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Hawaii Public School Students Outpace Nation in Gains on AP Exams

Hawaii’s public school students are exceeding the nation in gains on the Advanced Placement Program (AP) Exams over the year prior. In a report released today, the AP results for Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) students who were tested last May show increases in the number exam takers, exams taken and scores of 3 or higher.

Hawaii Advanced Placement Exam results 2014-15 vs. 2015-16 Photo Credit: Department of Education

Hawaii Advanced Placement Exam results 2014-15 vs. 2015-16
Photo Credit: Department of Education

“In just one year, between 2015 and 2016, the number of AP Exams in Hawaii that were scored 3 or higher increased by 7.5 percent,”said Scott Hill, a vice president at the College Board, which administers the AP Program. “That significant increase is a testament to the hard work and commitment of Hawaii’s students, parents, teachers, and education leaders, all of whom deserve commendation for this great achievement. We will continue to partner with Hawaii educators to ensure that all students ready for the challenge of AP are able to access those opportunities.”

Compared with last year, Hawaii’s public schools exceeded the nation’s growth in all categories –number of exam takers, exams taken and scores of 3 or higher.

Since 2012, the number of exams taken by Hawaii public school students has increased by 26 percent (from 6,669), and the number of passing scores increased by 29 percent (up from 2,599).

“Growth is crucial for our public schools and these results show promising system-wide improvement as we continue to raise the rigor and prepare our students for post-high school endeavors,”said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “These gains also reflect the hard work and professional development being done by our educators to prepare for and teach these college-level courses. Their dedication to their craft and students is evident in these positive results.”

The AP provides willing and academically prepared students with the opportunity to take rigorous college-level courses while still in high school, and to earn college credit, advanced placement, or both for successful performance on the AP Exams.

Students taking AP Exams also qualify for AP Scholar Awards, which recognizes exceptional achievement on the exams. For SY 2015-16, 616 students from 33 HIDOE schools earned AP Scholar Awards.

  • 10 students from 6 HIDOE schools qualified for the National AP Scholar Award by earning an average score of 4 or higher on a five-point scale on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 4 or higher on eight or more exams.
  • 26 students at 23 HIDOE schools qualified for the AP Scholar with Distinction Award by earning an average score of at least 3.5 on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 3 or higher on five or more of these exams.
  • 16 students at 26 HIDOE schools qualified for the AP Scholar with Honor Award by earning an average score of at least a 3.25 on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 3 or higher on four or more of these exams.
  • 374 students at 31 HIDOE schools qualified for the AP Scholar Award by completing three or more AP Exams with scores of 3 or higher.

The College Board also awards the AP International Diploma (APID) for students interested in pursuing university study outside of their native country, and who earn scores of 3 or higher on five or more total AP Exams in specific subject areas including world language and culture courses, global perspectives, science, math and computer science. Miki Kinnamon, a senior at Kalaheo High School, earned the APID for SY 2015-16.

Since 2012, Hawaii has received grants from the U.S. Department of Education to subsidize test fees for low-income students. Funding has increased year-over-year with HIDOE receiving $114,168 in 2015.

“These grants have been a tremendous help in making sure that we are able to provide college and career readiness opportunities for all of our students. For many of them, earning college credits at no cost in high school will help with the financial burden associated with completing a post-secondary degree,”Superintendent Matayoshi added.

The push behind providing opportunities for more students to take AP courses and exams are part of a range of recent transformational efforts to increase students’ college and career readiness. Learn more about these efforts in an Expectation of College. The results include strong increases in college enrollment, enrollment in early college programs at the high school level, as well as significant declines in college-level remediation in English and Mathematics.

For more information about AP courses and participation at HIDOE schools, visit www.hawaiipublicschools.org.

Senator Wakai and Representative Belatti to Serve as UH Manoa’s 2016 Legislators in Residence

The College of Social Sciences at UH Mānoa has selected state Senator Glenn Wakai and Representative Della Au Belatti as the 2016 Legislators in Residence (LIR). Established in 2002, LIR is designed to provide opportunities for dialogue and collaboration between policymakers and the academic community.

Sen. Glenn Wakai

Sen. Glenn Wakai

“We are honored to have Senator Wakai and Representative Belatti as part of the 2016 Legislators in Residence program, and appreciate the time they are dedicating to our students and faculty as part of this effort,” said Sharon Moriwaki, LIR coordinator. “Their participation in LIR is a tremendous opportunity to expand upon the college’s dynamic learning environment. It allows our students, faculty and staff to work alongside Hawai‘i’s policymakers, explore significant issues facing our community, and examine ways to develop policies in response to these issues.”

Rep. Au Bellatti

Rep.  Della Au Belatti

Both legislators are eager to work with faculty and students to explore areas of mutual interest. Representative Belatti has already begun work with the TASI-Pacific Health Informatics and Data Center to implement the health-care analytics project. The college’s Public Policy Center will facilitate the Legislative Oversight Committee’s dialog on Medical Marijuana Dispensaries. Senator Wakai is interested in various topics relating to innovation, technology, agriculture and economic development.  If interested and projects emerge, both legislators are also open to continuing to work with faculty and students in the Spring semester, developing policy and legislation for the 2017 Legislature.

Past LIR participants have explored a range of topics, such as the effectiveness and usefulness of tax credits; urban mobility alternatives; bi-partisan clean campaign; health insurance for Hawai‘i; Sustainable Saunders project; Hawai‘i 2050 Sustainability plan; long-term care; clean energy; new civic engagement models; history and outlook on civil unions and same-sex marriage; and sustainable agriculture.

LIR alumni include former Representative Hermina Morita and Representative Roy Takumi (2002), Senator Brian Taniguchi and U.S. Senator Brian Schatz (2003), Senator Les Ihara and former Representative Galen Fox (2004), former Representatives Lyla Berg and Lynn Finnegan (2005), Senator Suzanne Chun Oakland and former Representative Barbara Marumoto (2006), former Senator Gary Hooser and Senator Jill Tokuda (2007), former Senator Russell Kokubun and Representative Ryan Yamane (2008), Senator Will Espero and Representative Cynthia Thielen (2009), Governor David Ige and former Representative Denny Coffman (2010), and Senator Clarence Nishihara and former Representative Blake Oshiro (2011).

Senator Glenn Wakai (D) represents the 15th District (Kalihi, Mapunapuna, Airport, Salt Lake, Aliamanu, Foster Village, Hickam and Pearl Harbor). He is the current chair of the Senate’s Committee on Economic Development, Environment and Technology, and is a member of the Committees on Agriculture and Ways and Means.

Representative Della Au Belatti (D) represents the 24th District (Makiki, Tantalus, Papakolea, McCully, Pawaa, and Manoa). She currently serves as chair of the House Committee on Health and is a member of the Committees on Consumer Protection & Commerce, Housing, Human Services and Judiciary.

