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UH Announces Finalists for Dean of the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources

Three finalists have been identified for the position of dean of the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) and director for Research and Cooperative Extension. The three finalists are scheduled to participate over a three-day period of visits on the Mānoa campus and the island of Hawaiʻi. The visits include department discussions; meetings with senior administrators, faculty, staff, students and internal and external constituents; and a public presentation.

Nicholas Comerford, William Randle and Alan Sams

Campus and community members, as well as the general public, are encouraged to attend.

Campus visit schedule:

Nicholas Comerford, January 30–February 1

William Randle, February 6–8

Alan Sams, February 13–15

“We were fortunate to have received a strong pool of qualified candidates. I would like to thank the search advisory committee for their outstanding work in identifying these three finalists from the pool, and for their efforts and commitment to the search,” said Interim Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Vice Chancellor for Research Michael Bruno. “As always, we encourage UH faculty, staff, students and the public to come out and meet the candidates, and we look forward to receiving their input to assist in hiring the best person for the position.”

For more information about the search process, including a list of the members of the search advisory committee, the campus visit daily schedule and the candidate biographies, see the search website.

Film Festival Health Documentary to be Shown at UH Hilo

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo hosts a public screening of the documentary film “Ola–Health is Everything” on Thursday, January 26, at 5 p.m. in Wentworth Hall Room 1.
The documentary, which premiered at the Hawaiʻi International Film Festival in April 2013, highlights the power of communities to heal themselves, explores how society must rethink what it means to be healthy, and features individuals who bring hope to communities across Hawaiʻi. A Question & Answer discussion with Director Matthew Nagato will follow the screening.

“This film is so important and valuable because it highlights some of the protective factors present in our communities and relevant ways to foster health and healing,” said Dr. Yolisa Duley, East Hawaiʻi Suicide Prevention Task Force Chair and co-chair of UH Hiloʻs Suicide Prevention Committee. “Sadly, suicide is a leading cause of death in our state, and messages of hope such as those portrayed in ‘Ola’ can help people identify ways to reach out and seek support and a pathway to healing.”

The presentation is co-sponsored by the East Hawaiʻi Suicide Prevention Task Force, UH Hilo Student Health & Wellness Programs, and the UH Hilo Nā Kiaʻi O Ke Ola (Guardians of Life) Suicide Prevention Committee.

For more information about the event, email yolisaduley@hawaii.edu or call 932-7848.

UH Researcher: “Marijuana Compounds Show Promise in Treatment of Cardiac Disease”

A Nevada company is hoping to develop new medicines for heart failure using compounds in marijuana and a novel therapy identified by a University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa researcher.

Dr. Alexander Stokes in his JABSOM laboratory.

Dr. Alexander Stokes, assistant research professor in the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology at the UH John A. Burns School of Medicine, obtained a U.S. patent for his novel therapy in 2015.  The patent claims the cannabinoid receptor TRPV1 can be regulated therapeutically by plant-based cannabinoids.

Cannabinoids include psychoactive and non-psychoactive compounds derived from marijuana, both of which have medicinal properties. They exert their effects inside cells after binding to receptor proteins in the cell membranes, such as TRPV1 and the classical cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2.

Pharmaceutical development company GrowBlox Life Sciences LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of GB Sciences Inc., obtained the license for Stokes’ intellectual therapy last December from Makai Biotechnology LLC, a Hawaiʻi-based cardiovascular therapy company founded by Stokes.

“Cardiovascular disease is the leading global cause of death, accounting for more than 17.3 million deaths per year, a number that is expected to grow to more than 23.6 million by 2030,” said Dr. Stokes. In the U.S, he explained, this equates to one in three deaths, about one every 40 seconds, and costs the country approximately $316.6 billion a year.

Patients urgently need new drugs that can prevent or reverse the stages of cardiac disease and heart failure, according to Dr. Stokes. He further explained that TRPV1 is clearly a major cellular receptor involved in the progression to heart failure, and there is great potential for the new, proprietary mixtures within the GB Life Sciences portfolio to regulate the TRPV1 cannabinoid receptor.

GB Sciences said licensing the TRPV1 patent is a major step in its commitment to discovering new drugs that interact with the non-classical cannabinoid receptors, in addition to binding to the better characterized CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors.

“Our vision of novel, patentable cannabis-based formulations in the treatment of major diseases is now married with a proven drug target for modulation of adverse outcomes in cardiovascular disease,” said Dr. Andrea Small-Howard, Chief Science Officer of GB Sciences.

Cannabinoids in native plant extracts exerted a more significant effect on TRPV1 receptors than purified cannabinoids in published research reports.

“GB Sciences believes its cannabis-plant-based approach may provide additional clinical benefits to patients due to the ‘entourage effect.’ In addition, the side effect profiles of cannabis-based therapies have generally been well tolerated,” said Dr. Small-Howard. The “entourage effect” refers to the theory that some cannabis compounds have greater effects on the human body when combined with other compounds than when given alone.

Said GB Sciences CEO John Poss, “This license is an important step in our company’s march to successful drug discovery.  We are very proud of Dr. Small-Howard and her team, and we expect results from this effort that will enable the company to do well by doing good for literally millions of cardiac patients around the world.”

UH Hilo College of Arts and Sciences’ Fall 2016 Dean’s List

The following students in the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Arts and Sciences received Dean’s List recognition for the Fall 2016 semester:

Shannon Abarra, Jozie Acasio, Kendra Adams, Madeleine Adler, Hildhang Adona, Clifford Agcaoili, Reygan Agcaoili, Keinan Agonias, Sherry Agonoy, Princess Agtang, Breanna Aguiar, Rhonda Akano, Leahi Akao, Eric Alabanza, Jeannelle Alejo, Alia Alvarez, Catherina Amantiad, Austin Anderson, Brian Anderson, Keion Anderson,

Kinsley Anderson, Li Ju Anderson, Harrison Andina, Nicole Antonio, Kamalani Aona, Zion Apao, Shannon Apostol, Ralph Aquino, Kathleen Aragon, David Arakawa, Justin Araki-Kwee, Jodi Ariyoshi, Keanu Arke, Kapuanani Arsiga, Nicholas Asuncion, Toshonnie Baker, Sharlene Bala, Kayla Balezentis, Valerie Balken, Kellsie Ballesteros,

