• Follow on Facebook

  • puako-general-store
  • what-to-do-media
  • RSS W2DM

  • Cheneviere Couture
  • PKF Document Shredding
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    July 2017
    S M T W T F S
    « Jun    
     1
    2345678
    9101112131415
    16171819202122
    23242526272829
    3031  
  • When

  • RSS Pulpconnection

  • Recent Comments

Aloha Grown “Malama Honua Fund” Awards Five (5) Big Island Schools and Organizations

On Wednesday, June 28, 2017, five (5) Big Island schools and organizations were presented with a 2017 Aloha Grown Malama Honua Award. Each organization received a $500 award to put towards a specific project or program that embodies Aloha Grown’s philosophy to ‘Support Local, Sustain the Aina & Share the Aloha.’

From left to right: Camille Kalahiki (Manager – Parker Ranch Store), Joe Vitorino (Program Director – Kohala Youth Ranch), Tina Doherty (Head of Parker Middle School), Jenny Bach (“Farm to School” Coordinator/Garden Teacher – Laupahoehoe Community Public Charter School) and Randy Kurohara (President & Owner – Aloha Grown and Parker Ranch Store).

“Here at Aloha Grown, we are committed to supporting efforts to care for our island, our people and our culture,” said Randy Kurohara, President and Owner of Aloha Grown. “That is why 2% of every Aloha Grown sale goes to our Malama Honua Fund, which annually awards local nonprofits, schools, organizations and initiatives that embody our philosophy. This year we received a number of applications and essays from many well-deserving organizations.”

Parker Ranch Store Manager Camille Kalahiki noted, “it was inspiring to see how many organizations are committed to sustainability efforts in our Big Island communities.”

From left to right: Aunty Bev (Aloha Grown employee), Jason Wong (Principal – Na Wai Ola Public Charter School), Stephanie Olson-Moore (Third Grade Kumu – Na Wai Ola Public Charter School), John Lyle School (Parent – Volcano School of Arts & Sciences), Kalima Cayir (Principal – Volcano School of Arts & Sciences) and Randy Kurohara (President & Owner – Aloha Grown and Parker Ranch Store).

The Malama Honua Fund award application process included a one-page essay explaining how the organization follows Aloha Grown’s philosophy, as well as a description of the project/program that the $500 award would be used to fund. All essays were thoroughly reviewed by an Aloha Grown selection committee.

Congratulations to the 2017 Malama Honua Award Winners! We applaud you for your dedication to sustainability efforts on the Big Island!

  • Parker School & Waimea Elementary School – “Kihapai Ho`oulu” Project
  • Kohala Youth Ranch – “Equine-Assisted Therapy” Program
  • Laupahoehoe Community Public Charter School – “Farm to School” Program Hydroponics & Aquaponics Systems
  • Volcano School of Arts and Sciences – “Kalo Garden” Project
  • Na Wai Ola Public Charter School – “Third Grade Composting” Project

Hawaii Department of Education Opens Second Data Center

After seven years of progress towards upgrading its technology infrastructure, the Hawaiʻi State Department of Education (HIDOE) opened its second data center at Hoʻokele Elementary School earlier this month.  This marks an important milestone in HIDOE’s Converge Infrastructure initiative, which is focused on consolidating the information technology (IT) equipment and services in order to streamline management and support statewide.

The Hookele data center acts as a backup in case the primary fails and will eventually house disaster recovery services for HIDOE’s critical applications and systems.
Photo Credit: Department of Education

“Prior to the opening of these data centers, our IT equipment and services were scattered throughout various locations making management and recovery efforts difficult,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “Thanks to the work done through this initiative and legislative support, we have consolidated and enhanced our resources to meet the increasing connectivity demands in our schools.”

Planning for the initiative started in 2010 with the department’s offices of Information Technology Services and School Facilities and Support Services. In Spring 2015, the first data center opened at the former Queen Liliʻuokalani Elementary School in Kaimukī, which now houses department facilities and technology offices. The center is the primary production site with the new center at Hoʻokele serving as the back up and recovery site.

“During the planning process we put a lot of effort into the design of these centers. We incorporated energy efficient strategies and leveraged software that will provide additional flexibility for our systems that will allow us to adjust based on varying demand through the year,” added Clyde Sonobe, assistant superintendent and chief information officer.

The Hoʻokele center will eventually house disaster recovery services for HIDOE’s critical applications and systems.

Earlier this year, HIDOE was recognized as the top ranked school district in K-12 broadband connectivity according to the 2016 State of the States annual report released by Education Superhighway, an advocacy group dedicated to upgrading Internet infrastructure in K-12 public schools. For more information about this award, click here.

Department of Education Pursues Expansion of Hawaiian Education Assessment

The Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) has taken another step towards advancing Hawaiian language assessments for Hawaiian immersion students. In a collaborative effort with the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and Hawaiian language stakeholders, HIDOE is seeking federal approval for the expansion of the Kaiapuni Assessment of Educational Outcomes (KAEO) to Grades 5-8. Ka Papahana Kaiapuni (Hawaiian Language Immersion) students in Grades 3 and 4 have been taking the KAEO assessment since the 2014-15 school year.