Pan Pacific Robotics Championships Scheduled Oct. 7-9, 2016

The Pan Pacific VEX Robotics Championships return, Oct. 7-9, 2016 at Kamehameha Schools Kapalama Campus Kekuhaupio Gym, with nearly 700 students from Hawaii, California, Canada, China, and Taiwan competing for qualification slots at the 2017 VEX Worlds. The event is free to the public.

vex-challengeCorporate grants from the Hawaiian Electric Companies and Okinawa Enetech, with support from Kamehameha Schools, have helped organizers reinstate the Pan Pacific VEX Championships which were last held in 2013. Organizers plan to rotate the tournaments between Hawaii and the Pacific Rim in future years.

“VEX Robotics is the largest and fastest growing scholastic robotics program in the world which teaches engineering, high-tech and problem-solving skills while students work in teams to achieve a common goal,” said Art Kimura of the Hawaii Space Grant Consortium, one of the event organizers and a champion of space, robotics and science education programs in Hawaii. “For Hawaii teams, the Pan Pacific VEX tournaments give our students an opportunity to compete at an international level without the expense of travel. For all the students, VEX Robotics offer invaluable life experiences they wouldn’t find in a classroom setting,” he added.

For the past several months, the student teams have been working together under the guidance of teachers and mentors to build innovative robots designed to solve a set of difficult challenges presented in the game.

In the VEX Robotics Competition (VRC), 51 teams comprised of middle and high school students will square off in the game of “Starstruck,” which involves a two-team alliance maneuvering their autonomous and driver-controlled robots to place as many stars and cubes into their opponent’s side of the field and by hanging robots onto a bar.

In the VEX IQ Challenge, 36 teams made up of elementary and middle school students will compete in the game called “Crossover.” The objective of this game is to maximize the alliance teams’ scores by placing as many hex balls into the opponent’s side of the field and by parking and balancing robots on a bridge by the end of the match.

According to organizers, the Pan Pacific VEX Championships are the first tournaments of the 2016-17 robotics season to qualify teams for the 2017 Championships. Of the total 87 teams participating, only two (2) will earn an opportunity to participate in the 2017 VEX Worlds, the ultimate showcase of robotics engineering expertise, held in Louisville, KY next April. Hawaii teams will have one more opportunity to qualify for the 2017 VEX Worlds through the Hawaiian Electric Companies’ Hawaii State High School VEX Championship and Hawaii State Middle School VEX Championship events scheduled in January 2017.

Opening ceremonies for the Pan Pacific VEX games begin at 9:00 a.m. on Oct. 8, with the first qualification matches to start at 9:30 a.m. through the end of the day, and resume on Oct. 9 at 8:30 a.m. The VEX IQ Challenge and VRC will be held simultaneously on two different playing fields. The VEX IQ awards presentation will take place on Oct. 9 at 1 p.m., followed by the VRC awards presentation at 2:30 p.m.

Bone Hill – The Concert Coming to UH Hilo Performing Arts Center

The lives of four generations of women in a Cherokee family will be told through story and song when Martha Redbone and band perform Bone Hill – The Concert on Friday, October 28 at 7:30 p.m. in the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Performing Arts Center (PAC).
bone-hill

Redbone, accompanied by six musicians and a singer, will take the audience back to her own childhood and beyond into the memories and tales of her ancestors to share an important untold piece of American history. Bone Hill details the plight and struggles of the Cherokee nation, following the Trail of Tears, the U.S. government’s radical reclassification legislatures of the Mid-Atlantic states, and the desecration of ancient burial mounds on the highest peak of the Eastern seaboard for the sake of coal and the building of new mining towns during the early 1800s.

“Martha Redbone is a mesmerizing performer, writer, and storyteller,” wrote Broadway Director Charles Randolph-Wright. “Bone Hill is a uniquely American story of family and dreams. No matter who you are or where you’re from, Martha takes you home.”

Bone Hill – The Concert is written by Redbone, Roberta Uno, and Aaron Whitby with music and lyrics by Redbone and Whitby. Tickets are reserved seating and priced at $25 General, $20 Discount and $12 UH Hilo/Hawaiʻi CC students (with a valid student ID) and children, up to age 17 pre-sale, or $30, $25 and $17 at the door. Tickets are available by calling the UH Hilo Box Office at 932-7490 or ordering online at artscenter.uhh.hawaii.edu.

Hawaii Is the Worst State for Teachers – WalletHub Study

With Oct. 5 being International World Teachers Day and the Every Student Succeeds Act soon to go in effect, the personal-finance website WalletHub conducted an in-depth analysis of 2016’s Best & Worst States for Teachers.

wallethub-study-on-teachers
In order to help educators find the best teaching opportunities in the country and draw attention to the states needing improvement in this regard, WalletHub analyzed the 50 states and the District of Columbia across 16 key metrics, ranging from “average starting salary” to “pupil-teacher ratio” to “school safety.”

Teacher-Friendliness of Hawaii (1=Best; 25=Avg.)

  • 51st – Average Starting Salary for Teachers (Adjusted for Cost of Living)
  • 51st – Median Annual Salary for Teachers (Adjusted for Cost of Living)
  • 39th – WalletHub “School Systems” Ranking
  • 39th – Teachers’ Income Growth Potential
  • 21st – Projected Number of Teachers per 1,000 Students by Year 2022
  • 34th – 10-Year Change in Teacher Salaries
  • 37th – Pupil-Teacher Ratio
  • 19th – Public-School Spending per Student

For the full report, please visit:
https://wallethub.com/edu/best-and-worst-states-for-teachers/7159/

Hawai‘i International AgriTourism Symposium

Hawai‘i AgriTourism Association (HATA) will host the state’s first Hawai‘i International AgriTourism Symposium on October 15, 2016 at the College of Hawaiian Language: Ka Haka ‘Ulu O Ke‘elikōlani, in Hilo. Industry experts from Hawai‘i, New Zealand and Japan will share their forecasts, trends and tips on how they compete on a global stage. They will share what visitors from their regions are looking to experience in AgriTourism, as well as perspectives on how they have diversified agricultural operations in innovative ways to increase profitability, reduce risk, and protect rural communities.

ag-conference-2016This global symposium aims to help people get on trend with the connections between agriculture and travel/tourism. The industry is an “economic multiplier” that impacts restaurants, lodging, health, and education. For every dollar spent at an AgriTourism farm, an additional $2.25 is spent within the community in food, fuel, and retail. The ripple effect continues with home based and small businesses that create value add products from the farm crop such as jams, baked goods, and beauty or health products.

ag-conference

As a popular and highly marketable segment of Hawai‘i’s $10-billion dollar visitor industry, AgriTourism is poised to take off in the next decade. It’s not only a viable part of the economy; it’s also an important way to preserve our island lifestyles and culture.

