Pāhoa District Park Project Groundbreaking to Be Held July 31

A public groundbreaking ceremony for the Pāhoa District Park project will be held at 10 a.m. Thursday, July 31, at the park.

Pahoa Park Rendering

Join Mayor Billy Kenoi, County Council members Greggor Ilagan and Zendo Kern, Parks Director Clayton Honma, and other dignitaries as they signify the start of the biggest recreational project in Hawai‘i County history. The $22.3 million, yearlong construction project will more than double the size of Pāhoa Park and deliver increased recreational opportunities to one of Hawai‘i Island’s fastest-growing communities.

Refreshments and light pupu will be served.

Contractor Nan, Inc. is scheduled to start clearing and grading the site on August 4. During the following 12 months, it will construct a covered play court building, two lighted baseball fields, two multipurpose fields, one of which will be lighted for nighttime use, a keiki playground, concession building, new comfort station, accessible walkways, and ample parking areas.

Totaling more than 29 acres, the improvements will complement the park’s existing 15 acres of developed recreational facilities that include a 50-meter swimming pool, community center, senior center, and skate park.

For more information, please contact Jason Armstrong, Public Information Officer, at 961-8311 or jarmstrong@co.hawaii.hi.us.

Resource Caregivers Receive Increased Board Payments

Families that care for children placed with the Department of Human Services (DHS) Child Welfare Service (CWS) Branch will receive a foster board pay increase, effective July 1, 2014. Called resource caregivers, families will receive their first increased payment in August.

Department of Human Services

To ensure that resource caregivers receive the funds necessary to provide safe, healthy, and nurturing environments for children awaiting permanent placement, the DHS requested a legislative appropriation of $8,502,936 in 2014. The budget request was passed in its entirety as part of Governor Neil Abercrombie’s 2014 executive budget package.

“Hawaii’s rate increase is based on the DHS’ review of foster care rates and practices in 46 other states,” explained DHS Director Patricia McManaman, “and the benefits that Hawaii resource families currently receive in addition to tax-free monthly foster care payments.”

Children enter and exit the foster care system throughout the year. They can remain in resource family homes for days, months, or years in some cases. While siblings are often placed together, resource families also may care for two or more unrelated children.  In 2013, the average number of children per month in resource homes was 1,096.  In June 2014, a total of 1,156 children were in foster care across the State.

Representative Mele Carroll, Chair of the House Committee on Human Services, was a strong supporter of increasing foster board payments.  “The bill is a huge step forward to help support the foster families that are integral members of our communities.”  Her Senate counterpart, Senator Suzanne Chun Oakland agreed.  “I am very happy with the passage of this legislation and am grateful to the Department of Human Services, Governor, Legislature, advocates and foster families for this team effort!”

The increase in basic board payment also applies to families eligible for adoption assistance, permanency assistance, youth receiving higher education board allowance payments, and to young adults who choose to enroll in DHS’ new program of extended Voluntary Care to Age 21.

Foster board payment rates vary across the nation. Hawaii based its new rates on an age-tiered system indexed to documented costs contained in the United States Department of Agriculture’s Expenditures on Children by Families annual report.   The monthly per child payment to Hawaii resources caregivers has been increased from a base rate of $529 to $575 for 0-5 year olds, $650 for 6-11 year olds, and $676 for children aged 12 and above.

Similar to other states, Hawaii’s resource caregivers also receive QUEST health insurance benefits for their foster children, difficulty of care payments, and a clothing allowance. Difficulty of care payments are provided to resource caregivers that support children who require more intensive physical, emotional, psychological or behavioral care and supervision, as determined by a treating professional.

Resource families also are eligible to receive special circumstances or events payments, designated transportation costs (school bus fare or private car mileage, local bus fare) that effect child placement or promote family reunification, and $500 per child per year for extracurricular activities, social activities, hobbies, and camp funds.

Reimbursable costs include attendance at authorized meetings, respite care and child care coverage, limited liability insurance training, and  enhancements necessary for the child’s growth and development (e.g. Scouts, YMCA, YWCA, community soccer, community baseball, community swimming, Boys and Girls Clubs).

To learn more about becoming a resource care giver or attending one of the statewide informational briefings, please visit the DHS website www.humanservices.hawaii.gov/ssd/home/child-welfare-services/foster-and-adoptive-care/ 

Ni’ihau ‘Alilea Shell Workshops at Lyman Museum

For the very first time ever, men (and women too!) will have the opportunity to create a one-of-a-kind Ni’ihau shell lei that traditionally is made and worn by men for very special occasions such as a wedding, or a hula hālau performance.

Lei created from 'alilea shells.