Jill Banach, Kaitlin Barcoma, William Barden, Ashley Barhite, Benedick Baris, Ruth Bascar-Sellars, Joshua Bass, Daniel Baumgartner, Natalie Baus, Crystal-lynn Baysa, Anya Benavides, Chase Benbow, Cynthia Benevides, Chakra Best, Jahnu Best, Marjorie Betiong, Daniel Bilafer, Kateleen C. Bio, Victoria Birrenbach,

Kalaiakea Blakemore, Casey Blanchette, Chloe’ Blandino, Chelsea Blaquera, Sierra Bloomer, Hannah Blue, Marcia B. Blyth, Thomas Bolton, Stephen Bond, Jonathan Botticelli, Andre Brouillette, BreAnna Brown, Eleanor Brown, Laurel Brown, Matthew Brown, Rachel Bruck, Kathryn Brunk, Kailah Buchanan, Amberly Buer, Malia Byram, Ridge Cabaccang, Sydney Cabanas, Cheyrub Cabarloc, Riley Cabarloc,

Jerold A. Cabel, Leischene Calingangan, Chriztalee Calpito, Litah Campbell, Amanda Canda, Kirsten Cannoles, Terra Carden, Sheila M. Cariaga, Sheryl L. Cariaga, Tiari Carreira, Nicholas Carrion, Anne Carsey, Briauna Carter, Micah Carter, Kanoeuluwehianu Case, Gisele Cassarotti Prescott, Keenan Castro, Kahana Cazimero, Isabella Cebreros, Roget Chan, Andy Chang, Cheuk W. Chiu, Soo B. Choi,

Pono Christianson, Victor Ciaramitaro, Jessica M. Clark, Lautisha Cleavenger, Heather Coad, Ramzen Coakley, Zoe Coffman, Michael Coombs, Alysha Cosier, Clarence Cottrell, Celeste Cox, Seneca Cox, Rose Criscione, Tifaine Crivello, Trixie A. Croad, Callie Crowder, Kawelina Cruz, Ryan Cruz, Justin Cueva, Kendrick J. Dalmacio,

Uilani Dasalla, Stephanie Dawrs, DaShon Dean, Laura Deaton, Kaylee Decambra, Edwina Degrood, Marissa Dellomo, Audrey Deluca, Carey Demapan, Billi Derleth, Amy DeSa, Maluhia Desha, Leialii Dias, Stephi Dickinson, Savannah Directo, Danielle Dodge, Amelia Dolgin, Lorelei M. Domingo, Princess D. Domingo, Jasmine Donner, Sadie Dossett, Cortney Dougherty, Michael Dowsett, James Drescher,

Jordan Drewer, Jayahmie Drio, Alejandra Duarte, Jennifer Eastin, Caili Ebaniz, Raelyn Eckert, Jamie Economy, Michael Elder Waters, Meghan Elimon, Sara Ellsworth, Kenji Emerson, Remedios Epp, Tiffany Erickson, Chelsey Erickson-Vierra, Brianna Ernst, Duke Escobar, Corey Eshpeter, Raynell Espaniola, Herbert Estes, Rakeem Estrella-Clark, Meridith Farley, Jade Farmer, Sheilla M. Felipe,

Rachel A. Felix, David Finley, Amy Fischer, Rachel Fisher, Catrina Flores, Kirstie A. Flores-Oishi, Lindy Foust, Megan A. Francisco, Jeena Franco, Ella R. Fregeau-Olmstead, Dallas Freitas, Silmai U. Fritz, Esther Frost, Todd Frost, Brittany Fuemmeler, Shaylyn Fujii, Trent Furuta, Dylan Gable, Dillon-Jon Gabriel, Nicholas Galliani, Kelly Gani, April Gaoiran, Princess Gaoiran, Lehua Garcia, Nicole Garcia, Reyna Garcia Lopez, Madison Gates, Stacy M. Gelacio,

Emma-Lei Gerrish, Tuan G. Giang, Cody Gibo, Kawika Glimane, Kahri Golden, Kassidy Gonsalves, Jennifer Gonzales, Maya Goodoni, Rachel Gorenflo, Zachary Gorski, Michael Graue, Siera Green, Raymond Greene, Zechariah Greene, Rachel A. Greer-Smith, Chrisovolandou Gronowski, Rihei Grothmann, Courtney Guirao,

Katelyn Gundvaldson, Basu Guragain, Adrienne Gurbindo, Brittany Hale, Ariel Halemano, Quinn Hamamoto, Maile Hanaoka, Arielle Harnik, Katelyn Harris, Bridge Hartman, Krysten Hayashida, Kylee Hayashida, Jelyn Heaster, Alexander Hedglen, Dakota Helfrich, Jordan Heltz, Hannah Hendershot, Tessa Henderson, John Herman,

Jasmine Higa, Adam Hill, Kristie Hirai, Rachel Holmes, Tiana Honda, Lauren Hong, Alena Hookano, Alyssa Hoshide, Kainoa Howard, Karlie Howe, ZhiLing Huang, Merissa Hull, Francesca Huml, Kimberly Hutchinson, Mi Huynh, Thien Huynh, Joyce A. Ibasan, Hannah Ibbotson, Laura Ibbotson, Andi Igawa, Kadi Igawa,

Marina Ignacio, Alleonore-Destiny Iguin, Austin Inouye, Elise Inouye, Joanne Isabella, Kristen Ishii, Brian Ishola, Debby A. Itchon, Alexa Jacobs, Cyrus Johnasen, Lindsay Johnson, Kailani Jones, Kyle Jones, Mikayla Jones, Kara Jorgensen, Jaune A. Jose, Jamie Josephson, Kiilani Judd, Jessica J. Julian, Kayuri Kadoya, Janis Kaeo,

Polanimakamae Kahakalau, Kelii Kailipaka, Kahoruko Kajiya, Nainoa Kalaukoa, Ellie-Jean Kalawe, Brinell Kaleikini, Brooke Kamahiai, Keiki O Namahiai Kanahele-Santos, Stuart Kaneshiro, Tayler Kaniho, Sumire Kanno, Candace Karvas, Melvalee Kaulia, Germaine Kaululaau-Young, Martha Kawasaki, Hokuto Kawashima,

Kawena Kawelu, Jill Keely, Bianca Keohokapu, Emma Khachikian, Chantelle Kiessner, Brittany Kimball, Isaac Kimura, Mary L. Kimura, Sean Kirkpatrick, Rachel Kishimoto, Joshua Kitagawa, Keely Kitamura, Zena Kiyota, Tiana Klask, Alexandra Kler Lago, Aaron Knell, Kristi Kobashigawa, Sheena Kobayashi, Kamrie Koi, Rochelle Koi, Emilee Kojiro, Hyesun Kong, Krystle Koshiyama, Lisa Kosilla,