AgriTourism offers farmers and small businesses an incredible opportunity to expand their business using creative approaches, and innovative partnerships.  This symposium will show how the state’s largest economic industries, tourism and agriculture, merge to create economic diversity and innovation that visitors will pay for.

Farmers who include an AgriTourism component in their marketing plan can see substantial financial benefits. AgriTourism can provide the difference between a profitable and an unprofitable farming operation, and between a sustainable and an unsustainable agricultural region. With the potential of this niche market expanding at such a fast pace, there has never been a better time to learn more about AgriTourism.

Online Registration for Hawai‘i’s International AgriTourism Symposium is open at www.hiagtourism.org. Vendors who wish to sell products at the Hawai‘i Marketplace may also register online as well. For more information, please contact Lani Weigert, lani@hiagtourism.org. Space is limited, early registration encouraged.

Two Teams Share Top Honors at Hawaii Annual Code Challenge

Solutions tackling state challenges involving homelessness and jail facility visitation received top honors at the Hawaii Annual Code Challenge (HACC) Judging and Awards Ceremony, held today at the Aloha Tower Marketplace.

haccThe event was the culmination of the month-long, hackathon-inspired competition designed to engage the local tech community in the modernization of Hawaii state government.

Twenty-seven teams presented solutions to the HACC judges panel, which consisted of Gov. David Y. Ige; Sen. Glenn Wakai; Todd Nacapuy, state Chief Information Officer (CIO); Garret Yoshimi, vice president of IT and CIO, University of Hawaii; Camille Au, director, Desktop Services, Hawaiian Electric; Bill Hozey, business sales managing partner, Hawaii and Alaska, Verizon; and Donna Scannell, VP of IT operations and business information officer, Kaiser Permanente. Solutions were judged on originality, design, sustainability, utility and impact, team collaboration, presentation and delivery, and bonus points for “audience’s top choice.”

The winners were as follows:

1st Place — two-way tie! (each team receives $4,000 and will also have the opportunity to interview with Blue Startups and XLR8UH)

  • Team: Team Cobra

Challenge Category: Homelessness (a challenge presented to HACC participants by Scott Morishige, state coordinator on homelessness)

Team Cobra

Team Cobra

Team Members: Arun Lee, Jayson Lee, Kyle Loo, and Kim Vo

NOTE: Team Cobra was also selected to represent the State of Hawaii at GlobalHack, being held from Oct. 21 to 23, 2016, in St. Louis, Missouri.

  • Team: Hawaii Advanced Technology Society (HATS)

Challenge Category: Oahu Community Correctional Center Visitation Scheduling (a challenge presented by the Department of Public Safety)

Team HATS

Team HATS

Team Members: Andrew Abila, Gerome Catbagan, Edward Chang, Kenneth Dedicatoria, Samuel Erwin, Gabriel Farinas, Jayson Hayworth, Neil Knight, Robert Kuakini, Ben Lamosao, Duong Le, Dylan Nakahodo, Willam Ng, Rodgem Ragsac, Phillipe Rigor, Christine Rioca, Kevin Ryan, Bryan Tanaka, and Sharey Vendiola

3rd Place ($2,000)

  • Team: Local Mocos

Challenge Category: Made in Hawaii (a challenge presented by the Department of Agriculture)

Team Members: Jesse Copeland, Nikki Kobayashi, Javen Nakamoto, Bryce Saito, Steven Yamashiro, and Lisa Zhou

1st Place in Student Category ($1,000 and the opportunity to interview with Sultan Ventures)

  • Team: Team Imua (from Kamehameha Schools)

Challenge Category: Open (application assisting local high school students with preparing for college)

Team Members: Sage Foi, Davin Takahashi, Kevin Takahashi, and Zion Basque

At the HACC kickoff event on Aug. 27, more than 200 individual coders and innovators answered the call to apply their collective creativity to improving state government. Participants formed teams and selected from diverse challenges presented by state officials and personnel, to tackle over the next several weeks. Among the presenters were state Coordinator on Homelessness Scott Morishige and staff representing the Departments of Accounting and General Services, Agriculture, Health, and Public Safety, and others.

The HACC teams returned today to present their solutions for judging and selection of winners. In addition to awards, one team, Team Cobra, was selected to represent the State of Hawaii at GlobalHack. For more information on GlobalHack, visit: https://globalhack.org/

The HACC is the result of collaboration across public and private sectors. In coordinating the event, the CIO-led Office of Enterprise Technology Services (ETS) partnered with the Hawaii Technology Development Corporation, DevLeague, Empowered Presentations, Hawaii Open Data, Blue Startups, Sultan Ventures, and XLR8UH. Award prizes are being underwritten by sponsors such as Hawaiian Electric, Kaiser Permanente, KPMG and Verizon. Additional support is being provided by DataHouse, eWorld Enterprise Solutions, Socrata, Uber, Unisys, DRFortress, and Hawaiian Telcom.

For more information on the HACC, visit http://HACC.hawaii.gov.

UH BOR Approves Appointment of Carolyn Ma as UH Hilo Dean of Pharmacy

The University of Hawaiʻi Board of Regents approved the appointment of Carolyn Ma to be the second dean of the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (DKICP) at a meeting held on Maui on September 22.

Carolyn Ma

Carolyn Ma

Ma has served as interim dean since Founding Dean John Pezzuto left UH Hilo in August 2015. UH Hilo Chancellor Donald Straney said he asked UH President David Lassner to appoint Ma as permanent dean because “important work will be required” to prepare for an accreditation visit in March 2017 as well as to “continue ongoing efforts to enhance recruitment.”

“The Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy plays a critical role for our campus, our communities and our state,” Straney wrote in a letter to DKICP faculty and staff about the decision. “Dr. Ma has successfully guided the College in her year as interim dean. The College finances are secure and construction of a permanent facility has begun.”

Born and raised on O`ahu, Ma earned her bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Santa Clara in California, and her doctor in pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree from the University of California-San Francisco. She was awarded a residency in clinical pharmacy practice at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital’s Department of Pharmacy in Philadelphia. She went on to become an advanced oncology resident in the Department of Pharmacy and Drug Information at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

With an extensive background in clinical pharmacy practice, pharmacy and hospital administration, Ma is a registered pharmacist with licenses in Hawaiʻi, Nevada and California and remains boarded in Oncology Pharmacy. She joined DKICP in 2007 as the clinical education coordinator and designed, constructed and implemented 4,200-square feet of space in what is formerly known as the Gold Bond building in Kakaako on O`ahu. Additionally, in preparation for the advanced rotations, or internships for student pharmacists, she helped place numerous faculty in residence at O`ahu, Maui and Kaua`i hospitals and clinics.

Former Governor Neil Abercrombie appointed her Director for O`ahu on the Hawaiʻi State Board of Pharmacy from 2011- 2015 and Governor Ige re-appointed her to a 2015-2019 term. She also is past president of the Hawaiʻi Pharmacists Association (HPhA).

