

Open to boys and girls 9 to 17 years old, the Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp is named in honor of the legendary former University of Hawai‘i at Hilo basketball coach who helped guide the Vulcans-Hawai‘i Basketball School for 37 years. It will be held at the Afook-Chinen Civic Auditorium and the Pana‘ewa Covered Play Courts.

Teenage campers will receive personalized instruction from a team of coaches as they practice agility, ball-handling and other drills from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. daily. Then, the youth players will showcase their skills by competing in full-court games from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Campers age 9 to 12 years old will receive similar instruction from 9 a.m. until noon. Kids in this younger age group will play four-on-four games between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.

Early registration is $60 per child. The cost will rise to $70 for players registering after Monday,

July 14. All participants will receive a camp shirt and group photo.

Bill O’Rear, a former Vulcan star and UHH Hall of Fame inductee who coached at the Vulcans school for more than 30 years, is returning as lead clinician. Daphne Honma, Division II coach of the year following her first season at the helm of the Honoka‘a girls basketball program, also will assist.

UHH women’s head basketball coach David Kaneshiro and his staff has graciously agreed to share their basketball expertise during the four-day skill-development camp.

Registration forms are available during normal business hours at the Department’s Recreation Division Office located within Aunty Sally Kaleohano’s Lu‘au Hale at 799 Pi‘ilani Street in Hilo and online at: http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation. Checks should be made payable to the Director of Finance and include the note “Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp.”

Additional coaches are also welcomed. Those interested in volunteering are asked to contact Darrell Yamamoto, Recreation Specialist, at 938-2012, or dsyamamoto@co.hawaii.hi.us.

UH Hilo Students Awarded Hollings Scholarship

Two students from the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo majoring in Marine Science have been named to the Ernest F. Hollings Undergraduate Scholarship Program’s Class of 2014 by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Education.

UH Hilo Moniker

Katherine “Kate” Carroll and Emily Wallingford will both be juniors this fall. Carroll has concentrated her studies on marine debris and micro plastics, while Wallingford’s independent Marine Option Program (MOP) project has focused on shark ecology.

The Hollings Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides awards that include academic assistance (up to $8,000 per year) for two years beginning in September and running through May 2016, with a full-time summer internship position in 2015 ($650 per week) at a NOAA facility, subject to academic performance.

Carroll hopes to attend graduate school to earn a masters degree and possibly a Ph.D. She also plans to conduct research and is considering careers in teaching at a university or working in a conservation-related field.

“This is one of the best opportunities to happen to me,” Carroll said. “I plan to use this scholarship to gain research experience.”

Wallingford plans to use the scholarship to gain field experience with NOAA, career networking, and to narrow the area of marine science she’ll study in graduate school.

“Receiving this scholarship is very exciting,” Wallingford said. “I’m especially looking forward to the 10-week internship with NOAA, which will help me become a more experienced and knowledgeable marine scientist.”

Both students will attend a mandatory, one-week Orientation Program this month at NOAA Headquarters in Silver Spring, Maryland where they will meet the agency’s administrator, senior program managers, and scientists from NOAA’s organizations.

For more information about the Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship Program, visit http://www.oesd.noaa.gov/scholarships/hollings.html#page=program.

UH Hilo Announces Teaching Awards

Members of the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo faculty, including two from nursing, were presented special teaching awards at this year’s spring commencement held on May 17.

UH Hilo Moniker

“Teaching is one of the most significant components of any university,” said Chancellor Don Straney. “The awards presented to these faculty members are a recognition of outstanding accomplishments in teaching.”

Señora Monica Minnitt, instructor in Spanish, received the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. Minnitt’s nominators described her as “an extraordinary, exceptional, talented and gifted educator,” who manages to challenge her students academically and creates a creative and nurturing environment.

The Board of Regents Excellence in Teaching Award was presented to Alice Davis, associate professor of nursing. Her nominators describe Davis as someone who cares “professionally and personally” for her students, who is filled with passion for the field of nursing and always makes herself available for private tutoring.

