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UPDATE 4: Social Media Comments ‘Spiraled Out of Control’

UPDATE 4: 11:05 a.m.

Social media comments inferring the threat of gun violence at Big Island schools at the end of January “spiraled out of control, causing concern for parents,” Hawaiʻi Police Department Puna Patrol Area I Capt. Samuel Jelsma told Big Island Now this morning.

In response, additional officers were sent to the Pāhoa and Kea‘au schools indicated in the social media posts on Jan. 29.

The posts were brought to school official’s attention yesterday, Tuesday, Feb. 20, and the HPD responded “immediately and appropriately,” Capt. Jelsma said.

Capt. Jelsma said three officers were sent to Pāhoa High School, joining the schools resource officer. Four officers were sent to Kea‘au High School this morning as well, although no specific or direct threats were made.

“There were no recent threats made for either school,” said Capt. Jelsma, “only chatter on social media.”

Capt. Jelsma assured that any and all threats are taken seriously and will be handles appropriately.

In the case of the  threat made to a Pāhoa High School student, HPD initiated a harassment complaint case the 17-year-old girl. The girl is not a student at the school, said Capt. Jelsma. She was released and the case is being routed to Family Court.

UPDATE 3, 9:57 a.m.

Kamehameha Schools Hawaiʻi Head of School M. Kāhealani Nae‘ole-Wong sent an email to parents, telling them that the school is actively monitoring the situation in Pāhoa “and possibly other schools in the region (threats of violence.”

The Kea‘au campus will remain open at this time.

“We take all threats very seriously, and have asked our security team which protects our campus 24/7 to be on high alert,” said Nae‘ole-Wong. “Should there be any changes to this I will let you know, but please know that nothing is more important than the protection of your keiki.”

UPDATE 2, 9:10 a.m.

The Hawai‘i Police Department reports that there is no active shooter situation at either Pāhoa High School or Kea‘au High School.

Big Island Now found two HPD officers at Kea‘au High School, but the officers did not share any information about their investigation.

UPDATE 1: Feb. 21, 2018, 8:46 a.m.

Big Island police are on high alert after threats were made at three schools on the island.

In response, police have temporarily increased presence at the two public high schools in the Puna District—Pāhoa and Kea‘au High School—along with Konawainea High School on Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018.

Police have been meeting with school officials.

In response to social media posts on, Jan. 29, which were brought to school official’s attention yesterday, Tuesday, Feb. 20, police were summoned to the Pāhoa High School campus.

It was reported that during a back and forth Instagram text between two female teenagers in which insults were exchanged, a 16-year-old female made a comment referencing bringing a firearm to school.

Police generated a harassment case and located and interviewed the 16-year-old suspect on Tuesday. She was later released and the case is being routed to Family Court.

Although the posting didn’t specify a school, investigation revealed that one of the suspects was connected with Konawaena High School.

A 17-year-old male was subsequently arrested and charged with second-degree terroristic threatening. He was later released to his parents.

Later social media posts began discussing that a shooting would take place at a Keaʻau school as well.

It is a felony to threaten to shoot a gun at school and is punishable by up to five years in prison.

In the back of everyone’s mind is the spate of deadly shootings at schools, including one last week at a Florida high school that left 17 people dead.

Konawaena High School. File photo.

The shooting has prompted several “copycat threats” at other schools across the country, putting authorities on extra high alert.

ORIGINAL POST: Feb. 20, 2018, 11:36 p.m.

On Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018, at about 11:30 a.m., police received a report of a social media posting from a male party that referenced to “shooting up local schools.”

Investigation into this posting reveals it was posted by a 17-year-old-male juvenile.

At about 7 p.m., the suspect was taken into custody and charged with Terroristic Threatening in the Second Degree.

The juvenile was subsequently released to his parent due to not qualifying for further detention.

Although the posting did not contain a specific school, the juvenile was found to be connected with Konawaena High School.

As a result police will have a greater presence at Konawaena School tomorrow, Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018.

Bill to Protect Homeschooled Keiki Deferred

Sen. Kaiali‘i Kahele. Courtesy photo

In an effort to protect abused children, Sen. Kaiali‘i Kahele had worked with the Hawai‘i County Prosecutors office to introduce Senate Bill 2323 that would have established procedures for a parent or legal guardian to obtain authorization to home school a child.

However, understanding the strong concerns about the measure, Sen. Kahele requested the bill be withdrawn during the joint hearing of the Senate Committees on Education and Human Services. In his request.

He offered this explanation:

“Senate Bill 2323 was never meant to not allow loving, caring, families from homeschooling your child and from infringing on your constitutionally protected rights. It was meant to protect children that live unimaginable lives, and are abused, neglected at the hands of the very parents and guardians that should be nurturing them and forgotten by a system that should be protecting them.

“Today is Valentine’s Day and many of us will get to share this special day with our loved ones. But that is not the case for Peter Boy Kema, Shaelyn Lehano Stone and many other children across Hawai‘i and America, who do not have a voice and live their lives in fear.

“This is a conversation we need to have. It is a conversation we need to have in other States throughout our country and it is a conversation we need to have here in Hawai‘i.

“Due to the overwhelming testimony in opposition and the overwhelming turnout today at the Capitol, as the introducer of the bill, your voices have been heard by me and my colleagues and I would like to request that this bill be withdrawn and deferred.

“In the interim, I am committed to work in collaboration with stakeholders, the Home School Network, Department of Education and other agencies to address this issue and return next Session with a bill that protects all keiki of Hawai‘i.”

The Senate Committees on Education and Human Services deferred action on SB2323.

Entrepreneurs Recognized At Junior Achievement Awards Banquet

At an awards banquet held on Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2018, at Sanga Hall in Hilo, Junior Achievement of Hawai‘i Island congratulated outstanding young entrepreneurs and awarded $3,500 in scholarships.

The Junior Achievement company program helps high school students develop leadership and entrepreneurship skills by guiding them through the creation of a small business, from product development to marketing and sales. The awards recognize the hard work of the students and advisors from local businesses.

2018 Company of the Year, Branching Out, sponsored by Big Island Toyota. Photo courtesy Junior Achievement of Hawai‘i Island

A familiar face returned home to Hilo to keynote the awards banquet. Jimmy Chan, founder of the Hawaiian Chip Company, is a 1993 Waiākea High School graduate and a Junior Achievement company program alumnus. He shared his entrepreneurial journey with the audience, and spoke about the importance of the lessons he learned through Junior Achievement.

Guest speaker Jimmy Chan of the Hawaiian Chip Company. Photo courtesy Junior Achievement of Hawai‘i Island

The three student companies participating in this cycle were Branching Out sponsored by Big Island Toyota, Young Creations sponsored by HFS Federal Credit Union, and Zenith sponsored by HPM Building Supply. Company members sold their products to friends and family, and to the public at a trade fair held at Prince Kūhiō Plaza in November. Over the course of the cycle, the companies sold over $31,000 in merchandise.