“Dr. Ma’s impeccable credentials give us a strong foothold as we take the College of Pharmacy to the next level,” Straney said. “Meanwhile, this milestone comes at a timely juncture as bulldozers are currently at work on the construction of the permanent building. This is truly a testament to Senator Daniel Inouye’s dream of making the College the ‘center of excellence’ for Hawaiʻi Island.”

Hawaii Innocence Project Event Will Test Reliability of Eyewitness Identification

Could you be a reliable eyewitness? Want to test your skills with some expert attorneys?

eyewitnees-identification

On Tuesday, October 4, 2016, in recognition of “International Wrongful Conviction Day,” the Hawai‘i Innocence Project will challenge audience members to see how well they can identify a possible suspect in a mock exercise at the UH Law School.

The program, titled “Eyewitness Identification,” is scheduled from 12 noon to 1:15 p.m. in Classroom 2.  Lunch is available in the courtyard; donations are welcome.  Similar programs are taking place across the nation and around the world.

“Eyewitness Identification” aims to demonstrate pitfalls in the standard technique that has been used in courtrooms for decades. Documentation has begun to show that faulty eyewitness identification accounts for as much as 75 percent of all wrongful convictions, according to Innocence Project data.

The Hawai‘i Innocence Project is run by faculty members at the William S. Richardson School of Law, with assistance from community attorneys. In 2011, using advanced DNA testing technology, the Hawai‘i project succeeded in having Alvin Francis Jardine exonerated after he spent almost 20 years in prison for a rape and burglary he consistently maintained that he did not commit. The national organization has freed several hundred wrongly incarcerated people by using advanced DNA testing.

As part of the national Innocence Project network, Faculty Specialist Kenneth Lawson and Associate Dean Ronette Kawakami head the project and work with other attorneys on cases in Hawai‘i.  Said Law Dean Avi Soifer, “Our faculty and students, along with our cooperating attorneys, deserve great admiration for their passionate, tireless work to free those who have been unjustly imprisoned.”

The October 4 program will help show just how fallible eyewitness testimony can be.

Mark Alan Vocal Works Brings A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias to Hilo

Local singing students from Mark Alan Vocal Works, Mark Sheffield’s voice studio, together with singers from his UH Hilo voice studio, will present a recital of (mostly) classical songs and arias.  Together with legendary pianist Quack Moore and the new vocal ensemble VOICES, they bring their unique interpretations of classics and modern favorites to Hilo. Showtime is Friday, September 30, at 7:30 p.m. at Hilo’s Church of the Holy Cross. Admission is free.  For more information, call 238-6040.

classical-recital

A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias presents singers in various stages of vocal development – from young beginners to experienced performers – in a recital designed to showcase and celebrate their particular strengths.  Singers include RyAnne Raffipiy, Landon Ballesteros, Samantha Saiki, Rachel Edwards, Amy Horst, and Bridge Hartman, along with Mark Sheffield, who teaches the other singers. Students from Mark’s private Vocal Works studio join singers from his UH Hilo voice studio to bring to life songs of love, heartbreak, joy, and beauty.

VOICES, a new vocal ensemble also led by Mark Sheffield, joins the concert with a return to their roots. They will perform their signature motet, “The Silver Swan” by Orlando Gibbons.  The solo singers follow, celebrating classics including old Italian songs “O cessate di piagarmi” and “Caro mio ben;” while bringing to life arias such as “Si, mi chiamano Mimi” from La Boheme and Rachmaninoff’s haunting “Vocalise.” The recital earns its (mostly) classical label with the performance of pop tunes by Adele and Billy Joel, and sizzling Broadway hits including Sondheim’s great song “Being Alive.”

Mark Sheffield maintains a busy private voice studio in Hilo, where he has taught both privately and at UH Hilo for ten years. 2016 saw the inauguration of Mark’s Vocal Works program, designed to provide both individual training and theory-based practical education in the vocal arts. This year also saw the inception of VOICES, a vocal ensemble comprised of Mark’s advanced students from both his Vocal Works and UH Hilo studios. Mark is joined at the helm of this recital by Quack Moore, the Grammy-winning pianist of Hilo Palace Theater and Saturday Night Live fame, who now devotes much of her time to supporting and promoting young musicians.

When asked how he came to create A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias, Mark said, “For a decade now, my students have performed in joint studio recitals given by my wife, piano teacher Katie Sheffield, and I. Beyond this, my students have performed to acclaim in shows locally and around the country, as they pursue studies, work, and dreams of Broadway success. Now we invite our friends and our community to a recital of our very own.  Thank you, Hilo, for supporting vocal music. We look forward to singing for you.”

A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias comes to Hilo September 30, 2016, at 7:30 p.m. at Hilo’s Church of the Holy Cross for one show only.  Admission is free.  Call 238-6040 for more information.

UHH Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy 8th Annual Health Fair

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy presents its 8th Annual Health Fair on Saturday, October 22, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Prince Kuhio Plaza in Hilo.

(l-r) Late Sen. Gilbert Kahele, a big supporter of the pharmacy college, stands with Class of 2016 students Josen Ho, David Ung and Miraya Talavera, who were tending a booth at the fair in 2014.

(l-r) Late Sen. Gilbert Kahele, a big supporter of the pharmacy college, stands with Class of 2016 students Josen Ho, David Ung and Miraya Talavera, who were tending a booth at the fair in 2014.

More than 150 student pharmacists will host education booths, health screenings, and giveaways. There also will be live demonstrations, entertainment, and a keiki poster contest for elementary- and middle-school students.

Participating organizations include Aloha Care, Bone Marrow Registry, Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes, Crisis Line of Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi Island Diabetes Coalition, Hawaiian Islands AIDS and HIV Foundation, HMSA, Hui Malama Hawaiʻi, Medical Reserve Corps, NAMI – National Alliance of Mental Illness – Big Island, Partners in Developments, Senior Medicare Patrol, The Arc of Hilo and The Food Basket.

For more information, contact Tracey Niimi at 933-7663 or tniimi@hawaii.edu.

Dept. of Education Reminds Parents to Secure Vehicles in School Parking Lots

The Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) reminds parents to always secure their vehicles in school parking lots to prevent thefts.  Five vehicle break-ins using similar methods of entry have occurred at East Oahu public schools in September during after-school hours.  In each case, vehicle windows were broken and small items inside were stolen, including purses, bags, cell phones and laptop computers.

break-in

“Parents are reminded to be vigilant and always remove valuables or hide them from direct sight,”said HIDOE spokesperson Donalyn Dela Cruz.  “Although there is normally lots of activity on campuses during afterschool hours, such crimes of opportunity can take place in seconds, especially when valuables are left in plain sight.”

Parents can take actions to make their vehicle less attractive to property theft, including avoiding leaving valuables inside in open view, locking valuables in the trunk and installing anti-theft alarm systems.  Bags, such as backpacks and shopping bags, may be seen as a carrier of valuables by thieves and should be hidden from view.

