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HI-PAL Click It or Ticket Endless Summer Statewide Invitational Basketball Classic Results

A total of 122 youths from 13 teams, included four teams from Oahu and Maui, participated in the HI-PAL Click It or Ticket Endless Summer Statewide Invitational Basketball Classic this past weekend at Waiākea-Uka Gym.

In the Varsity Girls division finals, Maui Sparks edged Wahine Ryders 41-39 in overtime, with Mikayla Tablit hitting the game winning three-pointer in the waning seconds of the game. Tablit led the Sparks with 21 points. Mandy Kawaha topped the Ryders with 19.

Maui Sparks

Maui Sparks

Members of the champion Maui Sparks squad included Tablit, Nel Mae Bumanglag, Kaylee and Kyra Cambra, Kamaile Cugal, Jordyn Mantz, Honeylet Padasadao, Ashley Taylor Peralta, Kealia Sjostrand, Mikiala Sniffen and Tanniya Uchida.

In the third-place contest, Waiākea defeated Keaʻau 43-15. Madison Hwang tallied 10 for Waiākea.

In the Girls Rising Stars finals, Kona Stingrays withstood a furious comeback from Hoop Dreams to claim the championship 26-25. Gracie Hing scored 11 points for the Stingrays and Keani Midel had 10 for Hoop Dreams.

Kona Stingrays

Kona Stingrays

Members of the champion Stingrays included Hing, Kassie and Lanie Alapai, Kiera Ambrosia, Tayvia Cabatbat, Dallas Carlos, Rebekah Fong, Peyton Healeamau, Gabryela Kaipo, Iolani Kamakau, Caiyle Kaupu and Juliana Losalio.

In the third-place contest, Honokaʻa outscored Maui Sparks 26-15. Kaliana Salazar-Harrell led Honokaʻa with 14 points.

In the boys Rising Stars division, Hoop Dreams out-gunned St. Joseph 62-32 to claim the title. Keawe Silva scored 18 points, Kobe Kahele added 16 and Kiaʻi Apele tallied 11 for the champions. Stan Mawry led the runners-up with 10 points.

Hoop Dreams

Hoop Dreams

Members of the champion Hoop Dreams included Silva, Kahele, Apele, Kaukahi Alameda, Macmillan Aloisio, Isaiah Cordero, Chance Simeona, and Kaupena Yasso.

In the third-place contest, Hawaiʻi Storm ran past PGU 42-7. Enzo Mazzulli scored 10 for the Storm.

“Click It or Ticket” is a national education and enforcement campaign to increase seat belt usage and decrease traffic fatalities and injuries. The Hawaii Police Department encourages all youth, teens and adults to use their seat belts.

Hawaii’s Public High School Graduates Improve in ACT College Preparedness Test Scores

A national report released Tuesday shows an increase in Hawaii public schools’ Class of 2016 graduates meeting college readiness benchmarks. ACT, a research-based non-profit organization, issued The Condition of College and Career Readiness 2016 report, which includes information on students taking the ACT test in every state, including Hawaii.

2016 act

Hawaii’s Class of 2016 public high school graduates meeting ACT’s college readiness benchmarks saw these year-over-year changes:

  • A 2 percentage point improvement in Mathematics
  • A 1 percentage point improvement in English and Science
  • Unchanged Reading scores

Approximately 10,525 Hawaii public school graduates in the Class of 2016 took the ACT college preparedness test as juniors. All of Hawaii’s public school juniors now take the ACT test as part of a range of recent transformational efforts to increase students’ college and career readiness. Learn more about these efforts in an Expectation of College . These efforts have produced strong increases in college enrollment, enrollment in early college programs at the high school level, as well as significant declines in college-level remediation in English and Mathematics.

The ACT results provide students information about their readiness for postsecondary education, a score that they can use for college admissions and placement, and information about how to better prepare for postsecondary education during their senior years. The ACT includes a student survey to gauge their plans for life after high school.

“Eighty percent of 2016 graduates who took the ACT test indicated their desire to earn a two- or four-year college degree, and we are encouraged by steady gains in our students’ college preparation and enrollment,” said Kathryn Matayoshi, HIDOE Superintendent.  “However, we recognize the need for more of our students to be ready for the rigors of work and study after high school.”

Over the past three years, Hawaii public school students have seen steady improvements in the individually tested ACT subjects:

  • 4 percentage points up in English
  • 3 percentage points up each in Mathematics, Reading and Science

While Hawaii’s scores have been rising, ACT scores nationwide have shown declines and fluctuating results. Also, not all states administer the ACT to all juniors.

Improvements in the recent ACT scores are a promising reflection of college readiness in Hawaii’s public high school graduates. The ACT is one of only two readiness examinations used for U.S. college and university admissions and was taken by approximately 2.09 million 2016 graduates nationwide.

Click here to view The Condition of College and Career Readiness 2016 report.

 

Free ‘Imiloa Membership for All UH Hilo Students

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo has announced an exciting new benefit for its students. For the very first time, the University’s ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center is offering a complimentary individual membership to every student with a valid I.D. who is registered for the 2016-2017 academic year.

Free Imiloa
“Very few universities can boast an on-campus resource like the ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center, which showcases Mauna Kea and its cultural and scientific value, especially way-finding and astronomy,” said Chancellor Don Straney. “We greatly appreciate this gesture and encourage all of our students to take advantage of the benefits ‘Imiloa has to offer throughout the academic year.”

