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UH Researchers Discover New Fish – The Marianna Snailfish

The ocean’s deepest fish doesn’t look like it could survive in harsh conditions thousands of feet below the surface. Instead of giant teeth and a menacing frame, the fishes that roam the deepest parts of the ocean are small, translucent, bereft of scales — and highly adept at living where few other organisms can.

A specimen of the new species, Mariana snailfish. Credit: Mackenzie Gerringer, UW and UH.

Meet the deepest fish in the ocean, a new species named the Mariana snailfish by an international team of researchers, including scientists from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM) School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), that discovered it. The Mariana snailfish (Pseudoliparis swirei) thrives at depths of up to about 8,000 meters (26,200 feet) along the Mariana Trench near Guam. The team published a paper describing the new species this week in the journal Zootaxa.

“This is the deepest fish that’s been collected from the ocean floor, and we’re very excited to have an official name,” said lead author Mackenzie Gerringer, graduate student at SOEST at the time of this work and current postdoctoral researcher at the University of Washington’s Friday Harbor Laboratories. “They don’t look very robust or strong for living in such an extreme environment, but they are extremely successful.”

Snailfish are found at many different depths in marine waters around the world. In deep water, they cluster together in groups and feed on tiny crustaceans and shrimp using suction from their mouths to gulp prey. Very little is known about how these fish can live under intense water pressure; the pressure at those depths is similar to an elephant standing on your thumb.

This new species appears to dominate parts of the Mariana Trench, the deepest stretch of ocean in the world that is located in the western Pacific Ocean. During research trips in 2014 and 2017 aboard the Schmidt Ocean Institute’s R/V Falkor, scientists collected 37 specimens of the new species from depths of about 6,900 meters (22,600 feet) to 8,000 meters (26,200 feet) along the trench. DNA analysis and 3-D scanning to analyze skeletal and tissue structures helped researchers determine they had found a new species.

Since then, a research team from Japan has recorded footage of the fish swimming at depths of 8,178 meters (26,830 feet), the deepest sighting so far.

“Snailfishes have adapted to go deeper than other fish and can live in the deep trenches. Here they are free of predators, and the funnel shape of the trench means there’s much more food,” said co-author Thomas Linley of Newcastle University. “There are lots of invertebrate prey and the snailfish are the top predator. They are active and look very well-fed.”

A handful of researchers have explored the Mariana Trench, but very few comprehensive surveys of the trench and its inhabitants have been completed because of its depth and location, Gerringer explained. These research trips involved dropping traps with cameras down to the bottom of the trench. It can take four hours for a trap to sink to the bottom.

After waiting an additional 12 to 24 hours, the researchers sent an acoustic signal to the trap, which then released weights and rose to the surface with the help of flotation. That allowed scientists to catch fish specimens and take video footage of life at the bottom of the ocean.

“There are a lot of surprises waiting,” Gerringer said. “It’s amazing to see what lives there. We think of it as a harsh environment because it’s extreme for us, but there’s a whole group of organisms that are very happy down there.”

The Mariana snailfish’s location was its most distinguishing characteristic, but researchers also saw a number of differences in physiology and body structure that made it clear they had found a new species. With the help of a CT scanner at the UW’s Friday Harbor Labs, the researchers could look in close digital detail to study elements of the fish.

The authors, including SOEST oceanography faculty Jeffrey Drazen and Erica Goetze, acknowledge the broad collaboration needed for deep-sea science, particularly in this discovery, and decided the new fish’s scientific name should reflect that collaborative effort. The fish is named after a sailor, Herbert Swire, an officer on the HMS Challenger expedition in the late 1800s that first discovered the Mariana Trench, and in recognition of the critical role of crew members on board research vessels.

The research was funded by the National Science Foundation, Schmidt Ocean Institute and the Marine Alliance for Science and Technology for Scotland.

UH Hilo Announces New Director of Security

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo announced the appointment of a new director of campus security. Effective Nov. 6, 2017, Richard Murray will take over the position.

Murray brings to UH Hilo more than 16 years of experience in college security administration in Hawaiʻi. He is currently the safety and security manager at Honolulu Community College, where he is responsible for all safety, security and emergency preparedness programs in addition to supervising and providing in-service training for campus security officers and contracted security guards.