Joshua-Martin Kuanoni-Banagan, August Kubo, Kealiiahonui Kuikahi, Morgan Kultala, Keohikai Laikupu, Mia Lamirand, Brittney Lane, Samantha Lathrop, Brandon Lau, Luana Lavatai, Jesse Leavitt, Laurel Ledward, Robert Lee, Shalyn Lewis, Braysen Libed, Lee Linneman, Emerson J. Llaguno, Jessica Loeffler, Devynn Louie, Kristi Lovell, Noelle Lovesy, Rebekah Loving, Brittany Luna, Susanne Lyle,

Aleta Lyman, Natasha Machado, Taylor-Keahi Macomber-Cobile, Kimberly Magsipoc, Meagan Mahiko, Brandon Mahle, Wilson Malone, Natasha Manasas, Vanessa Mancera, Shelby Marhoefer, Danielle Marrufo, Dario Martin, Keelee Martin, Chanade Martins-Keliihoomalu, Mark Marzan, Shae Massie, Seth Master, Jaymie Masuda, Carle-Ann Mata, Moriah Mathson, Abcde Matias, Kasey Matsumoto, Kelley Matsumoto, Aspen Mauch, JoeAnna McDonald,

Danielle McDowell, Shaina McEnroe, Christina McIntosh, Jared McLean, Brannon McQuillan, Luana Mendiola-Smith, Ana Methuselah, Zoey Meyers, William Midgley, Anna B. Mikkelsen, Candice Miner-Ching, Zayin Minia, Jordan Mirels, Risako Mise, Philip Mitchell, Kelsy Miyake-Kamahele, Autumn Miyares-Thompson, Melissa Moats, Corrina Molina, Roseline Moniz, Brendan Moore,

Ariyana Moran, Jasmine Morikami, Lindsey T. Morin, Juliann Morris, Marilyn Motoishi, Shane-Earl Naeole, Amber Nagata, Lorelei Nakagawa, Robynn A. Namnama, Monnisa Nash, Jordan L. Nauka, Christopher Nelson, Cameron Nicholson, Richelle G. Nicolas, Karen Nishimoto, Allen G. Y. Nitura, Aaron O’Connor, Nai‘a Odachi, Amy Odaira, Dianna Oh, Morgan Olson, Ryder Oshiro, Cheynielle Pacheco, Lorelei T. Padasdao, Shandyn Pahia, Matthew Paio, Isaac Pang,

Jessica Pang, Stephanie Pasco, Taylor Patrick, Tyson Pavao, Jordan Pedersen-Fukunaga, Bryson Pedro, Leomanaolamaikalani Peleiholani Blankenfeld, Ulupuamahinamaikalani Peleiholani-Blankenfeld, Graham Pernell, Trevor Perry, Brenden Peterson, Michele Peterson, Mark Petner, Sharon Petrosky, Michelle Phillips, April Pinyerd,

Terri Pinyerd, Sarah Pitman, Debra Potter, Michelle Proue, Theodore Pruyne, Danielle Pulido, Froile Queja, Jasmin M. Quiamas, Natalie Quinajon, Sheri Quon, Crystal Rances, Skye Rances, Duchess Rapoza, Kaydee Rapozo, Evangeline Raza, Jeff M. Regalario, Karl Reid, Venesha Rems, Marleah Renti Cruz, Sharnelle Renti Cruz, Emily Risley, Anne Rivera, Johnvie Rivera, Joshua Robinson, Arlene Roche,

Alicia Rodriguez, Nikola Rodriguez, Janalynn Rollins, Ashley Romero, Jerome Romero, Shyla Ronia, Norie-Anne Rosal Calit, Megan Rose, Nickolas Rosenberg, Hannah Rosenow, Meghin Russell, Tahaanuiiterai Rutkowski, Nina Sabahi, Josiane Saccu, Melanie Sacro, Julie A. Sagabaen, Ruby A. Sales, Ilysia S. Sana, Gabriella Sanchez, Shelbi Santiago, Ryan T. Sasaki, Jacey Savage,

Kristen Savea, Blessing Savusa, Kimberly Schmelz, Dehrich Schmidt-Chya, Jacquelyn Schoenherr, Artem Sergeyev, Elisha Sevareid, Vanessa Shaffer, Ang Sheng, Laura Shepherd, Leah Sheppard, Jeffrey Shikany, Albert Shim, Jaci Shinoda, Keani Shirai, Dominique Shirazi, Jaylen Shiroma, Sheldon Shishido, Keian Shon, Ululani Siangco, Aimee-Joyce Silva, Malia Silva, Lindsay Simmons,

Heather Simon, Solomon Singer, Summer Singer, Hazel F. Sivila, Trevor Slevin, Alexa Smiley, Clara Smith, James Smith, Nicole Smith, Jonathan Snyder, Kiana Soloria, Vincent Soriano, Kalena Spinola, Ashlin Stahlberg, Maria Steadmon, Kyle Steckler, Phillip Steering, Luke Steinbach, Marguerite Stith, Jeremiah Storie, Oliver M. Strachan, Tiffany Stranathan, Marley Strand-Nicolaisen, Jamie Sugai,

Kylee Sullivan, Taliesin Sumner, Tyler Sumner, Tevis Swain, Kaylah M. Swanson, Randolph Tafua, Yaeko Tagami, Ryan Taifane, Marina Takada, Melia Takakusagi, Shania Tamagyongfal, Sophia Tang, Victoria Taomia, Morgan Tate, Taavili Taylor, Temau Teikitekahioho-Wolff, Allicyn Texeira, Gin Tezuka, Travis Thieme, Nicolette Thomas,

Kori Todd, Jodie Tokihiro, Julie Tom, Jeffrey Tomas, Kaycie Tomei, Ashley C. Tomori, Brandon Tomota, Kaye-Karren Topenio, Ryotaro Toshima, Cao-Minh Tran, Hulali Trask, Dominick Trevino, Kasey A. Udan, Lavin Uehara, Mary-Fem Urena, Nicholas Vallatini, Nicolas Vanderzyl, Ja’ie Victorine-Dyment, Aundrea Vidal, Yesenia Villafuerte, Audrey Villanueva, Fred Visaya, Nelson Vo, Lily Voitek,

Ashley Vongsy, Cecile Vulliet, Amirah Waite, Wailana Walker, HeNaniNoOeKaWahineUioIkePono Wandasan, Kenton Wandasan, Vernon Warnock, Sondra Warren, Misa Webber, Tino Wells, Zoe Whitney, Kaira Whittington-Ramirez, Brian Wild, Vanessa Winchester-Sye, Jade Wong, Tiana Wong, Selisa Wright,

Sharmaine Yacavone, Kazuma Yamaguchi, Marilyn Yamamoto, Lia Yamashiro, Yuto Yamauchi, Jia Hao Yao, Phillip Yawata, Shaniah Yogi, Ivana Yoon, Deanna Young, Jenna Yugawa, Justme Yulian, Luana Zablan, Turfa Zaman, Xiaoqing Zheng, Matthew Zizzi, Gregory Zukeran.

