Marine Debris Keiki Education & Outreach Program

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund is pleased to announce that it will begin its Marine Debris Keiki Education & Outreach “MDKEO” program on Hawaiʻi Island this Fall.

HWF works with Imi Pono No Ka ‘Āina group from Kaʻū to float microplastic debris from the beach sand at Kamilo Point.  Photo by M Lamson/HWF.

Handpainted keiki output from the HWF workshop at the “GEMS” (Girls Exploring Math & Science) program in Keauhou last year. Photo by M Lamson/HWF

This program will bring two marine science mentors into 20 different elementary schools (K – 5th grade classrooms) to introduce topics like ocean circulation, marine ecology, and human impacts (like marine debris).  Mentors will work with receptive Hawaiʻi Island teachers to coordinate relevant student activities that meet the math and science benchmarks and “Common Core” standards for the State of Hawaiʻi Department of Education for each grade level.

HWF works with Imi Pono No Ka ‘Āina group from Kaʻū to float microplastic debris from the beach sand at Kamilo Point.  Photo by M Lamson/HWF.

HWF works with Imi Pono No Ka ‘Āina group from Kaʻū to float microplastic debris from the beach sand at Kamilo Point. Photo by M Lamson/HWF.

These in-class lectures will conclude with student presentations of potential solutions to reduce marine debris here in Hawaiʻi and elsewhere throughout the Pacific Basin.

The program will culminate with a family “Beach Cleanup Day” at local marine debris hubs like Kamilo Point (Kaʻū), Pololu (North Kohala), Kānekanaka Point (South Kohala), Cape Kumukahi (Puna), Kaipalaoa (Hilo), and Oʻoma (Kona).  This MDKEO program began with financial support from a HWF t-shirt fundraiser and will now be sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Debris Program.

“Microplastics” photograph given with permission by HWF volunteer Sean P. King.

“Microplastics” photograph given with permission by HWF volunteer Sean P. King.

For more info about this marine debris prevention program or to sign up a classroom, please contact Catherine at spina.HWF@gmail.com; and for more info about volunteering for our next Kaʻū coastal cleanup event, contact Megan at kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com  or 808/769-7629. Find additional resources and details about HWF’s ongoing conservation projects online at www.wildhawaii.org.

Successful 2nd Annual Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp Concludes

A successful 2nd Annual Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp concluded Thursday, July 24, attracting nearly 150 keiki athletes and coaches to the four-day skills camp held in Hilo.

Can you find my son?

Can you find my son? (Click to enlarge)

Boys and girls 9 to 17 years old received personalized instruction from legendary former University of Hawai‘i at Hilo basketball Coach Jimmy Yagi, who helped guide the Vulcans-Hawai‘i Basketball School for 37 years.

The County of Hawai‘i Department of Parks and Recreation offered the camp for the first time in 2013 to honor Coach Yagi and provide a low-cost, end-of-summer program for kids to learn basketball fundamentals.

Teenage campers again played at the Afook-Chinen Civic Auditorium, while preteens were assigned to the Pana‘ewa Covered Play Courts. Shooting, defense, proper basketball stance, footwork, dribbling, and teamwork were among the lessons taught to the keiki, who displayed their skills during games played each afternoon.

The Department of Parks and Recreation thanks Coach Yagi, lead clinician Bill O’Rear, UHH men’s basketball Head Coach GE Coleman, UHH women’s basketball Head Coach David Kaneshiro, Honoka‘a girls basketball Coach Daphne Honma, the County’s Mass Transit Agency for use of a bus, and all the other coaches who volunteered their time and expertise to help the keiki athletes.

For more information, please contact Jason Armstrong, Public Information Officer, at 345-9105, or jarmstrong@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Pāhoa District Park Project Groundbreaking to Be Held July 31

A public groundbreaking ceremony for the Pāhoa District Park project will be held at 10 a.m. Thursday, July 31, at the park.

Pahoa Park Rendering

Join Mayor Billy Kenoi, County Council members Greggor Ilagan and Zendo Kern, Parks Director Clayton Honma, and other dignitaries as they signify the start of the biggest recreational project in Hawai‘i County history. The $22.3 million, yearlong construction project will more than double the size of Pāhoa Park and deliver increased recreational opportunities to one of Hawai‘i Island’s fastest-growing communities.

Refreshments and light pupu will be served.

Contractor Nan, Inc. is scheduled to start clearing and grading the site on August 4. During the following 12 months, it will construct a covered play court building, two lighted baseball fields, two multipurpose fields, one of which will be lighted for nighttime use, a keiki playground, concession building, new comfort station, accessible walkways, and ample parking areas.

Totaling more than 29 acres, the improvements will complement the park’s existing 15 acres of developed recreational facilities that include a 50-meter swimming pool, community center, senior center, and skate park.

For more information, please contact Jason Armstrong, Public Information Officer, at 961-8311 or jarmstrong@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Resource Caregivers Receive Increased Board Payments

Families that care for children placed with the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare Service (CWS) Branch will receive a foster board pay increase, effective July 1, 2014. Called resource caregivers, families will receive their first increased payment in August.

Department of Human Services

To ensure that resource caregivers receive the funds necessary to provide safe, healthy, and nurturing environments for children awaiting permanent placement, the DHS requested a legislative appropriation of $8,502,936 in 2014. The budget request was passed in its entirety as part of Governor Neil Abercrombie’s 2014 executive budget package.

“Hawaii’s rate increase is based on the DHS’ review of foster care rates and practices in 46 other states,” explained DHS Director Patricia McManaman, “and the benefits that Hawaii resource families currently receive in addition to tax-free monthly foster care payments.”

Children enter and exit the foster care system throughout the year. They can remain in resource family homes for days, months, or years in some cases. While siblings are often placed together, resource families also may care for two or more unrelated children.  In 2013, the average number of children per month in resource homes was 1,096.  In June 2014, a total of 1,156 children were in foster care across the State.

Representative Mele Carroll, Chair of the House Committee on Human Services, was a strong supporter of increasing foster board payments.  “The bill is a huge step forward to help support the foster families that are integral members of our communities.”  Her Senate counterpart, Senator Suzanne Chun Oakland agreed.  “I am very happy with the passage of this legislation and am grateful to the Department of Human Services, Governor, Legislature, advocates and foster families for this team effort!”

The increase in basic board payment also applies to families eligible for adoption assistance, permanency assistance, youth receiving higher education board allowance payments, and to young adults who choose to enroll in DHS’ new program of extended Voluntary Care to Age 21.