Hawaii Preschool Open Doors Application Period Begins Today

The Department of Human Services encourages families to apply for its Preschool Open Doors (POD) program between Monday, September 19 and Monday, October 31, 2016.  Applications received during this period will be considered for preschool participation during January 1, 2017 and June 30, 2017.

preschool-open-doorsThis program, which currently serves more than 1,300 children statewide, provides child care subsidies to eligible low- and moderate-income families to pay preschool tuition. POD aims to provide children whose families might otherwise not be able to afford preschool the opportunity to gain essential skills to be successful in school and in life.

To qualify for the program, children must be eligible to enter kindergarten in the 2017-2018 school year (born between August 1, 2011 and July 31, 2012). Families are reminded that a child must be five years old on or before July 31 to enter kindergarten. Families may choose any one of the 438 State-licensed preschools. Underserved or at-risk children receive priority consideration for the POD program, and funds are limited.

Interested families may request an application beginning Monday, September 19, 2016 from the Department’s POD contractor, PATCH, by visiting www.patchhawaii.org or calling 791-2130 or toll free 1-800-746-5620.  PATCH can also help families locate a preschool convenient for them.

Applications must be received by October 31, 2016 to be considered during the January 1, 2017-June 30, 2017 program period. Applications should be dropped off, mailed, or faxed to the following:

PATCH – POD
560 N. Nimitz Hwy, Suite 218
Honolulu, HI 96817
Fax: (808) 694-3066

Eligibility and priorities for POD program selection are detailed in HAR §17-799, which is available online at humanservices.hawaii.gov/admin-rules-2/admin-rules-for-programs. For more information about other DHS programs and services, visit humanservices.hawaii.gov

“Sea to Sky” – Rebuilding Hōkūalaka’i

A free youth event called “Sea to Sky” will be held this weekend.  This event is designed to bring different aspects of our island together with the common purpose of rebuilding the voyaging canoe, Hōkūalaka’i.  The Hōkūalaka’i will be used for teaching purposes on Hawaiʻi Island and beyond. Hōkūalakaʻi’s home is in the same location (Palekai) that the historic Hōkūleʻa departed from on its world wide voyage.

hokulakaiThis will be the first of many “Sea to Sky” events at Palekai in Hilo.  It will be an all day event with something for everyone to enjoy.  We have invited many members of the scientific field to have fun educational learning stations available for kids and all participants will be hosted with great food and activities. The focus of the monthly events are structured to:

  • Unite community in helping to restore the voyaging canoe, Hōkūalaka’i.
  • Promote indigenous knowledge in science programs
  • Increase cultural relevance
  • Create opportunities to pursue careers in science and culture education fields

The schedule for the September 24th will be:

  • 8:00-8:30am Informal meet, setup and discuss days activities and work planned for the canoe.
  • 8:45-9:30am ‘awa ceremony and welcome
  • 9:30-11:30am Work on Hōkūalakaʻi, Visit Learning Stations, and Site Beautification Project
  • 11:30-12:30pm Lunch
  • 1:00-4:30 Paddling, Sailing, Swimming (Ocean Activities)
  • 4:30-5:00 Closing talk and cleanup

We will have “Learning Stations” and a variety of organizations joining us each week. Come down to Palekai and join in the community effort to restore Hōkūalakaʻi and help our youth learn about the science and culture that is happening on the Big Island.

If you would like to setup a booth to help educate kids, please contact us!  This will be an on-going event to share Hawaii’s Science and Culture with our youth and each other.  We will be publishing more details and our upcoming events on our website: http://alohapueo.org/pueo-events

THURSDAY: 6th Annual Kipimana Cup – Keaau vs. Kamehameha

The Keaau Cougars will host the 6th Annual Kipimana Cup challenging the Kamehameha Warriors Thursday, this time with a new head coach who happens to be a former coach for Kamehameha.

kipimana-cup
“We are excited to host the Kipimana Cup at our campus this year,” said Iris McGuire, Keaau High School’s athletic director. “We have a new coach and style of football at Keaau High School,” she noted, referring to Aurellio Abellera, who was the defense coach for the Warriors before opting to lead the Cougars.

Hosted by W.H. Shipman, Limited, which calls Keaau home, the Kipimana Cup is a goodwill football game between the public and private schools located within a few miles radius in Keaau.

“Every year it is encouraging to see the attitude of friendship tied to this particular competition,” said Bill Walter, president of W.H. Shipman, Limited. “Team leadership has been effective in instilling what we all hoped that attitude would be: we can play hard, we can compete to win a game and we can compete here in Keaau in a spirit of good will. Similarly, we encourage incoming businesses to recognize this as a special place to do business and to work together to create an environment where our customers want to come to do business.”

Dan Lyons, head football coach for the Kamehameha Schools Keaau campus, noted the Kipimana Cup is a way of “creating a competition” among the two schools and their athletes, “but also an acknowledgement of sportsmanship” that exists between the two schools. “I just think it’s a really good thing for the community, building community togetherness with both of us being in Keaau.”

He noted that W.H. Shipman, Limited is rooted in the history of both schools, with the land originally owned by the family owned company. As for Keaau’s new coach being one of his former staffers, Lyons thinks it’s “awesome.”

“’Leo’ is a really good guy and a really good catch,” Lyons said. Noting the Cougars have already won a couple of games, he said Abellera will bring “structure, organization, character, and integrity” to the Keaau team. “I mean, he’s a very good coach and great guy. It obviously leaves a void in our program, but it certainly helps Big Island football be better.”

“I coached with Dan for the last three years, and he helped me bring back the fun in coaching and football,” Abellera said. He has actually been a math teacher at Keaau High School for the last 16 years, and this is his second time coaching there. “My dad got sick and footballl didn’t seem fun anymore,” he said.

It was Lyons and the Kamehameha Warriors that got him back into coaching. With Kamehameha on solid ground, and the Cougars in need of help, Abellera returned to Keaau.

For the Kipimana Cup Thursday, Kamehameha will show up with four wins and one loss to Kealakehe, in their most recent game on Friday. Keaau, meanwhile, will face off with the Kamehameha Warriors with two wins and one loss, having defeated the Honokaa Dragons in their most recent game last week.

Thursday’s Kipimana Cup will be a league game for both teams. Kamehameha Schools and Keaau High School didn’t always play against each other, being in different divisions — Keaau being in Division 1 and Kamehameha being in Division 2.  The Big Island Interscholastic Federation League ultimately changed that, but not before W.H. Shipman, Ltd. first pitched the annual Kipimana Cup six years ago.

W.H. Shipman, Limited provides $500 to each of the school’s booster clubs following the game, and a trophy to the winning team.
The Kamehameha Warriors have won all five of the previous Kipimana Cups, but that may be a different story this year with Abellera leading the Keaau Cougars, Lyons acknowledged.

