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UH Hilo Receives OHA Grant Funding

Na Pua No`eau- The Center for Gifted and Talented Native Hawaiian Children has announced that the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo has received funding from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) `Ahahui Grants program. The funds support UH Hilo’s strategic goal to strengthen its impact on the State of Hawai’i by working in partnership with other UH campuses to deliver joint program events or activities.

On February 23, 2017, Na Pua No`eau will present “E Ho`okama`aina” at the University of Hawaiʻi Maui College (UHMC). OHA awarded a total of $5,300 for this event, which will invite high school juniors and seniors to engage and learn about the various degree programs from faculty and program coordinators to inspire them to enter into higher education and further their career aspirations.

“Ma Uka a i Kai Akamai Engineers” will be held on April 3, 2017 at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mänoa. OHA awarded $1,950 to invite K-12 students and their `ohana to explore how the different types of engineering (mechanical, electric, civil, etc.) were applied during the days of their kupuna. The Native Hawaiian Science and Engineering Mentorship Program is a partner in the event, which will include games and work on projects that provide hands-on learning about the field of engineering.

`Ahahui Grants support community events that meet at least one primary strategic result. The events will address OHA’s Exceed Education Standards and UH’s Hawai’i Graduation Initiative (HGI). For more information, contact Nä Pua No`eau Director Kinohi Gomes at kinohi@hawaii.edu.

Hula to be Featured at UH Hilo Fall Commencement

Fall commencement at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo takes on a different look this year, reflecting the view of higher education through an indigenous lens promoted by the UH System’s Hawaiʻi Papa O Ke Ao initiative. The program will feature a student speaker, a hula presentation about learning and growth, and the awarding of degrees on Saturday, December 17 at 9 a.m. in Vulcan Gym.
uh-hilo-moniker
A total of 242 students have petitioned for 318 degrees and/or certificates from the colleges of Arts and Sciences (233), Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management (21), Business and Economics (30), Pharmacy (6) and Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language (7), while 21 others are candidates for various post-graduate honors.

Kyle James Davis, an agriculture major, will represent the graduating class as student speaker. Davis, who will receive a BS in tropical horticulture, has maintained a cumulative GPA of 3.48. His academic achievements include being named to the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management Dean’s List in 2013 and 2015. Davis also earned a Semester at Sea Scholarship and spent spring 2014 studying aboard the MV Explorer in nearly a dozen countries.

Davis is an ordained minister, who served five years in the US Army, including over two and a half years in Iraq as a combat medic. His commencement address will draw from his numerous life experiences and will include a call for his fellow graduates to broaden their horizons.

The chant- hula will be performed by UNUKUPUKUPU, Indigenous Leadership through Hula Program under the directorship of Pele Ka`io, Hawaiian Protocols Committee chairperson, and Dr. Taupōuri Tangarō, director of Hawaiian Culture and Protocols Engagement, at UH Hilo and Hawaiʻi Community College.

Organizers anticipate a dynamic performance, with at least 50 individuals representing UH Hilo, HawCC, and Waiākea High School. Gail Makuakāne-Lundin, interim executive assistant to Chancellor Donald Straney, director of Kīpuka Native Hawaiian Student Center, and a member of UNUKUPUKUPU, will introduce the chant-hula, entitled ʻUlei Pahu I Ta Motu, which was composed more than 200 years ago and documents the evolution of world view.

The chant-hula will be preceded and followed by the sounding of 20 pahu (drums) and 20 pū (conch-shell trumpets). The 20 pū will also sound honoring Moana-nui-ākea (large and broad oceans) that connect Hawaiʻi to the world. The performance concludes with the presentation of Paʻakai (sea-salt) to honor the profound intersection where the learner transitions to graduate.

Straney said fall commencement provides a unique opportunity to showcase the UH Hilo – Hawaiʻi Community College Papa O Ke Ao collaboration, which seeks to make the UH campuses leaders in indigenous education.

Seventy-Two Youths Participate in HI-PAL Youth Volleyball Clinic

Seventy-two youths participated in the HI-PAL Youth Volleyball Clinic held December 1 at the new Kaʻū District Gym in Pāhala. The free clinic was held in partnership with the UH-Hilo Vulcan Women’s Volleyball Team, County of Hawaiʻi Department of Parks and Recreation and the Hawaiʻi Police Department’s Community Policing Section-Hawaiʻi Isle Police Activities League (HI-PAL).

UH-Hilo Vulcan Coach Tino Reyes demonstrates ‘bump’ form.

UH-Hilo Vulcan Coach Tino Reyes demonstrates ‘bump’ form.