‘Imiloa is located on the upper campus, and housed in a striking titanium-clad conical structure. The Center is open to the public six days a week (Tuesday-Sunday). Student members will be able to enjoy four free daily shows in the full-dome planetarium, full access to the interactive exhibit hall, plus discounts on special events and purchases at ‘Imiloa’s award-winning Sky Garden Restaurant and on-site store.

For Astronomy majors Shelby Wood and Micah English, an ‘Imiloa membership is something they’ll make extensive use of.

“I’m from New Mexico, and have never been to ‘Imiloa, so I appreciate the opportunity to check it out,” Wood said. “I think it’s really great that they are doing this, because I have been to the planetarium and it was really cool,” English added.

Hawaiian Studies Major Kehaulani Esteban sees ‘Imiloa as a valuable resource for learning more about the Hawaiian culture.

“I’m really looking forward to the Mauna Kea show because we get to learn about how the Hawaiian Islands were created,” Esteban said.

`Imiloa Executive Director Ka’iu Kimura sees the memberships as an effective avenue for advancing ‘Imiloa’s mission to inspire exploration through the sharing of Hawaiian culture and science.

“One of the goals ‘Imiloa has set for our second decade is to take our programming across the island, the state and beyond. At the same time, however, we are committed to amplifying our impact here at home,” Kimura said. “What better way to inspire the next generation than to deepen our ties to UH Hilo and the community of students at our doorstep?”

Students can activate their free membership by visiting: http://blog.imiloahawaii.org/general-information/free-imiloa-membership-for-all-uh-hilo-students/.

Golden Anniversary of Kalakaua Basketball Clinic Recognized by Senator Kim and Clinic Alumni

Before a large and appreciative crowd in the Moanalua High School Gymnasium, the man behind the renown Kalakaua Basketball Clinic today was honored for five decades of serving the community and helping thousands of students find success both on and off the court.

Photo via Senate Communication

Photo via Senate Communication

State Senator Donna Mercado Kim (Dist. 14 – Kapalama, ‘Alewa, Kalihi Valley, Ft. Shafter, Moanalua Gardens & Valley, portions of Halawa and ‘Aiea) was on hand to present a proclamation to Coach Dennis Agena and his staff in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Kalakaua Basketball Clinic during a surprise ceremony at the end of practice.

“Coach Agena is an absolutely remarkable, generous individual who deserves all the accolades being bestowed on him today,” said Sen. Kim. “How he’s given so much of his time and his own resources for the last fifty years is an inspiration to us all.  He exemplifies selflessness and strong leadership through his coaching and guidance by teaching students how to be a good athlete and even greater citizen.”

Kalakaua Basketball Camp2

Sen. Kim’s son, Micah, was a participant in the clinic as a youngster and she witnessed how the program helps build character. “I was proud to see Micah blossom not only in his basketball skills but also as a responsible young man who learned the rewards of hard work and team work,” she said.

Coach Agena is recognized as one of the most respected basketball coaches in the state and founder of the renown Kalakaua Basketball Clinic.  Thousands of students have gone through the clinic that stresses the importance of mastering fundamental basketball skills, as well as team building skills.  Equally important are the values students learn through the program that they carry with them through life: respect, commitment, dedication, and humility.

While the clinic has moved locations over the years, the program has consistently been led by Dennis Agena, who along with his wife Lani, have made it their life mission to keep kids off the streets and out of trouble. He and his staff conduct the clinic on a completely voluntary basis.  The fee for the clinic goes towards maintaining the equipment and covering the expenses for the athletes to travel for tournaments.

Some of the players who have gone through the clinic to become successful athletes at the high school,college and professional level include Derrick Low, Kyle Pape, Blaine Gaison, Cliff LaBoy,Bobby Nash, Dean Shimamoto and Kahi Villa. Also, Nani Cockett, Brandy Richardson, Teddi Pila, BJ Itoman, Iwalani Rodrigues, Tiana Fuertes, and Melanie Azama.

“I’m proud of all the kids. You develop them, you mentor them, you see them grow up, get married, they have kids and I think soon it will be my third generation of coaching these kids and I’m happy for doing that,” said Dennis Agena. As for today’s honors, Agena was humbled. “It’s not about me, it’s about the product you produce out of the program that makes Coach Agena and Coach Myles (Akamine) look good.”

Community Voices Sought for Input on Public Education Plans

Since April, the Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) and Board of Education’s (BOE) has engaged the community as it reviews its joint Strategic Plan. BOE members have hosted meetings in Waimea (Hawaii Island) and Wailuku, and the public has more opportunities to provide feedback at upcoming community meetings on Oahu, Kauai and Molokai.

A group brainstorms ideas during the Maui Community Meeting on Aug. 8.  Photo: Department of Education

A group brainstorms ideas during the Maui Community Meeting on Aug. 8. Photo: Department of Education

“It is important for us to dialogue with members of all sectors of our communities as we work on strategies towards achieving student success,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “Education affects all of us, that’s why we appreciate the public input provided so far and urge others to attend the few meetings we have left before finalizing plans that will set the direction for public education in the upcoming years.”

The public has the remaining opportunities to lend their voice at the following community meetings:

  • Aug. 22: Kailua High School College and Career Center, 451 Ulumanu Drive
  • Aug. 31: Manoa Public Library, 2716 Woodlawn Drive
  • Sept. 1: Kaunakakai Elementary School, 30 Ailoa Street
  • Sept. 14: Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School, 4431 Nuhou Street
  • Sept. 15: Waianae Public Library, 85-625 Farrington Highway

All meetings will be held from 5:00 – 6:30 p.m.