Kamehameha School’s Hawai‘i campus opened on former W.H. Shipman land in 2001 and has an enrollment of a little over 1,000 students, grades K-12, while Keaau High School has an enrollment of 880 children, grades 9-12.  The school first opened in 1998, also on Shipman property.

Kipimana is how Hawaiians historically referred to Shipman. W.H. Shipman, Limited staff came up with the idea for the Kipimana Cup six years ago.

Based in the Puna for the last 130 years, W.H. Shipman, Limited currently has 17,000 acres in and around Keaau, and is active in agriculture and commercial/ industrial development and leasing. Shipman holds a long-range view toward sustainability and planned development for balanced community use.

Thursday’s Kipimana Cup will be held at Keaau High School.  Kickoff for the varsity game is expected to start around 7:30 p.m., a half hour after the 5 p.m. junior varsity game ends. Expect to pay a nominal admission.

Contact Walter at 966-9325 for more details.

Hawaii Celebrates National Child Passenger Safety Week with Free Car Seat Checks Statewide

The Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) is teaming up with the four county police departments and child passenger safety advocates to promote National Child Passenger Safety Week, September 18-24.

During Child Passenger Safety Week and throughout the year, Hawaii’s child passenger safety technicians are dedicated to helping parents and caregivers learn how to correctly install child safety seats and properly buckle up their keiki, whether it’s in child safety seats, booster seats or when using the vehicle’s seat belts.

“Hawaii’s keiki are our most precious asset, we can and need to do better to give them the future they deserve,” said Ford Fuchigami, Hawaii Department of Transportation Director. “Parents and caregivers can improve their child’s safety by simply using child safety seats, booster seats and seat belts properly.”

In Hawaii, children under 4 years old are required to ride in a child safety seat; children 4 through 7 years old must ride in a child passenger restraint or booster seat. Violators are required to appear in court, and if convicted, must attend a four-hour class. They may also be assessed a penalty of up to $500.

According to 2014 data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), nearly 24 percent of children ages 4 through 7 years old were prematurely moved to seat belts, and 9 percent were unrestrained. Children should remain in booster seats until they are 4 feet 9 inches tall and can use seat belts correctly without the booster seat.

Before a child can be moved from a child safety seat to a booster seat, parents and caregivers should check for the following:

  • The lap belt fits across the child’s upper thigh;
  • The shoulder belt fits across the child’s shoulder and chest;
  • The child’s knees bend comfortably at the edge of the seat when his or her back and bottom are against the vehicle seat back; and
  • The child can stay seated properly during the entire trip.

Additionally, the American Academy of Pediatrics is now advising that children ride rear-facing until at least the age of 2. To educate the public about this recommendation and Hawaii’s child restraint law, the HDOT is airing public service announcements on television and in movie theaters statewide. Hawaii’s child passenger safety media campaign is 100-percent federally funded.

Hawaii has more than 340 certified child passenger safety technicians, including firefighters, law enforcement officers, medical professionals and parents. All technicians have been trained to provide instruction on choosing the right car seat, installing it and using it correctly.

“Each county has child restraint inspection stations and community car seat checks to ensure that all children return home safe,” said Fuchigami. “Parents and caregivers should utilize these free resources to better protect their children.”

seat-checksFree public car seat check events will be held on National Seat Check Saturday, September 24, at the following locations and times:  

Oahu
Waipio Shopping Center, Waipahu
94-1040 Waipio Uka St.
10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Hawaii
Target, Hilo
391 E. Makaala St., 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Target, Kailua-Kona
74-5455 Makala Blvd., 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Kauai

Walmart, Lihue, 3-3300 Kuhio Highway 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

A community seat check event will also be held on Saturday,

September 17, at:  Maui

Maui Marketplace, Kahului, 270 Dairy Road,  10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Child Passenger Safety Week is sponsored by NHTSA. For more on child safety, as well as a list of child restraint inspection stations and community car seat check, visit:  www.kipchawaii.org or www.safercar.gov/parents

THINK Fund Classroom Grants Available for 2016-17 School Year

THINK Fund at HCF has funding available for STEM classroom grants through DonorsChoose.org for the 2016-17 school year.

The classroom grants support projects that boost Hawai‘i Island public and public charter school 3rd – 12th grade students in STEM learning; can include materials, supplies and on-island field trips; and can be up to but not over $2,500.

The Hawai‘i Island New Knowledge (THINK) Fund was created by the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) to benefit Hawai‘i Island students pursuing STEM endeavors with an annual contribution of $1 million. TMT selected two Hawai‘i foundations, Hawai‘i Community Foundation and Pauahi Foundation to administer THINK Fund distributions in scholarship and grant making platforms. TMT has so far funded $2.5 million to the THINK initiative on Hawai‘i Island.

The Hawai‘i Island New Knowledge (THINK) Fund was created by the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) to benefit Hawai‘i Island students pursuing STEM endeavors with an annual contribution of $1 million. TMT selected two Hawai‘i foundations, Hawai‘i Community Foundation and Pauahi Foundation to administer THINK Fund distributions in scholarship and grant making platforms. TMT has so far funded $2.5 million to the THINK initiative on Hawai‘i Island.

“Many types of projects are part of the STEM learning pathway for our local students, so we support engineering projects such as robotics, engineering design, and aerodynamic design,” says Lydia Clements, Director of Neighbor Islands for the Hawai‘i Community Foundation. “We also encourage projects that expose students to STEM career opportunities like computer programming, environmental science and healthcare.”

Projects can be posted at any time at DonorsChoose.org and requests are reviewed weekly by the THINK Fund at HCF. If a project is selected for funding it usually takes less than three weeks for the students to receive materials in their classroom.

Mrs. Richards’ science class at Keaau High School received a STEM classroom grant in the 2015-2016 school year. Instead of having her students read about decomposition, the students got their hands dirty and created interactive presentations that told the story. “These kids didn’t present dry, written lab reports,” Mrs. Richards said. “They created art to tell their scientific stories. We’re empowering young scientists, thanks to the grant.”

With the classroom grant from THINK Fund at Hawai‘i Community Foundation (HCF), the students used EcoSTEM Earth Kits to create mini biodome environments to study real-time worm culture, decomposition, soil quality, and planting. But they didn’t stop there. With the Epson 3LCD projector, they told their stories of theory and discovery using interactive technology.

THINK Fund at HCF gets classroom materials into the hands of teachers and students quickly, capturing their enthusiasm while it’s still fresh and getting them out in the field with their projects. The fund’s purpose is to support projects that promote science and math disciplines.

To apply, teachers write up their grant need on DonorsChoose.org, applications are reviewed, projects are selected and funded.

In its first eighteen months, THINK Fund at HCF has committed $150,000 and funded 82 classroom projects for over 8,000 students across Hawai‘i Island. These students have nurtured hydroponics gardens, studied water quality through new lab equipment, and built their own Mars Rover with the help of 3D printers.