“We wanted to bring the Vulcan athletes out to Kaʻū to share their knowledge and skills with our keiki and are very fortunate to have this brand new, three-court facility that could hold such an event,” said Kaʻū Community Police Officer Blaine Morishita.

Participants learned skills and were able to talk story with the college athletes. Afterward, participants were treated to dinner, which was served by community volunteers, P&R staff and police officers.

For information on HI-PAL activities in West Hawaiʻi, you may contact the Kona Community Policing Section at 326-4646, extension 259, or your nearest police station.

TMT Hosts International Workshop For Future Science and Technology Leaders in Hilo

Astronomy and engineering graduate students from the TMT international partnership countries are gathering in Hilo for a future leaders workshop this week through Wednesday, December 7. The scientific/technical workshop with an emphasis on international collaboration focuses on project management and other professional skills with the intention of training TMT’s future leaders.

The Institute for Scientist & Engineer Educators has been training graduate students and postdocs, and has partnered with telescopes for more than 15 years. ISEE is located at the University of California Santa Cruz, which is the headquarters of UC Observatories and the center for the University of California’s participation in the TMT. ISSE is developing a new program for TMT, which will be designed to engage the full international partnership of TMT science and technology development.

The Institute for Scientist & Engineer Educators has been training graduate students and postdocs, and has partnered with telescopes for more than 15 years. ISEE is located at the University of California Santa Cruz, which is the headquarters of UC Observatories and the center for the University of California’s participation in the TMT. ISSE is developing a new program for TMT, which will be designed to engage the full international partnership of TMT science and technology development.

“TMT is hosting 40 graduate and post doctorate students from Hawaii, Japan, China, India, Canada, University of California and Caltech to help them gain valuable technical and project management skills while collaborating with TMT staff and Mauna Kea Observatory partners. This workshop is serving as a pilot for future sessions for the TMT international training program. What better place than on Hawaii Island, in Hilo and on what many call the best site in the world to view the heavens,” said Sandra Dawson, TMT’s Hawaii Community Affairs Manager.

Participants in the workshop are gaining knowledge about opportunities for future involvement with TMT, project management skills, leadership and teamwork experience through hands-on training activities and an opportunity to help design a potential future TMT international program.

Workshop activities include a Mauna Kea summit tour, visits and interaction with scientists and engineers from Subaru Telescope, Gemini Observatory, W. M. Keck Observatory and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Participants are working with TMT staff members focusing on project management, systems engineering, science instruments, software development, safety compliance and invasive species controls.

The graduate students are also learning the history of astronomy in Hawaii, and particularly on the summit of Mauna Kea, and an overview of the cultural significance of Mauna Kea.

Participating students are from Caltech, University of California Davis, University of California Santa Cruz, University of California Los Angeles, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, University of Science and Technology of China, Dunlap Institute University of Toronto,  NRC-Herzberg, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, University of Tokyo, University of British Columbia, University of California Riverside, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan /Sokendai, University of Victoria, University of California Irvine, National Tsing Hua University, Inter University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tohoku University and the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy.

The workshop is funded by the Thirty Meter Telescope and led by the Institute for Scientist and Engineer Educators (ISEE) at UC Santa Cruz.

For more information contact Austin Barnes at isee.austinbarnes@gmail.com or visit the website at http://isee-telescope-workforce.org.

Hilo Passport Acceptance Fairs

Thinking about applying for a U.S. Passport? Don’t put it off any longer!
hilo-passport-fairApply for your U.S. Passport at a special Saturday Passport Acceptance Fair at Hawai’i Community College on December 3, 2016; April 1, 2017; and May 20, 2017.

To request an appointment, email your name, phone number, and preferred appointment date and time to PassportFair@state.gov. Walk-in customers will be accommodated as time permits.

Senator Kaialiʻi Kahele to Chair the Senate Committee on Higher Education

Newly elected State Senator Kaiali‘i Kahele (Dist. 1 – Hilo), was selected to Chair the Senate Committee on Higher Education (HED) by Senate leadership earlier today. Sen. Kahele will fulfill the final two years of his late father’s term in the Senate representing the residents of Hilo after being elected to the seat on November 8, 2016.

senator-kai-kahele-profileSen. Kahele, a 1992 graduate of Hilo High School, pursued his higher education at Hawai‘i Community College, the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo and received his Bachelor of Science in Education from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa in 1998.

As Chair of HED, Sen. Kahele will oversee the formulation of legisation for the University of Hawai‘i System – including three baccalaureate universities, seven community colleges and four educational centers across Hawai‘i. In addition, his committee purvue includes the Senate confirmation of the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents.

Sen. Kahele will also serve as Vice Chair of the Senate Committee on Education (EDU) with Chair, Sen. Michelle N. Kidani.

