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UH Hilo’s Lam Receives Prestigious Fulbright Award

Carolina Lam, director of global education at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Center for Global Education and Exchange, has received a prestigious Fulbright International Education Administrators (IEA) Award to visit South Korea.

Carolina Lam, Director, Global Education at UH Hilo

Carolina Lam, Director, Global Education at UH Hilo

The purpose of the program is to provide international education administrators an opportunity to learn about the host country’s educational system and network with Korean and U.S. cohort colleagues. Lam will spend two weeks in June traveling throughout South Korea, meeting with representatives from the country’s universities, along with selected government and private sector agencies.

“I am honored to have been selected to participate in this program,” Lam said. “I look forward to learning more about South Korea’s culture and educational system, and visiting with at least four of our 11 partner universities that are located there.”

The IEA award is part of the Fulbright Scholar program, which sends approximately 1,100 U.S. faculty and professionals abroad each year. Fulbright programs are international education exchanges that are sponsored by the U.S. government and designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and other countries.

For more information, visit http://www.cies.org.

Free Window Screening Workshop #FightTheBite

Lowes, Habitat For Humanity West Hawaii and the State Health Department have created a “Free Window Screening” workshop day on June 16th from 10-1 in the Lowe’s parking lot near the garden area to help repair people’s screens and teach residents how to do it themselves, as well.

Lowes Fight the Bite

Qualified residents can sign up to have Habitat folks provide the materials to make sure people have homes with screens to avoid contracting mosquito borne illnesses. Perk? A free BBQ from Randy’s BBQ!

One Week Left on Public Education Survey – Offer Your Input on Hawaii’s Education Future

The Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) is reminding the public that they have one more week to submit input on a plan for student success. HIDOE and the Board of Education (BOE) are currently reviewing their joint Strategic Plan for the next three years. The community’s input is needed to support student aspirations in our public schools.

Join the Conversation

Feedback is being sought through a survey posted at hiqualityed.tumblr.com. Some of the questions participants can expect include:

  • Given your understanding of HIDOE’s vision, mission, and values, how would you define “student success”?
  • What innovative practices, programs, or approaches best prepare students to become college, career, and community ready?
  • What promising practices, programs, or approaches could specifically support struggling students in setting and reaching their college, career, and community ready goals?
  • What school or community programs or efforts effectively support students in achieving their college, career, and community goals?

“In the past three weeks, we have received more than 730 completed surveys providing input on what the education experience should look like for our public school students, and we’re looking for more feedback before the May 31 deadline,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “This is an important opportunity for teachers, parents, students and community members to share their thoughts and make an impact on thousands of students.”

HIDOE is also taking into account the passage of the new federal education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which provides more flexibility to states to direct their own education strategies to support state goals, while keeping several federal requirements tied to funding in place. Since January, HIDOE has been providing ESSA analysis and information to the Governor, the BOE, the Legislature, educators and the public.

For more information and to take the survey, click here; to join the conversation on social media use #HIQualityEd.

High Technology Development Corporation Hosts Forum on Entrepreneurship with Noted Business Innovation Expert

The High Technology Development Corporation (HTDC) will host a free brown bag lunch lecture by nationally recognized venture capitalist, technology expert, business executive and media commentator Jonathan Aberman on Wednesday, June 1 from 12 noon – 1 p.m. at the NELHA Gateway Center in Kailua-Kona. Seating is limited for Aberman’s presentation, “The Challenge of Growth: It’s a high class problem, but still a problem.”

Jonathan Aberman

Jonathan Aberman

“We are absolutely thrilled to have Jonathan Aberman address our local business leaders in Kailua-Kona,” said Robbie Melton, executive director and CEO of HTDC.  “His vast experience in the technology innovation and business startup fields has made him a highly respected voice that people across the nation look to for guidance. We’re very fortunate to welcome him to Hawaii to share his thoughts on the challenges facing small businesses today.”

Aberman is founder, chairman, and managing director of Amplifier Ventures, a Washington, D.C.-based consortium of technology innovation consulting and investment management businesses that assists technology startups and provide consulting services to government agencies, academic institutions, nonprofit, and for-profit organizations. He has been cited as a thought leader in the areas of technology innovation and entrepreneurship by numerous media outlets. Washingtonian Magazine named him as one of its “Tech Titans,” and the Washington Business Journal tabbed him as one of the “Power 100” in the region. The Commonwealth of Virginia has also listed Aberman as one of its “50 Most Influential Entrepreneurs.”

Online registration is available at nelha-jonathanaberman.eventbrite.com. Tickets are free, but limited to 50 seats. The NELHA Gateway Center is located at 73-4460 Kaahumanu Highway in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii Island. Following his presentation, Aberman will be available for consultation. Appointments are limited and reservations are required.

To schedule an appointment or for more information, contact Tom Leonard at tom.ni3@htdc.org or (808) 936-0222.

Big Island Film Festival Offering Educational Component

The Big Island International Film Festival will present an educational component at this year’s 11th annual event. The festival is again showcasing outstanding indie cinema, music, culinary events and the world class hospitality presented by the Fairmont Orchid Resort.