Filmmaker to Present Award-Winning Documentary at UH Hilo

Japanese filmmaker and educator Miho Aida presents her award-winning documentary film, “The Sacred Place Where Life Begins: Gwich’in Women Speak,” at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo on Wednesday, January 11 at 5:30 p.m. in University Classroom Building Room 100. The event is free and open to the public.

The Gwich’in is an Athabaskan-speaking First Nations of Canada and an Alaska Native people. The documentary explores the coastal plain of Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge that has been eyed for oil and gas development since 1986. In the film, Gwich’in women speak out for their sacred land.

The film was named the top documentary at the 2015 Central Illinois Feminist Film Festival, received the Audience Choice Award at the 2014 Earth Port Film Festival, and was nominated for Best Documentary Short at the 2013 American Indian Film Festival. Following the screening, Aida will discuss the film and her new video series, “Standing Rock Women Speak,” along with her efforts to save the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North and South Dakota.

The event is sponsored by the UH Hilo Japanese Studies Program, Gender and Women’s Studies Program, Humanities Division, College of Arts and Sciences, and International Student Services and Intercultural Education Program.

For more information, contact Professor Yoshiko Fukushima at yf83@hawaii.edu or 932-7213. For more information about the film and filmmaker, visit http://mihoaida.com/gwichin.

UH Hilo Announces Fall Dean’s Lists

The following students in the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Business and Economics received Dean’s List recognition for Fall 2016:

Eva Abraham, Amerfil Grace Acob, Caitlin Aiona, Yesica Avendano-Villanueva, Irine Diane Bautista, Andrew Bayang, Peter Betham, Courtney Ann Brock, Summer Burns, Marson Cabay, Kyan Catton, Claire Cea, Kadey Chambless, Lexi Dalmacio, Lorena Dela Cruz,

Jhoanne Domingo, Cayla Michelle Esposo, Charles Fernandez, Manuel Fernandez, Mackenzie Foley, Kai Anthony Gaitley, Francine Andrei Gallego, Darcy Gaylord, Jordan Hart, Lara Hughes, Janine Iseri, Aisha Izuno, Jordan Kamimura, Nicholas Kaya, Cherilyn Kelii,

Zoe Kimura, Kimberlee Kitano, Jessica Kolish, Kiera Kua-Ramirez, Chelsey Lai, Marissa Lai, Stephanie Letro, Anna Liu, Xiaoting Liu, Samantha Lord, Cheyenne Losalio, Kainoa Lyman, Victoria Magana Ledesma, Nicholas Martin, Seth Master, Emily Masutomi, Dilrae Mechol, Xianbin Meng, Raeann Mukini, Wyatt Nelson, Neon Nishimura, Adora Omodt, Adam Onishi, Jazzle Paraiso,

Uookjin Park, Robert Parks, Jan Paulo Pascual, Nicole Perea, Leannka Rigby, Alicia Rodriguez, Nicole Saito, Annika Schulz, Ang Sheng, Vaclav Slezak, Danielle Stover, Erin Swain, Jubylen Teehee, Jade Thomas, Ryan Torio, Calvin Uemura, Onosa’i Va’a, Maria Vicente, Kinsey Volkart, Travis Winters, Tahiya Zaman, and Yuye Zhao.

The following students from the Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo have been named to the Dean’s List for the 2016 fall semester:

Class of 2020
Joshua Dillon, Amelia Furlan, Mary Lui, Stacey Nguyen, Felix Rasgo, Robyn Rector, Shaina Saiki, Reid Shimada, Thi Hong Vo, Brandi Chun, Jensine Melody Domingo, Jhoana Paula Gonzales, Jared Toba, Jarin Miyamoto, Tony Moua, Su Hyon Kwon, Courtney Elam, Tracy Lopez, Johnny Tran, Brooke Zarriello, Brent Ocker, Thuy-Mi Tran, Joseph Tanchevski, David Cao, Anna Claire Masuda, Kamala Lizama, Stacie Waiamau, Taumie Richie, Kelsey Trujillo, Andrew Nguyen, Taylor Hori, Logan Abney, Tyler Peterson, Charles Slusher, Wilson Datario

Class of 2019
Tyler Millar, Rachel Randall, Ashley Uehara, Nancy Wong, Carrie Yeung, David Pham, Preston Ho, Kara Paulachak, Gam Phan, Rene-Scott Chavez, Tyler Hirokawa, Kate Malasig, Nicholas Tsoi, Vance Hill, Jennifer Nguyen, Veronica Wong, Deniz Bicakci, Samantha Gonzalez, Kevin Lei, Athena Borhauer, Torrence Ching, Katrina Downey, Veronica Morales Colon, Shannon Trinh, Clement Tran Tang, Leigh Heffner

Class of 2018
Cierra Gauvin, Kerri Nakatsu, Carli Owan, Lauren Skorheim, Quan Truong, Goody Cacal, Sara Evanko, Kelli Goo, Macie Kim, Vicky Nguyen, Lauren Sato, Paolo Vinh Tuan Truong, Tram Le, John James Taman, Ciara Butts, Robby-Sean Cayetano, Karen Christian, Jui-Yu Kao, Andrew Skorheim, Caroline Rhee, XuanLam Le, Joann Phan, Seungyeun Yoo, Ha Tran, Krystle Kiyuna, Niaz Nafisi, Mari Takushi, Candace Woo, Chelsea Aipoalani, Mathew Eng, Niko Pogorevcnik, Katherine Post, Jennifer Fujio, Jonathan Kataoka, Jessica Penaranda, Erik Ferreira, Katrina Kutter, Miyuki Miller, Zebedee Walpert, Phuong Nguyen, Tiffany Alberg, Nicolette Lew, Marina Ortiz, Christopher Nakagawa, Jessica Lee, Tran Pham, Joshua Belcher, Jane Choi, Megan Olaguer, Cindy Khamphaphanh