He held the same title and responsibilities at Windward Community College from January 2011 until he assumed the HCC post in July 2016, and previously served as associate director of security and safety at Hawaiʻi Pacific University beginning in October 2001.

UH Hilo Security is responsible for providing 24-7, year-round security for the campus, including routine patrol duties, parking and traffic enforcement, conducting investigations, responding to emergencies and alarms, communicating emergency notifications, as well as securing rooms and buildings.

Gabbard’s Clean Energy Act Gains Momentum in Congress

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard. Courtesy photo.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard’s Off Fossil Fuels for a Better Future Act (OFF Act) is gaining traction in Congress with eleven new House cosponsors since it was first introduced in September.

The act is based on Hawai‘i’s legislative mandate aiming for 100% clean energy and would put the U.S. on track to completely replace fossil fuels with clean energy sources by 2035.

The OFF Act builds on a growing number of state initiatives designed to address climate change head-on by focusing on clean energy alternatives.

“It’s long overdue for Congress to take action to address the threat of climate change to our people and our planet,” said Rep. Gabbard. “We must end our addiction to fossil fuels and transition America toward a clean, sustainable energy economy and prioritize our future. I urge my fellow lawmakers to join us in supporting the OFF Act to put our country on the path to a 100% clean energy economy.”

“Americans deserve a Congress that will step up and act to solve climate change,” Rep. Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) said. “We simply cannot afford to continue using taxpayer dollars to prop up the coal and oil industries. It is long past time to transition from dirty fossil fuels to clean renewable energy. Scientific experts across the world are in clear agreement that climate change is happening and we are quickly running out of time to do something. This bill would take the strong action needed to aggressively combat climate change and lay the groundwork for the 100 percent clean energy economy our country needs.”

“As recent monster storms and raging wildfires clearly demonstrate, our climate crisis is acute,” said Wenonah Hauter, executive director of Food & Water Watch. “Science shows that to keep a decent chance of avoiding deeper climate chaos, we must move off fossil fuels aggressively, and the transition needs to be complete by 2035. The OFF Act is the strongest, most comprehensive climate and energy legislation we’ve got, and we’re mobilizing across the country to make it the law of the land.”

Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard’s OFF Fossil Fuels for a Better Future Act, H.R. 3671 is currently supported by environmental advocates and co-sponsors including Reps. Jamie Raskin (MD-08), Barbara Lee (CA-13), Nanette Barragán (CA-44), Ted Lieu (CA-33), Jan Schakowsky (IL-09), Keith Ellison (MN-05), Jerrold Nadler (NY-10), Luis Gutierrez (IL-04), Eleanor Holmes Norton, (DC-AL), Rosa DeLauro (CT-03), Zoe Lofgren (CA-19), Grace Napolitano (CA-32), Bonnie Watson Coleman (NJ-12), Mark DeSaulnier (CA-11), and James McGovern (MA-02).

Adult and Keiki Printmaking Workshops

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Continuing Education and Community Service (CCECS) offers adult and keiki printmaking workshops on Saturday, November 18 on the Manono Campus, Building 389.

The “Manono” Building is considered to be located at Hawaii Community College.

Art for Keiki: Encaustic Monotype Printing is for ages 6-11, and will be held from 8:30 am-10 am. Cost is $45 and includes all required supplies.

Art for Everyone: Encaustic Monotype Printing is for ages 12 and up, and will be held from 10:30 am-12:30 pm. Cost is $55 and includes all required supplies.

Encaustic monotype printing is a fun and simple way to produce quick, colorful works of art with bees wax, damar crystals, and ground pigments. Participants will take home multiple prints and will mount a single piece on a wood panel as a completed work of art ready for display.

Instructor Kevin Diminyatz received a Masters of Fine Arts in Painting from Mills College and a Bachelors of Fine Arts in Printmaking and a minor in Art History from Sonoma State University.  He is currently a lecturer in the Art Departments at UH Hilo and Hawaiʻi Community College.

For more information and to register, contact CCECS at 932-7830 or visit http://hilo.hawaii.edu/ccecs/.

UH Hilo Ranks No. 2 for Top College/University in Hawai‘i

In a recent study published by WalletHub, the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa was ranked the top college and university in Hawai‘i followed by the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo and Chaminade University of Honolulu.