Foster board payment rates vary across the nation. Hawaii based its new rates on an age-tiered system indexed to documented costs contained in the United States Department of Agriculture’s Expenditures on Children by Families annual report.   The monthly per child payment to Hawaii resources caregivers has been increased from a base rate of $529 to $575 for 0-5 year olds, $650 for 6-11 year olds, and $676 for children aged 12 and above.

Similar to other states, Hawaii’s resource caregivers also receive QUEST health insurance benefits for their foster children, difficulty of care payments, and a clothing allowance. Difficulty of care payments are provided to resource caregivers that support children who require more intensive physical, emotional, psychological or behavioral care and supervision, as determined by a treating professional.

Resource families also are eligible to receive special circumstances or events payments, designated transportation costs (school bus fare or private car mileage, local bus fare) that effect child placement or promote family reunification, and $500 per child per year for extracurricular activities, social activities, hobbies, and camp funds.

Reimbursable costs include attendance at authorized meetings, respite care and child care coverage, limited liability insurance training, and  enhancements necessary for the child’s growth and development (e.g. Scouts, YMCA, YWCA, community soccer, community baseball, community swimming, Boys and Girls Clubs).

To learn more about becoming a resource care giver or attending one of the statewide informational briefings, please visit the DHS website www.humanservices.hawaii.gov/ssd/home/child-welfare-services/foster-and-adoptive-care/ 

DOE Releases Income Eligibility Guidelines for Free and Reduced-Price Meals

The Hawaii State Department of Education (DOE) is announcing its policy for free and reduced-price meals for children unable to pay the full price of meals served under the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs. Copies of the policy are available at public schools.

Children from households with income at or below the following levels are eligible for free or reduced-price meals:

INCOME CHART: Effective from July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015

INCOME CHART: Effective from July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015

Application forms are being sent to all homes with a letter to parents or guardians. To apply for free or reduced-price meals, households should fill out one application and return it to the school where the child is enrolled or complete an online application via ezmealapp.com. Applications for the current school year (2014-2015) are now being accepted. The application information will be used to determine eligibility and may be verified at any time during the school year by the school or other program officials.

For DOE officials to determine eligibility, households receiving SNAP or TANF must list the child’s name, date of birth, grade, school code and their SNAP or TANF case number and the signature and name of an adult household member. Households not receiving SNAP or TANF must list: 1) the names of everyone in the household; 2) the amount of income received by each person, how often the income is received and the source of the income; 3) the name and social security number of either parent/guardian who is the primary wage earner or the adult household member who signs the form or the word “none” if neither adult household member has a social security number; and 4) the signature of an adult household member.

Applications may be submitted at any time during the year.

Under the provisions of the free and reduced-price policy, the DOE will review applications and determine eligibility. Parents or guardians dissatisfied with the ruling of the official may wish to discuss the decision with the reviewing official on an informal basis. Parents wishing to make a formal appeal may make a request for a hearing on the decision in writing to:

Name of Hearing Official: Glenna Owens, SFA Director
Address: 1106 Koko Head Avenue, Honolulu, HI 96816

Phone Number: (808) 733-8414 or toll-free 1-800-441-4845

In certain cases foster children are also eligible for school meal benefits. If a household has foster children living with them and wishes to apply for them, the household should contact the school for more information.

The information provided by the household is confidential and will be used only for purposes of determining eligibility and verifying data.

In accordance with federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability.

Report Shows Access Learning Pilot Enhances Teaching and Student Learning

A first-year report on the Hawaii State Department of Education’s (DOE) Access Learning pilot presented to the Hawaii State Board of Education (BOE) today shows the initiative is helping to reduce burden on teachers, increase student engagement and responsibility, and improve parents’ support of public schools.

Click to view the report

Click to view the report

Last year, the DOE unveiled Access Learning, a pilot project to study the impact of technology and digital curricular resources on teaching and learning, at eight schools. This initiative takes advantage of ongoing Department efforts such as new technology for learning while addressing challenges facing our public schools. Access Learning does not focus on the device, rather on how technology can be a tool to support teachers’ efforts to personalize instruction and engage students.

Monanalua Middle School Principal Lisa Nagamine told the BOE, “Access Learning has enhanced the collaborative learning environment of our school.”

Moanalua Middle is one of the eight Access Learning schools that has incorporated technology for learning at all levels within its campus, not just the student level.

“The dedication and commitment by the school leaders, staff, and students allowed us to see the full potential of this initiative and its impact on student learning,” said Schools Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “We appreciate their input and based on the positive results, hope to increase access to digital learning in all schools in the near future.”

Information and data collected from the eight Access Learning schools from October 2013 through April 2014 revealed:

  • Teachers use computers in a wide variety of ways to improve job performance and teaching – and that usage has increased since an initial survey was done last fall.
  • Teachers believe access to technology will benefit English language learners and special education students.
  • Students reported having positive experiences with the program. More than 90 percent of students surveyed say laptops make schoolwork more interesting and better prepare them for the future.
  • Students reported computers help them to be more organized and finish work more quickly and with better quality. Access to technology also made assignments a lot more fun by creating blogs, slideshows, movie trailers, and usage of other media.
  • Laptops allowed for better peer collaboration during project work and completing homework.
  • Parents believe computers help students gain a better insight into the happenings of the classroom and learn essential skills to compete globally.

“The 1-to-1 laptop program has improved education opportunities for students,” noted one parent. “The school has finally caught up with private schools.”

“I have seen increased student engagement in classwork because their computer allows them to have a ‘voice’ at the same time as everyone else. Less students are distracted or off task. (This) has allowed students to work more collaboratively in and out of the classroom setting,” one teacher reported.

The 2013 Legislature appropriated $8.2 million to the DOE for the pilot, which funded computers for teachers and students, technical support, professional development, and also helped offset curriculum and implementation expenses. In addition to Moanalua Middle, Access Learning pilot schools include Keaau Elementary and Pahoa Elementary, Mililani Mauka Elementary, Mililani Waena Elementary, Nanaikapono Elementary, Nanakuli Elementary, and Nanakuli Intermediate and High.

Pilot schools received devices for every student and teacher equipped with Hawaii Common Core-aligned digital curriculum for English Language Arts. The DOE partnered with county police departments to safeguard the computers, all of which are equipped with advanced security tracking software. As a result, the schools reported a combined theft and loss rate of only six computers (less than 1 percent).

Due to funding requirements, the Department was given a very short window to implement the initiative and the report noted those challenges. Teachers expressed frustration with limited time for professional development sessions. View the full report here.

During the past legislative session, DOE requested funding for ongoing Access Learning technical assistance and professional development. The budget request was denied; however, DOE officials worked with and received approval from the BOE to expend funding to continue technical assistance for the pilot schools through FY15. The funding request to the BOE will provide customized professional development for schools, overall and school specific program evaluation for formative purposes, and support for project management. For more information about the program, see the DOE’s Access Learning page.