“It is an honor and I am humbled to represent the residents of Senate District One in Hilo,” said Sen. Kahele. “I appreciate the trust and confidence the Senate Leadership has in me with these important committee assignments. I have a passion for education and providing quality, affordable education for all keiki, at all levels, across our State. Working together with Senator Kidani, I am looking forward to reshaping P-20 education throughout Hawai‘i and providing opportunities for our children to compete in the global arena as well as giving them the tools to shape the future of our Island home.”

UH Hilo Receives Smart Car Donation

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo is among three local nonprofit organizations on Hawaiʻi Island recently presented with Smart electric vehicles by the Hawaiian Electric Industries (HEI) Charitable Foundation and Hawaiʻi Electric Light Company. Vehicles and symbolic keys were also presented to the Boys & Girls Club of Hawaiʻi Island and HOPE Services Hawaiʻi.

At the Smart Car presentation. HELCo presented 3 smartcars to HOPE Services, UH-Hilo and Boys and Girls Club. — with Sen. Kaiali'i Kahele, Jerry Chang, Jennifer Zelko Schlueter and Sen. Russell Ruderman.  Photo Via Joy SanBuenaventura

At the Smart Car presentation HELCO presented 3 smart cars to HOPE Services, UH-Hilo and Boys and Girls Club. — with Sen. Kaiali’i Kahele, Jerry Chang, Jennifer Zelko Schlueter and Sen. Russell Ruderman. Photo Via Joy SanBuenaventura

The car is a lightly-used Smart for Two electric vehicle manufactured by Mercedes-Benz that is equipped with electric charging equipment. Smart electric vehicles have been rising in popularity in recent years due to their lower cost per mile than vehicles with a conventional gasoline-fueled engine, along with reduced carbon emissions and noise pollution levels.

“We are thankful and honored to have been selected as one of the recipients,” said University Relations Director Jerry Chang, who accepted the donation on behalf of UH Hilo during the November 17 presentation in Hilo. “This is another step in our goal of conservation and starting an Energy Science program at UH Hilo.”

The vehicle is presently located in the Auxiliary Services parking lot near the existing covered electrical outlet. Auxiliary Services Director Kolin Kettleson says the University’s goal is to use it when it’s practical, to increase UH Hilo’s visibility in the community.

“Because of the limited range and required charging times, this vehicle isn’t appropriate for the motor pool,” Kettleson said. “So we’re looking at assigning it to Administrative Affairs for the near future, to enable employees from the various divisions to use it for off-campus trips and meetings.”

UH Hilo was chosen as a recipient along with the UH Manoa, West O`ahu and Maui College campuses due to the integral role the University of Hawaiʻi plays in promoting Hawaiʻi’s goal to achieve a 100 percent clean, energy future.

PISCES Partners with UH Hilo and NASA for Simulated Human Mars Mission on Hawaii Island

The Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES) is partnering with the University of Hawaii at Hilo and NASA this month in a ground breaking research project to prepare for an eventual manned mission to Mars.

mars-simulationThe project, called BASALT (Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains), is focused on developing operation protocols for a joint human-robotic exploration of Mars in the search for extraterrestrial life. BASALT scientists and crew members are conducting simulated missions in two locations which closely resemble the Martian landscape at different areas: Mauna Ulu at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the Eastern Snake River Plain in Idaho.

Currently, the BASALT team is investigating Mauna Ulu by traversing the rugged lava terrain to collect rock samples for both biologic and geologic analysis.

“We add a twist to our scientific fieldwork by conducting it under simulated Mars mission constraints,” said Dr. Darlene Lim, geobiologist and principal investigator for the BASALT research project. “By doing so, we can evaluate operational concepts and a variety of supporting capabilities that range from software to hardware components with respect to their anticipated value for the human exploration of Mars.”

One of their constraints is a communication time delay to simulate the latency of transmissions experienced between planets. Dr. Lim and her team are hoping to develop a tricorder-like device, as envisioned in Star Trek, to be able to identify rock samples using a hand-held instrument.

The researchers hope to better understand the habitability of Mars by studying Mauna Ulu, which is a high-fidelity analog for the landscape of early Mars when volcanism and water were common.

“No one has really worked this out yet,” said John Hamilton, PISCES test logistics and education/public outreach manager. “We want to work out the kinks during these exercises so we have it together on a real mission. By the time they go to Mars, they’ll have a rock-solid plan.”

The BASALT team consists of scientists, engineers, mission operators and active astronauts. Roughly a dozen students from the University of Hawaii at Hilo are also assisting with the project. Hamilton, who is also a faculty member with the University of Hawaii at Hilo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, is serving on the BASALT Science Team, overseeing data collection, logistics, and student assignments. The research project is central to NASA’s Journey to Mars program.