Storyline Consulting, a third-party facilitator, brought in to ensure the objective report of community input, reported on the first phase of HIDOE’s community outreach, which included 108 focus groups on six islands and 1,429 online survey responses. The Phase I report noted the following emerging themes as community-based descriptors of student success:

  • Giving back to the community, environment, and world;
  • Discovering and pursuing passions so students can reach their full potential;
  • Demonstrating strong academic and soft skills, and showing an ability to think critically, solve problems, and apply knowledge to new situations or contexts;
  • Being prepared for life after high school, including setting clear goals and developing short-term and long-term engagement in learning;
  • Exhibiting strength, confidence, and resilience in their every day lives and being generally healthy and happy; and
  • Gaining a strong sense of cultural understanding and appreciation for Hawaii.

For more information, view the digital and print reports.

The Department and BOE are updating the description of student success, and strategies for school and community innovation, professional development, leadership and more. A draft plan will be presented to the BOE in mid-October, and final plan will be presented to the BOE in December.

“Since we embarked on community engagement in April, we have received tremendous amounts of valuable information that will help us craft a Strategic Plan that meets the ever-changing needs of our students and community,” said Tammi Chun, assistant superintendent, Office of Strategy, Innovation and Performance. “The process has been two-fold as we’re also using the feedback from the community to help us with our state plan in response to the new federal education law, ESSA, that is required to receive federal funds.”

HIDOE continues to monitor the national changes for the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), and has offered feedback to the U.S. Department of Education (USED) on how the rules and timelines will impact Hawaii.  The Department took issue with the draft regulations appearing to be more prescriptive than what is described in the spirit of the law. HIDOE anticipates submitting the state’s plan for ESSA funding on the USED’s March 6, 2017 deadline.

For more information about the Strategic Plan and HIDOE’s ESSA efforts, click here; to join the conversation on social media use #HIQualityEd.

Senator Schatz Accepting Applications for High School Internship Program

Schatz Seniors Internship Program Open to High School Seniors from Across the State

The office of U.S. Senator Brian Schatz (D-Hawai‘i) is currently accepting applications for this year’s Schatz Seniors High School Internship Program.

Sen. Schatz in Puna after Iselle hit the area.

Sen. Schatz in Puna after Iselle hit the area.

The Schatz Seniors program provides a hands-on learning opportunity about the U.S. Senate and encourages students to be advocates in their schools and communities.   Schatz Seniors will work with outreach staff, identify issues of interest to their communities, and attend and staff special events.

“Each year our Schatz Seniors show a commitment to service and our state that keeps me optimistic about Hawai‘i’s future.  I encourage all high school seniors who want to help make a difference in their communities to apply to be a part of our team,” said Senator Schatz.

This is not an office position.  Students will complete the majority of assignments in their homes, schools, and communities and should miss little or no class time.  The internship runs from October 2016 – April 2017, and interns must commit for the full term.  Public, private, charter, and homeschool seniors may apply.  Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or better and have personal access to email throughout the internship.  Schatz Seniors will be selected based on their involvement in their community, diversity of interests and life experiences, and demonstrated leadership.

The application is available on his website at schatz.senate.gov and must be completed no later than 6:00pm on Friday, September 16, 2016.  Please contact our Honolulu office at 808-523-2061 with any questions.

Internships for undergraduate and graduate students are also available year-round in our Washington, D.C. and Honolulu offices.  More information can be found on his website.

Kahilu Performing Arts Classes Fall Semester Registration Opens August 18

Registration for the fall semester of Kahilu Performing Arts Classes (KPAC) opens Thursday, August 18. The semester begins Wednesday, September 7 and classes run through Thursday, December 15, concluding with a music and theatre showcase on Saturday, December 17.

trapeze

There are a total of 26 classes on offer for the fall semester, including the addition of four new classes – Dance Improv & Choreo, Backstage Tech, Conditioning, and Acting the Song.

Formerly Prince Dance Institute and smArt Academy, these two programs have merged into the Kahilu Performing Arts Classes (KPAC). Directed by Angel Prince, former Artistic Director of Prince Dance Institute, this newly renamed Kahilu Theatre education program will continue to offer excellence in training in the performing arts with many of the same teachers and classes returning for the new semester.

New Classes:

Dance Improv & Choreo is a fun and explorative class, which will use interactive games as a tool to create movement, enhance creativity and inspire new ideas. Basic composition lessons will aid in developing individual creative expression in a relaxed and supportive environment.

Backstage Tech is a hands-on, audio-visual class for those who are interested in theatre production experience. Students will learn the basics of lighting, sound, set building, and various technical performing arts world skills. There is no experience needed to join this class.

Conditioning class optimizes neuromuscular connections, alignment, strength and flexibility. It supports dancers in training or anyone wishing to move with the skill and grace of a dancer. An ideal after-ballet class, all levels of experience are welcome to join to lengthen, tone and reconnect.

Acting the Song is a musical theatre class that will teach students a technique for working on and performing songs from musicals. The same method acting technique that Beth Dunnington teaches in acting class will apply to this musical theatre class. Students will work on individual songs and one group number, both of which they will have the opportunity to perform in the December 17th showcase at the Kahilu. Students will be welcome and encouraged to audition for the June Kahilu Theatre Youth Troupe production of 13: The Musical.