“The collaborative work to expand Kaiapuni assessments for more students honors our commitment to assure that a Hawaiian language education pathway is strengthened and realized in our public school system,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “A lot of work has been done to ensure that these tests are rigorous and meets a standard of education that provides high quality assessments for our Kaiapuni students.”

Additionally, the desire to expand Hawaiian assessment was expressed by Native Hawaiian education advocates who provided feedback during the Hawaii Consolidated State Plan for the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) public comment period and in testimony before the Board of Education.

For the past two years, the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) approved HIDOE’s requests for extended waivers that allowed Kaiapuni students to take a specialized assessment in lieu of the state’s English language arts and math student assessments.

HIDOE will now request a USDOE double-testing waiver for Kaiapuni students in Grades 5-8. Approval of the waiver would allow Kaiapuni students enrolled in those grades to take the KAEO field tests in language arts, mathematics and science in lieu of the Smarter Balanced Assessments (SBA) in language arts and mathematics and the Hawaii State Science Assessment (HSA-Science).

“The previous waivers granted by the USDOE has lifted the burden of having our Hawaiian language students take double the amount of assessments,” stated Tammi Chun, Assistant Superintendent, office of strategy, innovation and performance. “The work put into the expansion of assessments for Kaiapuni students is unprecedented.”

A seven-day public comment period will open on Wednesday, June 28, 2017 and close on Wednesday, July 5, 2017. Those interested in submitting comments can email ESSA@hawaiidoe.org.  For more information, please click here to view the public notice.

Click to read notice

Hawai‘i Community College to Host Car Show Featuring Automotive Celebrity Charley Hutton

Hawai‘i Community College (Hawai’i CC) will host a car show on Saturday, July 15 with featured guest Charley Hutton, one of the most talented and well-known automotive painters and fabricators in the world.

The Hawai‘i Community College Auto Body Repair & Painting Car Show will be at the Manono campus in Hilo from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

During the week prior to the car show, Hutton will teach special workshops for Hawai‘i CC students in the Auto Body Repair & Painting Program (ABRP) and local industry professionals.

A Hawai’i CC Auto Body Repair & Painting student works in the paint booth at the campus in Hilo.

“We are honored Charley will visit us,” said ABRP instructor and alumnus of the program Garrett Fujioka. “This is an exciting opportunity for our students to learn from one of the best in the business. We are also thrilled to be hosting this car show, which will hopefully become an annual Hawai‘i CC tradition that helps inspire the next generation of local auto body repair and painting experts.”

A Porsche 356 Speedster rebuilt and painted by Hawai’i CC instructor Garrett Fujioka.

The car show will feature a variety of vehicles, including show cars, race cars, classics, imports, cruisers and trucks. The event will also feature door prizes every hour, refreshments, entertainment, and opportunities to meet Hutton. Any proceeds will benefit the ABRP Program.

About the Auto Body Program

The Hawai‘i CC Auto Body Repair & Painting Program offers an Associate of Applied Science degree and a Certificate of Achievement. The program provides classroom and hands-on live lab training that represents the latest technological trends in the industry. Alumni have established successful careers on Hawai‘i Island and elsewhere as auto repair professionals and business owners.

More about Charley Hutton

Hutton is the owner of Charley Hutton’s Color Studio and has appeared on reality television shows American Hot Rod and Overhaulin’. He is the winner of four Ridler Awards. The Ridler Award is given annually at Detroit Autorama to the hot rod that exhibits the highest degree of creativity, engineering and design. It is considered the most prestigious award of its kind.

Big Island Police Searching for Missing 17-Year-Old Kona Girl

7/3/17 UPDATE: Hawaiʻi Island police have located 17-year-old Nahoni Chaul of Kailua-Kona, who was reported missing. She was found unharmed on the island of Kauai on (June 30).

Hawai`i Island police are searching for a 17-year-old Kailua-Kona girl who was reported missing.

Nahoni Chaul was last seen in Kailua-Kona on (June 20).

Nahoni Chaul

She is described as Caucasian, 5 feet-9-inches, 165 pounds with brown short shoulder length hair, medium complexion, and brown eyes. She was last seen wearing a pair of grey shorts, a grey t-shirt, a blue backpack, and brown slippers.

Police ask anyone with information on her whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000.00. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers does not record calls or subscribe to any Caller ID Service. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Reptile Skin Grown in Lab for First Time, Helps Study Endangered Turtle Disease

Scientists, including Tina Weatherby with the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM) School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), published a study wherein they reconstructed the skin of endangered green turtles, marking the first time that skin of a non-mammal was successfully engineered in a laboratory. In turn, the scientists were able to grow a tumor-associated virus to better understand certain tumor diseases.