Branching Out was named Outstanding Company Of The Year, and was also recognized for having the highest company sales at $11,652. Zenith was recognized for having the most compelling presence at the trade fair.

Scholarship Recipients (left to right): Albert Zuniga, Keziah Soares, Naya Nguyen, Brittney Williams, Crismel Juan. Photo courtesy Junior Achievement of Hawai‘i Island

There was a tie for Outstanding President – awards were presented to Daniel Briski of Young Creations and Brittney Williams of Branching Out. Outstanding Vice Presidents were also recognized for their contributions to their companies: Kanoe Kama (Branching Out – Finance), Kalsey Nacis Jr. (Branching Out – Production), Naya Nguyen (Branching Out – Marketing), Keziah Soares (Branching Out – Human Resources) and Kira Taylor (Young Creations – Public Relations) received the awards.

The top three salespeople of the year were Tristen Cullio of Branching Out with $2,277 in sales, Brittney Williams of Branching Out with $2,050 and Daniel Briski of Young Creations with $1,063.

Other awards were given to Naya Nguyen of Branching Out for Outstanding Sales Presentation and Brittney Williams of Branching Out for most products sold and highest individual sales at the trade fair.

The Junior Achievement sponsoring businesses instill the value of community service in their own employees and set excellent examples for the participants. Companies collaborated with Hale Ānuenue Restorative Care Center, Operation Christmas, and an effort to send aloha to members of the U.S. military abroad. This year’s Community Service award was given to Young Creations in recognition of their exceptional contributions to the community.

In addition to the awards recognizing achievement in the program, $3,500 in scholarships were awarded to six seniors who excelled both in the program and in other aspects of scholastic life: Crismel Juan of Young Creations (Kea‘au), Naya Nguyen of Branching Out (Waiākea), Princess Fatimah Rasalan of Young Creations (Kea‘au), Keziah Soares of Branching Out (Kea‘au), Brittney Williams of Branching Out (Waiākea), and Alfred Zuniga of Zenith (Kea‘au). This is the 29th year that Junior Achievement of Hawai‘i Island has awarded scholarships to participants.

“We are so proud of our students’ efforts and know that they have bright futures,” said district manager for Junior Achievement of Hawaiʻi Island Jeanine Acia. “The Futures Unlimited Banquet is a great opportunity to celebrate their success. We also must thank our volunteer mentors who give so generously – our program would not be a success if it weren’t for them.”

Junior Achievement is an organization founded in 1919 that fosters work-readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy skills in students nationwide. Locally, the organization is powered by members of Hawai‘i Island’s business community who serve as advisors, sponsors, and volunteers. To get Junior Achievement in your K-12 classroom, or to get involved as a volunteer or sponsor, contact District Manager Jeanine Acia at (808) 292-0570 or jahilo@jahawaii.org.

Full Listing of Award Recipients:

100 Percent Attendance Award

  • Branching Out – Callista Cava, Tristen Cullio, Aaryn Hoota, Kanoe Kama, Naya Nguyen, Keziah Soares, Kala Van Veen and Brittney Williams.
  • Young Creations – Wilmer Agpaoa, Jaylen Mae Arzaga, Daniel Briski, Dane Dupre, Francina Fabian, Phoebe Furuli, K-Talyn Keter, Kayla Okazaki, Nathan O’Leary, Katelin Paderan, Isabel Portillo, Princess Fatimah Rasalan, Emma Reed, Kailen Scanlon, Kira Taylor and Emilia Wagner-Prekaski.
  • Zenith – Riezhelle Agpaoa, Shayna Atiz, AJ Care, Mikaela Durch, John Carlo Galamay, Anela Kaneshiro, Iain Klegner, Kamakana Liwai, Mika Odaira, Esse Soyon, Thane Todd and  Shwe Win.

Achiever Award

  • Branching Out – Sydirah Aricayos, Kimokeo Bowden, Callista Cava, Rio Chopot, Tristen Cullio, Anthony Freitas, Alicia Freitas, Aaryn Hoota, Roger Kirkland-Obra, Kysha Rae Paglinawan-Pacheco, Kyla Rae Paglinawan-Pacheco, Carina Shintaku, Hope Surigao and Kala Van Veen.
  • Young Creations – Seth Bello, Sophia Booth, Dane Dupre, Francina Fabian, Bryana Grace, Crismel Juan, K-Talyn Keter, Shyshy Kopura, Hermione Mikami, Kayla Okazaki, Nathan O’Leary, Katelin Paderan, Isabel Portillo, Princess Fatimah Rasalan, Emma Reed and Kailey Scanlon.
  • Zenith – Nicolas Boo Rivera, John Bruce, AJ Care, Anela Kaneshiro, John Kenny, Minji Kim, Iain Klegner, Lorain Likich,e Kamakana Liwai, Mika Odaira, Chaselin Ogata, Leilauna Olson, Esse Soyon and Shwe Win.

$1,000 Sales Club

  • Branching Out – Tristen Cullio and Brittney Williams
  • Young Creations –  Daniel Briski and Rysa Lee Dela Cruz
  • Zenith – Albert Zuniga

$500 to $999 Sales Club

  • Branching Out – Kanoe Kama, Keziah Soares and Hope Surigao.
  • Young Creations – Wilmer Agpaoa, Jaylen Mae Arzaga, Kaylee Marques and Hermione Mikami.
  • Zenith – AJ Care and Iain Klegner.

$300 and $400 Sales Clubs

  • Branching Out – Kimokeo Bowden, Alicia Freitas, Kekoa Gomes, Aaryn Hoota, Keiko Mills, Naya Nguyen and Kala Van Veen.
  • Young Creations – Seth Bello, Phoebe Furuli, Mikyla Nakila, Nathan O’Leary, Princess Fatimah Rasalan, Kailey Scanlon and Titongi Taomia.
  • Zenith – Shayna Atiz, Brianna Diaz-Escobar, Mikaela Durch, Mika Odaira and Fiona Supan.

Executive Award

  • Branching Out – Kekoa Gomes, Kanoe Kama, Kalsey Nacis Jr., Naya Nguyen, Jaden Padamada, Keziah Soares and Brittany Williams.
  • Young Creations – Wilmer Agpaoa, Jaylen Mar Arzaga, Daniel Briski, Maribel Dela Cruz, Phoebe Furuli, Kaylee Marques, Jadon Smith, Titongi Taomia, Kira Taylor and Emilia Wagner-Prekaski.
  • Zenith – Riezhelle Agpaoa, Shayna Atiz, Sabina Boo Rivera, Mikaela Durch, Kyla Fabiani, John Carlo Galamay, Fiona Supan, Thane Todd, Corbin Warmbier and Albert Zuniga.