Complete List of Fall Semester Kahilu Performing Arts Classes:

  • Trapeze 1, Trapeze 2
  • Contemporary 1, Contemporary 2, Contemporary 3
  • Aerial Silks 1, Aerial Silks 2, Aerial Silks 3, Aerial Silks 4
  • Keiki Dance
  • Ballet 1, Ballet 2
  • Hip Hop 1, Hip Hop 2
  • Breakdancing
  • Hula 1, Hula 2
  • Dance Improv & Choreo
  • Theatre Games
  • Singing
  • Acting the Song
  • Acting Technique & Improv
  • Circus Arts
  • Conditioning
  • Backstage Production

KPAC Faculty

  • Angel Prince (Director of KPAC): Contemporary, Improv and Choreography
  • Noelani Anderson: Theatre Games
  • Lynn Barre: Ballet and Conditioning
  • Paul Buckley: Backstage Tech
  • Beth Dunnington: Acting Technique and Acting the Song
  • Graham Ellis: Circus Arts
  • Chris “Mana” Ho’opai: Hip Hop and Breakin’
  • Leia Lawrence: Hula
  • Elizabeth McDonald: Contemporary and Trapeze
  • Kat Reuss: Aerial silks
  • Victoria Roos: Aerial silks
  • Val Underwood: Singing

Class Enrollment Information:

Classes will be held Monday through Thursday, between the hours of 3:00pm and 7:30pm, and will be held on the main stage and in the Mike Luce Studio.

Dance Class

Scholarships are available for qualifying applicants and will be accepted from August 18 through September 1. A panel will review applications and notification will be sent to all applicants before classes begin on September 7.

For more information regarding class schedules, registration, fees, and scholarship information, call the Kahilu Theatre Box Office at 808.885.6868 or visithttp://www.kahilutheatre. org.

Hawaii Rush Soccer Team Wins National Championship… Again!

Winning a National Cup Finals championship means you’ve joined elite company.

Hawaii RushAbout 1,000 teams compete over the course of National Cup Regionals and the Finals, and that doesn’t even incorporate total state cup participation, which exceeds that.

With only 20 teams capturing national titles last month at the National Cup XV Finals, mathematics alone proves that winning your last game of US Club Soccer’s cup-based national championship series is a rare feat. The Hawaii Rush ’02 girls team one-upped those odds by winning the U-13 Premier Group championship last year and then winning the U-14 Premier Group title this year. This year, that feat was only accomplished by Hawaii Rush ‘02.

“I feel that this championship impacts all of these players for a lifetime,” Hawaii Rush coach Brent Murakami said. “It may not just be holding on to the trophy at the end of the tournament, but all the work that was put in to achieve that success. These girls needed to sacrifice a lot for this championship: time spent on the field instead of with friends, waking up early, sleeping early, being pushed physically and mentally.

“I think that the determination to overcome all those frustrations and sacrifices will take them a long way in life. It’s important to understand that getting to the top does not come easy. Unfortunately, only one team can win and that teaches the players to be proud, but to be humble. I believe that had been displayed by them throughout the entire tournament.”

The ultimate results may have been the same at Grand Park in Westfield, Ind. as it was at Aurora Sports Park in Aurora, Colo., but Murakami said the similarities stop there.

National Cup XV Finals in Aurora, Colo.:

  • Hawaii Rush ’02 5, GPS ME Phoenix Elite 1
  • Hawaii Rush ’02 4, FC Stars ’02 NH United 0
  • Hawaii Rush ’02 1, NEFC Premier South 0
  • Hawaii Rush ’02 2, NEFC Premier South 0

National Cup XIV Finals in Westfield, Ind.:

  • Hawaii Rush ’02 2, Washington East SC ’01 2
  • Hawaii Rush ’02 1, Cincinnati United Premier Black 01/02 1
  • Hawaii Rush ’02 2, California Odyssey ’01 1
  • Hawaii Rush ’02 3, Cincinnati United Premier Black 01/02 0

“Last year was our first opportunity for these girls to make a US Club Soccer national appearance,” he said. “It was tough last year in the sense that it was their first. Everything was new to them. It was the first time playing beyond the West Coast for most of the girls.”

This year, Murakami admits that the girls weren’t playing to their potential heading into the tournament after a “roller coaster spring season.” But, the momentum started changing through good training sessions.

“This tournament was different, because we were now the defending champions and we were no longer flying under the radar. Although we had never played any of the teams in our pool before, they all knew that we were the defending champions. There was motivation for them.”

With any national championship event, scouting is difficult. The team and even the coaching staff weren’t familiar with the teams they faced in pool play (GPS ME Phoenix Elite, FC Stars NH United and NEFC Premier South). But, Hawaii Rush managed to score first in all of its games – and not only score first, but do it within the first five minutes of each game.

As the girls enjoy their back-to-back championship notoriety, Murakami insists they’ve not entertained the idea of a three-peat just yet. “We are just so happy for the girls to win this year,” he said, adding they welcome the challenge of being moved to the Super Group (most competitive) next year if they qualify to the National Cup XVI Finals. “To end the year playing the quality of soccer they played in the tournament was awesome.”

Lance Keawe Wilhelm Reappointed Kamehameha Schools Trustee

Probate Court Judge Derrick Chan today reappointed Kamehameha Schools Trustee Lance Wilhelm to serve a second term on the trustee board. Trustees Corbett Kalama, Micah Kāne and Robert Nobriga filed a response in court in support of the reappointment.

Newly reappointed Trustee Lance Wilhelm (left) considers it a blessing to work alongside his fellow trustees Corbett Kalama, Robert Nobriga and Micah Kāne. Wilhelm hopes to use his five-year 'window of opportunity' to make a positive impact on KS.

Newly reappointed Trustee Lance Wilhelm (left) considers it a blessing to work alongside his fellow trustees Corbett Kalama, Robert Nobriga and Micah Kāne. Wilhelm hopes to use his five-year ‘window of opportunity’ to make a positive impact on KS.