Photo by Kirk Aeder

Photo by Kirk Aeder

The Big Island International Film Festival is hosting two special industry workshops on Friday May 27, 2016. These added value events are free and have appeal to all emerging filmmakers, entertainer’s, students and cinema lovers alike. The seminars take place at the Fairmont Orchid Hawai’i, and there will be daytime film screenings, indoors at the Lehua Theatre and evening movies under the stars at Plantation Estate.

First off, at 9:45 a.m., Jen Grisanti will be presenting, “TELLING AND SELLING YOUR STORY”.

Jen Grisanti

Jen Grisanti

She will illustrate proven techniques to raise the elements of a screenplay and increase your opportunities for marketability. A longtime television programmer, Grisanti will highlight how to bring emotion into your script.

At 4:30 p.m., Raymond Rolak, veteran sports producer and content provider, will be speaking on, “THE HARMONY OF MUSIC AND CINEMA”.

Ray RolakRolak will also showcase new trends in product placement, trans-media and the important implications of IRS Section-181 for indie investments.

The BIIFF will have 58 films, with seven from the State of Hawai’i and three produced on the Big Island. Speaking at a recent announcement of the festival Executive Director Leo Sears said, “I am so impressed with the quality of films this year.” He added, “Picking the Official Selections was very difficult. The features are excellent, and the shorts are so good that we added an extra film block so we could show six more. This is a great selection that any movie-lover will enjoy and we hope everybody will come and support indie films with us.”

There are also receptions with featured guests Bellamy Young and Michael Gross. Also there are free children’s films at, The Shops at Mauna Lani. A host of events can be accessed thru the BIIFF website. http://www.bigislandfilmfestival.com/wp/

The BIIFF concludes with a “Best of the Fest” concert featuring HAPA on Memorial Day, Monday, 5-7 p.m. at The Fairmont Orchid, Hawaii Plantation Estate, near the Tennis Park. It will be followed by the Best Short Film and Best Feature, chosen by audience votes. There’s also a silent auction to benefit Fisher House at Tripler Army Medical Center.

UH Hilo Announces 2015-16 Ka Lama Ku Student Leadership Awards

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Campus Center Leadership Program recently presented Ka Lama Ku Student Leadership Recognition awards and certificates to individuals and student organizations for their contributions to UH Hilo and the community during the 2015-2016 school year.
UHHilo

The Ka Lama Ku Umeke Awards and a Ka Lama Ku Award Plaque were presented to:

• Alaka‘i Certificate of Leadership: Destiny Rodriguez
• ˋIke Pāpālua Certificate of Leadership To Have the Gift of Vision: Mya Yee Nandar
• Laulima Award – No Task is Too Big When Done by All: Rose Hart
• Mālama Award – Taking Care of Others & Community: Serena Massrey
• Mālama ˋOhana Award – Taking Care of Our Families: Lauryn P. Mow
• Ka Lama Ku Recognition Plaque: Matthew Groulx

The Ka Lama Ku Leadership Plaque recognized student organizations for contributions to UH Hilo and Hawai’i Island communities:

• Alakai Award Plaque: The Pacific Youth Empowerment Day Team (Theresa Kimnoy Aten, Sinforsa Suzie Lippwe, Sione Lam Yuen Jr., Felicia Andrew, Axel Defngin, Bill Kennedy Yang, Lashay Masami, Jacob Kom, Elaine Chugen and Cheryll Ligohr

• ˋIke Pāpālua Award Plaque – To Have the Gift of Vision.: The Pacific Students Media Team (Calvin Myazoe ( Marshallese), Erbiland Mandira (Marshallese) Kathleen Gikbay (Yapese), Axel Defngin (Yapese), Bill Kennedy Yang (Kosraen/Pohnpeian), Vester Robester (Yapese/Pohnpeian) and Peter P Ramofolo (Solomon Islander)

• Kuleana Award Plaque – We are Accountable & Responsible: The Psychology and Kinesiology & Exercise Science Peer Advising Team (Alia Alvarez, Salamasina Aumua, Henry Blake, Bree Kalima, Keirsa Pakani-Tsukiyama, Nicole Rascon, Bailey Rodriguez, Keian Shon, Bennjamin Siemers and Ashley Winslow)

• Mālama Award Plaque – Taking Care of Others and Community: The Kanilehua Living Learning Community Peer Mentors/Tutors ( Bronson Palupe, Austin Awana, Abcde Zoller and Ashlen Kinilau)

The Certificate of Leadership was presented to:

• Alaka‘i Certificate – Leadership: Kailey Lapenia
• Kuleana Certificate – We are Accountable & Responsible: Bree Kalima
• Laulima Certificate – No Task is Too Big When Done by All: The UH Hilo Graduate Student Council (Heather Kimball, Deborah Michiko Fried, Samuel Kamu Plunkett and Summer Danner)
• Mālama ‘Āina Certificate – Taking Care of the Land and Environment: Kiana Soloria
• Mālama ‘Ohana Certificate – Taking Care of our Families: Koa Rodrigues

The Ka Lama Ku Student Leadership Program is sponsored by the UH Hilo Campus Center Fee Board, the Student Advisory Council, and Student Activities Council.