Lei created from ‘alilea shells.

At the Lyman Museum, Kele Kanahele of the Island of Ni’ihau will teach the authentic creation of these rarely seen pieces of Ni’ihau heritage for the first time anywhere, twice in August on Friday, August 15 and Saturday, August 16, from 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.

On either day you may learn how to make an18-inch necklace/lei ($380 for Museum members, $410 for nonmembers), or a pair of earrings for ladies ($105 for members, $130 for nonmembers)—or more than one piece, as long as you sign up for specific pieces in advance.  All pieces will be created in the pikake style, using ‘alilea ke’oke ‘o shells (white).  The ‘alilea is known as the large dove shell because it closely resembles but is slightly larger (about ¾ inch long) than the better-known momi or dove shell.  Such lei are rarely made because piercing is very difficult due to the thickness of the shell.  For the earrings, much smaller shells will be used to create pieces appropriate for ladies.

Space is limited to 24 persons per day; only people who have registered can be permitted in the classroom.  Reservations must be made, pieces specified, and the workshop fee(s) paid by Friday, August 8, to ensure your place and the availability of shells.  Space is limited to 24 persons per day; only people who have registered can be permitted in the classroom.

Kane, follow in the footsteps of generations of Ni’ihau men by creating and wearing this classic lei on important occasions of your own!  And wahine, these pieces will look just as lovely on you … or you can give your special someone a treasure of Hawai’i that shows everyone he’s a treasure too!  For more information or to register, please call 935-5021 or stop by the Museum’s Admissions desk.  The Lyman Museum is located at 276 Haili St in Hilo and is open Monday through Saturday, 10 am – 4:30 pm.

Lizard Talk at Lyman Museum

Among the many immigrants to reach Hawaiian shores are certain members of the reptilian Order Squamata (which includes lizards and snakes).  A variety of lizards have arrived with people through the years and made their homes in Hawai`i.  In addition to the several species of geckos which most of us here know well, and which have been in the Islands the longest, there are species of skinks, anoles, iguanas, and chameleons that have also established themselves as colonists.

My dog freaking out on a Jackson Chameleon

My dog freaking out on a Jackson Chameleon

On Monday, August 25, 7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. at the Lyman Museum, Dr. William Mautz pulls back the foliage to look at these special creatures: their habits and habitats, how and when they came to Hawai`i, and prospects for a future in which other immigrant lizards may gain a toehold.  Dr. Mautz is a professor of biology at UH-Hilo, where he teaches and conducts research on the physiology and ecology of amphibians and reptiles.

The nationally accredited and Smithsonian-affiliated Lyman Museum showcases the natural and cultural history of Hawai`i.  Located in historic downtown Hilo at 276 Haili Street, the Museum is open Monday through Saturday, 10:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.  For more information, call (808) 935-5021 or visit www.lymanmuseum.org.

DOE Releases Income Eligibility Guidelines for Free and Reduced-Price Meals

The Hawaii State Department of Education (DOE) is announcing its policy for free and reduced-price meals for children unable to pay the full price of meals served under the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs. Copies of the policy are available at public schools.

Children from households with income at or below the following levels are eligible for free or reduced-price meals:

INCOME CHART: Effective from July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015

INCOME CHART: Effective from July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015

Application forms are being sent to all homes with a letter to parents or guardians. To apply for free or reduced-price meals, households should fill out one application and return it to the school where the child is enrolled or complete an online application via ezmealapp.com. Applications for the current school year (2014-2015) are now being accepted. The application information will be used to determine eligibility and may be verified at any time during the school year by the school or other program officials.

For DOE officials to determine eligibility, households receiving SNAP or TANF must list the child’s name, date of birth, grade, school code and their SNAP or TANF case number and the signature and name of an adult household member. Households not receiving SNAP or TANF must list: 1) the names of everyone in the household; 2) the amount of income received by each person, how often the income is received and the source of the income; 3) the name and social security number of either parent/guardian who is the primary wage earner or the adult household member who signs the form or the word “none” if neither adult household member has a social security number; and 4) the signature of an adult household member.

Applications may be submitted at any time during the year.

Under the provisions of the free and reduced-price policy, the DOE will review applications and determine eligibility. Parents or guardians dissatisfied with the ruling of the official may wish to discuss the decision with the reviewing official on an informal basis. Parents wishing to make a formal appeal may make a request for a hearing on the decision in writing to:

Name of Hearing Official: Glenna Owens, SFA Director
Address: 1106 Koko Head Avenue, Honolulu, HI 96816

Phone Number: (808) 733-8414 or toll-free 1-800-441-4845

In certain cases foster children are also eligible for school meal benefits. If a household has foster children living with them and wishes to apply for them, the household should contact the school for more information.