Green sea turtles are listed as threatened or endangered. Credit: Thierry Work, USGS.

In an international collaboration led by the U.S. Geological Survey, scientists engineered turtle skin in order to grow a virus called chelonid herpesvirus 5 or ChHV5. ChHV5 is associated with fibropapillomatosis, known as FP, a tumor disease affecting green turtles worldwide but particularly those in Hawai‘i, Florida and Brazil. FP in turtles causes disfiguring tumors on the skin, eyes and mouth as well as internal tumors. The virus also harms turtles’ immune systems, leading to secondary infections, emaciation and often death.

Examining how ChHV5 grows in turtle skin brings researchers closer to fighting viral diseases that threaten imperiled species.

“Fibropapillomatosis is the most common infectious disease affecting endangered green turtles,” said Thierry Work, a USGS scientist and the lead author of the study. “Our findings provide a significant advancement in studying FP, and may eventually help scientists better understand other herpes virus-induced tumor diseases, including those of humans.”

Scientists used cells from tumors and normal skin from turtles to reconstruct the complex three-dimensional structure of turtle skin, allowing growth of ChHV5 in the lab. In order to observe virus replication in unprecedented detail, Weatherby, a research associate at the UHM SOEST Pacific Biosciences Research Center, precisely cut ultrathin slices of the skin to a thickness of about 60 to 80 nanometers or about one thousandths of the thickness of a hair. Viewing these slices through a transmission electron microscope, the only one of its kind in the state used for biological studies, revealed bizarre systems such as sun-shaped virus replication centers where the viruses form within cells.

Although the existence of ChHV5 has been known for more than 20 years, the inability to grow the virus in the laboratory hampered understanding of how it causes tumors and the development of blood tests to detect the virus.

“Examining viruses within the complex three-dimensional structure of engineered skin is exciting, because virus replication in such a system is likely much closer to reality than traditional laboratory techniques,” Work said. “This method could be a powerful tool for answering broader questions about virus-induced tumors in reptiles and herpes virus replication in general.”

The U.S Endangered Species Act and International Union for the Conservation of Nature list sea turtles as threatened or endangered throughout their range. Aside from disease, threats to green turtles include loss of nesting habitat, nest destruction and bycatch in commercial fisheries.

The USGS partnered with the University of Hawai‘i, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Zurich on the new study.

For more information about wildlife disease research, please visit the USGS National Wildlife Health Center website.

University of Hawai‘i Receives Human Research Protection Accreditation

The University of Hawai‘i (UH) is now recognized as a top research institution that follows rigorous standards for ethics, quality and protections while conducting human research — and becomes the first research organization in the state to be awarded this highly regarded status.

On June 14, 2017, UH was informed that it was awarded full accreditation by the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs (AAHRPP). In addition to assuring the public that the rights and welfare of individuals who participate in research are protected, the accreditation demonstrates to potential collaborators and sponsors in the competitive global research arena that UH has built extensive safeguards into every level of research operations.

“The AAHRPP accreditation reaffirms the University of Hawai‘i’s commitment to strengthen protections for participants involved in our research and will serve as a catalyst to further increase our community involvement and engagement efforts in this area,” said UH Vice President for Research and Innovation Vassilis L. Syrmos. “I would also like to acknowledge the Human Studies Program team and all members of the three UH Institutional Review Boards for their key role in preparing us for this important accreditation.”

Along with UH, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in Cambridge, Massachusetts and Central Michigan University received recent accreditation from AAHRPP.  More than 60 percent of U.S. research-intensive universities and 65 percent of U.S. medical schools are either AAHRPP accredited or have begun the accreditation process.

About AAHRPP

A non-profit organization, AAHRPP provides accreditation for organizations that conduct or review human research and can demonstrate that their protections exceed the safeguards required by the U.S. government. To learn more, visit www.aahrpp.org.

About UH Research

Research conducted by the University of Hawai‘i (UH) impacts the quality of life in the islands and around the world. As the state’s major research university, and because of Hawai‘i’s tremendous geographic diversity, UH plays a prominent role in the state’s economic growth and development through its diverse and world-renowned research programs in astronomy, earth and ocean sciences, medicine and tropical agriculture. http://www.hawaii.edu/research/

Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Campus Youth Football Clinic

Kamehameha Schools Hawaii Campus is having it’s First Annual Youth Football Clinic in July:

FREE Culinary Apprenticeship Training Available Through Kapi‘olani Community College

FREE Culinary Apprenticeship Training Available Through Kapi‘olani Community College

What:  WANTED: Restaurants and local food service establishments and their workers interested in participating in the Hawai‘i Cook Apprenticeship, a free, 20-week culinary program to develop the next generation of cooking professionals, offered by Kapi‘olani Community College’s award winning culinary program.

Culinary students at KCC

Who:

  1. Current employees of local restaurants and food service establishments interested in career advancement.
  2. Local restaurants and food service establishments interested in free, professional training for their employees.