Police Arrest 15-Year-Old After Threatening Notes Found at Waiakea High School

Hawaiʻi Island police have arrested a 15-year-old boy in connection with threatening notes left at Waiākea High School in Hilo.

Multiple notes threatening violence were left on bathroom walls sometime between 3:30 p.m. Wednesday and 11 a.m. Thursday.
School Note
At 9 a.m. Friday, police arrested the suspect at the school. Because he is a minor, no additional details are available about his identity.

He is being held at the South Hilo police station while detectives from the Area I Juvenile Aid Section continue the investigation.

Joint Task Force Established to Combat Rat Lungworm Disease in Hawaii

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) and the East Hawaii Liaison to the Office of the Governor announced today the establishment of a Joint Task Force to assess the threat of rat lungworm disease (Angiostrongyliasis) in Hawaii. The mission of the task force is to share scientific knowledge in the application of diagnostics, treatment, mitigation and public education activities.

rat lungworm

Rat lungworm disease is caused by a nematode, which is a roundworm parasite called Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The parasitic nematode can be passed from the feces of infected rodents to snails, slugs and certain other animals, which become intermediate hosts for the parasite. Humans can become infected when they consume, either intentionally or otherwise, infected raw or undercooked intermediate hosts.

Although rat lungworm has been found throughout the state, Hawaii Island has a majority of the cases. Some infected people don’t show any symptoms or only have mild symptoms. For others, the symptoms can be much more severe, which can include headaches, stiffness of the neck, tingling or painful feelings in the skin or extremities, low-grade fever, nausea, and vomiting. Sometimes, a temporary paralysis of the face may also be present, as well as light sensitivity. This infection can also cause a rare type of meningitis (eosinophilic meningitis).

“Establishing a joint task force with local experts in the medical field and leaders in government will produce a set of best practices that be used to target rat lungworm disease not only on Hawaii Island, but on a statewide scale as well,” said Wil Okabe, East Hawaii Liaison to the Office of the Governor. “There is no specific treatment yet identified for this disease, so finding the best ways to prevent its spread and educate the public is crucial.”

The members of the task force are as follows:

  • Wil Okabe (Facilitator), East Hawaii Governor’s Liaison Office
  • Robert Cowie, Ph.D., Pacific Biosciences Research Center, University of Hawaii at Manoa
  • Robert Hollingsworth, Ph.D., U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
  • Sue Jarvi, Ph.D., School of Pharmacy, University of Hawaii at Hilo
  • Jerry Kahana, Hawaii State Department of Agriculture
  • Kenton Kramer, Ph.D., Department of Tropical Medicine, John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM)
  • John Martell, M.D., Hilo Medical Center
  • Marian Melish, M.D., Pediatric Infectious Disease, Kapiolani Medical Center
  • Donn Mende, Research and Development, County of Hawaii
  • DeWolfe Miller, Ph.D., Tropical Medicine Microbiology and Pharmacology, JABSOM
  • Peter Oshiro, Sanitation Branch, DOH
  • Sarah Park, M.D., F.A.A.P., State Epidemiologist, DOH
  • Joanna Seto, Save Drinking Water Branch, DOH
  • Aaron Ueno, Hawaii District Health Office, DOH
  • Chris Whelen, Ph.D., State Laboratories Division, DOH
  • Jonnie Yates, M.D., Kaiser Permanente

Winner Announced for 2016 Auto Body Hawaii Senior Essay Contest

All senior year students from West & North Hawaii’s schools were invited to participate.  This year’s student winner is Simon Ellis from Konawaena.  He wins a $1000 cash prize.

Konawaena Student Simon Ellis was the 2016 Auto Body Hawaii Essay Winner

Konawaena Student Simon Ellis was the 2016 Auto Body Hawaii Essay Winner

Mr. Ellis’s essay, titled “Eclectic Election,” discussed how the current presidential race is generating a conversation amongst teens through social media and its potential impact on topics of teens’ interests. He chose not to write about one particular party but how, more than any other time, teens are actively getting involved in the political arena and how their involvement can make a difference.

An excerpt of his essay follows:

“In school, it has never been uncommon for students to discuss politics in Social Studies and History classes.  These days it’s not uncommon for students to discuss them electively in their free time.  The lunch room talk has moved away from “who’s her boyfriend” to “what is her stance on foreign policy.” I think that one reason teens are so much more involved in the democratic process this year in particular is that social media gives us the ability to discuss the issues like never before. Not only do we talk about current events at school, but we can also talk about them at home and immediately voice our ideas to the rest of the world.  This open dialogue is not only attractive to teens who want to have their voices heard, but also to those of us who want to learn more and see other people’s point of view.”

The full essay is posted on the Auto Body Hawaii website; www.autobodyhawaii.com.

 

Openings Still Available for Hawaii Summer Fun Programs

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation announces openings are still available for select youth Summer Fun Programs and Summer Sports Camps offered throughout Hawai‘i Island.