Free Kids Sports Physicals Available July 19th

Keiki up to 18 years old can receive a free sports physical on July 19 in Hilo under a partnership between Hawai‘i County, the nonprofit For Hearts and Souls and Sportz Viz.

countylogo

The “No Athlete Left Behind” sports physical program will be offered from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, July 19, at Pana‘ewa Park. Lead physician Dr. Kirk Milhoan, a Maui pediatric cardiologist and medical director of For Hearts and Souls, will perform sports physicals and echocardiographic screenings to rule out hidden conditions that could cause sudden cardiac arrest during strenuous activity.

Sportz Viz will take reservations for 25 athletes for each of four, two-hour blocks. Walk-in patients will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis.

Parents must bring the appropriate physical form for their child’s school or association.

Tax-deductible donations will be accepted and used to provide cardiac care to children throughout the world.

To reserve a space or obtain more information, please contact Thane Milhoan of Sportz Viz at (808) 938-6805 or info@sportzviz.com.

Hawaii State Department of Education Receives ESEA Flex Extension

As a sign of its continued confidence in the Hawaii State Department of Education (DOE), the United States Department of Education (USDOE) has extended the DOE’s waiver from some components of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)/No Child Left Behind (NCLB).

DOE
The ESEA Flexibility Waiver includes the Strive HI Performance System, which replaces the NCLB’s Adequate Yearly Progress system and its other obligations around college and career readiness and teacher and principal evaluations.

“The extension validates our work thus far in our efforts to transform public education in Hawaii,” said Schools Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “Additionally, it recognizes our strategic plan moving forward as we work tirelessly to elevate student achievement, and prepare all of our students for post-secondary success.”

The DOE initially applied for the waiver in September of 2012, and on May 20, 2013, it received conditional approval for one year – for the School Year 2013-14. Under the conditional approval, the DOE had to meet certain conditions to be granted an extension for a second year, for the School Year 2014-15. Among the conditions the USDOE required of the DOE for an extension was clear and compelling evidence of the DOE’s substantial progress with its Race to the Top (RTTT) grant. On July 29, 2013, the DOE was cleared entirely from “high risk” status with its RTTT grant.

The Strive HI Performance System not only reflects the State Strategic Plan, it aligns and connects with state education policies and initiatives including the Hawaii Common Core, updated assessments, more rigorous diploma and graduation requirements, successful school improvement strategies in the Zones of School Innovation and robust teacher and principal evaluation and support systems.

More about the DOE’s Strive HI Performance System can be found here.

Big Island Police Searching for Missing 16-Year-Old Keaau Girl

Hawaii Island police are searching for a 16-year-old Keaau girl who was reported missing.

Zeana Chong

Zeana Chong

Zeana Chong was last seen in Hilo on May 23. She is described as 5-foot-2, 180 pounds with brown eyes and black hair.

Police ask anyone with information on her whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

New Summer Program for Teens at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor

Teens will have an opportunity to soar at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor’s new cross-cultural Aviation Adventure program scheduled to launch this July. The three-day/two-night program will provide a sweeping view of aviation, from ancient Hawaii up to the present day. Two dates are available to choose from: July 15~17 and July 22~24, Tuesdays through Thursdays, 9am to 4pm.

Teen Aviation Program

Aviation Adventure is designed to immerse teens in the rich history of Ford Island and Pearl Harbor, as well as the science, technology, engineering and math concepts of aviation. Hands-on, practical experiences bring these principles to life in the Museum’s historic hangars and aboard the Battleship Missouri Memorial. This cross-cultural program is open to teens who have completed the basic Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor Flight School program, or those who are at least 13 years of age. They will be joined by teens of the same age, from China. Overnight accommodations are provided onboard the Battleship Missouri.

Cost of the three-day program is $300, which includes all materials, meals, snacks, overnight accommodations, and an Aviation Adventure logo tee shirt.

For more information and to register for Aviation Adventure go to www.PacificAviationMuseum.org/Education/AviationAdventure or email Education@PacificAviationMuseum.org.

Department of Education Reminds Parents About Kindergarten Requirements

With public school slated to start in a month on August 1, the Hawaii State Department of Education (DOE) is reminding parents about the new kindergarten requirements.

DOE ReleaseStarting this school year, children must be 5 years old on or before July 31 to enter kindergarten. Also, kindergarten is now mandatory in the State of Hawaii. Children who meet the age eligibility requirements for kindergarten may enroll in school anytime.

Parents of children born on or after August 1, 2009 have several options such as pre-school at a private provider or pre-kindergarten classes at select schools. Earlier this year, the State’s Executive Office on Early Learning (EOEL) announced 21 pre-kindergarten classrooms will be available at 18 schools statewide for children born on or between August 1, 2009 and July 31, 2010, and who are eligible for free- and reduced-price meals. Priority will be given to children born in 2009 to enroll in these pre-kindergarten classes. More information on the EOEL’s pre-kindergarten classes can be found at http://earlylearning.hawaii.gov/doe-eoel-prekindergarten-program/.

Parents whose children attended kindergarten outside of Hawaii, or at a private school in the 2013-14 school year can discuss enrollment options with their home school. Despite the many possible placement scenarios, the final decision for a child’s placement will be based on the principal’s discussions among the appropriate teaching staff and parents.

“We encourage parents to be aware of the changes and take appropriate action for their children,” said Schools Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “Kindergarten is a critical time in ensuring children have a solid academic foundation.”

For more information about enrolling in kindergarten in the State of Hawaii, please visit our website at HawaiiPublicSchools.org, and enter “kindergarten” in the white search box on the home page. Parents can also search under “enrolling in school” to be sure they have the necessary documents to enroll their child, including birth certificate, tuberculosis clearance, a completed student health record, and proof of current address.

Inaugural State Teacher Fellowship Program to Play Key Role in Public Education

The Hawaii State Department of Education (DOE) is pleased to announce the selection of 17 public school educators to the Hope Street Group’s inaugural Hawaii State Teacher Fellows. Together with the DOE and the Hawaii State Teachers Association (HSTA), the fellows will voice teacher perceptions and potential solutions to issues educators face in implementing the Hawaii Common Core.

DOE ReleaseThe fellows represent a range of outstanding Hawaii teachers chosen from a pool of competitive candidates from across the state. Selected for their strong individual commitments to improving learning outcomes for children, fellows will serve as leaders among their peers for the next 12 months, and have the option of continuing in their leadership capacity for additional school years.