“Lance has brought a lot of knowledge and wisdom to our group,” says Kalama, Trustee chair. “He also brings to our organization a deep respect for the Hawaiian culture – especially in his ability to speak Hawaiian in a very humble, sensitive and meaningful manor.

“As trustees, we strive to be good representatives of Pauahi. Lance carries himself well. His behavior reinforces what we expect of our students and staff members, making him an excellent role model.”

KS trustees are appointed by the Probate Court in accordance with a process approved by the court in 2000. They may serve up to 10 years and are eligible to petition for reappointment at the end of their initial five-year term. Wilhelm hopes to make the most of his remaining time as trustee.

“I am deeply humbled by the support of my colleagues,” says Wilhelm. “I have the greatest respect for my fellow trustees and consider it one of the great blessings of my life to work alongside these remarkable individuals.

“As trustees of Kamehameha Schools, we come to our responsibilities knowing that our window of opportunity to make positive impacts to our organization is limited. I hope that within my window I can help to move us into our Strategic Plan with high energy and high confidence.”

Joining the KS trustees at Probate Court to witness the hearing was KS Chief Executive Officer Jack Wong.

“Judge Chan’s reappointment of Trustee Wilhelm today reflects the court’s acknowledgement that he has served KS well and has earned his second term as trustee,” says Wong. “I look forward to our continued work with Lance and the trustees as we build momentum around our Strategic Plan and strengthen our commitment to cultivating a thriving lāhui.”

Wilhelm is the managing principal for Irongate Capital, overseeing its current and future development operations in Hawai‘i including Ritz-Carlton Residences, Waikīkī Beach. He is also a board member for several nonprofit organizations including the YMCA of Honolulu, Island Pacific Academy, Hawai‘i Pacific University and the University of Hawai‘i Foundation.

After graduating from Kamehameha Schools Kapālama in 1983, he went on to earn a bachelor of arts degree in communications from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

Hawaiian Electric Donates $25K to Waianae Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii

Students at the Waianae Clubhouse of Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii (BGCH) have received a much-needed boost from the Hawaiian Electric Companies today with a check for $25,000.

Hawaiian Electric presented a $25,000 grant to the Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii for the Waianae Clubhouse "Power Hour" - an afterschool program for students to focus on their studies so they can improve their school performance and achieve academic success.

Hawaiian Electric presented a $25,000 grant to the Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii for the Waianae Clubhouse “Power Hour” – an after school program for students to focus on their studies so they can improve their school performance and achieve academic success.

The funds, appropriated for the 2016-2017 school year, will be used to support the Clubhouse’s Power Hour, a dedicated after-school time for students to focus on homework or be tutored by trained staff members, allowing students to stay on pace with their peers and enter the next school day with confidence.

“Power Hour has helped me a lot,” said Tyrese Clark, a Waianae Clubhouse kid. “I use to hate math and I wasn’t very good at it. I didn’t like to do the homework, because it was hard. I was failing tests and not trying my best. But at Power Hour, Mr. Ortiz-Morales taught me how to do fractions in a way I can understand – and I made an ‘A’ on my last test.”

Power Hour at the Waianae Clubhouse began on August 1, 2016 with an estimated 65 elementary through high school student participants. Last year, the program served over 120 students throughout the school year.

“We are deeply grateful for Hawaiian Electric Companies’ generous gift,” said Tim Motts, President and CEO of BGCH. “Often coming from an underserved community and unstructured home environment, the students from the Waianae Clubhouse will benefit immensely from Power Hour to encourage academic success for a bright future.”

Statistics overwhelmingly show that nationally one in five kids will not graduate from high school, perpetuating the cycle of poverty. For low-income children, academic struggles can lead to disengagement from school and high drop-out rates. In 2015, 98 percent of BGCH high school seniors graduated with a high school diploma. Hawaiian Electric Companies’ support of Power Hour will provide youth with the opportunity to achieve their educational goals.

“We are encouraged by organizations like the Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii for their unwavering commitment to improving the lives and future of the communities they serve,” said Colton Ching, Hawaiian Electric vice president – energy delivery, and BGCH board member. “Seeing first-hand the impact of their programs and hearing from the kids themselves has been so rewarding. We share BGCH’s commitment to the health and welfare of children and youth, and we are honored to partner with them in their efforts.”

Justin Bieber Leaves the Big Island – His Pals Were…

Well Justin Bieber left the Big Island last night after being here for a few days staying at Waterfalling Estate.

bieberbyeA lot of folks were asking who the girls were that were with him.  I have learned that one of the girls is Australian bikini model Sahara Ray and another of the ladies was Meredith Hennessy.

Bieber Girls
Fashion designer Cedric Benaroch was the guy that was seen in many of the pictures while he was on the island.  Bieber has removed this picture from his Instagram of the two of them together.
Bieber and Cedric
Benaroch later posted a photo on Instagram confirming they were leaving Hawaii by saying “Peace Out Hawaii”.
aloha bieber

Hawaii Expresses Concerns Over ESSA Regulations and Implementation Timing

In a joint letter to the U.S. Department of Education, Governor David Ige, Hawaii State Board of Education (BOE) Chairperson Lance Mizumoto and Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi voiced concerns about the draft regulations and implementation timeline for the Every Students Succeeds Act (ESSA). The letter was sent as part of the public comment period for proposed federal regulations, and in response to BOE action on Aug. 16, 2016 in support of a joint letter protesting the implications of the draft regulations.