Summer FunSummer Fun Programs include excursions, swimming, nature exploration, arts and crafts projects, indoor and outdoor games, sports, music, and dance. Open to boys and girls who have completed kindergarten through the sixth grade, Summer Fun Programs are offered weekdays from June 6 through July 15, except for holidays.

Summer Sports Camps are open to older children, in some cases up to high school seniors, and offer sports, strength, speed and agility, and cross-training. They are held weekdays June 6 through July 15, except for holidays.

Registrations will be accepted for the following programs on a first-come, first-served basis until all open spots are filled:

Hilo District

  • Wainaku Gymnasium Summer Fun

Hāmākua District

  • Honoka‘a Gymnasium Summer Fun
  • Pa‘auilo Gymnasium Summer Sports Camp
  • Pāpa‘aloa Gymnasium Summer Fun and Summer Sports Camp
  • Pāpa‘ikou Gymnasium Summer Fun and Summer Sports Camp

Puna/Ka‘u District

  • Hawaiian Beaches Summer Fun
  • Kahuku Park Summer Fun
  • Kea‘au Middle School Summer Fun (registrations taken at Shipman Gymnasium)
  • Mountain View Gymnasium Summer Fun
  • Nā‘ālehu Community Center Summer Fun
  • Pāhala Community Center Summer Fun
  • Pāhoa Community Center Summer Fun

Kona and Kohala District

  • Kekuaokalani Gymnasium Summer Fun (at Kailua Park)
  • Yano Hall Summer Fun
  • Waimea Community Center Summer Fun
  • Waikoloa Park Summer Fun
  • Kamehameha Park Summer Fun

Parents should contact a site or sites directly to find out individual program details and learn if openings remain. Site information is listed on the Hawai‘i County website under: http://records.co.hawaii.hi.us/weblink/browse.aspx?dbid=1&startid=57945&cr=1.

For more information about Summer Fun Programs or Summer Sports Camps, please call 961-8740.

Industry Experts Featured May 22 at Ka‘u Coffee College

Leaders of the specialty coffee industry are traveling to the state’s largest agricultural district this month to taste and see all the effort that goes into producing award-winning Ka‘u coffee during the Ka‘u Coffee Festival.

Local growers get info on a variety of coffee industry topics at the annual Ka’u Coffee Festival.

Local growers get info on a variety of coffee industry topics at the annual Ka’u Coffee Festival.

While meeting Ka‘u growers, the visiting experts lead seminars at the festival’s annual Ka‘u Coffee College May 22 at the Pahala Community Center. The Ka‘u Coffee College has proven to be a place of learning, sharing and networking—and has featured some of the industry’s leading professionals from around the globe. The 2016 program follows in this tradition with the theme, “Coffee Quality.”

“These seminars are designed to not only continue to brand and market Ka‘u as a premium coffee growing origin, but to help the growers’ bottom line,” explained event organizer Chris Manfredi.  “We understand the challenges of sustaining a profitable farming operation in Hawai‘i. These talks will certainly reinforce the exceptionally high quality for which Ka‘u coffee has become famous, but also ensure there is a steady supply of it. As we reach more markets, we need a solid supply of quality coffees to meet the increasing demand while ensuring growers remain profitable.”

The Ka’u Coffee College is part of the eighth annual Ka‘u Coffee Festival, spanning May 13-22, and culminating May 21-22 at the Pahala Community Center. Coffee professionals learn first-hand about the Ka‘u coffee community in the days leading up to the May 21st ho‘olaule‘a, which includes guided tastings, farm tours and the opportunity to “talk story” with growers at their booths.

“The Ka‘u Coffee College is the last, but certainly not the least event,” adds Manfredi.

Topics covered at this year’s college include integrated pest management, CBB (coffee berry borer) and coffee quality’s impact on price.

“Six Years of Farming with CBB: Reflecting and Moving Forward” will be presented by Andrea Kawabata, assistant extension agent for coffee and orchard crops with the University of Hawai‘i CTAHR cooperative extension service and biologist Arturo Ballar Ortiz PSM, farm development and research director at Greenwell Farms. Working out of the Kona Research and Extension Center, Kawabata is the current project investigator for USDA and CTAHR Area-wide Mitigation and Management for CBB Control Project’s Outreach Program and cooperating investigator of the HDOA-funded Flat Bark Beetle Project.

Mike Perry will delve into “Coffee Quality’s Relationship to Price Sensitivity.” An award-winning roast master who blends a background in chemical engineering with a love for coffee, Perry is founder of Klatch Coffee in California.

“Falling Coffee, Falling Profits” will be discussed by Robert G. Hollingsworth, research entomologist of Hilo’s USDA-ARS-Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center and a specialist on coffee berry borer (CBB). Hollingworth’s research facilitated the deregulation of the GHA strain of Beauveria bassiana, the principal pesticide used to control CBB. Currently he is studying natural enemies of the pest, the effectiveness of sanitation methods and the influence of environmental factors on population growth and development.

Miguel Meza, owner and director of Paradise Coffee Roasters in Hawai‘i and Minnesota, teams up with Lee Paterson, owner of Hula Daddy Kona Coffee, to direct a coffee quality workshop, “Recognizing and Minimizing Coffee Defects.”