“PISCES is honored to be working together with the University of Hawaii at Hilo and NASA Ames on this project,” said Rodrigo Romo, PISCES program manager. “Collaborative work with Ames has been in the frontline of applied research for PISCES recently. The fact that university students get the opportunity to participate in events like the BASALT project will help them meet the demands of a very competitive industry.”

PISCES was selected last year by NASA’s highly competitive PSTAR (Planetary Science and Technology Through Analog Research) program to participate in the four-year, $4.2 million BASALT project, which is being administered by the University of Hawaii at Hilo. The BASALT research team will be conducting their research on Hawaii Island until Nov. 18.

For more information visit PISCES’ website at www.pacificspacecenter.com.

Zappa-4-Ever Coming to UH Hilo

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Jazz Orchestra presents its 4th Annual Frank Zappa Tribute Concert Zappa-4-ever on Wednesday and Thursday, December 7 & 8, at 7:30 p.m. in the UH Hilo Performing Arts Center.

frank-zappaThis year marks the 50th anniversary of Zappa’s debut album Freak Out! In celebration, the concert will feature songs from Freak Out!, such as Hungry Freaks Daddy and Trouble Every Day. Musical Director Trever Veilleux describes Zappa as a brilliant social commentator and notes a song like Trouble Every Day with lyrical themes of racial violence, social injustice, and sensational journalism is just as relevant today as it was when it was released in 1966.

“Because 2016 has been so crazy we decided to include more of Zappa’s political songs in this year’s show,” Veilleux said. “The concert will also feature songs from the albums You Are What You Is, Bongo Fury, We’re Only In It For the Money, and more.”

The UH Hilo Jazz Orchestra includes over 25 singers and musicians with a large horn section blowing over a rock and roll rhythm section. To capture Zappa’s complex music, the orchestra began rehearsals for the show back in August.

“Zappa always had amazing musicians in his bands, and he would push them to their limits with very challenging compositions,” said Veilleux. “Our students have the difficult task of performing these compositions. They’ve worked incredibly hard throughout the semester to bring our audience a tight, professional-sounding show.”

Tickets are open seating priced at $10 General, $7 Discount, $5 seniors, students w/valid ID & children 17 and under. Advance ticket purchase is recommended. For more information, or to order tickets, contact the UH Hilo Performing Arts Center Box Office at 932-7490 or artscenter.uhh.hawaii.edu.

For disability accommodation, contact Dori Yamada at 932-7496 (V) or 933-3334 (TTY) at least 10 working days prior to the event.

Pahoa Bee Company Wins $25,000 in 2016 HIplan Competition

A Pahoa based bee company was awarded $25,000 today at the University of Hawaii Campus Center for their business plan they entered in the 2016 Hawaii Island Business Plan Competition.

Ono Queens LLC owned by Christopher and Wendy Klepps won the grand prize beating out 49 other Hawaii Island Business Plans.

Wendy and Christopher Klepps of Ono Queens LLC accept a check for $25,000.

Wendy and Christopher Klepps of Ono Queens LLC accept a check for $25,000.

49 original competitors were trimmed down to 8 finalists and today they presented 15-minute PowerPoint Presentations to judges Howard Dicus, Murray Clay, Jared Kushi and Chuck Erskine.

hiplan-judgesAfter the judges listened to the 15-minute power point presentations, there was a short break and then the companies followed up with a 2-minute “Elevator Pitch” to try and win the judges over.

The overall judging was weighed in their two presentations given today as well as their submitted 7-page written plans.

The Finalists were (in order of presentation):

  • Aloha Nui Family Practice
  • Big Island Wasabi, LLC
  • Dam Fine Farms
  • Easybotics
  • Hawai’i Ulu Producers Co-op
  • Hawaii Family Health
  • Ono Queens, LLC
  • The Spoon Shop, LLC

The third place runner up was Big Island Wasabi LLC:

Sara Phillips authored the business plan for Big Island Wasabi LLC

Sara Phillips authored the business plan for Big Island Wasabi LLC

The second place runner up was Hawaii Family Health:

Michelle Mitchell was the author of the Hawaii Family Health business plan.

Michelle Mitchell was the author of the Hawaii Family Health business plan.

After the winners were announced, there was a short reception held for the folks and sponsors that were in attendance.

Some of the sponsors mentioned were, Ulupono Initiative, University of Hawaii Hilo, Big Island Toyota, HTDC, DeLuz Chevrolet, Darren T. Kimura, HIGROWTH, NELHA, Hilo Brokers, Marine Genetics and the Hawaii Island Chamber of Commerce.  The Official Media Sponsor was Pacific Media Group.