Hawaiʻi Community College Hosting Event for Prospective Students

Anyone thinking about enrolling at Hawaiʻi Community College (HawCC) in the fall semester of 2018, should mark down Thursday, Feb. 8, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on their calendar for the 5th annual Hawaiʻi Community College Day at the Manono Campus.

Hawaii CC science instructor Luria Namba talks to an attendee at a past Hawaii CC Day event.

The day will begin with a kīpaepae welina, a traditional Native Hawaiian welcoming ceremony. The college’s academic programs and student services will present interactive exhibits that highlight the degree and certificate programs available at the campus.

The event is free and open to the public.

“Hawaiʻi Community College has been serving the community for more than 75 years with high-quality programs that prepare students for success,” said Chancellor Rachel Solemsaas. “We encourage community members to visit the campus on Hawaiʻi CC Day to learn more about the higher education options available on Hawaiʻi Island.”

Visitors will be able to participate in express admissions by completing an application and learning more about the next steps in the enrollment process. HawCC staff members will also be on-site to help with enrollment.

For more information about the event, contact the HawCC Information Center at (808) 934-2800 or the HawCC website.

More Hawaii Teachers Obtain Certification

The Hawai‘i Department of Education announces that 56 teachers were honored Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018, for earning or renewing their National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Certification. Educators who earn this certification have demonstrated that they meet the highest standards for teaching, and must be up-to-date with the latest strategies and best practices in education.

Hawaii is ranked 11th in the nation for percentage of National Board Certified Teachers. Photo Credit: Department of Education

Superintendent Dr. Christina Kishimoto addressed the teachers at the 2018 Hawai‘i National Board Certified Teacher Ceremony hosted by the Hawai‘i State Teachers Association and Kamehameha Schools at the Hawai‘i State Capitol Auditorium.

“We are proud of these teachers for their efforts to elevate their profession and provide enhanced learning opportunities for Hawai‘i’s students,” said Superintendent Dr. Christina Kishimoto. “Earning this certification is no easy task and I commend them for taking on this additional workload and responsibility. Congratulations to these teachers, their families and schools on this remarkable accomplishment.”

Hawai‘i is ranked 11th in the nation for percentage of National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs), and boasts one of the fastest growing populations of NBCTs. There are currently 625 teachers who earned their certification.

“In 2017, The Aloha state added 56 new NBCTs reflecting a 10 percent jump in their total,”added NBCT president and CEO of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Peggy Brookins. This means more students across your state being taught by teachers who prove they teach to the highest standards. Every student deserves to be taught by an accomplished teacher.”

The NBCT certification is a rigorous process that can take anywhere between one to three years and involves applicants submitting comprehensive portfolio. The renewal process is just as demanding and requires teachers to show professional growth.

Tracey Idica, teacher at Aiea High School and HSTA NBCT network affiliate, shared, “This is how teachers are taking back their profession. Doctors can become Board Certified, accountants can become CPAs, and now teachers can become NBCTs. It’s a voluntary process but its the way we can show the community that we are accomplished teachers.”

The following teachers earned their certification in 2017:

  • Jennifer Ainoa, Molokai Middle
  • Lori Cabalar, Keaau Elementary
  • Jane Cariaga, Pahoa Elementary
  • Tanya Cobbin, Waipahu High
  • Patricia Contee, Salt Lake Elementary
  • Chris Cordell, Hawaii Technology Academy
  • Alexander Cyran, Keaau Middle
  • Jill Harai, Iliahi Elementary
  • Danielle Hartwick, Makawao Elementary
  • Liane Ibara, Palolo Elementary
  • Michael Ibara, Puuhale Elementary
  • Cheryl Iwasaki, Helemano Elementary
  • Qurratulay Joy, Makawao Elementary
  • Mara Kaizawa-Miyata, McKinley High
  • Naomi Kamauoha, Palolo Elementary
  • Dawn Kanoho, Momilani Elementary
  • Kellee Kelly, Keaau Elementary
  • Samantha Kodama, Kaimuki Middle
  • Laurel Latimer, Makawao Elementary
  • Christine Layton, Hawaii Technology Academy
  • Jamie Letreta, Holomua Elementary
  • Erin Medeiros, Kauai High
  • Elaine Medina, Makaha Elementary
  • Nikki Morishige, Waiahole Elementary
  • Cheryl Motoyama, Red Hill Elementary
  • Lisa Nakama, Kaneohe Elementary
  • Shanna Nakamura, Aliiolani Elementary
  • Laura Obuhanych, Holomua Elementary
  • Lisa Oka, Wahiawa Elementary
  • Elizabeth Okamoto, Webling Elementary
  • Sonia Orlando, Waianae Elementary
  • Sandra Oshiro, Momilani Elementary
  • Robyn Panem, Keaau Elementary
  • Suzanne Reed, Ahuimanu Elementary
  • Tamie Richardson, Kaimiloa Elementary
  • Catherine Ritti, Farrington High
  • Jennifer Sarpi, Campbell High
  • Mari Sato, Enchanted Lake Elementary
  • Sheena Shimose, Leihoku Elementary
  • Jessica Sleeper, Kamaile Academy
  • Aysha Spencer, Chiefess Kapiolani Elementary
  • Hannibal Starbuck, Baldwin High
  • Stefanie Sweeney, Waikiki Elementary
  • Jamie Takamura, Red Hill Elementary
  • Jennifer Valenzuela, Lahainaluna High
  • Maile Viela, Waihee Elementary
  • Lynn Wakahiro, Momilani Elementary
  • Amanda Watson, Kailua Intermediate
  • Elizabeth Williams, Campbell High
  • Jill Yamasawa, Kapolei Middle

For more information about the certification and the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, click here.

New School Lunch Online Payment System

PC: Department of Education

The Hawai‘i State Department of Education (HIDOE) is in the process of transitioning to Harris School Solutions (eTrition) – a new school lunch online payment system – after the current contract with PrimeroEdge (SchoolCafé) ended on Sunday, Dec. 31, 2017.

In a letter to parents and guardians, families were instructed to make all meal deposits directly to the school beginning Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. During this time, student eligibility and balance data will be transferred to eTrition from the PrimeroEdge system.

Click here to view the Frequently Asked Questions.

Click here to see when the new system will be rolled out to each school. Online payments for each school will resume and be implemented at a later date.

Former Big Island Student Protecting Corals

As a child growing up on the Big Island of Hawai‘i, Narrissa Spies thought the classroom and beach were two separate and distinct places. The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa announced that this 35-year-old graduate student in zoology at the university knows that protecting coral reefs is both her future job and life’s passion.

“I grew up in a house that didn’t have electricity, so for us going to the beach during the day was an amazing way to escape,” said Spies. “I didn’t realize as a child that I could do those types of things as a career, that I could investigate sea creatures, turn over rocks, as my job.”