The information provided by the household is confidential and will be used only for purposes of determining eligibility and verifying data.

In accordance with federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Offers Free Hawaiian Music Songwriting Retreat

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is offering a two-day Hawaiian music songwriting retreat for beginners on Saturday, August 16 and Sunday, August 17. Hawaiian music, language and haku mele (Hawaiian song) experts Kenneth Makuakāne and Kaliko Trapp-Beamer will lead the workshops.

Kenneth Makuakane teaching ukulele.

Kenneth Makuakane teaching ukulele.

Both workshops run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and will be held at the park’s Education Center. Advance registration is required. To register, call (808) 985-6166. Leave your name, email address, and best contact number no later than August 8. Space is limited. The park will contact you by email to confirm your reservation.

The retreat will be held in the park at the summit of Kīlauea. Budding songwriters will find inspiration in this wahi kapu (sacred place), among the towering koa and ‘ōhi‘a lehua trees, over fields of ropy pāhoehoe lava, and in the awe-inspiring eruptive glow from Halema‘uma‘u Crater.

Also inspirational are the retreat’s accomplished teachers. Kenneth Makuakāne is a multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano award winner, along with his group, The Pandanus Club. He’s a prolific songwriter (1,500-plus songs), producer of more than 100 albums, and collaborator who has worked with virtually all of the stars of Hawaiian music over the years.

Kaliko

Kaliko Trapp-Beamer

Kaliko was raised as the hānai son of Hawaiian cultural expert Aunty Nona Beamer (1923-2008), learning Hawaiian chant, storytelling, traditional protocol, family songs, and stories. He currently teaches Hawaiian language courses at the University of Hawai‘i in Hilo, and helps coordinate the Beamer Family Aloha Music Camp. He is the President of the Mohala Hou Foundation dedicated to “preserve and perpetuate Hawaiian culture through education and the arts.”

The two-day Hawaiian songwriting retreat is sponsored by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Park entrance fees apply.

Report Shows Access Learning Pilot Enhances Teaching and Student Learning

A first-year report on the Hawaii State Department of Education’s (DOE) Access Learning pilot presented to the Hawaii State Board of Education (BOE) today shows the initiative is helping to reduce burden on teachers, increase student engagement and responsibility, and improve parents’ support of public schools.

Click to view the report

Click to view the report

Last year, the DOE unveiled Access Learning, a pilot project to study the impact of technology and digital curricular resources on teaching and learning, at eight schools. This initiative takes advantage of ongoing Department efforts such as new technology for learning while addressing challenges facing our public schools. Access Learning does not focus on the device, rather on how technology can be a tool to support teachers’ efforts to personalize instruction and engage students.

Monanalua Middle School Principal Lisa Nagamine told the BOE, “Access Learning has enhanced the collaborative learning environment of our school.”

Moanalua Middle is one of the eight Access Learning schools that has incorporated technology for learning at all levels within its campus, not just the student level.

“The dedication and commitment by the school leaders, staff, and students allowed us to see the full potential of this initiative and its impact on student learning,” said Schools Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “We appreciate their input and based on the positive results, hope to increase access to digital learning in all schools in the near future.”

Information and data collected from the eight Access Learning schools from October 2013 through April 2014 revealed:

  • Teachers use computers in a wide variety of ways to improve job performance and teaching – and that usage has increased since an initial survey was done last fall.
  • Teachers believe access to technology will benefit English language learners and special education students.
  • Students reported having positive experiences with the program. More than 90 percent of students surveyed say laptops make schoolwork more interesting and better prepare them for the future.
  • Students reported computers help them to be more organized and finish work more quickly and with better quality. Access to technology also made assignments a lot more fun by creating blogs, slideshows, movie trailers, and usage of other media.
  • Laptops allowed for better peer collaboration during project work and completing homework.
  • Parents believe computers help students gain a better insight into the happenings of the classroom and learn essential skills to compete globally.

“The 1-to-1 laptop program has improved education opportunities for students,” noted one parent. “The school has finally caught up with private schools.”

“I have seen increased student engagement in classwork because their computer allows them to have a ‘voice’ at the same time as everyone else. Less students are distracted or off task. (This) has allowed students to work more collaboratively in and out of the classroom setting,” one teacher reported.

The 2013 Legislature appropriated $8.2 million to the DOE for the pilot, which funded computers for teachers and students, technical support, professional development, and also helped offset curriculum and implementation expenses. In addition to Moanalua Middle, Access Learning pilot schools include Keaau Elementary and Pahoa Elementary, Mililani Mauka Elementary, Mililani Waena Elementary, Nanaikapono Elementary, Nanakuli Elementary, and Nanakuli Intermediate and High.