Ke kukala aku nei ko ke Kulanui o Hawai’i ma Hilo koleke ‘o Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke’elikolani, i na inoa o na haumana kaha ‘oi no ke kau Ha’ulelau 2016:
(The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke’elikolani College of Hawaiian Language announces its Dean’s List for the Fall 2016 semester):

Jainine Abraham, Destanie Alayon, Zion Apao, Laura Birse, Christopher Chow, Sophie Dolera, Kameron Ho, Bridgette Ige, Kiana Kamala, Alana Kanahele, Ashley Nakoa-Kawahakui, Alana Paiva, Isaac Pang, Moananuimaikalani Peleiholani-Blankenfeld, Kainalu Steward, Tema’u Teikitekahioho-Wolff, Vanessa Winchester-Sye,

Joshua Bass, Ramzen Coakley, Angelica Durante, Roberta Gaskin, Ezra Grace, Karise Hallsten, Yukako Iha, Mary Kealaiki, Shoichi Kitaguchi, Hyesun Kong, Ana Methuselah, Risako Mise, Haruka Miura, Lauren Mizuba, Sarah Rafferty, Josiane Saccu, Trevor Slevin, Gin Tezuka, and Ryotaro Toshima

Zika Found in Hawaii Years Before Caribbean Outbreak

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) scientists have discovered that severe birth defects related to infection with the Zika virus (ZIKV) occurred much earlier than in 2016, when the connection was first made between the virus and an increased likelihood of microcephaly during outbreaks of ZIKV infection in Brazil and Puerto Rico.

UH scientists published their findings in December in the scientific journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, adding to the potential evidence of a link between ZIKV infection and microcephaly, a congenital condition associated with incomplete brain development and characterized by an abnormal smallness of the head.

Patient information and blood samples were collected voluntarily from mothers in Honolulu who delivered babies between 2007 and 2013 at the Kapiʻolani Medical Center for Women and Children, a Hawaiʻi Pacific Health hospital affiliated with JABSOM. The samples were collected and stored at the UH Biorepository (UHB) after obtaining written informed consent from the mothers.

“As per the information in the UHB, no mothers gave birth to babies with microcephaly in 2007 and 2008,” said Vivek R. Nerurkar, chair of the Department of Tropical Medicine, Medical Microbiology and Pharmacology. “However, from 2009 onwards, we identified six mothers who gave birth to babies with microcephaly. Of the six, ZIKV antibodies were detected in three, fifty percent, of the mothers who delivered babies with microcephaly, suggesting presence of positive Zika virus cases and associated microcephaly in the United States as early as 2009.”

Potential changes to women’s health practices

Nerurkar believes the growing evidence of an association between ZIKV infection and the devastating brain damage in infants justifies a new practice in women’s health.

“We need to be more proactive in tracking pregnant women and testing for the ZIKV ahead of time (before birth),” he said. “It may be time for health care professionals to routinely caution newly pregnant mothers (or those planning to become pregnant) about the ZIKV, and offer pre-natal tests to detect for the presence of the virus.”

Ideally, Nerurkar said, families can plan for safe pregnancies by avoiding travel to areas of known ZIKV outbreaks. In 2016, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization have issued travel alerts about locations with confirmed, locally acquired Zika virus infections.

The UH researchers expressed their gratitude for the women who agreed to voluntarily donate blood and placenta samples to build the UH Biorepository archive. “This has been an indispensable resource in our research,” said Nerurkar.

Nerurkar leads a team of scientists at UH working to develop a vaccine for ZIKV infection as well as robust diagnostic assays to rapidly detect ZIKV and other mosquito-borne viral infections. After the award of a Zika emergency response grant this year from the National Institutes of Health, his team members are also working to understand how ZIKV infection in men makes them susceptible to transmit the virus to their sexual partners, even though the men may appear symptom-free.

Circus Comedy Coming to UH Hilo

Virtuoso clown Jamie Adkins will bring his one-man circus comedy “Circus Incognitus” to the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Performing Arts Center on Thursday, January 26, at 7:30 p.m.

In “Circus Incognitus,” Adkins wanders on stage to perform his new show, but struggles to build the scene around him using everyday objects. Things go awry with his props proving to be most unhelpful: his ladder disintegrates under his foot, he wrangles an animated chair, tussles with a pesky hat, negotiates a precarious slack wire, and juggles almost everything. Theater goers even get involved in the endeavor by tossing lemons for him to catch on a fork, held between his teeth.

“This is a fun family show and a great way to start the new year,” said PAC Manager Lee Dombroski.

Tickets are reserved seating and priced at $20 General, $15 Discount and $10 UH Hilo/Hawaiʻi CC students (with a valid student ID) and children, up to age 17, pre-sale, or $25, $20 and $15 at the door.

Tickets are available by calling the UH Hilo Box Office at 932-7490 or ordering online at artscenter.uhh.hawaii.edu.

Black Arm Band to Perform “Dirtsong” at UH Hilo

A musical presentation celebrating the past and revolutionizing the future of Indigenous Australia will take place when Black Arm Band performs “Dirtsong” at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Performing Arts Center on Friday, January 20, at 7:30 p.m.
Black Arm Band, a collective of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders (ATSI), is led by some of Australia’s foremost indigenous artists, including Emma Donovan, Fred Leone, Mark Atkins and Deline Briscoe, alongside Executive Producer Elizabeth Woollacott. Considered one of Australia’s leading performing arts companies, they have been widely acclaimed in Australia and internationally.

At the heart of their work is the group’s relationship with indigenous communities from which they draw inspiration. Their musical tradition and presentation is forged from over 40,000 years of living culture, infused with contemporary styles adopted as their own by Aboriginal Australia.

Tickets are reserved seating and priced at $30 General, $25 Discount and $15 UH Hilo/Hawai `i CC students (with a valid student ID) and children, up to age 17 pre-sale, or $35, $30 and $20 at the door.

Tickets are available by calling the UH Hilo Box Office at 932-7490 or ordering online at artscenter.uhh.hawaii.edu.

UH Hilo Receives OHA Grant Funding

Na Pua No`eau- The Center for Gifted and Talented Native Hawaiian Children has announced that the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo has received funding from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA) `Ahahui Grants program. The funds support UH Hilo’s strategic goal to strengthen its impact on the State of Hawai’i by working in partnership with other UH campuses to deliver joint program events or activities.