“The Hawaii State Teacher Fellows have a critical charge ahead to expand engagement of their peers, by their peers. They stand ready to lead in this role as they lead every day in their respective classrooms,” said Dan Cruce, vice president for education, Hope Street Group.

The 17 teachers selected to be Hawaii’s first State Teacher Fellows are:

  1. Yuuko Arikawa (Leilehua Complex)
  2. Ruth Ballinger (Puunene – Maui District)
  3. Justin Brown (Kealakehe High)
  4. Kristen Brummel (McKinley Complex)
  5. Jaimelynne Cruz (Kamaile Academy)
  6. Elizabeth Marie Fitzpatrick (Keonopoko Elementary)
  7. Michelle June Fujie (Lanai High and Elementary)
  8. Jonathan Gillentine (Windward District)
  9. Tracey Lynn Idica (Aiea High)
  10. Dana Ishiii (Kanoelani Elementary)
  11. Loretta Labrador (Kualapuu Public Charter)
  12. Sharon M. Look (Paia Elementary)
  13. Jonathon Medeiros (Kauai High)
  14. Tracy Monroe (Ilima Intermediate)
  15. Christopher J. Rodriguez (Waipahu Elementary)
  16. Jamie Takamura (Red Hill Elementary)
  17. Leslie Toy (Aiea Intermediate)

Through the partnership, the group will be trained in peer and community engagement, data collection and media strategies – all with the intent of sharing information with the community. Fellows will also collect input from their peers to present to the DOE.

“The development of the Hawaii State Teacher Fellows is a tremendous step toward our shared commitment to engage teachers at every level,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “This collaborative program will reinforce our strategic work toward student and staff success in our schools. We’re grateful to our partners for their commitment and support in this effort.”

By engaging school communities, informing state policy decisions, and participating in professional development and training opportunities, fellows will work toward elevating the teaching profession and providing the DOE with critical feedback on the Hawaii Common Core – a set of consistent learning expectations aimed at preparing all graduates for college and careers.

HSTA Executive Director Al Nagasako supports this work stating, “Engaging teachers in the elevation of their profession is core to our work at the Hawaii State Teachers Association. We look forward to continuing our collaborative partnership with Hope Street Group and the Department of Education as this program provides additional teacher voice at the decision-making table.”

The Hawaii State Teacher Fellows program is supported locally by grants from Harold K. L. Castle Foundation, Hawaii Community Foundation, and by a $200,000 grant from McInerny Foundation.

“This program is heavily focused on supporting the development of teacher leaders in Hawaii, which is why the Castle Foundation chose to support it. We believe it is a step in the right direction in building a profession of teachers in Hawaii who take on added leadership to improve the system,” said Harold K.L. Castle Foundation President and CEO Terrence R. George.

“Ensuring that teachers have a voice in decisions that impact their daily practice is essential,” added Tammi Chun of the Hawaii Community Foundation.

Hope Street Group is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to expanding economic opportunity and prosperity for all Americans. For more information, see www.hopestreetgroup.org.

Ohana Shoreline Fishing Tournament August 15-17

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation invites anglers to enter the 18th annual ‘Ohana Shoreline Fishing Tournament to be held August 15 through August 17.

Pictured are some of last year’s tournament awards Photo Credit: Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation

Pictured are some of last year’s tournament awards
Photo Credit: Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation

Again this year will be separate divisions for keiki 5 to 12 years old, teens, men, women, kupuna 55 years and older, and ‘ohana. Entry fees are $20 per person for the keiki and senior divisions, $25 per person for the men’s and women’s divisions, and $20 per team for the ‘Ohana Division open to one adult and at least one keiki family member.

Entry forms must be turned in or postmarked by Friday, July 18. Forms are available at Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation swimming pools, gymnasiums and other facilities island-wide. They also can be picked up at S. Tokunaga Store in Hilo and J. Hara Store in Kurtistown.

Tournament weigh-ins will be held from noon until 1:30 p.m. Sunday, August 17, at Honoka‘a Gymnasium. An awards ceremony will follow, with valuable prizes for at least the 10 heaviest fish in each of the six divisions. Entrants must be present to receive prizes. No alcohol allowed on premises.

For more information, please call Jayme Carvalho at 962-2103 or 936-4285.

County of Hawai‘i Law Raising the Age of Sale to 21 Years for All Tobacco Products – Takes Effect July 1, 2014

Last year the Hawai’i County Council unanimously approved a bill to raise the age of sale of tobacco products to 21. That measure, Hawai‘i County Ordinance 13-124, takes effect on Tuesday, July 1, 2014.

Signs Required at the Point of Sale:  The law requires that signs are to be posted at the point of sale. Signs where sent out to all registered tobacco retailers in May 2014. Signs are available at the Mayors Offices in East and West Hawaii or by contacting the East Hawaii Tobacco-Free Coalition Coordinator via email at

Signs Required at the Point of Sale: The law requires that signs are to be posted at the point of sale. Signs where sent out to all registered tobacco retailers in May 2014. Signs are available at the Mayors Offices in East and West Hawaii or by contacting the East Hawaii Tobacco-Free Coalition Coordinator via email at

The law prohibits the distribution of tobacco products, including electronic smoking devices, to underage customers born after June 30, 1996. Retailers need to be aware that anyone who is born after June 30, 1996 is prohibited from purchasing tobacco products or electronic smoking devices until they are 21 years of age.

There is an exemption in the new ordinance for people who reach the age of 18 before July 1, 2014. Those who reach the age of 18 before July 1, 2014 are allowed to continue to purchase tobacco. The purpose of the exemption is to ease the transition for people who already use tobacco, and for the retailers.

The Coalition For A Tobacco-Free Hawai‘i (CTFH) and staff from the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids worked closely with West Hawai‘i Councilmember Dru Mamo Kanuha and his staff to pass this bill. Hawai‘i County Council unanimously passed Bill 135 on November 20, and Mayor Kenoi signed the legislation into law in December 2013.

The Coalition For A Tobacco-Free Hawaii applauds Hawai‘i County for standing strong on tobacco control. According to the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids (www.tobaccofreekids.org), “National data show that 95 percent of adult smokers begin smoking before they turn 21.” The ages of 18 to 21 are a critical period when many smokers move from experimental smoking to regular, daily use. Increasing the tobacco sale age to 21 will help prevent young people from ever starting to smoke.

Hawai‘i County joins New York City and Needham and Canton, Massachusetts, in raising the age of sale on tobacco products to 21.  Four states—Utah, New Jersey, Alaska and Alabama—require tobacco buyers to be 19.  Several other counties and states, including Texas, are considering similar measures.