Pilot schools received devices for every student and teacher equipped with Hawaii Common Core-aligned digital curriculum for English Language Arts. The DOE partnered with county police departments to safeguard the computers, all of which are equipped with advanced security tracking software. As a result, the schools reported a combined theft and loss rate of only six computers (less than 1 percent).

Due to funding requirements, the Department was given a very short window to implement the initiative and the report noted those challenges. Teachers expressed frustration with limited time for professional development sessions. View the full report here.

During the past legislative session, DOE requested funding for ongoing Access Learning technical assistance and professional development. The budget request was denied; however, DOE officials worked with and received approval from the BOE to expend funding to continue technical assistance for the pilot schools through FY15. The funding request to the BOE will provide customized professional development for schools, overall and school specific program evaluation for formative purposes, and support for project management. For more information about the program, see the DOE’s Access Learning page.

The Elders Headline Pillars of Peace Hawaii Events

Pillars of Peace Hawai‘i to host peace leaders Gro Harlem Brundtland, Hina Jilani, and Desmond Tutu in a series of community events.

Pillars of Peace Hawai‘i, an initiative of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation, will host three preeminent global leaders from The Elders from August 29-31. While in Honolulu, they will engage in a series of exchanges with the people of Hawai‘i on peace, compassion, and ethical leadership. The Pillars of Peace Hawaii program was established in part to inspire our community to cultivate empathy, mindfulness and justice in our daily lives and better understand the roles of diversity and culture in the practice of peace.

Elders

The Elders include former Prime Minister of Norway and former Director-General of the World Health Organization, Gro Harlem Brundtland; renowned lawyer, pro-democracy campaigner and Pakistani women’s movement leader Hina Jilani; and Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Nobel Peace Laureate, veteran anti-apartheid activist and peace campaigner.

This is the first time that representatives of The Elders will engage Hawai‘i. The community will have the unique opportunity to listen to this world-renowned group of leaders in a public forum entitled “A Just and Inclusive Global Community,” on Sunday, August 31, 4:00 p.m. at the Hawai‘i Convention Center’s Lili‘u Theater. Tickets for the public presentation will be available for purchase at http://pillarsofpeacehawaii.org/schedule-tickets-the-elders on August 1st. Student tickets are $12 and general public tickets are $20; both include validated parking at the Hawai‘i Convention Center.

There will also be an opportunity for selected Hawai‘i students to attend a special Student Leaders Program, “Leaders Make the Future: the Wisdom of Elders and Youngers.” The student leaders will be chosen to attend by their schools’ administrators or teachers. Other areas of discussion during the Elders’ visit to Hawai‘i include climate change and ethical leadership.

“We are honored to have such an esteemed group of leaders come to Hawai‘i to share their global experiences and perspectives on peace issues,” said Kelvin H. Taketa, President and CEO of Hawai‘i Community Foundation. “Their visit will enable us, in turn, to share our approach to peace, influenced by the spirit of aloha and our community that merges numerous cultural influences.”

The Elders is an independent group of global leaders brought together by Nelson Mandela in 2007; they use their collective wisdom, experience, and influence to support peace building, address major causes of human suffering, and promote the shared interests of humanity.

Kofi Annan, former United Nations Secretary-General, currently chairs The Elders. Archbishop Tutu served for six years as Chair and remains an Honorary Elder. Using its members’ collective experiences and insights, the group promotes universal human rights and peace. For more information on The Elders, please visit http://www.theelders.org/.

The Elders’ visit is part of “Pillars of Peace Hawai‘i: Building Peace on a Foundation of Aloha,” an initiative of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation launched in 2012. The program’s events aim to spark conversations about the roles of compassion, diversity, and culture in the practice of peace. Highlighting Hawai‘i’s culture and its spirit of aloha, the program also positions Hawai‘i as a leading voice for peace. Pillars of Peace Hawai‘i is funded by the Omidyar ‘Ohana Fund of the Hawai‘i Community Foundation and other partners. For more information on this initiative, please visit http://pillarsofpeacehawaii.org/.

About Hawai‘i Community Foundation

The Hawai‘i Community Foundation (HCF), with 98 years of community service, is the leading philanthropic institution in the state. The Foundation is a steward of over 650 funds, including more than 190 scholarship funds, created by donors who desire to transform lives and improve communities. In 2013, $43 million in grants and contracts were distributed by HCF statewide, including $4 million in scholarships. The HCF also serves as a resource on community issues and trends in the nonprofit sector. For more information on HCF, please visit http://www.hawaiicommunityfoundation.org/.