On February 23, 2017, Na Pua No`eau will present “E Ho`okama`aina” at the University of Hawaiʻi Maui College (UHMC). OHA awarded a total of $5,300 for this event, which will invite high school juniors and seniors to engage and learn about the various degree programs from faculty and program coordinators to inspire them to enter into higher education and further their career aspirations.

“Ma Uka a i Kai Akamai Engineers” will be held on April 3, 2017 at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mänoa. OHA awarded $1,950 to invite K-12 students and their `ohana to explore how the different types of engineering (mechanical, electric, civil, etc.) were applied during the days of their kupuna. The Native Hawaiian Science and Engineering Mentorship Program is a partner in the event, which will include games and work on projects that provide hands-on learning about the field of engineering.

`Ahahui Grants support community events that meet at least one primary strategic result. The events will address OHA’s Exceed Education Standards and UH’s Hawai’i Graduation Initiative (HGI). For more information, contact Nä Pua No`eau Director Kinohi Gomes at kinohi@hawaii.edu.

Hula to be Featured at UH Hilo Fall Commencement

Fall commencement at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo takes on a different look this year, reflecting the view of higher education through an indigenous lens promoted by the UH System’s Hawaiʻi Papa O Ke Ao initiative. The program will feature a student speaker, a hula presentation about learning and growth, and the awarding of degrees on Saturday, December 17 at 9 a.m. in Vulcan Gym.
uh-hilo-moniker
A total of 242 students have petitioned for 318 degrees and/or certificates from the colleges of Arts and Sciences (233), Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management (21), Business and Economics (30), Pharmacy (6) and Ka Haka `Ula O Ke`elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language (7), while 21 others are candidates for various post-graduate honors.

Kyle James Davis, an agriculture major, will represent the graduating class as student speaker. Davis, who will receive a BS in tropical horticulture, has maintained a cumulative GPA of 3.48. His academic achievements include being named to the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management Dean’s List in 2013 and 2015. Davis also earned a Semester at Sea Scholarship and spent spring 2014 studying aboard the MV Explorer in nearly a dozen countries.

Davis is an ordained minister, who served five years in the US Army, including over two and a half years in Iraq as a combat medic. His commencement address will draw from his numerous life experiences and will include a call for his fellow graduates to broaden their horizons.

The chant- hula will be performed by UNUKUPUKUPU, Indigenous Leadership through Hula Program under the directorship of Pele Ka`io, Hawaiian Protocols Committee chairperson, and Dr. Taupōuri Tangarō, director of Hawaiian Culture and Protocols Engagement, at UH Hilo and Hawaiʻi Community College.

Organizers anticipate a dynamic performance, with at least 50 individuals representing UH Hilo, HawCC, and Waiākea High School. Gail Makuakāne-Lundin, interim executive assistant to Chancellor Donald Straney, director of Kīpuka Native Hawaiian Student Center, and a member of UNUKUPUKUPU, will introduce the chant-hula, entitled ʻUlei Pahu I Ta Motu, which was composed more than 200 years ago and documents the evolution of world view.

The chant-hula will be preceded and followed by the sounding of 20 pahu (drums) and 20 pū (conch-shell trumpets). The 20 pū will also sound honoring Moana-nui-ākea (large and broad oceans) that connect Hawaiʻi to the world. The performance concludes with the presentation of Paʻakai (sea-salt) to honor the profound intersection where the learner transitions to graduate.

Straney said fall commencement provides a unique opportunity to showcase the UH Hilo – Hawaiʻi Community College Papa O Ke Ao collaboration, which seeks to make the UH campuses leaders in indigenous education.

Seventy-Two Youths Participate in HI-PAL Youth Volleyball Clinic

Seventy-two youths participated in the HI-PAL Youth Volleyball Clinic held December 1 at the new Kaʻū District Gym in Pāhala. The free clinic was held in partnership with the UH-Hilo Vulcan Women’s Volleyball Team, County of Hawaiʻi Department of Parks and Recreation and the Hawaiʻi Police Department’s Community Policing Section-Hawaiʻi Isle Police Activities League (HI-PAL).

UH-Hilo Vulcan Coach Tino Reyes demonstrates ‘bump’ form.

UH-Hilo Vulcan Coach Tino Reyes demonstrates ‘bump’ form.

“We wanted to bring the Vulcan athletes out to Kaʻū to share their knowledge and skills with our keiki and are very fortunate to have this brand new, three-court facility that could hold such an event,” said Kaʻū Community Police Officer Blaine Morishita.

Participants learned skills and were able to talk story with the college athletes. Afterward, participants were treated to dinner, which was served by community volunteers, P&R staff and police officers.

For information on HI-PAL activities in West Hawaiʻi, you may contact the Kona Community Policing Section at 326-4646, extension 259, or your nearest police station.

TMT Hosts International Workshop For Future Science and Technology Leaders in Hilo

Astronomy and engineering graduate students from the TMT international partnership countries are gathering in Hilo for a future leaders workshop this week through Wednesday, December 7. The scientific/technical workshop with an emphasis on international collaboration focuses on project management and other professional skills with the intention of training TMT’s future leaders.

The Institute for Scientist & Engineer Educators has been training graduate students and postdocs, and has partnered with telescopes for more than 15 years. ISEE is located at the University of California Santa Cruz, which is the headquarters of UC Observatories and the center for the University of California’s participation in the TMT. ISSE is developing a new program for TMT, which will be designed to engage the full international partnership of TMT science and technology development.

The Institute for Scientist & Engineer Educators has been training graduate students and postdocs, and has partnered with telescopes for more than 15 years. ISEE is located at the University of California Santa Cruz, which is the headquarters of UC Observatories and the center for the University of California’s participation in the TMT. ISSE is developing a new program for TMT, which will be designed to engage the full international partnership of TMT science and technology development.

“TMT is hosting 40 graduate and post doctorate students from Hawaii, Japan, China, India, Canada, University of California and Caltech to help them gain valuable technical and project management skills while collaborating with TMT staff and Mauna Kea Observatory partners. This workshop is serving as a pilot for future sessions for the TMT international training program. What better place than on Hawaii Island, in Hilo and on what many call the best site in the world to view the heavens,” said Sandra Dawson, TMT’s Hawaii Community Affairs Manager.

Participants in the workshop are gaining knowledge about opportunities for future involvement with TMT, project management skills, leadership and teamwork experience through hands-on training activities and an opportunity to help design a potential future TMT international program.