Bob Richmond, her faculty advisor and director of the Kewalo Marine Lab, says Spies is more than a brilliant scientist, “She is a cultural practitioner who will inspire future ocean researchers.”

Thanks to a $45,000 fellowship from the Kohala Center, a Waimea-based nonprofit, Spies is spending the 2017–18 academic year finishing her doctorate on how coral are able to withstand multiple stressors resulting from human activities.

“For many scientists, the coin of the realm is the peer-reviewed publication. They say, ‘Okay, my job is done, I’ve published the paper,‘” said her faculty advisor and director of the Kewalo Marine Lab Bob Richmond. “For Narrissa and her generation, that is no longer sufficient. ‘We’ve done the science, we’ve published the paper and now we have to put that knowledge to work.’ And that’s what distinguishes her from a lot of other people.”

Spies grew up in Hilo and Kawaihae, where her childhood aspiration was to become a medical researcher. She began her studies at Hawaiʻi Community College, graduating from UH Hilo with a bachelor of arts in biology and anthropology, and a master’s degree in tropical conservation biology and environmental science.

Today, you’ll find Spies at the Kewalo Marine Lab, near Kakaʻako Waterfront Park, where she is on schedule to earn a doctorate in zoology in Spring 2018. She continues her research after receiving yet another honor—a grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to engage high school students in the natural sciences as a career path.

By demonstrating her high level of success, this role model will increase the number of Native Hawaiian professionals with a cultural affinity for protecting fragile natural resources.

“I feel it’s important to educate students in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) because these are our resources in Hawaiʻi,” said Spies. “And who better to care for these resources than people who grew up here, and can understand how important they are to our local community.”

Cybersecurity Training Program for High School Girls

Hawai‘i Gov. David Y. Ige is encouraging high school girls to participate in the first major cybersecurity training program specifically for young women, grades 9 – 12, who may be interested in pursuing a career in cybersecurity. The state is partnering with the SANS Institute to bring the GirlsGoCyberStart program to Hawaiʻi.

The first 10,000 eligible registrants will be invited to play an online game that runs Tuesday through Sunday, Feb. 20 to 25, 2018, in which participants play cyber protection agents protecting an important operation base. Entrants who excel will be recognized and eligible to win computers and other prizes, as well as a trip (with a parent) to the 2018 Women in CyberSecurity Conference in Chicago in March.

“I encourage young women to sign up and to become more familiar with what it takes to work in this high-demand field,” said Gov. Ige. “Women are sorely underrepresented in this industry, and this program aims to change that. Our students have the talent and drive to succeed in cybersecurity and other high-tech fields, and we will help guide them to exciting and high-wage careers.”

“This is a wonderful educational opportunity for young women to learn about the various careers in cybersecurity. Right now, only 11 percent globally and 14 percent nationally of the cybersecurity workforce are women, and this program provides an outlet to inspire and empower high school girls who have a desire to enter the cybersecurity field,” said Office of Enterprise Technology Services Chief Information Security Officer Vincent Hoang.

“The nation desperately needs more highly-skilled cyber professionals, and we have evidence that CyberStart improves the quality of individuals entering the cybersecurity field,” said SANS Director of Research Alan Paller. Further, the two best cyber intrusion analysts I have ever met were named Vicki and Judy, yet women are woefully underrepresented in the technical side of cybersecurity. By opening CyberStart to thousands of high school girls we hope to help the nation identify the next generation of talented people who will excel in this critical field.”

The GirlsGoCyberStart program builds on last summer’s successful CyberStart pilot, in which 300 Hawaiʻi students joined 3,500 youths from seven states in game simulations and activities that taught them basic cybersecurity skills and tested their cyber aptitude.

Last year, 22 top performing Hawaiʻi students each received a SANS cybersecurity scholarship of $1,500. SANS reported that Hawaiʻi had a far larger number of high scorers and scholarship winners on a per capita basis than any other state.

Registration for GirlsGoCyberStart starts on Monday, Jan. 29, and ends on Friday, Feb. 16, 2018. Participating students do not need prior cybersecurity knowledge or programming experience. All that is required is a computer and an internet connection.

Register online.

For more information on Hawaiʻi’s GirlsGoCyberStart program, including exclusive prizes for Hawaiʻi participants and orientation opportunities, click here.

New Graduation Requirements for KSBE Students

Parents of students at Kamehameha Schools Bishop Estate (KSBE) students received an email from Vice President of Education Dr. Holoua Stender, notifying them of new graduation requirements that would begin with the class of 2022.

A new set of unified high school graduation requirements for all three campuses was recently approved by the Kamehameha Schools Board of Trustees. These new requirements will enable Kamehameha Schools students across the three campuses to have access to comparable and consistent educational experiences, founded on the achievement of the E Ola. Learner Outcomes which will assist each student to grow toward realizing his/her full potential as good and industrious global citizens and servant leaders.

“I am sincerely grateful to nā Poʻo Kumu (principals) and nā Poʻo Kula (headmasters) from Hawai‘i, Kapālama and Maui for their incredible work in creating our first-ever set of Kamehameha Schools graduation requirements beginning with the class of 2022,” said Education Vice President Dr. Holoua Stender.

The new graduation requirements will begin with next year’s incoming freshmen class (2022). Students in the classes of 2021, 2020 and 2019 will continue to follow the requirements set forth prior to the new tri-campus graduation requirements.

The new requirements are categorized into three areas:

  • Nā Papa ‘Ikoi (core courses)
  • Nā Papa Mauli (electives)
  • Nā Mauli Hiwa (non-credit courses).

*Language requirement includes two years of Hawaiian language (Hawaiian 1 and Hawaiian 2). Students who pass a tri-campus proficiency test for Hawaiian 1 may earn placement in Hawaiian 2. Students who pass a tri-campus proficiency test for Hawaiian 2 may earn placement in Hawaiian 3. Students who attain proficiency in Hawaiian 2 via assessment, or by completing the Hawaiian 2 course, may choose to enroll in Hawaiian, or another language (e.g., Japanese, Spanish, etc.) and complete at least two years of their selected language to fulfill the language requirement.

As a part of Nā Papa ‘Ikoi and Nā Papa Mauli, students will earn 26 core and elective credits. In addition, all students will be required to take two years of ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i (Hawaiian language).

Stender stated:

“This emphasis on ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi conveys Kamehameha’s commitment to cultivating a strong Hawaiian identity, which we believe provides a competitive advantage for our haumāna and graduates.

For the Nā Mauli Hiwa requirement, students will participate in school-based activities which foster character development, cultural identity, college and career readiness, safety, health and well-being, and servant leadership. A notable component in this new educational experience is a culminating senior capstone project demonstrating how E Ola! Learner Outcomes become embodied in student-centered, personalized projects which enable haumāna to become local and global leaders, who are culturally engaged and play significant roles in creating strong ʻohana and communities throughout ka pae ʻāina o Hawai`i and beyond.