The following 29 schools on Hawai‘i Island have received STEM Classroom Project Grants from the THINK Fund at HCF: Connections New Century Public Charter, Hilo Intermediate, Hilo Union Elementary, Ho‘okena Elementary, Innovations Public Charter, Ka ‘Umeke Ka‘eo Public Charter, Kano o ka‘aina New Century Public Charter, K‘au High and Pahala Elementary, Kea‘au High, Kea‘au Middle, Kealekehe Elementary, Kealakehe High, Kealakehe Intermediate, Keonepoko Elementary, Kohala Elementary, Kona Pacific Public Charter, Konawaena Elementary, Konawaena High, Konawaena Middle, Kua o ka La Public Charter, Laupahoehoe Community Public Charter, Paauilo Elementary & Intermediate, Prince Kalaniana‘ole Elementary and Intermediate, Volcano School of Arts & Science Public Charter, Waiakea High, Waiakea Intermediate, Waikoloa Elementary & Middle, Waimea Elementary and Waters of Life Public Charter School.

Hokulea and Aha Punana Leo Converge on Kahnawake – Heading Towards Great Lakes

As Hokulea continues forth on her Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage, the crew and founding board members of Aha Punana Leo-a Native Hawaiian nonprofit dedicated to revitalizing the Hawaiian language for future generations in Hawaiʻi-honored a relationship that spans nearly 5,000 miles and 40 years of revolutionaries working together to revitalize and perpetuate the core of indigenous knowledge.

hokulea-mohawke

Passing through the 34th lock to get to the upper Montreal area of the St. Lawrence river, Hokulea docked at her first Marina within a Native Reserve-the Mohawk Territory of Kahnawake.

This gathering was yet another opportunity along this Worldwide Voyage to honor the collaborative work being done in native communities to keep indigenous knowledge alive and relevant to the world around us. Additionally, the crew of Hokulea, the founding members of Aha Punana Leo, and the Mohawk community hope to inspire and perpetuate native knowledge and language for generations to come.

nainoa-with-mohawks

Kauanoe Kamana, founding board member and current president of Aha Punana Leo, addressed both groups in Hawaiian. “The connection between our work in language revitalization and the pursuits of our waʻa Hokulea, have to do with the fact that we set out with our work, prepared and with a strong resolve to succeed as best as we can,” said Kamana as translated in English. “But, we donʻt know what the result will be until we actually arrive.”

“Your work in the past had huge impact in Hawaiʻi, and the fact that you would allow us to bring our leaders up here, our pioneers, our courageous individuals, Pila Wilson, his wife Kauanoe, Nāmaka,” said Nainoa Thompson, Pwo navigator. “These are the ones that are changing the world and bringing back the language with your help,” Thompson added.

The Mohawk community is home to the immersion program whose leaders helped pave the way for Hawaiʻi’s immersion program in the early ʻ80’s. Dorothy Lazore was instrumental in establishing the Mohawk language immersion program in Kahnawake and spoke before Hawaiʻi’s Board of Education on the day that Hawaiʻi DOE’s immersion program was approved-a program that has become a model nationally and internationally.

mohawks“As you were telling us just how we helped you and how we were an inspiration for your people, and how our teachers went out to help you to revitalize what could have been lost in one generation or in two,” said Kanentokon Hemlock, Bear Clan Chief of the Kanonsonnionwe Long House. “It’s interesting because you inspire us.We look to you. We follow your inspiration too in all the work you have been doing in your land,” Hemlock shared.

During this monumental visit, crew members of Hokulea and Mohawk natives gathered at the Kanonsonnionwe Long House as they welcomed each other by exchanging gifts and songs in their native languages. Kālepa Baybayan, captain of Hokulea’s leg 23 of the Worldwide Voyage, presented Kanentokon Hemlock, Bear Clan Chief of the Kanonsonnionwe Long House, with a traditional Hawaiian feather or kahili.

“Working together like this-that is the key to our collective success! It is that kind of mindset, thinking not just about the individual, but thinking about all of us-us as an ʻohana,” said in Hawaiian by Kamanā.

Leg 23 Sail Plan

Leg 23 Sail Plan

Zika Video Released by University of Hawaii’s National Disaster Preparedness Training Center

The National Disaster Preparedness Training Center (NDPTC) at the University of Hawaiʻi focuses on natural hazards like climate change and other threats to coastal and island communities.

Under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency, NDPTC has developed a short video in partnership with the State of Hawaiʻi Department of Health and the University of Hawaiʻi as part of its Just-in-Time Training initiative to promote awareness and deliver basic information about the Zika virus. The center has developed other Just-in-Time Training on tsunamis, volcanoes, and other emerging threats and hazards.

In this video, Sarah Park, state epidemiologist and chief of the Hawaiʻi Department of Health’s Disease Outbreak Control Division, provides key information about the virus including its potential for spreading from an infected pregnant woman to her fetus causing birth defects and transmission via mosquitoes and through sexual contact.

Zika has been found in the Americas, Oceania/Pacific Islands, Africa and Asia. According to the Center for Disease Control, travel-associated cases of the Zika virus have been found in every U.S. state except Alaska and Wyoming, and in every U.S. territory except Guam and American Samoa. Locally acquired cases have been found in only Florida, American Samoa, Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands. It is spread by the bite of an infected Aedes species of mosquito (Aedes aegypti and Aedis albopictus). With the impact of climate change there has been a growth in regions that support mosquito habitats worldwide, increasing the world’s vulnerability to mosquito-borne diseases.

Aedes species of mosquito

Aedes species of mosquito

“We are particularly concerned about Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases because of their potential impacts on vulnerable, at-risk populations,” said Karl Kim, professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa and executive director of the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center. “We need to increase awareness of the disease but also work towards effective strategies for monitoring as well as combating Zika. As a global visitor destination, Hawaiʻi needs a multi-pronged approach involving health care providers, urban planners, emergency responders, as well as households and businesses is needed to manage this health threat.”

Homeowners and businesses need to protect themselves against mosquitoes and implement effective programs for mosquito control. Training and education is needed to increase preparedness as well as response and mitigation capabilities.

NDPTC is committed to provide relevant and up-to-date training and education on the latest threats to our society.

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Centennial Events for October

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2016, and continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park (ADIP) programs with the public in October.

All ADIP and Hawaiian cultural programs are free, but park entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. In addition, two artists-in-residence arrive for their October residency, sponsored by the National Parks Arts Foundation. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Centennial Hike: Hawaiian Adze Production—Lithic Block Quarries on Kīlauea. Join Park Ranger Jay Robinson on an easy hour-long hike among the abandoned adze quarry at Kīlauea Overlook. Most visitors have no idea this area was showered by large basalt rocks erupted from Kīlauea during its summit eruptions of 1790, or that Hawaiians coveted the rocks for stone tools (adze). Sturdy footwear, water, raingear, sun protection, and a snack are recommended.