UH Hilo Announces Night Photography Classes

The College of Continuing Education and Community Service (CCECS) at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo announces classes in night photography with award-winning landscape photographer Michelle Shuey. Sessions will be held on the main campus Friday & Saturday, November 11 & 12, from 5:30 – 9 p.m. at a location to be announced and will include a field trip. Tuition is $75 and includes transportation.

Kīlauea aglow from its summit crater is visible from Kulanaokuaiki Campground.  NPS Photo/Jacob W. Frank

Kīlauea aglow from its summit crater is visible from Kulanaokuaiki Campground. NPS Photo/Jacob W. Frank

Shuey, a member of the UH Hilo Geography and Environmental Science faculty, will teach participants how to manipulate a Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) camera to take captivating night photos. The classes will focus on basic camera techniques and settings used for long exposure photos, and taking photographs at various locations, with possible venues including Hilo town, Hilo Bay, Coconut Island, Mauna Kea, and the night-time glow from Halema`uma`u crater, weather permitting.

Students are responsible for providing their own DSLR or mirrorless camera, a remote shutter release, and tripod. To register and for more information, contact CCECS at 932-7830 or email ccecs@hawaii.edu.

Hawaii Recovers $130,367 in Prevailing Wages for Work Done on UH Hilo College of Hawaii Language Building

The Hawaii State Department of Labor & Industrial Relations (DLIR) today announced it has assessed Tradewind Plastering and Drywall, Inc. a total of $143,000. $130,367 is for wages owed to construction workers, with $13,037 added for penalties. Tradewind Plastering and Drywall, Inc. was a subcontractor of Jacobsen Construction Co., Inc. on the University of Hawaii at Hilo College of Hawaii Language Building construction project.

tradewind-drywallThe most costly of the violations was underpaying construction workers by misclassifying them as apprentices, and paying lower apprentice wages, with no registered apprenticeship in evidence. This was in violation of Hawaii’s prevailing wage law covering public works construction.

“Our State prevailing wage law intends that all construction contractors bid on a “level playing field” with regard to labor costs,” said DLIR Director Linda Chu Takayama. “Bids are to be won because of better, more efficient contracting methods, rather than by pushing down the standard of living for Hawaii’s workers.”

Director Takayama explained, “This is a different sort of misclassification from the case at the presumptive Holiday Inn Express at the Maile Sky Court. In that case, workers were wrongly misclassified as independent contractors, and protections and benefits required for employees were not provided. In this case, workers were classified as lower paid apprentices, but there was no registered apprenticeship. In both types of cases, law-abiding bidders face unfair competition, and the workers lose.”

DLIR also notes that it recently recovered wages for hair salon workers who were paid nothing for work performed. They were labelled as apprentices, and kept off-the-books for employment purposes. DLIR has been working with the Hawaii State Department of Commerce and Consumer affairs to educate salon owners and workers on the matter.

UH Hilo Accepting Applications for Marine Science and Conservation Project

Applications are currently being accepted for the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Project Maʻa. The year-round Mānowai o Hanakahi project, funded by the National Marine Fisheries Service, provides up to 15 students marine conservation and outreach training.

manowai-o-hanakahi-projectHawai’i Island middle and high school students currently attending grades 8-12 are eligible to apply for the free program. The application deadline is Friday, November 11, 2016.

Activities will include field trips, mentored research projects and career pathway exposure beginning in mid-November and running until mid-May. A kick-off tide pooling event will be held on Sunday, November 6, from noon – 3 p.m. at Onekahakaha Beach Park, where more can be learned about the project.

For more information, to apply, or to RSVP for the tide pooling kickoff, call 933-0707, email hperry@hawaii.edu or visit http://stem.uhh.hawaii.edu/manowai.php.

Butchering and Curing Meat Class Coming to Hilo

The College of Continuing Education and Community Service (CCECS) at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo offers a class in “The Art of Butchering and Curing Meat for Home Food Preservation” on Saturdays, November 19 and December 3, from 1 – 4 p.m. at The Kitchen, located at 615 Haihai Street in Hilo. Tuition is $80.

Porchetta

Porchetta

Chef Dean Shigeoka, co-founder of The Kitchen, will cover a wide range of topics, including meat dressing, salting, corning and aging. Shigeoka will also provide participants with an introduction to the craft of charcuterie as they make sausage and porchetta, corn their own beef, and taste samples. The instruction and hands-on experience will provide students with the basic skills needed to begin experimenting with home butchery and charcuterie.