To help college-bound seniors choose the best schools within their states, WalletHub’s analysts compared nearly 1,000 higher-education institutions in the U.S. based on 26 key measures grouped into seven categories, such as Student Selectivity, Cost & Financing and Career Outcomes. The data set ranges from student-faculty ratio to graduation rate to post-attendance median salary.

The following is a closer look at some of the top schools and how each performed in certain metrics (1=best):

University of Hawaiʻi-Hilo

  • 1st – Admission Rate
  • 1st – Net Cost
  • 2nd – Student-Faculty Ratio
  • 3rd – On-Campus Crime
  • 3rd – Gender & Racial Diversity
  • 3rd – Graduation Rate
  • 3rd – Post-Attendance Median Salary

University of Hawaiʻi-Mānoa

  • 2nd – Admission Rate
  • 3rd – Net Cost
  • 2nd – Student-Faculty Ratio
  • 2nd – On-Campus Crime
  • 1st – Gender & Racial Diversity
  • 2nd – Graduation Rate
  • 1st – Post-Attendance Median Salary

Chaminade University of Honolulu

  • 3rd – Admission Rate
  • 2nd – Net Cost
  • 1st – Student-Faculty Ratio
  • 1st – On-Campus Crime
  • 2nd – Gender & Racial Diversity
  • 1st – Graduation Rate
  • 2nd – Post-Attendance Median Salary

Related Links
Best Colleges & Universities Overall
Best Colleges
Best Universities

MANA WAHINE Coming to UH Hilo Performing Arts Center

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Performing Arts Center (PAC) presents the Okareka Dance Company of New Zealand‘s all-female production MANA WAHINE, on Tuesday, October 24 at 7:30 p.m.

Their performance combines dance, theatre and film to tell the true life story of Te Aokapurangi, a young maiden from Rotorua. Captured in battle by a tribe from the far north, she returns many years later to single-handedly save her people from slaughter, as well as experiences within their own lives.

“MANA WAHINE is a vision of strength that empowers women around the world, and above all, a rich fusion of choreography, music, tikanga, Maori and performance practices, video projections, lighting and performance design . . . enriched and enlivened by the dancing of five powerhouse performers,” wrote Raewyn Whyte of Theatreview Magazine in New Zealand.

Tickets are reserved seating and priced at $25 General, $20 Discount and $12 UH Hilo/Hawaiʻi CC students (with a valid student ID) and children, up to age 17, pre-sale, and $30, $25 and $17 at the door. Tickets are available by calling the UH Hilo Box Office at 932-7490, Tuesday – Friday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., or ordering online at artscenter.uhh.hawaii.edu.

UH Hilo Interns Join Scientists on Marine Research Expedition

Two interns from the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Marine Option Program (MOP) have recently returned from a 25-day expedition to the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, where they took part in the 2017 Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (RAMP) cruise conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

School of bigeye trevally (Caranx sexfasciatus) and a NMFS PIFSC CRED diver conducting fish counts at Swains Island, American Samoa, as part of the Pacific Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (Pacific RAMP). NOAA photo by Ben Ruttenburg of NMFS SEFSC.

UH Hilo’s Roseanna (Rosie) Lee and Keelee Martin were joined by UH Mānoa MOP intern Colton Johnson aboard the Research Vessel Hi’ialakai on the journey to Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (PMNM), where they worked alongside regular NOAA divers as full members of survey crews, conducting Rapid Ecological Assessments (REAs) of reef fish, corals and non-coral invertebrates. Their work was guided by NOAA scientists and researchers from Papahānaumokuākea, the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research and UH Hilo.

The survey crews visited Lehua, French Frigate Shoals, Laysan Island, Lisianski Island, Pearl and Hermes Atoll, Midway Atoll and Kure Atoll within Papahānaumokuākea to conduct their various activities. The results of their research will help scientists gain a better understanding of the health of coral reef ecosystems throughout the archipelago.

Martin worked on the benthic (sea floor) team that counted, measured and assessed the health of the coral reefs, which are home to over 7,000 marine species. She said the experience made her a better diver, scientist and team player.

“This was a humbling and gratifying opportunity that allowed me to work in an area few people will ever see alongside acclaimed scientists mentoring me the whole way through,” Martin said.

Lee was assigned to the fish survey team, whose work included identifying, counting, and sizing fish for set intervals of time and taking photographs of their habitat. She is now a far more confident researcher and scientific diver.