Admission to the 9 a.m.-pau Ka‘u Coffee College is free, though donations are appreciated.

All activities at the Ka‘u Coffee Festival are open to the general public; some require a fee. Find details at www.KauCoffeeFest.com. Call 808-929-9550 or visit www.KauCoffeeFest.com.

Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp Returns to Hilo

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation invites keiki basketball players to the 4th Annual Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp that returns to Hilo July 26-29.

YagiOpen to boys and girls 9 to 17 years old, the Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp will be held at the Afook-Chinen Civic Auditorium and the Pana‘ewa Covered Play Courts, which feature new flooring.

David Kaneshiro, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo head women’s basketball coach, and GE Coleman, UH-Hilo head men’s coach, will serve as lead clinicians. Each will share basketball expertise and offer personalized instruction during the four-day camp. Assisting the Vulcan coaches will be Daphne Honma, Honoka‘a High School girls basketball coach, previous Division II coach of the year, and former UH-Hilo head women’s basketball coach. Additional college and high school coaches have been invited to be camp clinicians.

A team of coaches will instruct and supervise campers as they practice agility, ball-handling and other drills during morning skill sessions. Following a lunch break, players will showcase what they’ve learned by competing in games expected to last until about 3:30 p.m. each day. Special awards will be presented to outstanding participants at the close of Friday’s session.

The registration fee is $60 per child. The fee will increase to $70 for players registering after Tuesday, July 12. All participants will receive a camp shirt and group photo. Please make checks payable to the County Director of Finance and include the note “Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp.”

Registration forms are available at the Department’s Recreation office located within Aunty Sally Kaleohano’s Lū‘au Hale at 799 Pi‘ilani Street in Hilo, county gyms islandwide, and online at http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/parks-and-recreation/.

The Jimmy Yagi Summer Hoops Camp is named in honor of the legendary former UH-Hilo men’s basketball coach who helped guide the Vulcans-Hawai‘i Basketball School for 37 years.

For more information, please contact Jason Armstrong, Public Information Officer, at 961-8311 or jarmstrong@hawaiicounty.gov.

2016 UH Hilo Awards and Recognition Celebration Awardees

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo honored several members of the University community at its 2016 Awards and Recognition Celebration held on Thursday, May 5.
UH Hilo Moniker
Mathematics Professor Dr. Mitch Anderson was presented with the Excellence in Service Award, given to a faculty or professional staff for service-related professional skills to UH Hilo and the community.

Anderson is one of the most active professors in the UH Hilo Faculty Congress and the go-to faculty member for program review, assessment and accreditation, one nominator noted. He was a key author of the new Program Review Handbook that went into effect two years ago, and also spearheaded one of the nation’s biggest mathematical curricular redesigns by working with the State Department of Education to align its mathematics curriculum to state Common Core Standards (CCSS). His efforts have helped make Hawai’i a model for curricular alignment to CCSS.

Kaliko Trapp, lecturer, Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language, received the Distinguished Service Award for Improving Student Life for making outstanding contributions beyond the boundaries of his official responsibilities.

His student nominator, Vanessa Winchester-Sai, who is largely confined to a wheelchair, credits Trapp with helping her get the most out of her educational experience. In addition to being an instructor, he provided the technical accommodations necessary for Winchester-Sai to participate in her other classes as well. She said Trapp has made a profound difference in her life, for which she is eternally grateful.

The Pūlama ʻIke Award, which recognizes a significant contribution to developing and promoting the spirit and mission of the University, was presented to Gail Makuakāne-Lundin, interim vice chancellor for student affairs.

As a member of UH President David Lassner’s Hawai’i Papa O Ke Ao task force to indigenize each campus, she has spearheaded activities to increase student success, faculty and staff development, and institutional and extramural funding. Makuakāne-Lundin has led the Kupa ʻĀina Summer Bridge program with Kamehameha Schools, which provides incoming students with a six-week residential experience focused on cultivating academic learning, personal development and professional skill sets. Her U.S. Department of Education grant-funded Ho’okahua initiative provided $1 million in improvements and renovations to the Hale Kanilehua dormitory while funding a Scholars-in-Residence program that included Dr. Manulani Meyer and Keali’i Reichel among its participants.

Dr. Mahavir Chougule, associate professor, department of pharmaceutical sciences, was awarded the Koichi and Taniyo Taniguchi Award for Excellence and Innovation, which recognizes creativity in teaching, scholarship and artistic production at UH Hilo.

Chougule has contributed to UH Hilo’s training and research mission with innovative nanotechnology research, focusing on targeted delivery to improve the therapeutic outcomes of diseases such as cancer and asthma that resulted in filing a provisional application for a patent. His research has led to establishment of the first nanotechnology-based extramural funded lung cancer and asthma program in the State of Hawaiʻi, bringing national recognition to the University in the form of the American Association of Cancer Research Minority-Serving Institution Faculty Scholar in Cancer Research Award.

The Excellence in Building & Grounds Maintenance Award was presented to Kevin Hand, the University’s electrician.