Click to read the letter

Click to read the letter

“The draft regulations being put forward appear to be more prescriptive than the spirit of the law. ESSA was initially returning more control to the states,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “In the letter, we shared our concerns over proposed regulations, which are overly restrictive and harken back to No Child Left Behind’s one-size-fits-all approach. Also, the proposed implementation timeline is unrealistic and not conducive to school improvement. Our schools will be developing their academic and financial plans in Spring 2017 in time for the start of school for teachers on Aug. 1, 2017.”

This is the first of several anticipated public comment periods for various components of the ESSA law during the rulemaking process. HIDOE anticipates submitting the state’s ESSA plan for funding to the U.S. Department of Education by the March 6, 2017 early deadline in preparation for required implementation during the 2017-18 school year.

Hawaii is in the process of taking advantage of flexibility in the ESSA law by reviewing and updating its Strategic Plan so that the state’s plan guides federal planning efforts.

Hawaii has served as a model for other states in regards to the outreach being done to solicit feedback for the Strategic Plan, which will inform our state’s ESSA plan for federal funding. As part of the review and extension of the joint Strategic Plan with the BOE, HIDOE has been collecting feedback from schools, students, parents and the community that will be incorporated into the ESSA state plan. This includes 1,429 survey responses as well as 108 diverse focus groups conducted statewide with an estimated 1,201 participants. Additionally, the BOE and HIDOE are taking into account the Governor’s ESSA Task Force’s work as part of the community feedback to shape the Strategic Plan and state’s ESSA plan for federal funding.

“While Hawaii is ahead of the curve with our rigorous academic standards and Strive HI accountability system, there is still room for growth and improvement and we are reaching out to the community for feedback,” said Assistant Superintendent Tammi Chun. “We will continue our community outreach for the joint Strategic Plan through community meetings from August through October, information gathered will also be considered for the ESSA state plan.”

The first BOE community meeting about the Strategic Plan review and update is Wednesday, Aug. 3 in Waimea, Hawaii Island. For more information about tomorrow’s meeting, visit www.hawaiiboe.net.

For more information about ESSA and its impact in Hawaii, as well as the HIDOE and BOE joint Strategic Plan, visit www.hawaiipublischools.org.

Registration Deadline Extended for ‘Ohana Shoreline Fishing Tournament

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation has extended the registration deadline for its 20th Annual ‘Ohana Shoreline Fishing Tournament until Friday, August 12.

Ohana Fishing Tournament fishCompleted registration forms must be turned in to the Recreation Division office located at 799 Pi‘ilani Street in Hilo or postmarked by Friday, August 12. Registration forms, along with tournament rules, are available at County Parks and Recreation facilities island-wide, S. Tokunaga Store in Hilo and J. Hara Store in Kurtistown. The forms also can be found online at: http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation/.

The ‘Ohana Shoreline Fishing Tournament will open Friday, August 19, and end with weigh-ins conducted from noon until 1:30 p.m. Sunday, August 21, at Honoka‘a Gymnasium.

Separate divisions are offered for keiki 5 to 12 years old, teens, men, women, kūpuna at least 55 years old, and ‘ohana or families. There also will be a barbless circle hook challenge. Entry fee is either $25 or $30 per person or family, depending on the division entered. Please make checks payable to “County Director of Finance.”

For more information about the ‘Ohana Shoreline Fishing Tournament, please call Jayme Carvalho at 962-2109 or 936-4285.

Hawaii Income Qualifications for Free/Reduced Lunch Updated

The Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) announced on Wednesday its policy for free and reduced price meals for children unable to pay the full price of meals served under the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs. Each school has a copy of the policy, which may be reviewed by an interested party.

The following household size and income criteria will be used for determining eligibility. Children from households whose income is at or below the levels shown are eligible for free or reduced price meals.

income chart

Applications are now being accepted for the current 2016-2017 school year. Application forms are being sent home with a letter to parent/guardian. To apply for free or reduced price meals, households should submit an electronic application online at EZMEALAPP.COM or complete a paper application. The information provided on the application will be used for the purpose of determining eligibility and may be verified at any time during the school year by school or other program officials.

For HIDOE officials to determine eligibility, households receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) must list the child’s name, date of birth, grade, school code and their SNAP or TANF case number and the signature and name of an adult household member.

Households not receiving SNAP or TANF must list: 1) the names of everyone in the household; 2) the amount of income received by each person, how often the income is received and the source of the income; 3) the name and last 4 digits of Social Security Number of the household’s primary wage earner or if no adult household members have a Social Security Number, leave this space blank and mark the box labeled “Check if no SSN”; 4) the signature of an adult household member.

Applications may be submitted at any time during the year.

Under the provisions of the free and reduced price policy, the DOE will review applications and determine eligibility. Parents or guardians dissatisfied with the ruling of the official may wish to discuss the decision with the reviewing official on an informal basis. Parents wishing to make a formal appeal may make a request for a hearing on the decision in writing to:

Glenna Shim, Director
School Food Services Branch
1106 Koko Head Avenue
Honolulu, HI  96816

The information provided by the household is confidential and will be used only for purposes of determining eligibility and verifying data.

In accordance with federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability.

Statewide Community Meetings on Improving Public Education

The Hawaii State Department of Education (DOE) and Board of Education (BOE) have scheduled a series of community meetings to provide updates on plans to better public education.  These meetings are part of the ongoing outreach effort in the updating of the Strategic Plan.

Student Success

Student success is at the core of the DOE/BOE Strategic Plan, which sets targets for progress tied to three goals. Earlier this year, the DOE/BOE embarked on a review and extension of the plan.