“The kind of experience you get by jumping into the field and actually getting to do the same work as the established scientists you are working with is a learning experience you can’t get any other way,” Lee said.

Their work drew praise from the scientific leads on their respective teams, who both predicted amazing futures for the interns. REA fish team head Jason Leonard said Lee and Johnson “both performed at very high levels of professionalism and overcame obstacles.” Benthic team leader Stephen Matadobra said of Martin “her excitement and enthusiasm to be in the Monument and collect data gave the team a positive mood every morning.”

Martin, who graduated in May with a Bachelor of Science in Marine Science, a minor in English and a MOP certificate, wants to become a science writer. Lee, a senior, seeking a Bachelor of Science in Marine Science and a MOP certificate, is still considering her career path.

The UH Hilo internships are made possible through a memorandum of agreement (MOA) with the NOAA PMNM Division and are available to MOP students who complete the two-week field SCUBA diving course QUEST (Quantitative Underwater Ecological Surveying Techniques). The agreement provides funding to hire up to four students each year to work on the RAMP cruises. Lisa Parr, Instructor of Marine Science, MOP Site Coordinator at UH Hilo, and Principal Investigator on the MOA says the research opportunities the program provides to work with established scientists on important research prepares the students well for careers in marine science.

“Our partnership with NOAA provides an invaluable opportunity for our students, who consistently receive outstanding reviews for their performance on the cruises, and we’re extremely proud of how well they represent UH Hilo, the Marine Option Program, and QUEST,” Parr said.

Additional information on the RAMP cruises is available at
https://www.pifsc.noaa.gov/cred/pacific_ramp.php. For more information on the UH Hilo internships with NOAA email lparr@hawaii.edu.

Live Stream with Bernie Sanders at UH Hilo – Proposed Legislation to Make Tuition Free

Tomorrow, Tuesday October 10th, the University of Hawaii Hilo registered group Global Hope, will be showing a nation-wide streaming of Bernie Sanders proposed legislation to make public colleges and universities tuition free.

The presentation will be at 7:00pm at University of Hawaii Hilo in UCB 100.

Many in Hawaii support Bernie Sanders and will be interested in this proposal.

UH Statement on Coach Chris Naeole’s Departure

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa Football Offensive Line Coach Chris Naeole and the university have decided to part ways, UH Athletic Director David Matlin announced today.

Chris Naeole

“I want to thank Chris for his hard work and dedication to our football program,” said Head Coach Nick Rolovich. “He was critical in holding this program together in the transition from Coach Chow to myself. We wish him well in his future, and we will meet this challenge head on, because that is the Warrior way.”

Athletics Director Matlin says Naeole has had a tremendous impact on the program.
“Chris will be missed and he will always be a member of our Rainbow Warrior ʻohana,” said Matlin

Naeole spent the last four-plus years on the UH football staff, three under former head coach Norm Chow and the last one-plus under Rolovich. He also served as interim head coach after Chow’s departure.

Maunakea Speaker Series – The Growth and Evolution of Maunakea, a Geologic Story of Sibling Rivalry

The next scheduled program in the Maunakea Speaker Series will be held Tuesday, October 17th from 7 pm to 8 pm at UH Hilo Science & Technology Building (STB) Room # 108.

Is Maunakea volcano the tallest volcano in the world? Or is there another side of the story? Ken will unravel what we know about the growth and evolution of Maunakea volcano and its complicated relationship with its nearby siblings Kohala and Maunaloa.

Dr. Ken Hon is Professor of Geology and Interim Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo. Ken is an enthusiastic instructor of courses including Physical Geology, Volcanoes and Earthquakes, Geology of the Hawaiian Islands, Mineralogy, Petrology, Volcanology, and Remote Sensing; with his research focusing on these same topics.

The Maunakea Speaker Series is free and open to the public. On-campus parking is open and available without charge after 4:00 pm.

For more information, visit malamamaunakea.org or call 808-933-0734

UH Campuses – Graduation and Recruitment Continue to Improve as Overall Enrollment Declines

Enrollment at the University of Hawaiʻi’s 10 campuses dropped slightly in fall 2017 to 51,674 total students, a decrease of 1,746 students, or 3.3 percent compared to fall 2016.