Receiving the Frances Davis Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching was Lisa Tostenson, assistant professor of nursing. Described by her nominators as possessing a “passion for nursing,” Tostenson’s teaching incorporates humor and real-life situations to skillfully guide her students toward critical thinking assessments relative to the evidence-based nursing process.

Jacquelyn Pualani Johnson, professor of drama, received the 2014 Chancellor’s Certificate of Recognition. This award recognizes faculty and staff whose accomplishments and contributions exemplify the vision of UH Hilo to prepare students to thrive, compete, innovate and lead in their personal and professional lives.

“Jackie is a leading exemplar of what our faculty and staff do best,” Straney said. “She is a person of remarkable achievement—both on our campus and in the local community—with her teaching, research, and community outreach. Most importantly to the mission of UH Hilo, Jackie is an exceptional teacher, creating scholars and performers of her students, who go on to have successful careers of great impact on our communities, our island, and our State.”

UH Hilo Announces Ka Lama Ku Awardees

Several University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo students and a pair of student organizations have been awarded 2014 Ka Lama Ku Certificates of Leadership for their contributions to the University and the community.

UH Hilo Moniker

The presentations were made during the recent UH Hilo Campus Leadership Program with the Ka Lama Ku Certificate of Leadership awarded to students in the following leadership categories:

Alaka`i Certificate of Leadership:

• Kamalani Johnson

Kuleana Certificate of Leadership – Being Responsible and Accountable:

• Kealaka`i Matsumoto
• Keani K Santa-Isabel
• Marcy Martinez

Mālama Certificate of Leadership – Taking Care of Others:

• Tracy Ng
• Mary Ann Kalei Baricuatro

Laulima Certificate of Leadership – No Task is Too Big When Done by All:

• Kapuaonaona Roback

Certificate of Appreciation:

• Koa Rodrigues

Two student organizations were also recognized for their leadership contributions with a Ka Lama Ku Certificate of Leadership.

Mālama Certificate of Leadership:

• Hawaiʻi Island Pre-Vet Club. Students presented with the Mālama Certificate of Leadership were Alexandra Doi, Carrie Nakagawa, Diana Kitiona, Gema Cobian, Kealaka`i Matsumoto, Kerstyn Au, Krystal Yamamoto, Meilani Jose, Santana Soria and Suluama Faaiuaso.

Laulima Certificate of Leadership:

• The Minority Access & Achievement Program Peer Assistant Linkages and Support (MAAP – PALS) Program with Peer Assistant Students. Students members receiving the Laulima Certificate of Leadership were Amy Horn, Ashley Kennedy, Austin Awana, Katrease Torres, Kellie Miyazu, Lashauna Wilson, Lindsey Muranaka, Mariah Potts, Mark Bigler, Rose Ann Navalta, Saengthong Douangdara, Sarah Amber Wakana, Shaylyn Fujii, Sheryl Visitacion, Zachary Tman and Zion Apau.

The Ka Lama Ku Certificate of Leadership is sponsored by the Campus Center Student Leadership Development Program and the Campus Center Fee Board.

Parker Ranch and UH Hilo Presents “Happy”

Parker Ranch, in collaboration with the University of Hawaii at Hilo, produced a remake of the music video “Happy” by Pharrell Williams to showcase the uniqueness of Hilo and as a tribute to the university’s Spring 2014 graduating class.

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Neil “Dutch” Kuyper, President and CEO of Parker Ranch, was the keynote speaker at the Spring 2014 commencement. The overarching theme of his speech—happiness—is a reminder for all to live a life rooted in happiness because life is too precious to live otherwise.

A special mahalo to the wonderful people of Hilo for dancing with incredible enthusiasm and to the video crew—Brett Wagner of Wagnervision (Director), George Russell (Cameraman), Ashley Kierkiewicz of Hastings & Pleadwell (Executive Producer) and Shawn Pila of ENA Media Hawaii (Assistant Producer) for making production awesome.

The song used in this music video is “Happy” by Pharrell Williams—Courtesy of Universal Pictures & Columbia Records.