It is important for retailers and potential buyers to know these key points for the new law:

  • Any person who sells or distributes tobacco products, including electronic smoking devices, to an underage customer will be subject to a fine of up to $2,000.
  • Persons, retailers, and employees that sell or distribute tobacco products must verify proof of age of the recipient/purchaser.
  • Sale is prohibited to persons born after June 30, 1996.
  • Valid identification includes: state driver’s license, state identification card, military ID, or passport.
  • Signs are required to be posted at every point of sale.
  • From July 1, 2014 – July 30, 2017, persons who sell or display tobacco products shall post signs clearly and keep them posted at the place of business at each point of sale.
  • Failure to post this sign shall be subject to a fine of up to $500.

Signs were sent to all registered tobacco retailers in May 2014. Additional signs are available at the Mayor’s Offices in East and West Hawai‘i or by contacting the East Hawai‘i Tobacco-Free Coalition Coordinator via email at sally@tobaccofreehawaii.org.

For more information please visit the Coalition for a Tobacco-Free Hawai‘i website at: http://www.tobaccofreehawaii.org/community-coalitions/tobacco-free-big-island/hawaii-county-new-law-raising-the-age-of-purchase-for-tobacco-products-to-21/

UH Hilo College of Arts and Science Announces Spring 2014 Dean’s List

The following students in the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Arts and Sciences have been named to the Dean’s List for the spring 2014 semester.

UH Hilo Moniker

They include:

Leilani Maijastina Abaya, Janjake Z. Abedania, Jenna Louise Acia, Nicholas Jack Ackerman, Anthony A. Actouka, Melissa Ellen Adams, Robert Wallace K Adviento, Breanna Teiko Ann Aguiar, Brittany Rachael Ahn, Ka’alalani Wilson Ahu, Jessica Ann Akiona, Alston Alika Albarado, Erica Kathleen Amundson, Tiani Arlana Sachiko Anang-Shimabukuro, Keehinani Mikiala Victoria Andrade, Anshuka Anshuka, Brandi J. Antonio, Krista Natsuko Aoki, Shanley Apele, Brandon Scott Tsuyoshi Arakaki, David James Arakawa, Justin King Shan Tooru Araki-Kwee, Megan Lilinoe Araujo, Jamie L.H. Araujo-Rosa, Kana Asama, Colleen Marie Aubrey, Heather Rae Bailey, Christan Sadao Balicoco, Paul Jacob Barch, William Judson Barden, Sydney Lee Barney, Ashley Alexa Bass, Peter Charles Bennett,

Lars Arthur Bergstrom, Alyssa Ann Berry, Jahnu D. Best, Aaron James Bishop, Kalaiakea Mary Blakemore, Alize Marie Blas, Kyra Lynn Blue, Lindsey Siqian Bohnert, Casey William Bolger, Audrey Claire Bonk, Jocelyn Anne Borek, Zachary Edward Boysen, Sari Anne Breitenfeldt, Anashe Brooks, Chanelle Marie Brooks, Kavan Peter Brown, Benjamin Garrett Browning, Kevin Alexander Bruce, Ashley Dawn Buasriyottiya, Kailah Michelle Buchanan, Sydney Maemi Cabanas, Blythe Sierrah Cabanting, Kacie R.K.K. Cabarloc, Goody Butay Cacal, Joseph Kuali’i Lindsey Camara, Vada Grace Cambio, Sheryl Lyn Ubaldo Cariaga, Imelda Auxiliadora Da Conceicao Carlos, Sean Leo Carlos, Devin Lee Kaikane Carlson, Renee Francis Carlson, Vanessa Lynn Carlson, Christina Noel Cauley, Tani K. Chamberlin, Emily Jane Puamahina Charman, Matt Chen,, Katlin J. Chesney, Marymargaretrose Cheung-fuk, Alexis Yuk Lan Ching, Kealii Andrew Cho, BoRam Choi, Skyler L.H. Chun-Ming, Kobie Lehua Clarke, Jordan Bledsoe Concannon, Nicole C. Conley, Taylor Alexandra Coons, Caitlyn Nicole Corfey, Renee Lynn Corpuz, Elyssa Rae-Ann Correia, Alysha Ann Kehaulani Cosier, Leanne Elizabeth Crain, Trixie Alice Croad, Angel Lee Cruz, Angeline Marie Cruz, Andrea Kae Dacar, Chelsey Mae Dahl,

Alric Alvarez Dalere, Angelo Davis, Victoria Gladys Davis, Theodore Joseph Maka’iwi DeRego, Liliana Gene DeSmither, Megan Piilani Noelani Decoito, Axel Junior Defngin, Thomas M. Dela Cruz, Kanoelani Kikue Delatori, Dustin Casey Kuikahi Delima, Kasen Kamuela Delos Reyes, Cassidy James Puuone Dixon, Jesse Marco Dodt, Stacie Emiko Doi, Noah Patterson Dolim, Shaylin K. Domingcil, Ryan S. Domingo, Ryder Pueo Donahue, Jason Heyes Donaldson, Pedro Dos Santos, Katrina Elise Downey,

Mike Dowsett, Kaylie Lynn Drew, Alejandra Evajean Duarte, Julie Padua Duhaylongsod, Sarah Itai Dunaway, Aubrie Elaine Eaton, Jacqueline Frances Economy, Louise Marie Economy, Rachel A. Edwards, Tiffany Marie Epping, Tiffany Grace Erickson, Chelsey Hali’ilaulani Erickson-Vierra, Richard M. Esterle, John Richard Evans, Zachary Chung Everett, Christina Marie Evert, Maria Carla Sampang Felix, Rachel Anne Sampang Felix, Emily Fernandes, Sharrylei Fernandez, Erik Daniel Ferreira,

Chelsea Kahealani Field, Tiffany Danielle Fisk, Doug Walter Fitzpatrick, Hannah Louise Flanery, Carlee Hope Fleck, Kayleigh Elizabeth Flynn, Joseph John Fontana, Amber Rose Fontes, Amanda Kathleen Ford, Amber Marie Forrestal, Cory Aikau French, Joshua Allen Fuentes, Kana Fujihira, Kendra Akemi Fujioka, Keri Reiko Fujiwara, Ashley Ayaka Fukuchi, Ryder Kaleikoa Furukado, Summer Galon-Mizusawa, Geralynn Cadelina Gamayo, Dayna Lynn Pu’unani Ganigan, Jeremy Ramos Ganir, Desha Ann Hiroko Napua Gapusan, Grace Christina Garberson, Jonathan Robert Garnett, Wilfred Tyler Gee,