UH Hilo College of Business and Economics Announces Dean’s List

UH Hilo Moniker

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Business and Economics announces its Dean’s List for the Spring 2014 semester:

Amerfil Grace Acob, Scott T. Ashida, Stacy C. Aurway, Marisa R. Baptista, Heather K. Bartlett, Andrew D. Bayang, Julianna K.T. Blair, Debra H. Cannoles, Dylan M. Collins, Lorena A. De La Cruz, Lilly P. Dorr, Carole J. Duquette, Robert W. Fellhauer, Silmai Uchellaz D. Fritz, Hannah M. Furumo, Jerome G. Gemine, Shantel L. Geringer, Kamaile R. Henriques, Justin K. Hirako,

Summer K. Llac-Wong, Melanie C. Isa, Aisha K. Izuno, Donald R.H.L. Jobe, Yvonne S. Johnny, Aysia K.M. Kaaumoana, Dajeong Kim, Joohyeon Kim, Kyli K.Y. Kim, Hitomi Kitade, Eunah Kong, Corey K. Kozuma, Laura Lanwehr, Nanncy Leao, Han Sang Lee, Suna Lee, Xiaoting Liu, Emerson Jake T. Llaguno, Cheyenne M. Losalio, Gareth K. Makino, Kerson T. Mariur, Aquilla Masami, Dilrae U. Mechol,

Eve Hida Morei, Raeann M. Mukini, Kelly A.A. Nakamichi, Alexandria J. Nakao-Eligado, Paolo A. Navalta, Claire-Ann H. Niibu-Akau, Kin B. Oshiro, Geraldine D. Padilla, Carissa N. Pajo, Kenny Paul, Nicole J. Perea, Lindsey F. Poulsen, Rosalie G. Roberts, Rachel J. Roorda, Andres Sanchez Gonzalez, Kyle R. Schulte, Aaron H. Sugimoto, Jade L. Thomas, Peleiupu M. Thomas, Cody J. Ventura, Maria L. Vicente, Rowell V. Villanueva, Hokuloa K. Waahila, Risa Watabiki, Aaron M. Zackoski, and Xiaoqing B. Zheng.

Free Kids Sports Physicals Available July 19th

Keiki up to 18 years old can receive a free sports physical on July 19 in Hilo under a partnership between Hawai‘i County, the nonprofit For Hearts and Souls and Sportz Viz.

countylogo

The “No Athlete Left Behind” sports physical program will be offered from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, July 19, at Pana‘ewa Park. Lead physician Dr. Kirk Milhoan, a Maui pediatric cardiologist and medical director of For Hearts and Souls, will perform sports physicals and echocardiographic screenings to rule out hidden conditions that could cause sudden cardiac arrest during strenuous activity.

Sportz Viz will take reservations for 25 athletes for each of four, two-hour blocks. Walk-in patients will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis.

Parents must bring the appropriate physical form for their child’s school or association.

Tax-deductible donations will be accepted and used to provide cardiac care to children throughout the world.

To reserve a space or obtain more information, please contact Thane Milhoan of Sportz Viz at (808) 938-6805 or info@sportzviz.com.

Permanent Building Helps College of Pharmacy Receive Extended Accreditation

In a report to the Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, the national accreditation body has extended the accreditation of the only pharmacy school in the Pacific region, reversing an earlier noncompliance finding.

UH Hilo Inouye College of Pharmacy

The American Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) has now found DKICP compliant with all of the 30 standards that it uses to evaluate colleges of pharmacy.

The main issue considered by the ACPE was compliance with the standard concerning physical facilities. In May this year, State House and Senate budget conferees agreed to fund a building to house the College on Hawaiʻi Island.

Chancellor Donald Straney: “I was secure in the knowledge that our community knew the value of the College of Pharmacy to the future, to the economy and to the general well-being of our State. I want to thank everyone involved for their continued support that led to the funding of a permanent building.”

In 2013, ACPE declared DKICP was out of compliance with the standard concerning physical facilities after which, without promise of a permanent building, could ultimately lead to probation. Founding Dean John Pezzuto said probation could have signaled the end of the College.

“If we had followed the path we were on just a year ago, I could be saying that we have been placed on probation, which would’ve been disastrous for the future of the College,” Pezzuto said. “It is heartening that our accreditation is once again secure, but we all must remain diligent and prepare for the next steps.”

The College now must complete a self-study due by September, to be followed by an on-site visit in October 2014. The results of the site visit and continuation of accreditation will be reviewed at the next ACPE Board meeting, to be held in January 2015.