“We have sought input from students, teachers, school leaders, parents, employers and community members and their feedback is an important component as we move forward,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi.  “Additionally, we are reviewing our student data, and the output of the Governor’s team on the Every Student Succeeds Act. Based on the collective feedback, we will develop new strategies to support student success.”

“A lot of work has been done and we want to share this information with our school communities and education stakeholders,” added BOE Chairman Lance Mizumoto.  “We encourage anyone interested in public education to attend our meetings to learn about our efforts.”

Staff from DOE will be collecting community members’ perspectives on the draft Strategic Plan priorities, which will also be used to inform the Plan’s review and extension.

The Governor’s Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Team is also sharing information about new opportunities under the federal Every Student Succeeds Act. Hawaii’s state plan for ESSA will be informed by the Strategic Plan.

For more information about the Strategic Plan or ESSA, please visit HawaiiPublicSchools.org.

Hawai‘i Island

AUG. 3, 2016 BOE Community Meeting at Kanu o ka ʻĀina Learning ʻOhana,
Hālau Hoʻolako Building, ʻOluʻOlu Room. Address: 65-1043 Hiʻiaka Street, Waimea.
5-6:30 p.m.
AUG. 17, 2016 Governor’s ESSA Team Town Hall Meeting, Kealakehe High School.
Address: 74-5000 Puohulihuli St, Kailua-Kona. 4:30-6:30 p.m.
AUG. 24, 2016 Governor’s ESSA Team Town Hall Meeting, Waiakea High School.
Address: 155 W Kawili Street, Hilo. 4:30-6:30 p.m.

Kaua‘i

AUG. 24, 2016 Governor’s ESSA Team Town Hall Meeting, Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School.
Address: 4431 Nuhou Street, Lihue. 4:30-6:30 p.m.
SEPT. 14, 2016 Board of Education Community Meeting, Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School.
Address: 4431 Nuhou Street, Lihue. 5-6:30 p.m.

O‘ahu

AUG. 2, 2016 Board of Education, General Business Meeting, 1390 Miller Street, Boardroom, 4th floor
AUG. 10, 2016 Governor’s ESSA Team Town Hall Meeting, Kalani High School.
Address: 4680 Kalanianaole Hwy, Honolulu. 6-8 p.m.
AUG. 16, 2016 Board of Education, General Business Meeting, 1390 Miller Street, Boardroom, 4th floor
AUG. 22, 2016 Board of Education community meeting, Kailua High School library.
Address: 451 Ulumanu Drive, Kailua. 5-6:30 p.m. (tentative)
AUG. 31, 2016 Board of Education community meeting, Manoa or Liliha public library.
5-6:30 p.m. (tentative)
SEPT. 6, 2016 Board of Education, General Business Meeting, 1390 Miller Street, Boardroom, 4th floor
SEPT. 7, 2016 Governor’s ESSA Team Town Hall Meeting, Castle High School.
Address: 45-386 Kaneohe Bay Drive, Kaneohe. 6-8 p.m.
SEPT. 14, 2016 Governor’s ESSA Team Town Hall Meeting, Moanalua High School.
Address: 2825 Ala Ilima Street, Honolulu. 6-8 p.m.
SEPT. 15, 2016 Board of Education community meeting, Waianae Public Library.
Address: 85-625 Farrington Hwy, Waianae. 5-6:30 p.m.
SEPT. 20, 2016 Board of Education, General Business Meeting, 1390 Miller Street, Boardroom, 4th floor

Maui

AUG. 8, 2016 BOE Community Meeting at the Baldwin High School Library.
Address: 1650 Ka‘ahumanu Hwy, Wailuku.
5-6:30 pm (tentative)
SEPT. 7, 2016 Governor’s ESSA Team Town Hall Meeting, Maui High School.
Address: 660 Lono Avenue, Kahului. 4:30-6:30 p.m.

Moloka‘i

AUG. 27, 2016 Governor’s ESSA Team Town Hall Meeting, Moloka‘i High School.
Address: 2140 Farrington Avenue, Ho’olehua. 1-3 p.m.

 

Hawaii Department of Education Advises on Heat Safety

With the new school year beginning Aug. 1, the Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) reminds schools and parents about health guidance on preventing heat illness.

Portable ACs installed as temporary supplemental cooling in some of Hawaii's hottest classrooms.

Portable ACs installed as temporary supplemental cooling in some of Hawaii’s hottest classrooms.

“We have been working hard to cool classrooms across the state, however, with increased heat and humidity, it’s important to revisit tips on preventing heat exhaustion,” stated Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “In addressing heat concerns, we met with Principals to discuss options of moving students to cooler areas of their campuses if necessary.”

Next week, letters from HIDOE and the Department of Health will be sent home to parents providing health recommendations, which include helping students prepare for hot days.

A year ago, high temperatures prompted HIDOE to post Heat-Related Guidelines in all classrooms and school offices. Those guidelines are also posted on the Department’s website.

Meanwhile, HIDOE’s heat abatement efforts have resulted in more than 400 portable classrooms with heat reflective materials, 139 classrooms installed with ceiling fans, 109 classrooms equipped with portable ACs, and upgrades to electrical systems at schools across the state.

Work towards the Governor’s goal of installing air conditioning units in 1,000 classrooms is also ongoing. Learn more about the ongoing heat abatement projects.