Zachary Geisterfer, Emma-Lei Ohalani Gerrish, Hattie Le`a Gerrish, Tuan Giai Giang, Rachel Michelle Gorenflo, Kiersten Gabrielle Gormeley, Lauren K.A.H Grace-Finley, Christine Louise Gray, James Cecil Green, Rachel Grace Greenbach, Ava Shruti Kartik Greenwood, Amanda Lee Grelock, Jessica Lynn Griffiths, Kylie Judith Grogg, Kalai Kamalanai Michiko Grothmann, Ole Christian Hagestad, Rebecca Ann Hahn, Brittany Krystal Hale, Ivana Mahealani Hall, Jamaica Ann Hancock,

Kawehiokaiulani Mieko Elizabeth Hanohano, Jenna M. Harburg, Margaret Alyse Harris, Shane Allen Harrison, Alexander Dean Hedglen, Jordan Kekoa Esprecion Heltz, Zachary David Kahue Heltz, Karl Robert Hennen, John Gregory Herman, Alexandria Aspen Herring, Brad Pono Higa, Caitlin Rose Higa, Garret Hayato Ly Hino, Iris Hsing Mei Hirayama, Karlie Marie Hoekstra, Rebecca K. Hogan, Corinna Marie Holfus, Emily Kuho’oki’eki’e Ferreira Holt, Eric Miller Holub, Blake Y. Honda, Brock G. Honda,

Tiana Nanayo Kuuleialoha Honda, Alyssa Michelle Hoshide, Asia Carolynne Howe, Samantha Ai Howell, Christina Huckfeldt, Adrian Takeo Huff, John Mead Hunter, Laura Elizabeth Ibbotson, Zachary Kanoeau Vili Ifo, Kai Aaron Igarashi, Kadi Mie Igawa, Chihiro Inaguma, BeeJay Idian Ines, Kevyn-Bren K. Inouye, Carrie Ga lai Ip, Kelsey Kazuyuki Ito, Linda Gabriela Ixtupe, Rina Mae Vinluan Jabilona, Jessica Jacobs, Erika Rose Jardin, Alyssa Patricia Jasso, Joahnna Javaluyas,

Haley Sue Jerman, Michael Jerry, ShoaAxum Salasse William Johnson, Casey Marshall Jones, Kyle Kepano Jones, Mikayla Jade Jones, Kaycie Chiemi Jyo, Jarin S. Kadooka, ‘I’inimaikalani Keali’ikua’aina Kahakalau, Morrisa Shaye Kahakui, Kawena Kuulei Kahui, Ayaka Kajiura, Kaimipono Shane Kajiyama, Tira Makanamaikalani Kamaka, Cami Chieko Kanahele, Tia Lee Kauiheleole Kanoe, Kawehi Mariko Kanoho-Kalahiki, Noelani Satsuki Kansaku, Evianne Elise Keeney, Marina J. Kelley, Ashley Irene Kennedy, Richard Maxwell Kerr, Ada Kettner, Ara Kim,, Duk Hwan Kim, Hyelim Kim, Macie Yoshiko Kim, Peter Allen Kim, Mary Louise Yasuko Kimura, Satoko Kin, Gavin Cole Kinoshita, Rachel Alana Kishimoto, Christopher Zdenek Kluzak, Amber L. Koker, Eivind Kolaas, Hyesun Kong,

Daniel Jacob Konkler, Nada Kotaishova, Kristen Rachel Krieger, Kealiiahonui Alik Kuikahi, Johann Wei-Xin Kuipers, Luke Andrews Kupcha, Franchael K. Laimana, Meadow Rose Lambert, Amy Gaylene Landers, Brittney M. Lane, Tynan Cody Lazarus, Junbeom Lee, Robert A.F. Lee, Shanda Leilani Lee, Jobe Kekoa Angel Leialoha, Meredith June Lenz, Cynthia Marie Lilleston, Hannah Ida Lipman, Sarah Anne Lips, Elijah C.R. Livingston, Danalynne Ki’ilani Llacuna, Kawehi Marie Kane Lopez, Michael Ryan Lovell, Alyssa Kealohi Loving, Chari-Ann G.. Luis-Calvo, Blaine CM Luiz,

Kristy Lynn Lungo, Alayna Rachelle Leilani Machacek, Meghan Bailey Makanani, Ian Tadashi Makida, Kate Manzano Malasig, Ashley Alohilani Alyce Maldonado, Kayla Anne Malott, Amber K. Manini, Kerson Tachedesel Mariur, Keelee Jade Martin, Shae Alexandria Massie, Anna Claire Masuda, Amber Sunshine Masulit, Carle-Ann Kaiulani Mata, Sheena Eulani Mathews, Kelley Kurt Matsumoto, Evan Seki Matsuyama, Mathew Robert Mauldin, Joseph Edward Maxwell, Meghan Renee Meier McGrath, Angelo Alcino Menezes Guterres Aparicio, Chad Ethan Miguel-Harris, Bryce Evan Miles-Leighton, Thane Bryan Milhoan, Francis Blake Miller, Jessica Aurora Miller, Maikai Koonohiokala Miller,

Emily Hannah Minakin, Amanda Joan Minney, Ashley Masae Minobe-Nacua, Norman Zuniga Mogote, Celina Ilikea Monge, Ariel Kahoniahiku Moniz, Sherise-Charity Moani Keala o ka awapuhi Moniz, Hannah Moore, Michael J.M.K. Mulkey, Koran Nichole Munafo, Lindsey Kealohalani Elilai Muranaka, Kenneth Kansuke Nagata, Angela Fumiko Nakamura, Richard Toshi Nakamura, Kerri Mika Nakatsu, Remi Nakaza, Robynn Ailynn Ines Namnama, Cameron Robert Nance, Kirstie Kanoelani Akemi Naone, Byers Hoapili Naope, Allyssa Leilani Nau, Jordan Lyle Keoni Nauka, Kara Marie Nelson,

Anjenette Viernes Nicolas, Jaysen Christopher Niedermeyer, Scott Laurence Nielsen, Nina Kawehi Nihipali, Mikiko Ninomiya, Anela Lani Nishimoto, Lindsey Lani Nishimura, Allen Gail Yvette Niere Nitura, Nicole Chelsea Jean Nonies, Rochelle N. Nowaki, Angelica M. Nuyen, Daniel Bernard O’Halloran, Michelle Rico Odasco, Steven Mitsuaki Ogi, Zechary Palaina Okamoto, Stephanie-Leanne Shigeko Okumura, Helio Miguel Arcanjo Oliveira De Araujo, Jenae Marie Olson, Morgan Olson, Karen Konohikiokalani Ota, Hiroyuki Otsubo, Evan Kauanoe Oue, Jamie Jungeun Ouye, Wesley Dean Owens,