The approved requirements align Kamehameha to other independent schools, while also acknowledging emerging trends in college acceptance requirements. As haumāna explore their options for college and career, they will be confident knowing that Kamehameha Schools has prepared them with rigorous and relevant courses of study. Haumāna wil be equipped with skills, knowledge and values through our Hawaiian culture-based program of study which will prepare them with a unique growth mindset for learning and leadership in the complex global society of today.

Our kumu, administrators and operations staff continue to put their hearts and souls into creating wonderful and enriching educational experiences for your keiki. As always, I am grateful for their dedication to our haumāna and to all of you, for fulfilling the sacred mission that Ke Ali‘i Pauahi set forth for us 130 years ago.

Our campus staff will continue to discuss and review these new graduation requirements among their colleagues, department heads, and campus leaders, and will work diligently to prepare our haumāna as we take this important step forward.

More information will be forthcoming about the Hawaiian language proficiency assessment for incoming freshmen and their senior capstone project. This information will be sent out by your student’s campus. The new requirements and frequently asked questions are available online if you would like to see more. If you have other questions about the new requirements, please call your son’s/daughter’s counselor or the high school principal’s office.”

$3 Million in Improvements Slated for Honoka‘a High & Intermediate

Hawai`i State Senator Lorraine Inouye. Senate Communications photo.

Hawai‘i Gov. David Ige released $3 million in Capital Improvement Project (CIP) funding for Honoka‘a High and Intermediate School.

Allocated has been $1.5 million to provide covered walkways that will connect various buildings at Honoka‘a High and Intermediate School. This project will also improve cross-campus mobility while improving sidewalk ADA ramps and access. Another $1.5 million will finance the design and construction of new restroom facilities at the school’s auditorium.

Sen. Lorraine Inouye (District 4: Hilo, Hāmākua, Kohala, Waimea, Waikoloa, Kona) championed to secure the funds which was approved in the 2016 and 2017 Legislative Sessions.

“Honoka‘a High and Intermediate is a school that carries a substantial responsibility in educating a huge number of students, so I’m thrilled that my colleagues in the Legislature and the Governor recognized the needs of the campus,” said Sen. Inouye. “I’m proud and happy students and staff at the school will soon have a healthier and safer environment to learn.”

Honoka‘a High and Intermediate School was founded in 1889 and is located in the center of Honoka‘a Town on the Hāmākua Coast of the Island of Hawai‘i. The Honoka‘a complex is unique in that it is the only high school in the state that is fed by a kindergarten to eighth grade public conversion charter school (Waimea Middle), a kindergarten to sixth grade elementary school (Honoka‘a Elementary) and a kindergarten to ninth grade elementary and intermediate school (Pa‘auilo Elementary & Intermediate), serving students from as far as Kawaihae through ‘Ō‘ōkala, about a 40 mile reach.

State VEX Championships Scheduled Jan. 13-14, 2018

The Hawaiian Electric Companies Hawaii State VEX Championships are scheduled Jan. 13-14, 2018 at Kamehameha Schools Kapalama Campus gymnasium with more than 140 elementary, middle and high school teams from around the state competing for 25 qualification slots at the VEX World Championships in St. Louis, Kentucky this April. The state VEX Championships are free to the public.

Na Paniolo, a robotics team from Kohala High, took home the Sportsmanship Award at the 2017 Pan Pacific VEX Robotics Championship, photo credit: Art Kimura

On Saturday, opening ceremonies for the VEX EDR (middle and high school teams) will begin at 8:45 a.m. with qualification matches starting at 9 a.m. through 12:45 p.m. Elimination matches will start at 1:45 p.m. followed by an awards ceremony at 4 p.m. Of the total 47 teams competing, only five will advance to the VEX Worlds.

Competing schools in the VEX EDR include Highlands Intermediate, Hilo High, Island Pacific Academy (Kapolei), Kaiser, Kalani, Kamehameha Schools, Kapolei Middle, Keaau High, Kealakehe High, King Kekaulike, Konawaena High, Kohala High, Lokelani Intermediate, Maryknoll High, Maui High, Mililani High, Mid-Pacific Institute, Moanalua High, Molokai High, Pearl City High, Sacred Hearts Academy, Saint Joseph, Saint Louis, Stevenson Middle, Waiakea Intermediate, Waialua High & Intermediate and Waipahu High. Circuit Breakers, Island Robotics and 808 Robotics Homeschool also will compete.

On Sunday, opening ceremonies for the VEX IQ championships will begin at 8:30 a.m. with concurrent qualification matches starting at 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. on separate fields for elementary and middle school teams. Afternoon matches begin at 1 p.m. followed by an awards ceremony at 3:45 p.m. The VEX IQ elementary championships will advance 11 of 46 teams to the VEX Worlds while the VEX IQ middle school championships will advance 9 of 45 teams.

Competing elementary schools are: Aliamanu, August Ahrens, Ewa Beach, Hawaii Technology Academy, Holualoa, Huaikalani School for Girls, Kaunakakai, Keaau, Konawaena, Kualapuu, Lihikai, Manana, Manoa, Maryknoll, Mililani, Moanalua, Nuuanu, Pearl City Highlands, Pomaikai, Princess Nahienaena, Pukalani, Sacred Hearts Academy, Saint Joseph and Waimalu. Mechaneers Robotics Club, BSA Aloha Council Troop 32, Manoa RoBlocks, Moanalua Pack 9 Cub Scout and Pack 33 Manoa-Kapiolani District Aloha Council also are entered.

Competing middle schools are: Akaula, Hanalani Schools, Hawaii Technology Academy, Hilo Intermediate, Ilima Intermediate, Island Pacific Academy, Kamehameha, Kapolei, Keaau, Konawaena, Lokelani Intermediate, Maryknoll, Mid-Pacific Institute, Mililani, Molokai, Sacred Hearts Academy, Saint Louis, St. John Vianney, Volcano School of Arts and Sciences, Waiakea Intermediate and Waialua. Cornerstone Engineering Robotics, Girl Scouts Troop 254, KalamaBotics (Makawao) and Phoenixbots (Mililani) also are registered.