When: Sat., Oct. 1, 2016 at 11 a.m.

Where: Meet at Kīlauea Overlook

Lili‘uokalani at Washington Place.  Jackie Pualani Johnson performs an amazing, one-woman show about Queen Lili‘uokalani, the last monarch of Hawai‘i. Lili‘uokalani was imprisoned for a year at ‘Iolani Palace following the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom in 1893, where she composed the poignant song Aloha ‘Oe and translated the Kumulipo, the Hawaiian creation chant, into English. Johnson’s performance emphasizes the relationship with her hānai children, and is taken directly from the writings of Queen Lili‘uokalani, the queen’s family and other historical sources. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Oct. 4 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Nā Pa‘ahana Hula (Tools of Hula). Learn about the beautiful implements that accompany traditional hula and ‘oli (chant).

Instruments of Hula.  NPS Photo

Instruments of Hula. NPS Photo

Pele Kaio, kumu hula for Unulau, and an instructor at Hawai‘i Community College, displays and describes the importance of ‘ulī ‘ulī (feathered rattles), pahu (drum), ‘ipu heke (gourd) and other Hawaiian hula tools. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

When: Wed., Oct. 5 from 10 a.m. to noon

Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Hawai‘i Nei Art Adventure: Palm Trail Hike. The featured category for this year’s Hawai‘i Nei Art Contest are the national parks of Hawai‘i Island to celebrate the centennial of the National Park Service. Come get inspired on Kahuku’s Palm Trail. This ranger-led hike across the 1868 lava flow reveals the pioneer plants that thrive on new flows, and more diverse and established flora in areas with deeper soil. The hike is moderately difficult, 2.5 miles roundtrip and will take 2-3 hours.  Carpooling is encouraged. Space is limited; register by Oct. 5 at www.hawaiineiartcontest.org. Free!

Where: Enter the Kahuku Unit on the mauka (inland) side of Highway 11 near mile market 70.5

When:  Sat., Oct. 8 at 9:30 a.m.

Kahuku ‘Ohana Day. Calling keiki 17 and younger and their families to help the park’s natural resources staff restore native forest by planting native trees in the Kahuku Unit in Ka‘ū. Call (808) 985-6019 to register by October 3. Bring lunch, snacks, water, a re-usable water bottle, sunscreen, hat, long pants and shoes. Sponsored by the park and the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Enter the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on the mauka (inland) side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5, and meet near the parking area. Free.

When: Sat., Oct. 15 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where: Kahuku Unit

Bert Naihe in Concert. Hawaiian musician and singer Bert Naihe will perform songs from his own CD, You’re the One, and catchy versions of other favorite tunes. Naihe, who was born and raised in Hilo, is also a musician for Hālau o ka Ua Kanileua with Kumu Hula Johnny Lum Ho.  Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.

When: Wed., Oct. 19 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

After Dark in the Park: LiDAR Sheds New Light on Hidden Gems. LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) technology is used to digitize archeological resources including ancient footprints, petroglyph fields and agricultural systems. Join Park Archeologist Dusten Robbins to learn how the park uses LiDAR in managing cultural resources, and future uses of this exciting technology.

When: Tues., Oct. 25, 2016 at 7 p.m.

Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Ulana Niu (Coconut Leaf Plaiting). Join park rangers and learn to make fun and creative trinkets out of coconut leaves to take home. Park rangers and staff from the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association share their knowledge of this beloved Polynesian tradition. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.

When: Wed., Oct. 26 from 10 a.m. to noon

Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

After Dark Out of the Park: LiDAR Sheds New Light on Hidden Gems. LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) technology is used to digitize archeological resources including ancient footprints, petroglyph fields and agricultural systems. Join Park Archeologist Dusten Robbins to learn how the park uses LiDAR in managing cultural resources, and future uses of this exciting technology. Sponsored by Mokupāpapa Discovery Center.

When: Wed., Oct. 26 at 7 p.m.

Where: Mokupāpapa Discovery Center in downtown Hilo, 76 Kamehameha Avenue

Centennial Hike: LiDAR Sheds New Light on Hidden Gems. Join park rangers on a moderate, 2 ½-mile roundtrip hike into the Ka‘ū Desert and learn how LiDAR has helped rescript the history surrounding the ancient footprints embedded in this landscape. Sturdy footwear, water, raingear, sun protection, and a snack are recommended.  About two hours.

When: Sat., Oct. 29, 2016 at 1 p.m.

Where: Meet at the Ka‘ū Desert Trailhead

Artists-in-Residence Programs for October. Composer, jazz musician and ‘ukulele champion Byron Yasui and accomplished painter and cellist Noreen Naughton, are the park’s Artists in Residence for October. Join the artists for these upcoming free events, which include public workshops, an After Dark in the Park presentation, and an open-house studio.

‘Ukulele: A Brief History and a Sampling of Playing Styles. Byron Yasui shares the various ‘ukulele styles he grew up with as a living history interpretation of the instrument’s varied history. This class is for players of moderate to advanced level, and could also inspire composers and arrangers in the areas of playing techniques, notation and tablature. Free, but registration is required. Call Laura Schuster at 808-985-6130 or email laura_c_schuster@nps.gov.
When: Sat., Oct. 1 at 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Theater at Kīlauea Military Camp

Painting Workshop with Noreen Naughton. Artist-in-residence and painter Noreen Naughton will talk about her process of discovering the subject and how she arrives at abstraction while painting out in the park. She will also discuss creative process and how it works for her. Free, but registration is required. Call Laura Schuster at 808-985-6130 or email laura_c_schuster@nps.gov.
When: Sat., Oct. 8 and Sat. Oct. 22 at 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: the lobby of the ‘Ōhi‘a Wing, between Kīlauea Vistor Center and the Volcano House

‘Ukulele Kani Ka Pila with Byron Yasui. Bring your ‘ukulele to this workshop for players of all skill levels. The objective is to have fun and learn easy-to-finger chords as an accompaniment to singing simple songs. Free, but registration is required. Call Laura Schuster at 808-985-6130 or email laura_c_schuster@nps.gov.
When: Sat., Oct. 15 at 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Theater at Kīlauea Military Camp

After Dark in the Park with Artists-in-Residence Bryon Yasui and Noreen Naughton. The artists speak about the creative process and how Hawai‘i informs and inspires their different art forms. Yasui, a Professor Emeritus of Theory and Composition at the University of Hawai‘i, is a composer, jazz musician, and ‘ukulele aficionado. Naughton is a renowned painter, educator and cellist. Free.
When: Tues., Oct. 18 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium

The artists’ residency begins Sept. 27 and ends Oct. 27. The residency is brought to the Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park by the National Parks Arts Foundation (NPAF). These residencies are sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.