Robotics and STEM Events Receive Funding From Hawaiian Electric

sgcAs part of its 2016 second quarter contributions, the Hawaiian Electric Companies have donated $20,000 to the Hawaii Space Grant Consortium for the:

  • Pan Pacific VEX (high school) and VEX IQ (elementary and middle school) Championships, Oct. 7-9 at Kamehameha Schools Kapalama Campus Kekuhaupio Gym. Initiated in 2008 as a means to have Hawaii teams participate in an international robotics tournament, the Pan Pacific VEX has hosted more than 100 teams from China, Taiwan, the U.S. mainland and Hawaii, growing to become at one time the second largest VEX tournament in the world. The Hawaiian Electric Companies’ support will help to reinstate the Pan Pacific VEX Championship which has not been held for the past two years.
  • Astronaut Lacy Veach Day of Discovery, Oct. 29 at Punahou School. The event honors the late Astronaut Charles Lacy Veach who considered Honolulu his home, and promotes interest in science and technology among educators, students and their families. The 2016 event will include hands-on workshops, displays and a VEX IQ qualifying robotics tournament involving 18 school teams. Hawaiian Electric is a founding sponsor of the event that was first held in 2002. Company employees continue to actively participate in providing workshops, a display and volunteers at the event.
  • 2016-17 Hawaiian Electric Companies Hawaii State High School and Middle School VEX Championships, featuring the high school event on Jan. 5, 2017 at Keaau High School on Hawaii Island, and the middle school event on Jan. 7, 2017 at Stevenson Middle School on Oahu. In these team-based games, first held in 2013, students must design, build and control their robots to participate in various skills challenges that demonstrate their grasp of STEM concepts. The event will qualify teams to participate in the 2017 Worlds VEX Championships.

To date in 2016, the Hawaiian Electric Companies have provided more than $60,000 in corporate contributions to advance STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) learning and enrichment programs for Hawaii students and educators, including math and science bowls, engineering and science fairs, education summits, robotic programs, and STEM projects and events.

Company employees also volunteer countless hours to provide student mentoring as well as staffing at robotic tournaments, science, engineering and math fairs, and other related events. Hawaiian Electric has supported STEM programs and initiatives in Hawaii for more than 30 years and contributed more than $1 million during that time.

Gov. Ige Supports Foster Youth and Resource Caregivers with Bill Signing

During the 2016 legislative session, Department of Human Services (DHS) advocated alongside the community for two bills that expand the opportunities for young people to discover who they are through education and experiences, supported by people who care for them. On June 29, Governor David Ige signed into law these two pieces of legislation.

Gov. Ige stands beside young people, legislators, community members, DHS staff and other state employees after signing HB2350 and SB2878 into law.

Gov. Ige stands beside young people, legislators, community members, DHS staff and other state employees after signing HB2350 and SB2878 into law.

In a bill signing ceremony, Gov. Ige first signed House Bill 2350 into law as Act 133. This law supports resource caregivers, giving them more discretion to allow youth to participate in activities that will help them grow, learn, and thrive. Additionally, Gov. Ige signed Senate Bill 2878 into law as Act 134. This law extends the application period for former foster youth to access higher education benefits to age 26 and supports Imua Kākou, helping ease the transition for foster youth to adulthood.

The two laws brought together the community, DHS, and the very young people whose lives are impacted by the bills to work with legislators and stress the importance of these supports. The legislature’s passage and governor’s signing of these laws demonstrate the power of these young people and our government’s commitment to supporting them. The two laws represent shared commitment across the community and the three State of Hawai‘i branches of government, which was displayed in each branch’s presence at the bill signing ceremony.

Early Registration Fee for Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp Extended

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation is extending the discounted early-registration fee for its 4th Annual Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp that returns to Hilo July 26-29.

Yagi

Parents who have not yet signed up their keiki may still take advantage of the reduced $60 per-child entry fee that was to have expired July 13.   New registrations will be accepted up until the first day of camp July 26.

Registration forms are available at the Department’s Recreation office located within Aunty Sally Kaleohano’s Lū‘au Hale at 799 Pi‘ilani Street in Hilo, county gyms, and online at http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation/.

Please make checks payable to the “County Director of Finance” and include the note “Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp.”

The Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp is named in honor of the legendary former UH-Hilo men’s basketball coach who helped guide the Vulcans-Hawai‘i Basketball School for 37 years. Open to boys and girls 9 to 17 years old, the camp will be held at the Afook-Chinen Civic Auditorium and the Pana‘ewa Covered Play Courts, which feature new flooring.

A team of coaches will instruct and supervise campers as they practice agility, ball-handling and other drills during morning skill sessions.
Following a lunch break, players will showcase what they’ve learned by competing in games expected to last until about 3:30 p.m. each day. Special awards will be presented to outstanding participants at the close of the four-day camp.

FREE to First 120 Children – ‘Aha Pai’ea Keiki Sports Challenge at UH Hilo

The annual ‘Aha Pai’ea Keiki Sports Challenge is slated for Saturday, August 27 at the University of Hawai’i at Hilo Athletic complex.
Keiki Challenge at UHH
Hosted by the UH Hilo Vulcan Athletic Department and the Vulcan Booster Club, the challenge runs from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. It is FREE and limited to first 120 children 7-12 years old to register. Lunch, beverages and a t-shirt will be provided.

Registration forms are available by clicking on link below, emailing vulcansathletics@gmail.com or calling Vulcan Booster Club ‘Aha Pai’ea Coordinator Ed Torrison at 808-987-3215.

Through the course of the day, participants need to be prepared for vigorous physical activity and should bring a water bottle, running shoes and wear comfortable attire. Various activities are scheduled in baseball, basketball, soccer, softball, tennis and volleyball.

For more information call 808-987-3215.

Registration form