Hand is currently UH Hilo’s only electrician, who is currently working on a campus-wide lighting conversion. The replacement of old fluorescent light fixtures with modern LED fixtures is enabling the University to maintain existing light levels with half as many lights, while saving an estimated 60 percent on electricity for lighting. He has also helped beautify the grounds and buildings by installing new conduits inside and underneath buildings.

Jamie Ouye, Housing’s senior resident student assistant, was named Student Employee of the Year.

Selected for a strong work ethic and attention to detail, Ouye plans and implements engaging training and staff outreach, and has coordinated various informational outreach and awareness programs, such as suicidal ideation, the effects of bullying, stress management, and the importance of community service. Ouye was also credited for going the extra mile for her co-workers by covering shifts during breaks and holidays to allow them to travel home to visit family.

The event also recognized retired employees and those receiving various years of service awards.

Student Photographers Excel in First Time Competition

The Shops at Mauna Lani presented nine students with cash scholarships and prizes in its first annual Student Photography Competition on Saturday, April 30, 2016. From 80 total entries, winning photos were selected based on technical excellence, composition, artistic merit, creative excellence, overall vitality, impact and more.

Courtesy The Shops at Mauna Lani. L to R: Marketing Assistant Manager Kawelina Gomes, Thomas Scott, Taylor Mabuni, Nuuhiwa Beatty, Sammi Goldberg, Jordan Vedelli, Priscilla Lange, General Manager Michael Oh

Courtesy The Shops at Mauna Lani. L to R: Marketing Assistant Manager Kawelina Gomes, Thomas Scott, Taylor Mabuni, Nuuhiwa Beatty, Sammi Goldberg, Jordan Vedelli, Priscilla Lange, General Manager Michael Oh

In First Place, Taylor Mabuni, Grade 11 at Makua Lani Christian Academy, won a $500 cash scholarship for his work, showing artistic eye and technical expertise in expressing The Shops’ architectural features and inviting ambiance. Jordan Vedelli, Grade 8 at Parker School, Second Place ($300), captured the fun and vitality of a family dinner at Monstera Noodles & Sushi restaurant. Third Place ($200) went to Priscilla Lange, Grade 8 at West Hawaii Explorations Academy, whose winning photo spotlighted the weekly hula and fire dance performance.

Special category awards went to:

  • Thomas Scott, Grade 10 at American School Distance Learning Program, Technical Excellence
  • Lily Kassis, Grade 6 at Hawaii Preparatory Academy, Composition Excellence
  • Eima Kozakai, Grade 9 at Kealakehe High School, Artistic Excellence
  • Orlando Corrado, Grade 9 at Kealakehe High School, Creative Excellence
  • Sammi Goldberg, Grade 11 at West Hawaii Explorations Academy, Overall Vitality
  • Nuuhiwa Beatty, Grade 6 at Makua Lani Academy, Overall Impact

“We were thrilled with the quantity, and the quality of all the photos,” said Michael Oh, General Manager. “These young photographers exceeded our expectations in every way. We are delighted to honor them, and wish them much success in their career. And, we are already looking forward to our next Student Photography Contest.”

Big Island Entrepreneurs Launch $25,000 Business Plan Competition

Two long-time Big Island businessmen are aiming to give would-be entrepreneurs a serious jump start.

Click for more information

Click for more information

World-renowned aquaculture expert Dr. Jim Wyban and Kelly Moran, President/Founder of Hilo Brokers, are co-chairing the upcoming “Best Big Island Business Plan” competition, to be hosted by the University of Hawaii at Hilo in the fall of 2016.

At stake is a total of $25,000 in seed money from a variety of sponsors including the Natural Energy Lab, the Hawaii Island Chamber of Commerce and the Ulupono Initiative..  Entry is open to any and all types of businesses, from Astronomy and Agriculture to Technology and Tourism.

“As long as it’s Big Island-based, it qualifies,” explains Moran, adding, “there’s so much talent out there, and this is a great opportunity to fast-forward someone’s killer concept.”

But the purpose of the competition goes beyond jump-starting a lone entrepreneur or co-op.  Both men are confident that by encouraging budding businesses to put their ideas forward, a better entrepreneurial ecosystem can be built on the Big Island.

“Good ideas can’t thrive in isolation,” describes Dr. Wyban, adding, “it takes peers, mentors and even competitors to push a venture to its full potential.”

Dr. Wyban speaks from experience.  An aquaculture pioneer, he helped to develop pathogen-free shrimp varieties that helped to quadruple global production before selling his technology to a multinational corporation.

Moran is a 30-year real estate veteran, who has overseen more than $500 million worth of transactions in his career.

Plan entries are being accepted now.  Competition proceedings will be held at the University of Hawaii at Hilo in the Fall 2016 semester, exact date and time to be announced.

For more information on the competition and to download entry forms, visit the Best Big Island Business Plan’s website at www.BBIBP.org.

Questions can be directed to Dr. Wyban by emailing jim@BBIBP.org.

National Science Foundation Awards $20 Million Dollar Grant to UH System for Clean Water Research Project

Today, Hawaii’s Congressional Delegation announced that the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a $20,000,000 grant to the University of Hawaii System for a clean water research project. The project, titled Ike Wai from the Hawaiian words for knowledge and water, will address the critical needs of the state to maintain its supply of clean water, most of which comes from groundwater sources.