Why:

  1. The employees receive free culinary training from one of the best culinary schools in the Pacific region that will lead to career advancement and higher paying jobs.
  2. The restaurants and local food service establishments save time and money in training their own employees and will, in a relatively short time, employ more professionally trained employees that will result in better product and higher customer satisfaction.

When & How:  Current Kapi‘olani CC Hawai‘i Cook Apprenticeship enrollment ends on June 30, 2017 and the next enrollment period begins on October 2 for the intake that begins on November 13, 2017. Go to https://continuinged.kapiolani.hawaii.edu/hawaii-cook-apprenticeship-program/ or contact Marcus Fikse, Kapi‘olani CC culinary apprentice coordinator at marcusjt@hawaii.ed or (425) 308-6163 or (808)734-9484.

 Other facts:  

  • Apprentices attend a six-hour in-person lab class at Kapi‘olani CC once a week for 20 weeks on the basics of cooking and enroll in four five-week online lecture courses that cover food service industry, sanitation, menu planning and culinary nutrition and complete 2,000 work hours under the guidance of the employer’s chef.
  • Apprentices will be paid a progressively increasing schedule of wages during their apprenticeship based on the acquisition of increased skill and competence on-the-job and in related instruction.
  • Upon successful completion of the program, apprentices should receive promotions to be a bona fide line cook for that employer and being paid at the journey worker’s rate.
  • Apprentices receive a Hawai‘i Cook Apprenticeship certification equivalent to 14 credits, which is considered a full semester that would cost a Hawai‘i resident $1,794 and a non-resident $4,790
  • Kapi‘olani CC pays an apprentice’s employer a $500 stipend per apprentice who completes the program to compensate them for the time and effort to monitor their apprentice.
  • Apprentices must be at least 17 years of age, with a high school diploma or equivalent, have current TB clearance and MMR innoculations and possess physical, verbal and reading abilities essential for job safety.

UH College of Education Faculty Member Awarded $1.8 Million Grant to Promote Life Sciences

UH Mānoa College of Education (COE) Department of Curriculum Studies Professor Pauline Chinn received a four-year award from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for Transforming Scientific Practices to Promote Students’ Interest and Motivation in the Life Sciences: A Teacher Leadership Development Intervention.

Chinn says the program is aligned with the vision of Hōkūle‛a’s Worldwide Voyage and the Promise to Children signed by the COE, University of Hawai‛i and Hawai‛i Department of Education. “We are the stewards and navigators of Hawai‛i’s educational community,” she said.  “We believe that the betterment of humanity is inherently possible, and that our schools, collectively, from early childhood education through advanced graduate studies, are a powerful force for good.” (Promise to Children).

Jackie Camit shows how art can be integrated into a lesson on ocean acidification.

Three courses, underwritten by NSF, integrate science with culture and place to engage students in developing design-based solutions to local problems of economic, cultural and ecological importance.

Teachers and community partners will form an interdisciplinary professional learning community with a UH team, comprised of Chinn, Curriculum Studies Assistant Specialist Kahea Faria, Institute for Teacher Education Assistant Professor Kirsten Mawyer, Kawaihuelani Center for Hawaiian Language Professor Puakea Nogelmeier, and Botany Professor Celia Smith. Community partners provide students with STEM role models and exposure to future careers.

Recruitment is under way for the Fall 2017 EDCS 640J/P Seminar in Place-based Science. The seminar is designed to help teachers build their knowledge mauka-makai (ridge to reef) to engage students in problem-based learning addressing ecological issues, such as invasive and endangered species, water quality and climate change. Other courses in the program will enable teachers to develop and teach lessons aligned to standards as well as to hone research skills that are integral to educational expertise.

Nine credits of NSF sponsored coursework may be applied to an Interdisciplinary MEd or PhD in Curriculum and Instruction. For more information, contact Pauline Chinn at chinn@hawaii.edu.

For more information, visit: https://coe.hawaii.edu/

Hawaii Department of Education Announces Transition Centers Initiative in Honor of Late Congressman K. Mark Takai

In partnership with Hawaii 3Rs and the Military Affairs Council, the Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) announced today an effort to develop high-quality transition centers for Hawaii public schools. The effort is in honor of late Congressman K. Mark Takai, who was a staunch advocate for Hawaii’s students and supporter of military-dependent students throughout his career.

Takai Transition Center partners and Kailua Intermediate AVID students announce the new HIDOE initiative. Photo Credit: Department of Education

School Transition Centers provide a safe and stable foundation for all students, particularly newly arrived military-dependent students, offering peer-to-peer mentoring to help students acclimate into their school community.

“Transition Centers provide tremendous support to new students as well as instilling leadership skills for student mentors,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “We’re grateful for this partnership that allows us to not only expand this program, but fulfill one of our goals in our Strategic Plan in helping as many students and families as possible.”