Aimee Lynn Leinaala Pacheco, Cheynielle Minoakalani Pacheco, Ciera Moanilehua Pagud, Basanta Raj Pahari, Fagalima Lenell Paleafei, Bronson Paul Amio Palupe, Isaac Kuuiponohea Pang, Kirsten Leigh Pang, Jannah Gaile Pante, Marian Grace Andrada Paras, Kirsty Zeandra Parker, Kristine Pasek, Kara Lianne Paulachak, Casey Jay Low Pearring, Kristin M. Pedersen, Kori Laine Pedraja, Jessica Marie Penaranda, Elizabeth Mischell Pennock, Kahiau Raymond Tatsumi Peralta, John Henry Albert Pezzuto, Kaylie Renee Pickup, Loaa K Pine, Hye Jin Piper, Robert Frank Piper, Robert Michel Pipes,

Tyler Melvin Vermudez Pitpit, Kyle Robert Pittman, Arwen May Potochney, Zachary Alan Pratt, Stevan Premovic, Ashley Ray Pugh, Kori Gaila Quander, Vernon Kalani Quiocho, Laurel Rain, Micah Rhobelyn Tunac Ramos, Crystal Jenna Rances, Rachel Lily Rechtman, Stacey Elisabeth Reed, Jessica Ramos Regpala, Maricel Masing Reid, Chelsey Kristin Rickert, Adan William Rodrigues, Koa Henry Damien Rodrigues, Analysa G. Rodriguez, Rebecca Marie Rogers, Saul David Rollason, Gerry Abergido Romero, Kainoa Kamakani Rosa, Makoa Rosa, Kevin Lewis Rose, Robin Christian Rudolph,

Alicia Marie Ryan, Ardena M.J. Saarinen, Christa Nicole Sadler, Julie Anne Garo Sagabaen, Michelle Ruiz Sahagun, Sam Saidi,, Karl John Sakai, Francis Elliott Sakai-Kawada, Nalei Kapua’a’ala Sampson, Gabriella Martiza Sanchez, Teresinha Santos Da Costa, Christlynn Mary Sappa, Christian Keakaokalani Saragosa, Chelsea Midori Sato, Sigrid Dingle Shizuko Sato, Michael Al Seizen Sayaboc, Emily Linden Schneider, Jordan Scott Scrivner, Samantha Lee Shaw, Justin Yukio Shiigi, Albert Eugene Shim, Hyungchul Shin, Keani Keiko Kamalani Shirai, Sheldon Mitsuru Shishido,

Stephanie Lee Shor, Rebecca Nicole Short, Desiree Luana Shortt, Bennjamin Paul Siemers, Laurie Simon-Boursier, Michelle Rose Smith, Samuel Cabot Smith, Sheila M. Soledad, Sondre Solstad, Carrie Ann Soo Hoo, Ryder K. Souza, Ashley M. Spencer, Ashlin Hope Stahlberg, Ken Lloyd Stallman, Kristen Emily Stalter, James Stilley, Taylor Stokesbary, Natalie Rose Strauss, Cole M.M.M Stremski-Borero, Andrea Stroescu, Caroline Michele Stromick, Jeremy Martin Suguitan, Michael James Takeshi Suguro,

Gary Loui Sur, Yvonne L. Sylva, Caitlin Symons, Dillon K. Tacdol, Hazel Pontanes Tagalicud, Nako Takaki, Tara Miyoko Takamori, John James Gregorio Taman, Jove Jenn Maalihan Taman, Casey Hiroichi Tamura, Wing Sing Tang, Reuben Blake Tate, Alana K. Tavares, Ashley Carol Terrell, Sarah Rose Theesfeld, Rachel Lorraine Thompson, Natasha Marie Thorell, Tyler Thornhill, Sherise U’ilani Johanna Tiogangco, Zachary Tman, Ashley Anne Toland, Taylor Tomita, Ashley Chanel Nobuko Tomori, Jennifer Leigh Trujillo, Jonathan M. Truslow, Kyle Kenta Tsubota, Peter Aaron Tuck,

Shanece Kekainani Turner, Lincoln Moses Tyler, Michelle Emiko Uchida, Christine Joy Calabucal Ucol, Stephanie L. Valant, Korie Lihau Maelia Valeho, Keith Joseph Valentis, Sage Trinidad Van Kralingen, Mark J. Vancamp, Rosella Manja Vaughn, Sage Arianna Vecchio, Jasmine Bae Star Venegas, Shelby Ann U’ilani Vickers, Conan-Cordero Laahia Vierra, Lindsay Marie Vik, Robert Benito Villanueva, Anthony Paul Vizzone, Christopher Vito Vizzone, Nelson Vo,, Michael Edward Voight, Maria Karin Walczuk, Emily Grace Wallingford, Laurence K. Walsh, Claire Elvrum Warner, Sondra Michelle Warren, Valerie Kelly Wasser, Hunter Samuel Wilburn, Brittany Nicole Willbrand, Courtney Taylor Williamson, Joshua Aaron Willing, Henry Chico Wilson, Katherine Elizabeth Wilson,

Leah Adele Wilson, Christina Mei Lin Wine, Stacey Marie Witt, Corey George Yamaguchi, Kelli Emi Yamane, Takuhiro Yamashita, Nicholas William Yamauchi, Eddie Iosinto Yeichy, Darcy Kamalani Yogi, Nicole Michiko Yoneishi, Carl Katsumi Yoshida, Bithiah Yuan, Ye Lin Yun, Marikka Chihiro Zavas, Yuri Alexander Zhuraw, James Hugh Ziegler, Jessica Haley-Lauren Zima-Lee, and Anastasia V. Zosim.

Backpack Drive for Kids Who Can’t Afford to Buy Them

The Hawaiʻi Police Department is proud to participate again in a backpack drive for children who cannot afford to buy them. As in previous years, all police stations around the island will double as drop-off points for persons interested in helping children in need. Backpacks may be dropped off between June 23 and August 30.

Hope Services Hawaii workers pick up backpacks from Officer Jason Grouns, Chief Harry Kubojiri and Officer Patrick Menino at the Hilo police station, one of eight collection sites around the island.

Hope Services Hawaii workers pick up backpacks from Officer Jason Grouns, Chief Harry Kubojiri and Officer Patrick Menino at the Hilo police station, one of eight collection sites around the island.

Backpacks have been identified as the most requested non-food item for charities in Hawaiʻi. The donated backpacks will be distributed to children at women’s shelters, homeless shelters and transitional housing facilities around the Big Island.

This is the sixth consecutive year the Police Department has worked in partnership with HOPE Services Hawaiʻi (formerly known as the Office of Social Ministry).