Ike Wai

“This grant will greatly improve our understanding of one of Hawaii’s most precious natural resources,” said Representative Mark Takai (HI-01). “Through public-private collaboration with federal, state and local agencies, we can increase the efficiency of our state’s water management, and ensure that we have the federal resources necessary to promote a workforce capable of conducting this type of research for generations to come.”

“Due to our volcanic origins, our system of aquifers is far more complex than we once thought,” said U.S. Senator Brian Schatz (D-Hawai‘i). “This grant will allow scientists to use modern mapping tools to provide policymakers with critical information about our water resources, and help ensure that there is enough for the needs of people, agriculture, and future generations.”

“Hawaii’s water is a precious resource, and this competitive funding will support the University of Hawaii’s research into protecting our fresh water sources for future generations,” said Senator Mazie K. Hirono, Ranking Member of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on Water and Power. “Ike Wai and other projects that build an innovative, sustainable future are essential to understanding and finding solutions for our island state’s unique needs, and also underscore the importance of significant federal investments in research in these critical areas, something that I strongly support.”

“Pollution, fracking, unsustainable farming practices, and over development have put serious pressure on our clean water supply across the globe. It is essential that we protect and maintain access to fresh and clean water in Hawaiʻi due our isolated location in the Pacific,” said Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02). “There is still much unknown about how water flows through the unique landscapes and volcanic foundations of our islands. This grant from the National Science Foundation will help us to better understand how to use our precious natural resources to ensure a continuous and high quality water supply.”

Ike Wai Valley

The Ike Wai project, awarded under the NSF’s Research Infrastructure Improvements Program, will greatly improve understanding of where the water that provides for the needs of Hawaii’s cities, farms, and industries comes from and how to ensure a continued, high quality supply. This supply is under increasing pressures from population growth, economic development, and climate change. The funding provided by the NSF will encourage collaboration with federal, state, and local agencies and community groups concerned with water management.

Hawaii Department of Education to Expand Free Meal Program to 30 Schools on Six Islands

This upcoming school year, the Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) will expand a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) free meal program, called the Community Eligibility Provision (CEP), from seven public schools to 30 across the state. 

School Lunches

The CEP program allows a school district, a group of schools or a single school to serve free meals to all students even if they do not qualify for free or reduced-priced lunch reimbursements.

“We are pleased to be able to expand this program to more schools and include nearly every island with free meals,”stated Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “We’ve heard from parents in this year’s pilot project who say the program was a tremendous help for their families.”

The 23 additional schools being added to the program in school year 2016-17 are:

Kauai:

  • Kekaha Elementary

Hawaii Island:

  • Kau High & Pahala Elementary
  • Keaau Elementary
  • Keaau High
  • Keaau Middle
  • Keonepoko Elementary
  • Naalehu Elementary
  • Pahoa Elementary
  • Pahoa High

Maui:

  • Hana High & Elementary

Lanai:

  • Lanai High & Elementary

Oahu:

  • Leihoku Elementary
  • Maili Elementary
  • Makaha Elementary
  • Nanaikapono Elementary
  • Nanakuli Elementary
  • Nanakuli High & Intermediate
  • Olomana School
  • Pope Elementary
  • Waianae Elementary
  • Waianae High
  • Waianae Middle
  • Waimanalo Elementary & Intermediate

The seven schools in the pilot program will continue participating next year, including:

  • Kaunakakai Elementary School, Molokai
  • Kilohana Elementary School, Molokai
  • Maunaloa Elementary School, Molokai
  • Molokai Middle School, Molokai
  • Molokai High School, Molokai
  • Mountain View Elementary School, Hawaii Island
  • Linapuni Elementary School, Oahu

To qualify for the CEP program, a district, grouping or school must have a minimum of 40 percent or more of its students eligible for free or reduced-price meals through the National School Lunch Program.

Currently HIDOE pays an average of $5.50 a meal (including food costs, labor, utilities, etc.). The USDA reimburses the state $3.85 for students who qualify for a free meal and $0.40 for those paying for a meal. HIDOE charges $2.50 for elementary school meals for a total of $2.90 in recouped cost for the state. 

Under the program all students in the CEP school would qualify for the higher $3.85 reimbursement. While the seven schools will no longer be collecting meal monies and ensuring accounts have sufficient funds, families will be required to provide information for data collection.  

“Last year, we were able to launch this pilot project at seven schools to establish its impacts on finances and staffing,”said Assistant Superintendent Dann Carlson, Office of School Facilities and Support Services. “The response was positive and we are happy that this year we will be able to expand the program to all counties and include several new whole school complexes. This USDA program allows us to feed more students, for free, and do so in a way that does not increase the cost to the state.”

For more information about the USDA CEP program visit: http://1.usa.gov/1iP9FQI.  For details on HIDOE’s CEP pilot program, visit http://bit.ly/1Kh8SL1

HIDOE’s School Food Services Branch has a website that will provide families at schools that are not in the CEP program with the option to submit applications for Free and Reduced-Price Meal Benefits online. For more information visit http://bit.ly/1VX1OID.