HIDOE will commit $250,000 annually for four years using federal Impact Aid funds towards school Transition Center facility improvements, technology, furnishings and special events.  Program partners at the Hawaii Chamber of Commerce’s Military Affairs Council and the Hawaii Business Roundtable will provide matching funds each year to be managed by the Hawaii 3Rs Special Fund.

“Hawaii 3R’s is pleased to partner with the Hawaii Department of Education to develop transition centers that will help students assimilate into an unfamiliar environment,” said Hawaii 3Rs Board Chairman Alan Oshima. “By easing them into the rhythm of a new school and campus, learning can become the priority.”

U.S. Rep. Takai’s conscientious work was essential in securing tens of millions in federal Impact Aid funding every year that goes to all public schools

“In working on this initiative there was no question that the effort would be in honor of our friend Mark Takai who was fiercely committed to public education and his service to our nation,” added Superintendent Matayoshi.

“Transition Centers provide tremendous support to new students as well as instilling leadership skills for student mentors,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. Photo Credit: Department of Education

Transition Centers are rooted at public schools with higher populations of military-dependent students, such as Radford High, Leilehua High, Mokapu Elementary and many more.  The success of these Transition Centers will be expanded to serve more students at other schools across the state.

Future transition centers that benefit from this effort will be known as a “Takai Transition Center” and will feature the following pledge.

Future transition centers that benefit from this effort will be known as a “Takai Transition Center” and will feature a pledge welcoming all transitioning students and recognizing military-connected students and their families. Photo Credit: Department of Education

As a member of the K. Mark Takai Transition Center Network, we:

  • Understand the challenges that are an inherent part of matriculating into a new and unfamiliar school environment;
  • Welcome all students transitioning into our school, including military-connected students, and will support and sustain them throughout their time in our school community;
  • Recognize and honor our military personnel for the contributions and sacrifices they make for our defense and the preservation of our rights, and the sacrifices of our military families to support them;
  • Value the added richness and experience that students from varied cultural and social backgrounds bring to our school community; and
  • Commit to providing high-quality supports through dedicated resources via the establishment and sustained operation of a transition center on our school campus.

Schools interested in establishing a new Transition Center or upgrading existing Transition Center facilities should contact HIDOE Military Liaison Cherry Okahara at cherry_okahara@hawaiidoe.org.

Hawaii Governor Signs Heat Abatement Bill to Expedite Cooling Public School Classrooms

Gov. David Ige signed HB 957 (Act 57) – authorizing the Department of Education to borrow money, interest-free, from the Hawai‘i Green Infrastructure Loan Program for heat abatement measures in Hawai‘i’s public school classrooms.

This will expedite the cooling of classrooms across the state while decreasing energy usage and electricity costs.

“I ordered the cooling of 1,000 public school classrooms about a year and a half ago. The state and the DOE have worked very hard to achieve this goal. Although the process hasn’t always been easy and it has taken more time than we would have liked, I am happy to say that we expect to have 1,000 classrooms cooled off by the end of August,” said Gov. David Ige.

The DOE is expecting significant decreases in energy use and electricity costs. The use of LED indoor lighting in public school classrooms is expected to result in a $4 million drop in energy costs annually. Such reductions in energy consumption and the lowering of the kilowatt load may enable the installation of AC units in classrooms without expensive and time consuming electrical upgrades.

The governor’s Cool the Schools initiative and the DOE’s Heat Abatement program have resulted in:

  • The installation of 456 classroom air conditioning units
  • The installation of 201 photovoltaic AC units
  • The distribution of 402 portable AC units to the hottest classrooms across the state
  • Ordering of 1,062 AC units

In addition, 461 portable classrooms have been covered with heat reflective material; trees have been planted to shade buildings and minimize heat; awnings have been installed on at least four buildings; ceiling fans have been installed in 139 classrooms; and large diameter fans are being installed in cafeteria dining rooms.

“A big mahalo to our state legislators for their support of our efforts to cool the schools. Thank you also to the DOE for its hard work and for helping us to achieve our goal of creating a learning environment in which our students and teachers can thrive,” Ige said.

Hawaii Island Students Win $20,000 in Scholarships

Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union (HCFCU) is pleased to announce the recipients of its 2017 College Scholarships. A total of $20,000 was awarded to eight deserving Hawaii Island recipients. Seven of the scholarships were awarded to high school graduates planning to attend a two- or four-year institution of higher learning in the coming school year, and one of the scholarships was awarded to a recipient who is continuing her education post-high school graduation. The scholarships are named after a retired HCFCU employee and community volunteers who made important contributions to the HCFCU.

Aaliyah Kamalii-Keka of Pahoa Intermediate and High School

  • The $2,500 Mitsugi Inaba Scholarship was awarded to Aaliyah Kamalii-Keka of Pahoa Intermediate and High School who intends to pursue studies in Nursing and Hawaiian Language.
  • The $2,500 Peter T. Hirata Scholarship was awarded to Andre Fazeli. The Konawaena High School graduate intends to pursue a career in Mechanical Engineering.