For more information, disability accommodations, or to register, call CCECS at 932-7830 (V) or 932-7002 (TTY).

People’s Congress Tonight at UH Hilo

Leading non-profit and advocacy groups in Hawai‘i launched “The People’s Congress,” a new initiative to build a more just, fair and healthy future for Hawai`i. Working with organizations and individuals across the islands, this coalition seeks to end systemic barriers to justice with the launch of a “People’s Agenda” – a political and organizing strategy for lasting positive change in Hawaiʻi.

peoples-congressThe main launch event of The People’s Congress is a two-day statewide convention on December 2-4, 2016 in Honolulu, hosted by organizations and community leaders working across the islands on issues of social, economic, racial and environmental justice. Also, from October 19th – 27th, community forums will be held on each island to convene local leaders and gather input for the People’s Agenda.

Today, Thursday Oct. 27th, from 6pm-9pm in UCB 100 at UHH 200 W. Kawili St. Free parking on campus after 4pm. This event is free and will include some light pupus from local restaurants and farmers, feel free to bring something to share.

There will be food/refreshments at the event and free HAPA T-shirts for the first 15 people to sign-in.

The People’s Congress will provide an opportunity to engage in shared movement building and concrete action. More information is available at: https://www.facebook.com/PeoplesCongressHI. (Upcoming website address: www.PeoplesCongressHI.org)

People’s Congress Partner Organizations include Aikea Movement, Community Alliance on Prisons, Hawaiʻi Alliance for Progressive Action (HAPA), Hawaiʻi Appleseed Center for Law and Economic Justice, Hawaiʻi Center for Food Safety (HCFS), Hawai‘i People’s Fund, Hawai‘i SEED, Hawai‘i Teachers for Change Caucus, Hawai‘i’s Thousand Friends, Life of the Land, Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation (NHLC), Sierra Club of Hawai`i, the Aloha ‘Aina Project, and Unite Here! Local 5 Union and Global HOPE.

Why Now? Hawai‘i residents are facing fundamental challenges: historic wealth inequality and a high cost of living, lack of affordable housing, an education system in crisis, and the 6th highest rate of poverty in the United States. And Hawai‘i’s lands and waters are at increasing risk: local funding for environmental protection is dropping as the climate crisis worsens; streams are diverted even as we face drought. Because Hawai`i imports 80% of our food and much of our energy, we are vulnerable to high food and energy prices, shortages in basic necessities, and unstable job markets. Hawaiʻi’s residents need fundamental change. That is why The People’s Congress will convene concerned citizens throughout the islands to focus on positive solutions to these long-standing problems.

“Hawai‘i Appleseed is excited to be a part of the People’s Congress because of its potential to bring together a strong, unified voice to address the most pressing issues facing Hawai‘i,” said Gavin Thornton, Co-Executive Director of the Hawai‘i Appleseed Center for Law and Economic Justice. “So many of our residents struggle with high housing costs, low wages, inequitable tax burdens, and other widespread problems that threaten their ability to achieve economic stability and fulfill their potential.

The People’s Congress can help create a shared vision of a better Hawai‘i and raise the chorus for positive change.” Cade Watanabe, of Unite Here! Local 5 and Aikea Movement said, “We live in a Hawai`i that today provides less and less opportunity for Hawai‘i’s working families. The People’s Congress is an exciting opportunity for our members to connect, strategize and organize for a better Hawai‘i. It’s time for us to take back our community.” Tiare Lawrence, Project Coordinator for HAPA, and also a founder and community organizer for the Aloha `Āina Project, believes that the People’s Congress “will allow us the opportunity to build partnerships and help us help each other. I believe these partnerships will assist us in achieving our goals for a better Hawai‘i.”

Moses K.N. Haia, Executive Director for the Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation (NHLC) said, “The People’s Congress represents cooperative and collaborative work which seeks proactive change for the benefit of the entire community. For NHLC, this initiative provides a partnership opportunity that will greatly assist with identifying the issues important to members of the larger community as a means of engaging in a collective effort to align those interests with the best interests of the Hawaiian community.”

The head of the Hawai`i “Teachers for Change” Caucus, Mireille Ellsworth, makes clear “we want to establish connections with activists on other issues that also affect our students, members and the larger community. Without developing shared understanding of the need for crosscutting solidarity in action, we will always be easily isolated and defeated.”

Marti Townsend, Director of Sierra Club of Hawai‘i said, “People’s Congress provides a unique opportunity for us to work together with others of like-mind and mission. The Sierra Club’s mission is to protect both the natural and human environment. To achieve this mission we need a fair and open government committed to serving the interests of the people, not corporations. We need a system that respects and includes all of us equally. We need a community united in our collective best interest to overcome the oppression and fear that dictates so much of our decisionmaking today.”