UH Hilo College of Business and Economics Dean’s List Fall 2017

The following students in the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Business and Economics made the Dean’s List for fall 2017:

Shiela Mae Sagun Almazan, Sheng Paul Ang, Desiree Rosalita Ashley, Jeryl Dadulla Bautista, Courtney Ann Aiko Inone Brock, Marson Nicolas Cabay, Charlene Mae Corotan, Elijah J.O.A. Cruz, Andrew Nalu Dawrs, Jhoanne A. Domingo, Allison Leilani Dupre, Lindsay Baker Emerson, Cyanne Malia Meihoong Fernandez, Manuel M. Fernandez, Gabriel Adam Fry, Christine Joy Halabas Galdones, Francine Andrei Bautista Gallego, Darcy Malia Gaylord, David Scott Graehler, Yan Ying Huang, Jeongwon Hwang, Nicole Kaleiokamalamalama Ignacio, Chelsey Kimiko Ikeda,

Janine Makanalani Iseri, Juvette Kamaka’ala Kahawaii, Pilialoha Jean Kailiawa, Zoe Ayaka Kimura, Momoko Koizumi, Polina I. Kozinskiy, Sinailetulaga Trude Kulberg, Thomas Weston Lindsey III, Samantha June Lord, Kainoa Abram Lyman, Victoria Magana Ledesma, Seth Thomas Master, Evan James Merrier, Tailani Morse, Austin Masaki Nakamura, Puanani Amina Nakamura-Jones, Attok David Nashon, Wyatt John Nelson, Brandon Kenta Okimoto, Lynda Naomi Ono, Minami Osawa, Cortney Gail Sachiyo Oshiro, Jazzle Ann Paraiso, Kahiau Raymond Tatsumi Peralta,

Jaye Leah Plumb, Alyssa Marie Reinking, Alicia Chanes Rodriguez, Marvin Joubin Rositzki, Kyungmin Ryu, Nicole Yukiko Saito, Shelby Blue Steele, Garnett Gani Stone Jr., Jaron Takeo Sugimoto, Adam Robert Swope, Nolan Anthony Cruz Taianao, Jubylen Godoy Teehee, Calvin Daishi Uemura, Onosa`i Va`a, Sienna Lynn Wareham, Thomas Edward Warren III, Travis Keoni Winters, YingYan Sun Wong, Kristen Michie Yagi, Tahiya Zaman and Yuye Zhao.

HCFCU 2018 Scholarship Program to Award 8 Scholarships

Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union (HCFCU) is excited to announce its 2018 Scholarship Program will be accepting applications starting January 2, 2018.

Eight deserving Hawaii Islanders will each receive $2,500, totaling $20,000 given in scholarships, to help support their transition to higher education.  HCFCU has provided scholarships to Hawaii Island students for more than 32 years.

Each scholarship is named after an HCFCU volunteer or manager who made important contributions to the organization.

Five of the scholarships — Peter Hirata Scholarship, Albert Akana Scholarship, Katsumasa Tomita Scholarship, Frank Ishii Scholarship, and Mitsugi Inaba scholarship — are awarded to students based on need, academic achievement, career goals, and extracurricular activities.

The John Y. Iwane scholarship will be awarded to a high school senior that meets all the criteria mentioned above with plans to enter an agriculture-related field of study.

The Michael Asam Scholarship will be awarded to a senior who actively participates in an HCFCU sponsored Student Credit Union as a teller or as a Student Credit Union Board member.

The Yasunori Deguchi Scholarship will be awarded to a post-graduate on Hawaii Island, currently attending college or going back to college.

Eligibility Requirements

HCFCU’s Scholarships are open to our Hawaii Island communities. You do not have to be a member of Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union. You must meet at least one of the following requirements to be eligible to apply.

  • Graduating senior from any Island of Hawaii high school and planning to attend a post-secondary college or four-year college during next school year as a full-time student(post-secondary college, vocational, technical – with a minimum two-year curriculum); or
  • A posthigh school graduate on Hawaii Island who is either currently attending, or going back to, a post-secondary college or four-year college as a full-time student (post-secondary college, vocational, technical – with a minimum two-year curriculum).

Submission Requirements

The following is required in order to complete your application.

  • Academic Record
  • Non-Academic/Extra-Curricular Activities
  • Career Goals & Educational Plans
  • Financial Need -Verified EFC signed off by counselor. FAFSA will need to be completed. (not required for post-graduates returning to college)

Interested applicants may fill out an application online at HCFCU’s website, www.hicommfcu.com. The online application streamlines the process and allows the applicants to save their work and complete it at a later date.

Applications and all required information must be received by April 2, 2018 to be considered.

Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union is a not-for-profit, federally insured financial institution owned by its 40,000 members. HCFCU’s branches are located in Honokaa, Kailua-Kona, Kaloko, Kealakekua and Kohala, along with Student Credit Unions in Kealakehe, Kohala and Konawaena High Schools. In 2018, HCFCU will open its first-ever branch in East Hawaii in Hilo. In addition to complete checking and savings services,

HCFCU provides service-minded financial professionals to help facilitate mortgage, land, construction, small business, educational, personal and auto loans; drive up tellers; credit and debit cards with rewards; online and mobile banking; investment services and youth programs. HCFCU also supports numerous Hawaii Island non-profit organizations and community events. Membership in Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union is open to all Hawaii Island residents.

UH Hilo College of Pharmacy Names Fall 2017 Dean’s List

The following students from the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy have been named to the Dean’s List for the fall 2017 semester:

Class of 2021
Clifford Agcaoili, Trang Bui, Aileen Bulatao, Brandon Chagami, Thai Dinh, Lauren Domingo, Sean Domingo, Angina El, Justin Fujiwara, Tailai Guan, Taylor Hiraga, Jake Hoctor, Feng Ming Huang, Jenna James, Patsylynn Jetley, Melody Keshavarz, John-Michael Kimhan, Da Hai Lee, QiXin Li, Kimberly Lin, Noelle Lovesy, Brittany Luna, Christian Macaspac, Josephine McDonald, Shane-Earl Naeole, Nu Nguyen, Lan Thi Hoang Nguyen, Destinee Ogas, Kimo Okamoto, Rebecca Oshiro, Calvin Ostler, Jaymee-Rae Pang, Elaine Phan, Henry Quach, Tiana Ramos, Tiana Ramos, Norlyn Ranchez, Sera Shimizu, Maysyvelle Sistoza, Johnson Siu, James Soe, Fumiko Steiger, Melissa Ann Tyndale, Christian Villalta, Donald Waddell

Class of 2020
Brandi Chun, Joshua Dillon, Jensine Melody Domingo, Amelia Furlan, Jhoana Paula Gonzales, Taylor Hori, Kamala Lizama, Tracy Lopez, Mary Lui, Jarin Miyamoto, Tony Moua, Stacey Nguyen, Brent Ocker, Tyler Peterson, Felix Rasgo, Robyn Rector, Taumie Richie, Shaina Saiki, Reid Shimada, Samantha Texeira, Jared Toba, Johnny Tran, Kelsey Trujillo, Thi Hong Vo, Stacie Waiamau

Class of 2019
Sydney Barney, Deniz Bicakci, Athena Borhauer, Rene-Scott Chavez, Torrence Ching, Katrina Downey, Samantha Gonzalez, Cathlyn Goo, Leigh Heffner, Faith Hicks, Vance Hill, Preston Ho, Stacy Huynh, Gurinder Kaur, Logan Kostur, San Ly, Kate Malasig, Jennifer Nguyen, Thu Nguyen, Kelsey Noetzelmann, Kara Paulachak, David Pham, Gam Phan, Rachel Randall, Lindsey Reinholz, Desiree Shouse, Clement Tran Tang, Shannon Trinh, Nicholas Tsoi, Ashley Uehara, Nancy Wong, Veronica Wong, Krystin Yasay, Carrie Yeung

Hawaii Gets Federal Nod on ESSA Plan, Approval Expected Soon

The Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) this morning received encouraging feedback from the U.S. Department of Education (USED) following a review of its State plan for the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). USED officials gave the indication for “ultimate approval of the plan” during a call with HIDOE officials.