Kamehameha Schools Graduate Shariah Mae Olomua

  • Shariah Mae Olomua, a Kamehameha Schools Hawai graduate, was awarded the $2,500 Albert Akana Scholarship. Olomua’s career goal is to study Business and Law.
  • The $2,500 Katsumasa Tomita Scholarship was presented to Danielle Brown. The Hilo High School graduate intends to become a Professional Writer.
  • Lois Taylor, a graduate of Kealakehe High School, is the recipient of the $2,500 Frank Ishii Scholarship. Taylor will be studying Environmental Biology
  • Gabriella Boyle, a graduate of Kohala High School, was awarded the $2,500 Student Credit Union Scholarship. Boyle intends to pursue a career in Psychology.
  • The $2,500 John Y. Iwane Scholarship was awarded to Hailey Briseno who graduated from Hawaii Preparatory Academy. Hailey intends to pursue a career in Ecosystem and Marine Sciences.
  • Sarah Rouse of Wheaton College is the very first winner of our new $2,500 Yasunori Deguchi Scholarship. The scholarship is offered to high school graduates who could not attend college right after graduation or are currently in their second year of college and in need of further financial assistance.

Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union is a not-for-profit credit union owned by it’s over 39,000 member/owners with branches in Honokaa, Kailua-Kona, Kaloko, Kealakekua and Kohala. In addition to complete checking and savings services, the credit union offers credit cards, auto, mortgage, construction, small business, educational and personal loans; online and mobile banking; investment services; youth programs and supports numerous Hawaii Island programs and events. Membership in Hawaii community Federal Credit Union is open to all Hawaii Island residents. For more information visit www.hicommfcu.com.

Big Island Police Searching for Missing 17-Year-Old Kona Girl

6/22/17 UPDATE:  Hawai`i Island police have located 17-year-old Leilani Alvarado of Kailua-Kona, who was reported missing.  She was found unharmed on the island of Kauai on Thursday morning (June 21).

Hawai`i Island police are searching for a 17-year-old girl who was reported missing.

Leilani Alvarado was last seen in Kailua-Kona on (May 3)

Leilani Alvarado

She is described as Caucasian, 4-feet-11-inches, 95-pounds with brown hair with red highlights, and brown eyes.

Police ask anyone with information on her whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the island-wide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000.00. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers does not record calls or subscribe to any Caller ID Service. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

Hawai‘i Electric Light Company Supports Ku‘ikahi School Mediation Program

The non-profit Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center received a $1,500 grant from Hawai‘i Electric Light Company to support its East Hawai‘i Peer Mediation Elementary School Program.  The program brings conflict resolution and prevention skills to students, developing peacemakers in East Hawai‘i schools.

“I have learned as a Peer Mediator to let the students solve their own problems and not be rude and disrespectful.  I improved my communication and behavior by not interrupting conversations and to be patient when people are talking,” said fifth grader Caleilah-Estelle Ahyee.  “I am proud to be a Peer Mediator because I can make the world better.”

Keonepoko Elementary School fifth grader Caleilah-Estelle Ahyee in school year 2016-2017

During the 2016-2017 school year, 42 fourth, fifth, and sixth graders were trained on how to mediate disputes among students at Kapiolani and Keonepoko elementary schools.  In the coming school year, Mountain View will also participate.

“We appreciate Hawai‘i Electric Light’s ongoing commitment to working with local charities and other non-profit organizations toward a vision of a better Hawai‘i,” said Ku‘ikahi Executive Director Julie Mitchell.

“Peer mediation directly contributes to Hawai‘i Electric Light’s focus on community programs aimed at promoting educational excellence.  Our East Hawai‘i Peer Mediation Program helps keiki reach their full potential,” Mitchell stated.

Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center’s mission is to empower people to come together–to talk and to listen, to explore options, and to find their own best solutions.  To achieve this mission, Ku‘ikahi offers mediation, facilitation, and training to strengthen the ability of diverse individuals and groups to resolve interpersonal conflicts and community issues.  For more information, call Ku‘ikahi at 935-7844 or visit www.hawaiimediation.org.

Board Unanimously Approves Hawaii ESSA Plan for Submission

The Hawaii Department of Education Board of Education (BOE) unanimously approved the submission of the Hawaii Consolidated State Plan for the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA Plan) to the U.S. Department of Education. The plan will be submitted following a 30-day opportunity for Governor David Ige to sign it.

“We appreciate the many meetings and valuable input that led up to today’s Board action,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “This decision is one step forward in greatly helping our administrators who are now tasked with implementing the plan in time for the 2017-18 school year, which starts as early as two weeks for some of our schools.”

The ESSA Plan serves as Hawaii’s application for federal funds, providing resources for our schools to support students in achieving equity and excellence. The plan takes advantage of flexibility by leading with the state’s aspirations, goals and plans as described in the Governor’s Blueprint for Public Education and the joint Strategic Plan.