Jyselle Arruda Awarded Hawaii Rotary Youth Foundation Scholarship

Jyselle Arruda of Hilo High School has been awarded the 2016 Youth scholarship from the Hilo Bay Rotary Club.

Hilo Bay Rotarians congratulate Jyselle Arruda on her scholarship award. Left to right, Richard Cunningham, Kim Keahiolalo, Arruda and Bettye Williams, RCHB president.

Hilo Bay Rotarians congratulate Jyselle Arruda on her scholarship award. Left to right, Richard Cunningham, Kim Keahiolalo, Arruda and Bettye Williams, RCHB president.

Ms. Arruda will receive a cash award of $5,000 for her planned studies at the University of Hawaii-Hilo. A member of the National Society of High School Scholars and active in community service and school clubs, Ms. Arruda plans to study pre-med at UH-Hilo with a goal to become a pediatrician and set up a children’s health clinic on Hawaii Island. She lives in Honomu with her grandmother, and buses daily to Hilo High.

Hawaii Rotary Youth Foundation Scholarships (HRYF) are awarded to senior high school students across the state on a competitive basis of scholarship, campus leadership and service, and promise of future contributions to the community at large.

“Once again, Rotary Club of Hilo Bay had a number of outstanding scholar applicants. Jyselle impressed us not only with her academics, but with her drive to overcome obstacles on her path to meet her goals,” said Kim Keahiolalo, scholarship committee chair.

The Rotary Club of Hilo Bay is a staunch supporter of academic scholarships for future leaders, and is generally the Club with the largest contribution to the HRYF each year. This year alone, Hilo Bay contributed $6,100 to the scholarship fund. Richard Cunningham of Cunningham Galleries, spearheads scholarship donations in East Hawaii.

USDOE Grants Waiver Extension to Hawaiian Language Test

For the second consecutive year, the Hawaiʻi State Department of Education (HIDOE) will issue a specialized assessment to Hawaiian immersion students. The U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) granted HIDOE’s request for an extended waiver that allows Hawaiian Language Immersion Program (HLIP) students to take a specialized assessment in lieu of the state’s English language arts and math student assessments.

“The continued opportunity for our Hawaiian Immersion students to be tested in their language of instruction has been a highlight for the Department, and we appreciate the USDOE’s recognition of our progress in this initiative,”said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “The work continues as we are piloting an innovative Hawaiian Language State Assessment in science and look forward to federal approval next year.”

Click to view entire letter

Click to view entire letter

The double testing waiver response by the USDOE advised that HIDOE’s Ka Papahana Kaiapuni (Hawaiian Language Immersion) schools lacks the data required for a specialized science assessment to provide student results during this pilot year of testing.

Two years ago, HIDOE, in partnership with the University of Hawaii-Manoa (UHM), developed a field test for HLIP students that measures progress toward mastery of academic standards given in the English language Smarter Balanced Assessments. In Spring 2015, a field test in language arts and math for third and fourth graders enrolled in Ka Papahana Kaiapuni schools was used. This year, the pilot becomes operational and assessment scores will be recorded in the Kaiapuni students’ records.

The field test foregoes the statewide assessment, Smarter Balanced, which is administered to students in grades 3-8 and 11.

Last year, the Office of Hawaiian Education (OHE) was established under the Office of the Superintendent, a result of a policy audit of Hawaiʻi State Board of Education (BOE) policies 105.7 (2104) and 105.8 (2105) pertaining to Hawaiian Education and Hawaiian Language Immersion programs.

OHE is currently implementing a new policy, known as Nā Hopena Aʻo, which provides for the expansion of Hawaiian education across Hawaiʻi’s K-12 public education system for all students and adults. Together, this work helps HIDOE meet its obligations to both BOE policies and the Hawaiʻi State Constitution (Article X, Section 4 and Article XV, Section 4).

Hawaii Lawmakers Provide $100 Million for Cooling Schools and Energy Efficiency

House and Senate conferees today provided $100 million to the Department of Education to install air conditioning and heat abatement equipment to cool 1,000 public school classrooms throughout the state and to establish a sustainable schools initiative.

Capital

In his State of the State address, Governor David Ige proposed borrowing $100 million from the state’s Green Energy Market Securitization (GEMS) program to cool 1,000 public school classrooms.  In response, lawmakers drafted House Bill 2569 and Senate Bill 3126, proposing varying methods of funding, but in essence, working toward the same end.  Both bills were sent to conference with unspecified funding for the conferees to decide.

During negotiations, the conferees agreed to $100 million in general funding to immediately begin carrying out the work of installing cooling and energy efficiency upgrades.  The measure now goes to the full House and Senate on Tuesday, May 3, for approval.

“The faster we can reduce our electric costs, the more money we can put back into helping students and teachers.  If the DOE can make progress reducing electric costs even a couple percent per year, that could still save millions over the long term that could be better spent in our classrooms, rather than going to utility bills,” said Rep. Chris Lee, Conference Committee chair, who took the lead for the House on the pair of bills.