UH Hilo College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resource Management Announces Dean’s List

UH Hilo Moniker

The following students in the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resource Management are recognized as Dean’s List recipients for spring 2014:

Jean Marie Acuna, Harmony Aiona, Kevin Alison, Peter Angeleo, Juan Avellaneda, Joshua Boranian, Ashley Borja-Roese, Whitney Boteilho, Elizabeth Capron, Sarah Chard, Shannon Correia, Wehart Daniels, Noel Dickinson, Alexandra Doi, Robert Dundas, Yasha Eads, Bryan Epes, Adrian Frazier, Kyle Frazier, Esther Frost, Alyssa Fujii, Kawaikapuokalani Genovia, Colin Hart, Pavel Havlicek,

Terence Hedtke, Ashli Hirai, Kelly Hodson, Oliver Jimenez Prado, Laura Kelly, Tiffany Kotani, Kuilei Kramer, Martin Alfonso Ledesma, Jordan Lee Loy, Daisy Maher, Jordyn Mansinon, Chantelle Mashreghy, Jade Miyashiro, James Moore, Ron O’Brien, Michelle Ono, Mariah Potts, Hannah Reid, Tara Renkes, Jake Rodrique, Johnathan Shestokes, Heather Stever, Michael Sthreshley, William Trammell, Lehua Wall, Noelani Waters, and Stephen Zilch.

Hawaii State Department of Education Receives ESEA Flex Extension

As a sign of its continued confidence in the Hawaii State Department of Education (DOE), the United States Department of Education (USDOE) has extended the DOE’s waiver from some components of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA)/No Child Left Behind (NCLB).

DOE
The ESEA Flexibility Waiver includes the Strive HI Performance System, which replaces the NCLB’s Adequate Yearly Progress system and its other obligations around college and career readiness and teacher and principal evaluations.

“The extension validates our work thus far in our efforts to transform public education in Hawaii,” said Schools Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “Additionally, it recognizes our strategic plan moving forward as we work tirelessly to elevate student achievement, and prepare all of our students for post-secondary success.”

The DOE initially applied for the waiver in September of 2012, and on May 20, 2013, it received conditional approval for one year – for the School Year 2013-14. Under the conditional approval, the DOE had to meet certain conditions to be granted an extension for a second year, for the School Year 2014-15. Among the conditions the USDOE required of the DOE for an extension was clear and compelling evidence of the DOE’s substantial progress with its Race to the Top (RTTT) grant. On July 29, 2013, the DOE was cleared entirely from “high risk” status with its RTTT grant.

The Strive HI Performance System not only reflects the State Strategic Plan, it aligns and connects with state education policies and initiatives including the Hawaii Common Core, updated assessments, more rigorous diploma and graduation requirements, successful school improvement strategies in the Zones of School Innovation and robust teacher and principal evaluation and support systems.

More about the DOE’s Strive HI Performance System can be found here.

Big Island Police Searching for Missing 16-Year-Old Keaau Girl

Hawaii Island police are searching for a 16-year-old Keaau girl who was reported missing.

Zeana Chong

Zeana Chong

Zeana Chong was last seen in Hilo on May 23. She is described as 5-foot-2, 180 pounds with brown eyes and black hair.

Police ask anyone with information on her whereabouts to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call the islandwide Crime Stoppers number at 961-8300. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

New Summer Program for Teens at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor

Teens will have an opportunity to soar at Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor’s new cross-cultural Aviation Adventure program scheduled to launch this July. The three-day/two-night program will provide a sweeping view of aviation, from ancient Hawaii up to the present day. Two dates are available to choose from: July 15~17 and July 22~24, Tuesdays through Thursdays, 9am to 4pm.

Teen Aviation Program

Aviation Adventure is designed to immerse teens in the rich history of Ford Island and Pearl Harbor, as well as the science, technology, engineering and math concepts of aviation. Hands-on, practical experiences bring these principles to life in the Museum’s historic hangars and aboard the Battleship Missouri Memorial. This cross-cultural program is open to teens who have completed the basic Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor Flight School program, or those who are at least 13 years of age. They will be joined by teens of the same age, from China. Overnight accommodations are provided onboard the Battleship Missouri.

Cost of the three-day program is $300, which includes all materials, meals, snacks, overnight accommodations, and an Aviation Adventure logo tee shirt.

For more information and to register for Aviation Adventure go to www.PacificAviationMuseum.org/Education/AviationAdventure or email Education@PacificAviationMuseum.org.

VIDEO: NASA’s Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Recovered

First video of NASA’s saucer-shaped test vehicle, the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) after it was recovered from the ocean and returned to Port Allen, Kauai, on June 29, 2014.