UH West Oʻahu is up 4.9 percent to 3,082 students, continuing the trend that began in 2012 when the school moved to its Kapolei campus. UH West Oʻahu was recently recognized as the fastest growing public baccalaureate campus in the nation. Windward Community College enrollment remained unchanged, while the other eight campuses experienced varying declines.

The overall decline was no surprise, as UH continues to graduate more students on time while competing for students with a tight local labor market experiencing extraordinarily low unemployment. University leadership remains committed to reversing the enrollment declines through a proactive enrollment management program informed by statewide data and analysis.

“We need to continue our great work increasing timely graduation of students while building greater successes in our recruitment, retention and transfer programs,” said UH President David Lassner. “There are a number of positives in this fall’s data, but it is just a start.”

For the full story, including the fall enrollment numbers, go to UH News at: http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2017/10/03/graduation-recruitment-improves-as-enrollment-declines/

Class of 2021 to Recite Pharmacist Oath at UH Hilo White Coat Ceremony

Eighty-two student pharmacists will hear words of inspiration from the president of one of Hawaiʻi’s few remaining independent pharmacies at this year’s University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (DKICP) White Coat Ceremony on October 8 in the UH Hilo Performing Arts Center. The event, which takes place from 2-4 p.m., is open to the public.

Kimberly Mikami Svetin, the third president in the 82-year history of family-run Moloka`i Drugs, will be the keynote speaker. Svetin will give the student pharmacists her view of “how to get the most out of life.” She also plans to talk about how the pharmacy staff at Hawaiʻi’s oldest independent pharmacy focuses on the community and how that benefits their personal and professional lives.

The ceremony, where new student pharmacists recite the Oath of a Pharmacist, signifies a rite of passage for individuals entering their first year in the professional program. Students will be cloaked with a white coat symbolizing their student status and the values of the profession.

Three pharmacy residents who are continuing their training with DKICP faculty on Kaua`i and O`ahu, as well as a new Ph.D. student at DKICP, also will take part in the ceremony.

Ka Haka ʻUla O Ke`elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language will perform the mele ho`okipa, or welcoming chant, Ua Ao Hawaiʻi.

The students will also be addressed by UH Hilo Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai and DKICP Dean Carolyn Ma.

The event is sponsored exclusively by Walgreens. Erin Samura, Pharmacy Manager from Hilo, will speak on behalf of Walgreens.

Online Bachelor of Social Work Option Extends Education Opportunities Statewide

A new Distance Education (DE) Option for the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree delivered by the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa will launch in Fall 2018, providing increased accessibility for students statewide to pursue the degree.

Developed by the Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work in partnership with Outreach College, the online degree is designed for eligible students who have completed the General Education Core Requirements and BSW prerequisites.

Courses are offered in a five-week, asynchronous format that allows for flexibility and busy schedules. Students take the online courses sequentially as a cohort, and practice real world skills under the supervision of social work professionals in community agencies.

Students and community members are invited to attend informational sessions regarding the BSW-DE Option:

• Maui. UH Maui College, 9/20/17, 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Transfer and College Fair, Ka Lama Building. Also, 2 to 3 p.m.: Outreach College on Maui hosted session in HITS (for Moloka‘i, Lāna‘i, Hāna and Lahaina).

• Hawaiʻi Island. Hawaiʻi Community College Manono Campus (Hilo), 10/03/17, noon to 1 p.m., Building 379A, Room 6B. Hawai‘i Community College – Palamanui (Kona)10/03/17, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., Koali 101.

• Kauaʻi. Kaua‘i Community College, 10/06/17, noon to 1 p.m., Learning Resource Center, LRC-124B.

For more information, contact the Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work at (808) 956-9470 or by email sent to sswde@hawaii.edu.

For more information, visit: www.hawaii.edu/sswork/

Pahoa High Alumna Awarded Audrey S. Furukawa (ASF) Study Abroad Scholarship

Chrisovolandou Gronowski, a senior psychology major and chemistry minor at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, has been awarded the Audrey S. Furukawa (ASF) Study Abroad Scholarship in the amount of $1,000 for the fall 2017 semester.
Gronowski, a Pahoa High and Intermediate School alumna who carries a cumulative 3.96 grade point average, is currently attending Anglo-American University in the Czech Republic.