Workshop activities include a Mauna Kea summit tour, visits and interaction with scientists and engineers from Subaru Telescope, Gemini Observatory, W. M. Keck Observatory and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Participants are working with TMT staff members focusing on project management, systems engineering, science instruments, software development, safety compliance and invasive species controls.

The graduate students are also learning the history of astronomy in Hawaii, and particularly on the summit of Mauna Kea, and an overview of the cultural significance of Mauna Kea.

Participating students are from Caltech, University of California Davis, University of California Santa Cruz, University of California Los Angeles, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, University of Science and Technology of China, Dunlap Institute University of Toronto,  NRC-Herzberg, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, University of Tokyo, University of British Columbia, University of California Riverside, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan /Sokendai, University of Victoria, University of California Irvine, National Tsing Hua University, Inter University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tohoku University and the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy.

The workshop is funded by the Thirty Meter Telescope and led by the Institute for Scientist and Engineer Educators (ISEE) at UC Santa Cruz.

For more information contact Austin Barnes at isee.austinbarnes@gmail.com or visit the website at http://isee-telescope-workforce.org.

Hilo Passport Acceptance Fairs

Thinking about applying for a U.S. Passport? Don’t put it off any longer!
hilo-passport-fairApply for your U.S. Passport at a special Saturday Passport Acceptance Fair at Hawai’i Community College on December 3, 2016; April 1, 2017; and May 20, 2017.

To request an appointment, email your name, phone number, and preferred appointment date and time to PassportFair@state.gov. Walk-in customers will be accommodated as time permits.

Senator Kaialiʻi Kahele to Chair the Senate Committee on Higher Education

Newly elected State Senator Kaiali‘i Kahele (Dist. 1 – Hilo), was selected to Chair the Senate Committee on Higher Education (HED) by Senate leadership earlier today. Sen. Kahele will fulfill the final two years of his late father’s term in the Senate representing the residents of Hilo after being elected to the seat on November 8, 2016.

senator-kai-kahele-profileSen. Kahele, a 1992 graduate of Hilo High School, pursued his higher education at Hawai‘i Community College, the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo and received his Bachelor of Science in Education from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa in 1998.

As Chair of HED, Sen. Kahele will oversee the formulation of legisation for the University of Hawai‘i System – including three baccalaureate universities, seven community colleges and four educational centers across Hawai‘i. In addition, his committee purvue includes the Senate confirmation of the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents.

Sen. Kahele will also serve as Vice Chair of the Senate Committee on Education (EDU) with Chair, Sen. Michelle N. Kidani.

“It is an honor and I am humbled to represent the residents of Senate District One in Hilo,” said Sen. Kahele. “I appreciate the trust and confidence the Senate Leadership has in me with these important committee assignments. I have a passion for education and providing quality, affordable education for all keiki, at all levels, across our State. Working together with Senator Kidani, I am looking forward to reshaping P-20 education throughout Hawai‘i and providing opportunities for our children to compete in the global arena as well as giving them the tools to shape the future of our Island home.”

UH Hilo Receives Smart Car Donation

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo is among three local nonprofit organizations on Hawaiʻi Island recently presented with Smart electric vehicles by the Hawaiian Electric Industries (HEI) Charitable Foundation and Hawaiʻi Electric Light Company. Vehicles and symbolic keys were also presented to the Boys & Girls Club of Hawaiʻi Island and HOPE Services Hawaiʻi.

At the Smart Car presentation. HELCo presented 3 smartcars to HOPE Services, UH-Hilo and Boys and Girls Club. — with Sen. Kaiali'i Kahele, Jerry Chang, Jennifer Zelko Schlueter and Sen. Russell Ruderman.  Photo Via Joy SanBuenaventura

At the Smart Car presentation HELCO presented 3 smart cars to HOPE Services, UH-Hilo and Boys and Girls Club. — with Sen. Kaiali’i Kahele, Jerry Chang, Jennifer Zelko Schlueter and Sen. Russell Ruderman. Photo Via Joy SanBuenaventura

The car is a lightly-used Smart for Two electric vehicle manufactured by Mercedes-Benz that is equipped with electric charging equipment. Smart electric vehicles have been rising in popularity in recent years due to their lower cost per mile than vehicles with a conventional gasoline-fueled engine, along with reduced carbon emissions and noise pollution levels.

“We are thankful and honored to have been selected as one of the recipients,” said University Relations Director Jerry Chang, who accepted the donation on behalf of UH Hilo during the November 17 presentation in Hilo. “This is another step in our goal of conservation and starting an Energy Science program at UH Hilo.”

The vehicle is presently located in the Auxiliary Services parking lot near the existing covered electrical outlet. Auxiliary Services Director Kolin Kettleson says the University’s goal is to use it when it’s practical, to increase UH Hilo’s visibility in the community.

“Because of the limited range and required charging times, this vehicle isn’t appropriate for the motor pool,” Kettleson said. “So we’re looking at assigning it to Administrative Affairs for the near future, to enable employees from the various divisions to use it for off-campus trips and meetings.”

UH Hilo was chosen as a recipient along with the UH Manoa, West O`ahu and Maui College campuses due to the integral role the University of Hawaiʻi plays in promoting Hawaiʻi’s goal to achieve a 100 percent clean, energy future.

PISCES Partners with UH Hilo and NASA for Simulated Human Mars Mission on Hawaii Island

The Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES) is partnering with the University of Hawaii at Hilo and NASA this month in a ground breaking research project to prepare for an eventual manned mission to Mars.

mars-simulationThe project, called BASALT (Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains), is focused on developing operation protocols for a joint human-robotic exploration of Mars in the search for extraterrestrial life. BASALT scientists and crew members are conducting simulated missions in two locations which closely resemble the Martian landscape at different areas: Mauna Ulu at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the Eastern Snake River Plain in Idaho.

Currently, the BASALT team is investigating Mauna Ulu by traversing the rugged lava terrain to collect rock samples for both biologic and geologic analysis.

“We add a twist to our scientific fieldwork by conducting it under simulated Mars mission constraints,” said Dr. Darlene Lim, geobiologist and principal investigator for the BASALT research project. “By doing so, we can evaluate operational concepts and a variety of supporting capabilities that range from software to hardware components with respect to their anticipated value for the human exploration of Mars.”

One of their constraints is a communication time delay to simulate the latency of transmissions experienced between planets. Dr. Lim and her team are hoping to develop a tricorder-like device, as envisioned in Star Trek, to be able to identify rock samples using a hand-held instrument.