In testimony submitted by Farrington-Kaiser-Kalani Complex Area administrators, praised the process of developing the plan stating, “Ongoing participation for input and feedback via surveys and face-to-face meetings were provided to learn more about the direction of our Department. We understand that the ESSA plan aligns with our State Strategic Plan and provides overarching guidance while leaving discretion to the schools to determine customized priorities and needs of our community.”

Since January 2016, the Hawaii State Department of Education sought input from educational communities to inform development of the ESSA Plan. Engagement included:

  • 230 meetings to share information and gather feedback with legislative leaders, the Hawaii State Teachers Association, school leaders, the Hawaii State Student Council, and more;
  • 35 presentations and 450 pieces of testimony considered by the BOE; and
  • 458 online survey submissions providing feedback as part of a public comment period.

In his letter of support for the ESSA Plan, Governor Ige noted, “The past year has been unprecedented in the engagement of our statewide community in the development of our education blueprint, strategic plan, and state plan for ESSA. My heartfelt thanks goes out to all teachers, administrators, and community members who submitted testimony and provided input into this plan.”

For more information about the ESSA Plan, click here. To view today’s BOE presentation, click here.

Hawai‘i Community College – Pālamanui Earns LEED Platinum Status for Sustainable Campus Design

The Hawai‘i Community College – Pālamanui (Hawai‘i CC – Pālamanui) campus has earned a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum rating from the U.S. Green Building Council, the highest rating possible in the sustainable building program.

Photos by Andrew Richard Hara

“Hawai‘i CC – Pālamanui is committed to being a community leader in West Hawai‘i in the areas of science, culture and conservation,” said Director of Hawai‘i CC – Pālamanui Dr. Marty Fletcher. “By designing a campus to achieve the highest possible rating in the LEED sustainable building program we are demonstrating our commitment to those principles.”

University of Hawai‘i President David Lassner said, “Congratulations and thanks to our entire team for certifying another LEED Platinum building at UH. The University of Hawaiʻi stands firmly committed to addressing the challenges of climate change and achieving our sustainability goals across our operations, education, scholarship, cultural connections and community engagement.”

Hawai‘i CC – Pālamanui is the West Hawai‘i campus of Hawai‘i Community College with over 500 students enrolled during the past academic year in programs such as Liberal Arts, Digital Media Arts, Hospitality and Tourism, and more. The first phase of Hawai‘i CC – Pālamanui was completed in August 2015 and includes 24,000 square feet of learning space comprised of classrooms, culinary arts kitchens, science labs and more.

The campus earned the LEED Platinum rating by incorporating numerous sustainable design elements in the facility. This includes on-site photovoltaics for electricity; efficient use of water, including a “living machine” natural wastewater recycling system; certified sustainable wood; low-emitting paints and adhesives; and much more.

The campus was designed by Honolulu-based architecture firm Urban Works. In 2016 the design won a Renaissance Building & Remodeling Grand Award for new commercial construction from the Building Industry Association of Hawai‘i.

This is the second Hawai‘i CC building to earn a LEED rating. Hale Aloha on the Manono campus in Hilo earned a LEED Gold rating for a renovation project that incorporated many sustainable design features such as a green roof and use of recycled materials.

Students interested in enrolling at Hawai‘i CC – Pālamanui for the fall 2017 semester can visit hawaii.hawaii.edu/palamanui or call 969-8816. The deadline to apply is August 1.

Department of Health – Lead Tests Can Give False Results, Advises Parents About Re-Testing Their Children

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) recommends parents with children less than 6 years old who had a venous blood lead test drawn before May 17, 2017 consult with their health care provider to determine whether their child should be retested. This advisory does not apply if the child was tested with a finger or heel stick. Additionally, pregnant women and nursing mothers who had a venous blood lead test before May 17, 2017 should consult a health care provider about retesting.

In May, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a warning about Magellan Diagnostics’ LeadCare® analyzers used by some Hawaii laboratories. Magellan blood lead tests on blood drawn from a vein may provide falsely low results. The warning does not apply to capillary blood test results collected by finger stick or heel stick.When the warning was issued, DOH contacted local independent testing laboratories using Magellan Diagnostics’ LeadCare® analyzers. The DOH also contacted the chief medical officers of all health care facilities statewide. Working closely with laboratories throughout the state, and as more information became available, it was determined that a substantial number of children’s test results in Hawaii may have been affected. At this time, the exact number of inaccurate blood lead test results received within the state is not known.

“It’s very important to identify children who may have been exposed to lead” said DOH Director, Dr. Virginia Pressler. “The faulty test underestimates low blood lead levels and even low levels of lead exposure may cause adverse health effects such as learning and behavior problems in young children. If your child was tested for lead with blood drawn from a vein from 2014 to May 17, 2017, please contact your health care provider to discuss the need for retesting.”