The ASF Study Abroad Scholarship was created to provide a UH Hilo student with the opportunity to study abroad and begin their global education journey. The recipient must have at least a 3.2 GPA with preference given to Hawaiʻi high school graduates.

To help support future students from Hawaiʻi to study abroad, or to learn more about the study abroad program, call UH Hilo’s Center for Global Education and Exchange at 932-7489 or visit www.hilo.hawaii.edu/studyabroad/.

Call for Nominations for the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents

The Candidate Advisory Council (CAC) of the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents has initiated the recruitment process for four (4) seats on the Board of Regents.

Nominations are now being accepted for one (1) At Large seat; one (1) Hawaiʻi County seat; and one (1) Maui County seat for five-year terms.  Nominations are also being accepted for one (1) Student seat for a two-year term.  All terms begin July 1, 2018.

Candidates for the Hawaiʻi County and Maui County seats must reside in the geographic area that they represent.  Candidates for the Student seat must be a University of Hawaiʻi student.

Application materials, procedures and descriptions of regent responsibilities are available online at www.hawaii.edu/rcac.  This information may also be requested by calling (808) 692-1218 or by email at borapp@hawaii.edu.

Completed applications must be received by CAC or postmarked by 11:59pm on Friday, October 13, 2017.

Members of the UH Board of Regents as well as the Candidate Advisory Council, who represent various constituent groups, serve voluntarily and are not paid.

UH Shines in 2018 U.S. News and World Report Rankings

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, UH West Oʻahu and UH Hilo once again made the U.S. News and World Report’s Best Colleges Rankings, along with UH Mānoa Shidler College of Business. The 2018 U.S. News and World Report rankings were released on September 12.

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa moved up 10 spots to 159 on the 2018 U.S. News and World Report’s Best Colleges Rankings. UH Manoa is also ranked 6 in Best Ethnic Diversity (National Universities), 83 in Top Public Schools, and 177 in High School Counselor Rankings.

“We continue to be gratified by the upward movement in recent academic and research rankings, both on national and international levels,” said Michael Bruno, UH Mānoa interim vice chancellor for academic affairs and vice chancellor for research. “They show that our faculty and staff are working hard, and working together, to give students the best and most accessible higher education experience.”

The announcement of UH Mānoa’s upward mobility on the U.S. News and World Report ranking follows the 2018 Times Higher Education World University Rankings that rated UH Mānoa 63 in the U.S., up from 69 last year—representing its best showing ever in the Times ranking.

UH West Oʻahu ranked 25 among Best Regional Colleges (West), placing it in the top 38 percent of schools in their respective category.

“The faculty, staff and students are thrilled to be recognized as it is an affirmation of the great work we do to prepare 21st Century leaders—career creators who are making a positive difference in our communities!” said UH West Oʻahu Maenette K. P. Ah Nee-Benham.

UH Hilo ranked 66 among Best Regional Universities West, placing it in the top 47 percent in their respective categorory.

“We are very pleased to see UH Hilo recognized for its excellence in providing a quality educational experience,” said UH Hilo Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai. “This ranking is a testament to the work of our faculty and staff, who are deeply committed to providing our students with the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed when they graduate and enter their chosen professions.”

The U.S. News and World Report rankings surveyed 1,600 colleges among more than 3,000 four-year institutions throughout the U.S. Its methodology considers, among various factors, endowment size, rate of alumni giving and student-to-faculty ratio, which tend to favor private institutions.

U.S. News and World Report profiles:
UH Mānoa
UH West Oʻahu
UH Hilo

Finalists Announced for Dean of the College of Education at UH Mānoa

Three finalists have been identified for the position of Dean of the College of Education (COE).  The three finalists are scheduled to participate over a two day period of visits on the Mānoa campus.  The visits include department discussions; meetings with senior administrators, faculty, staff, students, and internal and external constituents; and a public presentation.

Campus and community members, as well as the general public, are encouraged to attend.