The researchers hope to better understand the habitability of Mars by studying Mauna Ulu, which is a high-fidelity analog for the landscape of early Mars when volcanism and water were common.

“No one has really worked this out yet,” said John Hamilton, PISCES test logistics and education/public outreach manager. “We want to work out the kinks during these exercises so we have it together on a real mission. By the time they go to Mars, they’ll have a rock-solid plan.”

The BASALT team consists of scientists, engineers, mission operators and active astronauts. Roughly a dozen students from the University of Hawaii at Hilo are also assisting with the project. Hamilton, who is also a faculty member with the University of Hawaii at Hilo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, is serving on the BASALT Science Team, overseeing data collection, logistics, and student assignments. The research project is central to NASA’s Journey to Mars program.

“PISCES is honored to be working together with the University of Hawaii at Hilo and NASA Ames on this project,” said Rodrigo Romo, PISCES program manager. “Collaborative work with Ames has been in the frontline of applied research for PISCES recently. The fact that university students get the opportunity to participate in events like the BASALT project will help them meet the demands of a very competitive industry.”

PISCES was selected last year by NASA’s highly competitive PSTAR (Planetary Science and Technology Through Analog Research) program to participate in the four-year, $4.2 million BASALT project, which is being administered by the University of Hawaii at Hilo. The BASALT research team will be conducting their research on Hawaii Island until Nov. 18.

For more information visit PISCES’ website at www.pacificspacecenter.com.

Zappa-4-Ever Coming to UH Hilo

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Jazz Orchestra presents its 4th Annual Frank Zappa Tribute Concert Zappa-4-ever on Wednesday and Thursday, December 7 & 8, at 7:30 p.m. in the UH Hilo Performing Arts Center.

frank-zappaThis year marks the 50th anniversary of Zappa’s debut album Freak Out! In celebration, the concert will feature songs from Freak Out!, such as Hungry Freaks Daddy and Trouble Every Day. Musical Director Trever Veilleux describes Zappa as a brilliant social commentator and notes a song like Trouble Every Day with lyrical themes of racial violence, social injustice, and sensational journalism is just as relevant today as it was when it was released in 1966.

“Because 2016 has been so crazy we decided to include more of Zappa’s political songs in this year’s show,” Veilleux said. “The concert will also feature songs from the albums You Are What You Is, Bongo Fury, We’re Only In It For the Money, and more.”

The UH Hilo Jazz Orchestra includes over 25 singers and musicians with a large horn section blowing over a rock and roll rhythm section. To capture Zappa’s complex music, the orchestra began rehearsals for the show back in August.

“Zappa always had amazing musicians in his bands, and he would push them to their limits with very challenging compositions,” said Veilleux. “Our students have the difficult task of performing these compositions. They’ve worked incredibly hard throughout the semester to bring our audience a tight, professional-sounding show.”

Tickets are open seating priced at $10 General, $7 Discount, $5 seniors, students w/valid ID & children 17 and under. Advance ticket purchase is recommended. For more information, or to order tickets, contact the UH Hilo Performing Arts Center Box Office at 932-7490 or artscenter.uhh.hawaii.edu.

For disability accommodation, contact Dori Yamada at 932-7496 (V) or 933-3334 (TTY) at least 10 working days prior to the event.

Pahoa Bee Company Wins $25,000 in 2016 HIplan Competition

A Pahoa based bee company was awarded $25,000 today at the University of Hawaii Campus Center for their business plan they entered in the 2016 Hawaii Island Business Plan Competition.

Ono Queens LLC owned by Christopher and Wendy Klepps won the grand prize beating out 49 other Hawaii Island Business Plans.

Wendy and Christopher Klepps of Ono Queens LLC accept a check for $25,000.

Wendy and Christopher Klepps of Ono Queens LLC accept a check for $25,000.

49 original competitors were trimmed down to 8 finalists and today they presented 15-minute PowerPoint Presentations to judges Howard Dicus, Murray Clay, Jared Kushi and Chuck Erskine.

hiplan-judgesAfter the judges listened to the 15-minute power point presentations, there was a short break and then the companies followed up with a 2-minute “Elevator Pitch” to try and win the judges over.

The overall judging was weighed in their two presentations given today as well as their submitted 7-page written plans.

The Finalists were (in order of presentation):

  • Aloha Nui Family Practice
  • Big Island Wasabi, LLC
  • Dam Fine Farms
  • Easybotics
  • Hawai’i Ulu Producers Co-op
  • Hawaii Family Health
  • Ono Queens, LLC
  • The Spoon Shop, LLC

The third place runner up was Big Island Wasabi LLC:

Sara Phillips authored the business plan for Big Island Wasabi LLC

Sara Phillips authored the business plan for Big Island Wasabi LLC

The second place runner up was Hawaii Family Health:

Michelle Mitchell was the author of the Hawaii Family Health business plan.

Michelle Mitchell was the author of the Hawaii Family Health business plan.

After the winners were announced, there was a short reception held for the folks and sponsors that were in attendance.

Some of the sponsors mentioned were, Ulupono Initiative, University of Hawaii Hilo, Big Island Toyota, HTDC, DeLuz Chevrolet, Darren T. Kimura, HIGROWTH, NELHA, Hilo Brokers, Marine Genetics and the Hawaii Island Chamber of Commerce.  The Official Media Sponsor was Pacific Media Group.

UH Hilo Announces Night Photography Classes

The College of Continuing Education and Community Service (CCECS) at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo announces classes in night photography with award-winning landscape photographer Michelle Shuey. Sessions will be held on the main campus Friday & Saturday, November 11 & 12, from 5:30 – 9 p.m. at a location to be announced and will include a field trip. Tuition is $75 and includes transportation.

Kīlauea aglow from its summit crater is visible from Kulanaokuaiki Campground.  NPS Photo/Jacob W. Frank

Kīlauea aglow from its summit crater is visible from Kulanaokuaiki Campground. NPS Photo/Jacob W. Frank

Shuey, a member of the UH Hilo Geography and Environmental Science faculty, will teach participants how to manipulate a Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) camera to take captivating night photos. The classes will focus on basic camera techniques and settings used for long exposure photos, and taking photographs at various locations, with possible venues including Hilo town, Hilo Bay, Coconut Island, Mauna Kea, and the night-time glow from Halema`uma`u crater, weather permitting.

Students are responsible for providing their own DSLR or mirrorless camera, a remote shutter release, and tripod. To register and for more information, contact CCECS at 932-7830 or email ccecs@hawaii.edu.