“We had a great discussion with federal education officials who determined that Hawaii is well on its way for approval once we make minor adjustments to our consolidated plan,” said Superintendent Dr. Christina Kishimoto. “The State plan is a culmination of a community effort and it’s rewarding to see that the USED recognizes Hawaii’s effort and commitment to providing equitable and accessible education.”

ESSA is a reauthorization of the federal education law known as the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. It replaces the prior reauthorization, most commonly known as No Child Left Behind.

Following the Hawaii State Board of Education approval, the Superintendent and Governor David Ige submitted the signed state’s ESSA plan to USED in September 2017. The Hawaii ESSA plan is designed to support HIDOE’s Strategic Plan objectives, which provides common direction for public schools to empower students in their learning.

“I’m pleased to learn that we are close to getting our ESSA plan approved,” said BOE Chairman Lance Mizumoto. “The plan reflects our collective commitment to providing a well-rounded education for all students.”

HIDOE is making the necessary adjustments where further clarification is being sought on student supports that are already in place. Once the non-substantial changes are made, Superintendent Kishimoto will send the State plan to the USED for final approval.

For information on the state plan, visit http://bit.ly/HIDOE-ESSAfaqs.

Click to read

Read the USED Hawaii State plan interim feedback letter here.

UH Hilo Chancellor Search Begins

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Chancellor Search Advisory Committee has been appointed, and the committee will begin meeting immediately. A local, national and international search will be opened with the assistance of a professional firm, and the committee hopes to begin screening applicants and nominees by the end of February 2018.

The committee will conduct confidential video interviews of the most promising candidates, and the committee plans to host on-campus visits by the finalists in late April to ensure that students, faculty, staff and other stakeholders are able to meet the finalists and provide input.

UH President David Lassner will receive input from the committee and stakeholders and will then present a recommendation for appointment to the Board of Regents. The start date of the new chancellor will be determined based on the availability of the selectee.

“The next chancellor will be critical in strengthening UH Hilo’s unique position in the state and beyond,” said Lassner. “UH Hilo is enriched by an amazing natural environment for learning and research, a deep grounding in Native Hawaiian language, culture and community, and remarkable faculty and student diversity—all enveloped by the warmth of the welcoming Hilo community. The next chancellor must lead the campus vigorously forward to serve Hawaiʻi Island and the state as a vital part of the UH System with a spirit of innovation and collaboration in order to adapt to the changing environment for higher education in Hawaiʻi and across the nation.”

The 16-member search advisory committee includes representation from UH Hilo faculty, students, staff, the Hanakahi Native Hawaiian council and community leaders. All committee members share a common commitment to the future of UH Hilo.

Co-Chairs

  • Farrah-Marie Gomes, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, UH Hilo
  • Vassilis Syrmos, Vice President for Research and Innovation, UH System

Committee members

  • Diane Barrett, Chair and Professor, School of Education, UH Hilo
  • Philippe Binder, Professor of Physics, Natural Sciences Division, UH Hilo
  • Lois Fujiyoshi, Executive Director of Budget and Business Management, UH Hilo
  • Kerri Inglis, Chair of Social Sciences Division and Professor of Hawaiian and Pacific History, UH Hilo
  • Gerald De Mello, Retired Director of University Relations, UH Hilo
  • Carolyn Ma, Dean of the Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy and Associate Professor, UH Hilo
  • M. Kāhealani Naeʻole-Wong, Poʻo Kula (Head of School), Kamehameha Schools Hawaiʻi Campus
  • Joni Onishi, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Hawaiʻi Community College
  • Sherrie Padilla, Enrollment Services Manager and Director of Financial Aid, UH Hilo
  • Isaac Pang, Graduate Student in Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language, UH Hilo
  • Kaleihiʻiikapoli Rapoza, Interim Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs, UH Hilo
  • Jennifer Stotter, Director of Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action, UH Hilo
  • Misaki Takabayashi, Interim Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Professor, UH Hilo
  • Victoria Taomia, Vice President of UH Hilo Student Association

Applications Open for 2018-2019 Native Hawaiian Health Scholarship

The Native Hawaiian Health Scholarship Program (NHHSP), a program of Papa Ola Lōkahi (POL), is pleased to announce that it is now accepting applications from students in health care and allied health professions for the 2018-2019 academic year. The deadline to apply online is March 18, 2018.

Awards are provided to students enrolled or enrolling full-time in an accredited college in Hawai‘i or the continental U.S. Benefits include tuition, other school related expenses, and a monthly stipend. Upon completion of the degree and required training and licensure, the recipient shall serve two to four years of full-time employment in designated medically underserved sites in Hawai‘i.

“Our applicants all demonstrate that they are exceptional college students,” asserts NHHSP director Keaulana Holt. “The ideal applicant will also understand the needs of their communities and be willing to apply their training and skills to improve the well-being back home.”

Applications are being accepted from students in clinical psychology, dentistry, dental hygiene, dietetics, marriage & family therapy, nursing, medicine, optometry, pharmacy, physician’s assistant, public health and social work.

Last years recipients

Nine scholarships were awarded earlier this year. More than 275 scholarship awards have been made in almost 20 different health and behavioral health disciplines since 1991.

“The success of this grow-your-own program is that the scholars and alumni all contribute to improving the health of the lāhui.” POL executive director Dr. Sheri-Ann Daniels says proudly. “Even better, they are becoming the leaders in our lāhui. We’re nurturing Hawaiians to serve Hawaiians.”

The entire application process is online. For more information about the Native Hawaiian Health Scholarship Program visit our website at www.nhhsp.org.

STUDY: 94% of the Rats in Hilo Are Infected With Rat Lungworm Disease

A University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo research group supported by Hawai‘i Island legislators is urging more control measures be taken to lower the risks of the spread of rat lungworm (RLW) disease.

UH Hilo Rat Lungworm Lab

Findings of a study headed by the Rat Lungworm Working Group at the UH Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (DKICP) are described in a paper entitled “High prevalence of Angiostrongylus cantonensis (rat lungworm) on eastern Hawai‘i Island: a closer look at life cycle traits and patterns of infection in wild rats” published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Our study showed almost 94 percent of the rats in the Hilo area are infected with RLW,” said Susan Jarvi, director of the working group who has been researching the progress of the disease for more than six years.