The campus visits of the three candidates have been scheduled as follows:

Dr. Michael Sampson

Dr. Michael Sampson, visiting September 21-22, 2017
Dean and Professor
School of Education
St. John’s University
Public Presentation:  Friday, September 22, 3:00-4:15 p.m./Art Building Auditorium 132

Dr. Nathan Murata

Dr. Nathan Murata, visiting September 28-29, 2017
Professor and Department and Graduate Chair
Department of Kinesiology
College of Education
University of Hawaii at Manoa
Public Presentation:  Friday, September 29, 3:00-4:15 p.m./Art Building Auditorium 132

Dr. DeLacy Ganley

Dr. DeLacy Ganley, visiting October 2-3, 2017
Professor and Director
Department of Teacher Education, School of Educational Studies
Claremont Graduate University
Public Presentation:  Tuesday, October 3, 3:00-4:15 p.m./Bilger Building Auditorium 150

“We were fortunate to have received a highly qualified pool of candidates.  The Search Advisory Committee did a terrific job in identifying these three finalists and I would like to thank them for their outstanding effort and commitment to the search,” said Interim Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Vice Chancellor for Research Michael Bruno.  “As always, we encourage UH faculty, staff, students and the public to come out and meet the candidates, and we look forward to receiving their input to assist in hiring the best person for the position.”

For more information about the search process, including a list of the members of the search advisory committee, the campus visit daily schedule and the candidate biographies, see the search website at http://www.manoa.hawaii.edu/executivesearch/educ.

For more information about the College of Education, please visit https://coe.hawaii.edu/.

UH Mānoa Moves Up in Prestigious Ranking

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa has received more global recognition of its academic and research excellence in an international ranking released on September 5.

The 2018 Times Higher Education World University Rankings rated UH Mānoa number 63 in the nation, up from 69 last year—representing its best showing ever in the Times ranking. According to the U.S. Department of Education, there are more than 3,000 four-year universities in the nation.

“This upward movement on the Times ranking is a bright note recognizing the hard work and continued dedication of our faculty, who teach students and lead research efforts that make an impact on a global level,” said Michael Bruno, UH Mānoa interim vice chancellor for academic affairs and vice chancellor for research.

The Times rankings are the only global university league tables to judge research-intensive universities across all of their core missions—teaching, research, knowledge transfer and international outlook.

UH Mānoa also ranks among the top 100 U.S. universities in other international rankings, including number 71 in the Academic Ranking of World Universities, based at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China, and number 69 in the United Kingdom-based QS World University Ranking.

For more information on rankings, see the Mānoa Institutional Research Office website.

UH Hilo Student Participates in International Human Rights Summit

A University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo senior from Timor-Leste (formerly East Timor) represented her country as a youth delegate at the 14th Annual International Human Rights Summit, held recently at United Nations (UN) Headquarters in New York City.

Josefina Pereira (right) seated with fellow delegates at the UN Trusteeship Council Chamber Room.

Josefina Pereira, who is majoring in administration of justice and political science, was one of 52 delegates selected for the summit, which teaches youth about human rights, specifically the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and inspires them to become advocates for tolerance and peace.

“It was an honor to represent Timor- Leste and UH Hilo as a delegate, and to learn more about important human rights issues from true human rights champions and activists from around the world,” Pereira said.

Pereira is a recipient of a United States Timor-Leste Scholarship funded by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs administered by the East-West Center. Her attendance at the summit was sponsored through a merit-based scholarship from Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI) and with financial assistance from the UH Hilo Office of International Student Services program.

“We were thrilled to have Josefina represent her country and UH Hilo at this important event,” said Jim Mellon, director of International Student Services at UH Hilo. “It is a testament to her dedication to human rights and to UH Hilo’s engagement with the global community.”

The summit brought together officials and advocates who work for equality and justice through human rights education, including ambassadors and other representatives of permanent missions to the UN. During the session, keynote speakers, youth delegates and ambassadors and observers from more than 45 countries were invited to share their thoughts and feelings on human rights issues in their home countries. Pereira addressed children’s rights in her homeland, with a focus on mitigating and eventually ending child abuse.

“This is an issue of great concern to me,” Pereira said. “I appreciate the opportunity the summit provided me to share my thoughts on this topic with an international audience.”

Participants also attended panel presentations on key human rights issues, including human trafficking, that featured leaders of the international effort to prevent human trafficking and a survivor who shared her own personal story. They later heard from noted human rights activists, including author and social entrepreneur Bryant McGill, Reach the World Director of Partnerships Christopher Ahearn, and radio and TV host Kerri Kassem. Pereira said she was deeply inspired by her experience and hopes to return.