The LDSD Test Vehicle recovered

The LDSD Test Vehicle recovered

The LDSD vehicle had completed its first test flight from the Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai one day earlier.

Training International Volcano Scientists and Saving Lives Worldwide

Scientists and technicians who work at volcano observatories in 11 countries are visiting the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory this week to learn techniques for monitoring active volcanoes.

Mike Poland (USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory) shows Marcellin Kasereka  (Goma Volcanological Survey, Democratic Republic of Congo, red jacket) how to adjust the leg of a tripod, while Patricia Ponce (Colombia Geological Survey, white hat) keeps the GPS antenna rod steady.

Mike Poland (USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory) shows Marcellin Kasereka (Goma Volcanological Survey, Democratic Republic of Congo, red jacket) how to adjust the leg of a tripod, while Patricia Ponce (Colombia Geological Survey, white hat) keeps the GPS antenna rod steady.

The International Training Program in Volcano Hazards Monitoring is designed to assist scientists from other nations in attaining self-sufficiency in monitoring volcanoes and reducing the risks from eruptions. Field exercises on Kilauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes allow students to observe and operate a variety of instruments, and classroom instruction at the Observatory provides students the opportunity to interpret data, as well as plan a monitoring network for their home volcanoes. U.S. scientists are providing training on monitoring methods, data analysis and interpretation, and volcanic hazard assessment, and participants are taught about the use and maintenance of volcano monitoring instruments. Participants learn about forecasting events, responding rapidly during volcanic crises, and how to work with governing officials and the news media to save lives and property.

Organized by the Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, with support from the University of Hawaiʻi at Manoa and the joint USGS-U.S. Agency for International Development Volcano Disaster Assistance Program, the annual program has been training foreign scientists for 24 years. This year’s class includes 16 volcano scientists from Chile, Colombia Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of Congo, Indonesia, Italy, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, and South Korea.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Geochemist Jeff Sutton and CSAV international volcanology students visit a continuous gas monitoring site on Kilauea's east rift zone during field studies portion of the summer training course. Instrumentation at this site measures ambient concentration of noxious sulfur dioxide gas released from the volcano's vents, along with meteorological parameters, transmitting these data back to HVO in real time for display and analysis.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Geochemist Jeff Sutton and CSAV international volcanology students visit a continuous gas monitoring site on Kilauea’s east rift zone during field studies portion of the summer training course. Instrumentation at this site measures ambient concentration of noxious sulfur dioxide gas released from the volcano’s vents, along with meteorological parameters, transmitting these data back to HVO in real time for display and analysis.

“Hawaiian volcanoes offer an excellent teaching opportunity because our volcanoes are relatively accessible, they’re active, and USGS staff scientists can teach while actually monitoring volcanic activity,” said the USGS’s HVO Scientist-in-Charge, Jim Kauahikaua. “The small investment we make in training international scientists now goes a long way toward mitigating large volcanic disasters in the future.”

“Providing training in volcano hazards assessment and monitoring is by far the most cost effective strategy for reducing losses and saving lives for those developing nations exposed to high volcanic hazards risks,” said CSAV Director Donald Thomas. “The goal of our course is to provide our trainees with an understanding of the technologies that can be applied to an assessment of volcanic threats as well as how to interface with their respective communities to increase awareness of how to respond to those threats.”

“The training program directly benefits the United States, through international exchange of knowledge concerning volcanic eruptions, and it serves as an important element in our country’s humanitarian assistance and science diplomacy programs around the world,” said the USGS’s VDAP Chief, John Pallister.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Geochemist Jeff Sutton and CSAV international volcanology students visit a continuous gas monitoring site on Kilauea's east rift zone during field studies portion of the summer training course. Instrumentation at this site measures ambient concentration of noxious sulfur dioxide gas released from the volcano's vents, along with meteorological parameters, transmitting these data back to HVO in real time for display and analysis.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Geochemist Jeff Sutton and CSAV international volcanology students visit a continuous gas monitoring site on Kilauea’s east rift zone during field studies portion of the summer training course. Instrumentation at this site measures ambient concentration of noxious sulfur dioxide gas released from the volcano’s vents, along with meteorological parameters, transmitting these data back to HVO in real time for display and analysis.

The international participants are learning to use both traditional geological tools and the latest technology. To anticipate the future behavior of a volcano, basic geologic mapping brings an understanding of what a volcano is capable of doing, how frequently it has erupted in the past, and what kind of rocks, and ash it produces. Using Geographic Information Systems, the students learn to predict lava flow paths, conduct a vulnerability assessment, and tabulate the predicted costs associated with the damage from a lava flow. Participants are trained in the emerging field of infrasound monitoring, which is critical for rapidly detecting volcanic explosions and/or rift zone eruptions, as well as basic seismological fundamentals, and a survey of pre-eruptive seismic swarms at various volcanoes around the world. Monitoring and modeling deformation of a volcano focuses on different techniques from traditional leveling methods to GPS and satellite-based radar.