“There are so many good people working on important issues, from protecting our natural resources for future generations, to issues of homelessness, wealth inequality, open government, education and equal rights,” said Anne Frederick, Executive Director of HAPA. “We believe that if we come together through the People’s Congress to identify the barriers we face in common and illuminate the root causes of injustice we all face, that we (and our work) can be more powerful and effective.”

Entertainment Business Careers with CBS and Hawaiʻi Five-0

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Career Center hosts CBS On-Tour at Mānoa with two presentations, Student of the Business, November 2, and A Conversation with Hawaiʻi Five-0, November 3. Both presentations will be held in the UH Mānoa Art Auditorium at 3:30 p.m.

hawaii-5-0CBS On Tour is a community outreach program where CBS executives visit universities and junior colleges to speak with students about career opportunities in the entertainment industry. The program was created in 2011 to expose students in largely diverse regions/institutions about the vast occupational options available in entertainment. CBS On Tour, specifically, brings students awareness to the often overlooked career opportunities at CBS, focusing on positions in front of and behind the camera. The goal of this initiative is to create a direct pipeline for diverse individuals from academia to the professional world, and diversify the networks and studios on an executive level.

The speakers for Student of the Business are Tiffany Smith-Anoaʻi, executive vice president of entertainment diversity, inclusion and communications, and Jeanne Mau, vice president of entertainment diversity.

In A Conversation with Hawaiʻi Five-0, participants can get an inside look at the process of how an episode gets made.

  • What is involved in hiring the cast and crew.
  • How the storytelling comes to life.
  • Telling diverse stories that reflect the people of Hawaiʻi.
  • Insight on how to break into the business.

Panelists include:

  • Peter M. Lenkov, executive producer
  • Brian Spicer, co-executive producer and director
  • Rachel Sutton, casting director (Hawaiʻi)
  • Tiffany Smith-Anoaʻi, executive vice president of entertainment diversity, inclusion and communications will moderate.

Sign ups for the workshops are available here:  A Conversation with Hawaiʻi Five-0.

UH Hilo Announces Gilman Scholarship Recipients

Four students at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo have been awarded the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship to study abroad:

  • Anayah Doi, a linguistics major, is studying at Hokkaido University in Japan
  • Sequoia Marks, a kinesiology and mathematics double major, is studying at Rikkyo University in Japan
  • Keith Nerida, a Japanese studies and computer science double major, is studying at Tokyo Gakugei University in Koganei, Japan
  • Marleena Sheffield, a linguistics major who is also working toward a Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) certificate, is studying at Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru in South America

benjamin-a-gilman-international-scholarshipThe Gilman scholarship program supports undergraduate students with high financial need and who are underrepresented in education abroad. This scholarship program provides the opportunity to better prepare U.S. students to assume significant roles in a globally interdependent world.

For further information, contact the Center for Global Education and Exchange at 932-7488 or email uhhglobe@hawaii.edu.

UH Hilo Appointment of Administrators

University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Matthew Platz announces the appointment of two deanship positions following the UH Board of Regents meeting held today on O`ahu. The positions take effect November 1, 2016.

uh-hilo-monikerDr. Bruce Mathews has been appointed permanent dean of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management. He previously served as acting dean from January – July 2012, then interim dean to present.

A 1986 graduate of UH Hilo, Mathews joined the University in 1993 as a Temporary Assistant Professor of Soils & Agronomy and became a tenure-track assistant professor two years later. His areas of research include plant nutrient cycling and soil fertility as affected by environmental conditions and crop management, assessment of the impact of agricultural and forestry production practices on soil, coastal wetlands, and surface waters, and the development of environmentally sound and economically viable nutrient management practices for pastures, forests, and field crops in the tropics.

He received an M.S. in agronomy from Louisiana State University and a Ph.D. in agronomy & soils from the University of Florida.

“As a graduate, faculty member and most recently interim dean, Bruce has unrivaled knowledge of this College, its mission, and its potential,” said Chancellor Don Straney. “I can think of no one else who better understands our responsibility to the community and the entire state of Hawaiʻi than Bruce Mathews.”

Dr. Drew Martin will serve as interim dean of the College of Business and Education. He joined UH Hilo in August 2004 and most recently served as professor of marketing. He has over 25 years of higher education teaching experience that spans three countries. Currently, he is also an affiliate faculty member of Daito Bunka University’s (Japan) Business Research Institute and the University of Hawaiʻi at Manoa’s Center for Japanese Studies.

Martin received a B.A. and an MBA in business administration from Pacific Lutheran University, and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Hawai’i at Manoa.