“I feel I gained a lot from my experience, but have more to learn. So I would like to return next year as a youth ambassador,” Pereira said. “2018 will also be a very special year as the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights celebrates its 70th anniversary and YHRI marks its 15th anniversary. ”

UH Manoa Volcanologists Receive International Recognition

Two volcanologists from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Department of Geology and Geophysics have received two of the top three awards from the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI). Bruce Houghton, the Gordon A. MacDonald Professor of Volcanology and Science Director of the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center at UHM, was honored recently with the IAVCEI Thorarinsson Medal. Sébastien Biass, a post-doctoral researcher at the UHM School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology Department of Geology and Geophysics, was honored with the George Walker Medal.

Houghton’s Thorarinsson Medal

The Thorarinsson Medal is awarded only once every four years by the IAVCEI for outstanding contributions to volcanology, and is the highest award in international volcanology.

“A giant of volcanology, Bruce has tackled ‘big’ problems in geology with innovative approaches and technologies, and is truly a scientist of outstanding distinction,” stated University of Tasmania’s Rebecca Carey in her nomination letter. “His research has not only generated a wealth of new scientific understanding, but also critically Thorarinsson-type pioneering advances in long-standing cornerstone volcanologic concepts.”

Bruce Houghton Near Ruapehu, New Zealand

Further, Houghton has pioneered research across the interface of fundamental volcanological science and hazards, social and behavioral science, leading to a world-first detailed training course for scientists, first responders and emergency managers, titled the U.S. FEMA Volcanic Crisis Awareness course.

Houghton and his predecessor at UHM, George Walker, are among the only 9 volcanologists to date given the Thorarinsson award, which is named for noted Icelandic geologist and volcanologist Sigurdur Thorarinsson.

Houghton reflected on becoming a Thorarinsson Medalist: “I was delighted and surprised by the award. All my research is collaborative and, since moving to UH, 70% of my papers have been first-authored by my students or postdocs, and these are not the type of statistics that usually lead to such awards. I was particularly pleased because all three of my mentors in volcanology are on the list of eight prior winners of the medal; it is quite humbling to be joining them. For UH to have been awarded two of the nine Thorarinsson Medal to date is, I think, a sign that volcanology is in excellent health here in Hawaiʻi. The challenge now is to find ways to build on this reputation and capture for UH some of the wonderful crop of young volcanologists on the market.”

Biass’s George Walker Award 

The George Walker Award is given every two years to a young scientist up to seven years after acquiring a doctoral degree. The award recognizes achievements of a recent outstanding graduate in the fields of research encompassed by IAVCEI.

Sebastien Biass

Sébastien Biass, post-doctoral researcher working with Houghton at UHM, was honored for “achievements that are all deeply rooted in field studies and because of his unique appreciation with the importance of statistical and critical treatment of field data within the growing field of numerical modelling,” cited Professor Costanza Bonadonna of the University of Geneva. “His unique approach stems from combining thorough field studies with state-of-the-art numerical modeling, furthering both deposit characterization and the newly born discipline of hazard and risk assessment that he is pioneering. What makes Sébastien unique in his science is his open mind and multidisciplinary approach, his scientific curiosity and enthusiasm, and his dedication to going beyond his own limits.”

Sebastien Biass in the Field

Biass commented, “My vision of the IAVCEI George Walker Award for early career scientist is closely tied to my vision of scientific research, which contains three components. First, scientific curiosity is one of the greatest source of pleasure in life and provides the motivation to attempt understanding the unknown. Second, luck, that is in the selection of work colleagues, has been an integral part of my research. Specifically, Costanza Bonadonna and Bruce Houghton, both part of the UH family in either past or present, have shown me how working on interesting science with bright people is an invaluable source of satisfaction. Thirdly, I see research as having a global objective of the well-being of society, which in volcanology translates to a better understanding of the physics of hazardous processes occurring during eruptions in order to mitigate better the impacts on exposed communities. This award therefore represents a success on these three levels and belongs as much to everyone I have ever looked up to as it does to me. Having been picked amongst a long list of such successful young scientists humbles me and gives great motivation to pursue my scientific career.”

The award honors the memory of former UHM Geology Professor George Walker, whose discoveries pioneered a modern quantitative approach to physical volcanology and greatly accelerated understanding of volcanic processes.

For more information, visit: https://www.soest.hawaii.edu