Hope Services Hawaiʻi provides a continuum of homeless and transitional programs from outreach to emergency shelters, including permanent supportive housing placements.

Hawaii Passes Revenge Porn Bill – Becomes 10th State in Nation to Enact Legislation

Vice Speaker John Mizuno (Kamehameha Heights, Kalihi Valley, and Lower Kalihi) the author of HB1750, Hawaii’s “revenge porn” bill, provided, “Prior to the convening of the 2014 legislative session only two states, California and New Jersey, had “revenge porn” laws.

HB 1750

Today Hawaii became the 10th State in the nation to have this legislation enacted. (Source National Conference of State Legislatures).  I looked at California’s revenge porn law as a blueprint, however, we crafted our law to be stronger against the perpetrator. California’s crime for distributing unconsented nude or sexual photos or videos of another person is considered a misdemeanor, punishable by up to six months in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; Hawaii’s revenge porn law makes it a Class C felony, up to five years in jail and up to a $10,000 fine.”

Revenge porn occurs where the depicted person initially agrees to the photographs or video, often in the context of a romantic relationship, only to have one partner distribute those nude or sexually graphic images via photos or on the internet after the relationship ends. This law will criminalize the perpetrator from distributing sexually explicit pictures that were intended to be private.

Mizuno states, “This newly enacted law will make it a crime to distribute, transmit or display photos, images or videos of sexual representation or nude photos without the consent of the person represented, with the intent to harm the depicted person, with respect to that person’s health, safety, business, calling, career, financial condition, reputation, or personal relationships.  With technology comes different crimes; today Hawaii will have passed a very important and progressive piece of legislation to address a crime that was unforeseeable years ago and criminalize such offensive crimes.  The fact that we made it a Class C felony, punishable by up to 5 years in jail and up to a $10,000 fine, is extremely tough on this sort of crime.”

Mizuno added, “The consequences of posting private images on the internet with the intent to hurt the person in such publications is degrading, humiliating, career threatening and places that person at significant risk in terms of her (his) safety, reputation, physical and mental health. At times this form of cyber bullying may cause the person to commit suicide.”  Please note news articles on the 15-year old girl in California who committed suicide after nude photos were posted of her.

According to Rep. Mizuno, “Today the State of Hawaii will have enacted a law which makes it a felony for perpetrators to post unconsented nude or sexual photos of another person on the internet.  There is not one scintilla of doubt this new law will save lives.”

Biggest Little Airshow in Hawaii is Back

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor’s popular Remote-Control Biggest Little Airshow in Hawaii is back and it’s bigger than ever, Saturday and Sunday, August 16 and 17, 10am to 4pm. Guests will be able to drive on to Ford Island for this event, or take the free shuttle from the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center. There will be music, food, drinks, retail and entertainment booths and exhibits, and lots and lots of airplanes.

biggest 4For two days, Ford Island will come alive with remote-control flying and static aircraft and full size aircraft on display, “candy bombings” over historic Ford Island Runway for the keiki, hands-on modeling stations, and open access to Hangar 79 to see the Museum’s many aircraft exhibits and Restoration Shop.

Biggest

Talented local performers, Mainland pilots from the Academy of Model Aeronautics, and remote control flyers from Japan will perform remote-control aviation feats for two days. Airshow pilots will fly their massive, 1-to-5 scale planes in the skies above the Museum. Specialty acts to be performed include: Pattern, 3-D fixed wing and helicopter aerobatic flights, South Pacific battles, “Candy Bomber” drops, and Skycam drone helicopters. There will be remote control aircraft in the air and on static display, including jets, helicopters, F-22s, warbirds, B-17s, P-38s, Corsairs, OV-10s and more.

Biggest 2

Visitors can also enjoy free tours of Hangar 79, which still bears the bullet holes of the December 7, 1941attack. Inside, guests will see helicopters, fighter planes, and the Lt. Ted Shealy Restoration Shop–the 1941 machine shop that is busy restoring the Museum’s aircraft. They’ll also get up close and personal with an F-14 Tomcat, F-15 Eagle, F-86s, P-40, MiG-15, F-111, and the Museum’s “MiG Alley” and Flying Tigers Exhibits.

biggest 3Admission to the Airshow is $5 per person (including entry to Hangar 79), $15 per family (limit 6 entries per family). It’s free with Museum general admission and free to Museum Members. Tickets for the Airshow only and tickets for the entire Museum visit that day are available online at www.PacificAviationMuseum.org. Museum admissions may also be purchased at the Museum and at the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center ticketing desk. Shuttles depart every 15 minutes, 7:30am to 5:00pm from the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center, round trip to the Museum. Call 808/441-1007 for more information or visit www.PacificAviationMuseum.org, Facebook, Flickr, Instagram, and @PacificAviation on Twitter, for updates.

This is a City & County of Honolulu and Hawaii Tourism Authority sponsored event. Sponsored in part by Clear Channel Media + Entertainment, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Yelp, Pearlridge Center, Mokulele Airlines, Pizza Hut, Aqua Hospitality, and Hawaii Gas. Sponsors and vendors are invited to participate by calling 808-441-1013.

Keiki Volleyball Players Sought for Hilo Teams

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation invites keiki to sign up for youth volleyball programs offered at Hilo’s Waiākea-Uka Gymnasium.

HI PAL Volleyball players

HI PAL Volleyball players

Boys 7 to 14 years old and girls 7 to 10 years old can play in the Department of Parks and Recreation’s youth volleyball league that starts in September.

Registration opens July 22 at Waiākea-Uka Gymnasium. Space is limited to two teams. A modest fee will be collected to pay for uniforms, awards and other program expenses.

To register or learn more about the upcoming keiki volleyball programs at Waiākea-Uka Gymnasium, please call Coach Mark Osorio at 959-9474.

Police Searching for Maui Woman and Children Who May Be On the Big Island

6/18/2014 UPDATE: Hawaiʻi Island police have located 28-year-old Halley Leah Ries of Maui, who was reported missing.   Ries and her two children were found unharmed in Kalapana at 4:20 p.m. Tuesday (June 17).

Hawaiʻi Island police are assisting Maui police in locating a 28-year-old Haiku woman who was reported missing and may be on the Big Island.

Halley Leah Ries

Halley Leah Ries

Halley Leah Ries is reportedly with her two daughters, ages 5 and 8 months, and operating a gray 2014 Nissan 4-door sedan, license ZBN 509. She is described as Caucasian, 5-foot-11, 145 pounds with green eyes and blond hair.

She has a medical condition that requires medication.

Police ask anyone with information on her whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.