His intellectual contributions include extensive research on consumer behavior. He has published 65 research papers and book chapters.

“Drew is an intellectual heavyweight with an extensive professional background in business, government and academia,” Platz said. “His extensive research and publications have earned him international acclaim and numerous invitations to speak with emerging scholars on how to get their research published in leading academic journals.”

Farrah-Marie Gomes Appointed UH Hilo Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs

University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Chancellor Donald Straney today announced the appointment of Farrah-Marie Gomes as the University’s new permanent vice chancellor for student affairs following the UH Board of Regents meeting held today on O`ahu. The appointment is effective December 1, 2016.

uh-hilo-monikerGomes currently serves as interim associate vice president for student affairs for the UH System, a position she has held since April 1, 2016. Prior to that, she served as founding director of the North Hawaiʻi Education and Research Center since its inception in 2006, and from 2011-2016, also served as interim dean of the College of Continuing Education and Community Service. She is active in numerous university and community committees.

Gomes received her B.A. in psychology and sociology from UH Hilo in 1998, Masters in counseling psychology from Chaminade University in Honolulu in 2000, and a Ph.D. in educational studies with a specialization in educational leadership and higher education from the University of Nebraska in Lincoln in 2016.

“Farrah is a dynamic leader who has effectively served our students and community in numerous administrative roles,” Straney said. “She also possesses tremendous energy, vision and a special capacity to connect with various constituencies, which will help the Division of Student Affairs serve the needs of our students.”

Gomes succeeds Interim Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Gail Makuakane-Lundin, who returns to the position of Executive Assistant to the Chancellor.

“We all deeply appreciate the outstanding and tireless job Gail has done as interim vice chancellor for student affairs,” Straney said. “I now look forward to her putting those same unique skills and versatility to work again as a member of my executive team.”

Big Island, UH Hilo to Host PWC Cross Country Championships

When the University of Hawai`i Hilo hosts the Pacific West Conference Cross Country Championships this Saturday (Oct. 22), one thing is certain… the course will be unlike any other that the teams have run on this season, or maybe ever.

uhh-xcThe jungle trail at Kamehameha School Hawai`i will feature grass, gravel, mud and likely, standing water. There will be a mixture of hill and flat. There could be rain, and it will be warm and humid.

In other words, this is no walk in the park.

“It is a true cross country course,” said Vulcan head coach Jaime Guerpo. “Other than the Hawaii schools that were here for our meet early in the year, this will be a new experience for everyone else. It’s a fair course, and it is challenging, which in my mind is perfect for a championship meet.”

14 schools will make their way to Hilo and Keaau, flying in from Utah, northern California, southern California and Oahu. 14 men’s teams will compete in the 7:30 a.m. race, and 12 women’s squads (including UHH) will run at 8:30 a.m.

In both races, California Baptist University is the defending champion. In fact, the Lancers have won the last five championships on the men’s side, and the last two trophies in the women’s race. Individually, 2015 PacWest champion Eileen Stressling from Azusa Pacific is back. The junior is running strong again this season and was named the PacWest Runner of the Week earlier in the month after crossing the line as the top Division II finisher at the Stanford Invitational.

CBU is ranked 17th nationally this week in the men’s NCAA Division II poll, with Academy of Art at No. 24. On the women’s side, the Lancers are No. 8 in this week’s national listing, with Point Loma at No. 16.

Hawai`i Hilo hosted the very first PacWest Cross Country Championships in 2006, on their campus. The conference was much smaller back then, but now nearly 250 student-athletes will race and many more coaches, administrators, parents and fans will travel to the Big Island for the event.

“We are pleased to host this event for a number of reasons,” said Vulcan athletic director Patrick Guillen. “We are excited to show off the Big Island to our fellow PacWest universities and we look forward to putting on a quality event. At the same time, these championships bring in significant tourism dollars to Hilo and the surrounding communities, and we feel privileged to partner with local businesses to help make this a great experience for all involved.”

Dr. Tam Vu, Chair of the UHH Business Administration and Economics department, confirmed that teams visiting Hilo bring in significant dollars.

“Between airfare, rental vehicles, hotel rooms, restaurants and shopping, there will be significant spending,” said Vu, who along with
Dr. Eric Im compiled the long-run impact for this event. “That includes spending in Oahu and the Big Island. The number on the Big Island can be estimated at over a half million dollars ($556,100) including the leakage spending due to the larger number of Big Island residents shopping in Oahu in the future, and with Oahu as the base for Hawaiian Airlines, their number is close to $400,000 ($390,700). That brings you close to a million dollars ($946,800) in long term impact.”