More than 30 other countries report data on RLW, including Australia, Brazil, Thailand and China. Jarvi suggests that due to the lack of diagnostic tools and difficulty in diagnosis, the disease may be underreported. Her group has been adding to the scientific evidence that gives legislators in Hawai‘i the proof they need to become more involved.

“Hawai‘i is able to take the lead globally on assessing the effects of this debilitating disease thanks to this scientific evidence from UH Hilo,” said Senator Kai Kahele, who represents Hawai‘i Senate District 1, which includes Hilo. “The first step in conquering a threat is in knowing the enemy. We can get ahead of the terrifying risks, but these results certainly show the urgency for more research.”

RLW disease is a parasitic infection that reproduces in rats and is transferred to slugs and snails, which can, if ingested intentionally or not, infect people. While symptoms can be mild and flu-like, there have been cases that have resulted in long-term disability and even death.

“UH Hilo continues to support Dr. Jarvi’s efforts to safeguard public health through her research on the system of this disease,” noted UH Hilo Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai. “We are exploring alternatives with state agencies that will continue to fund this important research, which reflects our commitment to help maintain the health of the community.”

Researchers in this study examined a total of 545 wild rats from multiple sites in the South Hilo District of east Hawai‘i Island. Through evaluation of multiple stages and locations of development of the infection with A. cantonensis, they were able to determine prevalence, and examine patterns of infection. The purpose was to determine how these data can be used to improve risk assessment and guide research development to better prevent and control human infection.

“Defeating this threat to our islands is essential to perpetuating our way of life,” said Representative Chris Todd, who represents Hilo in the Hawai‘i State House of Representatives. “I believe in the research being done at UH Hilo; their work will help us ensure a healthy future for our keiki – we, as a legislature, need to do more to support their mission.”

DKICP and the Hawai‘i Community Foundation – Medical Research supported research in this study. Authors were from DKICP: Jarvi, Stefano Quarta, Steven Jacquier, Kathleen Howe, Deniz Bicakci, Crystal Dasalla, Noelle Lovesy, Kirsten Snook and Robert McHugh; and Chris N. Niebuhr from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal Plant Health Inspection Service’s National Wildlife Research Center, Hawai‘i Field Station in Hilo.

“The clear and present danger of this difficult-to-eradicate disease warrants increased measures to control its spread in both snails, slugs and rodents,” Jarvi said. “Only by deliberate management can we hope to protect human and animal populations.”

Hawaii Supreme Court Holds Oral Argument at Castle High School

The Hawaii Supreme Court held oral argument today at Castle High School with about 200 Oahu high school students in attendance.

Students from Castle, Farrington, McKinley, and Mililani high schools and Le Jardin Academy participated in the Judiciary’s Courts in the Community outreach program. They prepared to watch the oral argument by working through a curriculum developed by the Kamehameha V Judiciary History Center and the Students for Public Outreach and Civic Education of the University of Hawaii’s William S. Richardson School of Law. Attorneys from the Hawaii State Bar Association also volunteered their time to visit classrooms to assist in preparing students for the argument.

The case heard at Castle, CC vs. DD, is a parentage case involving a former same sex married couple. The issue is whether Appellant has a legal parent/child relationship with the child born to Appellee during the marriage.

The goal of Courts in the Community is to enhance students’ understanding of the Judiciary’s role in government and its function in resolving disputes in a democratic society. The Hawaii Supreme Court convenes in schools to hear oral argument in actual cases pending before the court. Since the program’s inception in 2012, 56 schools and about 3,900 students have participated. This is the 11th oral argument under this program.

“Our Courts in the Community program enables students to discover how our judicial system operates in practice,” said Chief Justice Mark E. Recktenwald. “Through this experience, we hope that the students realize the judicial process is designed to get to the truth by carefully considering both sides of the case. That understanding of the rule of law is vital to the future of our democracy.

“I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the teachers, the Hawaii State Bar Association, the Hawaii State Bar Foundation, and the volunteer attorneys who helped make this happen. These invaluable partnerships are what make the program a success,” added Chief Justice Recktenwald.

The Hawaii State Bar Association and the Hawaii State Bar Foundation generously provided the students with lunches and transportation to and from their schools.

“The Hawaii State Bar Association would like to thank and congratulate the many dedicated teachers, volunteer attorneys, school and court administrators, and especially the students, who together made the Hawaii Courts in the Community Supreme Court session at Castle High School such an overwhelming success,” said Howard Luke, president-elect of the Hawaii State Bar Association. “The attorneys arguing each side of the many unique, challenging issues presented in this case set the stage for a very spirited question-and-answer session following the Court proceedings.

“It was especially encouraging to see how well prepared and thoroughly engaged the students were, as demonstrated by their very thoughtful, relevant questions to the justices. We are grateful for this wonderful opportunity made possible by our Hawaii Supreme Court,” added Luke.

Oral argument was followed by two separate question-and-answer sessions for the students – one with the attorneys and another with justices.

Hasinger Leaving UH Institute of Astronomy for the European Space Agency

University of Hawaiʻi Institute for Astronomy (IfA) Director Günther Hasinger is leaving UH to be the next director of science at the European Space Agency (ESA), Europe’s equivalent to NASA. He will be responsible for the definition, planning and execution of ESA’s science program, which includes working with member countries and international partners like the United States. Hasinger has been with the university since 2011.

Günther Hasinger

“I am extremely honored to have been part of the IfA ʻohana and to have worked with such a talented and dedicated group of people,” said Hasinger, who will be based in Spain and will be closer to his family, including his first grandchild. “I look forward to future partnerships between ESA, NASA and the ground-based observatories, especially those here in Hawaiʻi.”

UH will name an interim director for IfA and begin the search for a new director.

During his tenure, Hasinger led the institute during the ongoing TMT process and regularly represented the university during the proceedings. He also oversaw many significant advances at IfA. The Pan-STARRS1 telescope on Haleakalā, Maui, came into full operation, eventually producing the world’s foremost sky survey, and becoming the world leader in the detection of asteroids, comets and near-Earth objects.

Hasinger also helped shepherd the transfer to UH of the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope and James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Maunakea. The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope, also on Haleakalā, drew close to completion during his tenure.

Lasting changes to IfA’s education and outreach programs were also made under his leadership. The institute and the UH Mānoa College of Natural Sciences developed a new undergraduate degree program, offering a BA in astronomy and a BS in astrophysics. IfA also worked with the Maunakea observatory community to significantly expand public outreach, including development of the Maunakea Scholars program. IfA now organizes more than 200 events annually, reaching 25,000 people across the state.

For more information, visit: http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/