For further questions on lead exposure contact the Hawaii Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222.

Information on the national safety alert is available at: https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/about/blood_lead_test_safety_alert.html

VIDEO: Rep. Tulsi Gabbard Addresses Opening Session of the 2017 World Youth Congress

Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02) addressed hundreds of young leaders from Hawaiʻi and around the globe at the opening session of the 2017 World Youth Congress today. Inspired by the Worldwide Voyage of Hōkūleʻa, the 2017 World Youth Congress will be addressing issues from the 2016 International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) World Conservation Congress and exploring the theme “Reconnecting to our Ancestral Roots to build Sustainable Communities.”

In her remarks, the congresswoman spoke about how successful examples of sustainability throughout history, like the ahupuaʻa system developed by the Native Hawaiians, can continue to inspire policies and communities worldwide today. She also encouraged the delegates of the World Youth Congress and other attendees to continue the mission of the Hōkūleʻa—Mālama Honua—by finding ways to care for each other and the planet in their daily lives.

Addressing the delegates, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard said, “Our ancestors taught us basic principles of sustainability and conservation—replenishing what we take, putting need over greed, and giving back to our home. These lessons gifted to us throughout history are just as timely and relevant now as ever before, and they must frame our path in the future.”

Background: Yesterday, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard attended the Hōkūleʻa Homecoming Ceremony and Celebration at Magic Island, where she joined thousands of families, students, educators, sustainability organizations, ocean conservationists, voyaging waʻa groups, residents and visitors from around the world in welcoming the Hōkūleʻa, her sister Hikianalia, and their crew home to Hawaiʻi. The congresswoman will return to Washington, DC on Monday, June 19 for votes in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Hawaii Department of Education Makes Progress with Energy Efficient Strategies for Cooling Schools

The Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) has been working to fast track heat-relief initiatives through its Heat Abatement Program. During the last three years, schools across the state were evaluated for various cooling options including air conditioning (AC), ceiling fans, nighttime heat flushing fans, solar light, trees, heat reflective paint, and more.

Phase II of the Heat Abatement program is already underway with an emphasis on implementing passive cooling projects. Photo Credit: Department of Education

“The department has made every effort to find solutions to cooling our classrooms in ways that are not only cost-efficient but also energy efficient,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “Our Heat Abatement program includes long-term plans for our schools as well as addressing the high-priority classrooms quickly. We want to thank the legislature for funding this effort to accomplish this goal.”

The Department has made significant upgrades to lower temperatures in many of the classrooms at Campbell High including an awning installation over O Building’s courtyard. Photo Credit: MK Think

In 2016, Governor David Ige signed Act 47, which appropriated $100 million to fund equipment and installation costs for AC and other cooling measures. Progress from the department’s Heat Abatement program in conjunction with the Governor’s Cool Classrooms initiative includes:

  • 456 classroom AC units have been installed;
  • 1,062 AC units have been ordered;
  • 1,062 units are out to bid;
  • 201 photovoltaic AC units installed; and
  • 402 portable AC units were distributed to the hottest classrooms statewide.

Phase II of the Heat Abatement program is already underway with an emphasis on implementing passive cooling projects. To date, the following projects have been completed:

  • 461 portable classrooms have been covered with heat reflective material;
  • Trees planted at numerous campuses;
  • 4 buildings have installed or are currently installing awnings;
  • 139 classrooms had ceiling fans installed; in addition, large diameter fans are being installed in cafeteria dining rooms.

“Despite a few setbacks, which included high bid prices due to Hawaii’s construction; the department has worked diligently to come up with solutions that have kept our heat abatement efforts moving forward. Our push for better prices has allowed us to cool more classrooms,” added Assistant Superintendent Dann Carlson.

Duane Kashiwai, public works administrator, shares what HIDOE has been doing to fast track heat-relief initiatives through its Heat Abatement Program. Photo Credit: Department of Education

At James Campbell High School (JCHS), third on the heat abatement priority list, the Department has made significant upgrades to lower temperatures in many of the classrooms. The completed and ongoing improvements include:

  • Installation of new tinted windows;
  • Air conditioning;
  • Nighttime heat flushing fans;
  • Ceiling fans;
  • Progress in the awning installation over O Building’s courtyard;
  • Solar AC and battery units for the portable classrooms;
  • Upcoming fan installation in the cafeteria; and
  • Covered walkways project that will begin early next year.

JCHS is also undergoing other facility renovations and construction from a 30-classroom building currently in the design phase to restroom renovations in O and D buildings, and new portables and reroofing on I Building.

“We have seen a positive change in the campus culture because of these facility improvements,” shared Principal Jon Henry Lee. “The school community recognizes the investment the legislature and department have made towards enhancing the academic experience at our school, and we look forward to seeing the excitement of our students and staff when they return in August.”

For more information about HIDOE’s Heat Abatement program and continued updates about projects going on statewide, click here. A cost breakdown of the AC projects is available here.