Providing critical training to international scientists began at HVO, leading to the creation of CSAV to continue the legacy. Since 1990, almost 200 scientists and civil workers from 29 countries have received training in volcano monitoring methods through CSAV. USGS’s HVO continues to provide instructors and field experiences for the courses, and VDAP has a long-term partnership with CSAV, providing instructors and co-sponsoring participants from countries around the world.

Department of Education Reminds Parents About Kindergarten Requirements

With public school slated to start in a month on August 1, the Hawaii State Department of Education (DOE) is reminding parents about the new kindergarten requirements.

DOE ReleaseStarting this school year, children must be 5 years old on or before July 31 to enter kindergarten. Also, kindergarten is now mandatory in the State of Hawaii. Children who meet the age eligibility requirements for kindergarten may enroll in school anytime.

Parents of children born on or after August 1, 2009 have several options such as pre-school at a private provider or pre-kindergarten classes at select schools. Earlier this year, the State’s Executive Office on Early Learning (EOEL) announced 21 pre-kindergarten classrooms will be available at 18 schools statewide for children born on or between August 1, 2009 and July 31, 2010, and who are eligible for free- and reduced-price meals. Priority will be given to children born in 2009 to enroll in these pre-kindergarten classes. More information on the EOEL’s pre-kindergarten classes can be found at http://earlylearning.hawaii.gov/doe-eoel-prekindergarten-program/.

Parents whose children attended kindergarten outside of Hawaii, or at a private school in the 2013-14 school year can discuss enrollment options with their home school. Despite the many possible placement scenarios, the final decision for a child’s placement will be based on the principal’s discussions among the appropriate teaching staff and parents.

“We encourage parents to be aware of the changes and take appropriate action for their children,” said Schools Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “Kindergarten is a critical time in ensuring children have a solid academic foundation.”

For more information about enrolling in kindergarten in the State of Hawaii, please visit our website at HawaiiPublicSchools.org, and enter “kindergarten” in the white search box on the home page. Parents can also search under “enrolling in school” to be sure they have the necessary documents to enroll their child, including birth certificate, tuberculosis clearance, a completed student health record, and proof of current address.

Complete List of Society of Professional Journalists Hawaii Chapter Awards

Here is the full list of the 2013 winners and finalists of the Hawaii Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists that were recognized Friday evening at the Manoa Grand Ballroom of the Japanese Culture Center over on Oahu.

Hawaii SPJ

The ceremony and banquet was emceed by Keoki Kerr and Robbie Dingeman.  The Colorado Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists judged the 2013 contest.

Every entrant had to pay $25.00 per category to have their entry judged.

ALL MEDIA

Column Writing or Blog/News

First Place – “Board Talk,” Teresa Dawson, Environment Hawai’i

Comments: “Exhaustive reporting clearly presented. sometimes excessive length, but comprehensive. Good public service reporting/writing.”

Finalists

“Patti Epler columns,” Patti Epler, Civil Beat

Comments: “Ms. Epler de-mystifies journalism for readers, writes about important topics like access to open records and strong shield laws. ”

“The State of Aloha,” Ben Lowenthal, Maui News

Comments: “Nice use of historical perspective. Clear writing style.”

Column Writing or Blog/Features or Sports— First Place:

“Sharing Mana’o,” Kathy Collins, Maui News

Finalists:

“Afterthoughts,” Michael Keany, Honolulu Magazine

“My Job: Greens Coordinator for Films, Jewelry Takes Her Underwater, ‘Eyes and Ears’ of the Store, Caring for Kahoolawe, Family Tradition of Feather Work,” Stacy Yuen, Catherine Toth, Paula Rath, Lehia Apana, Lee Ann Bowman – Hawaii Business

Overall comment: “This category has a broad variety of entries. I think the “”Modern Cowboys”” video might fit better in another place. Very strong column-writing entries. It was tough to decide between No. 1 and No. 2!”

Government Reporting

First Place -“Hawaii Prison Problems,” Keoki Kerr, Hawaii News Now

Comments: “Terrific series of reports, eye openers.”

Finalists

“The Agribusiness Development Corporation,” Teresa Dawson, Environment Hawai’i

Comments: “Impressive continuing coverage of a government body wielding a lot of money but with little oversight and media scrutiny. Great job.”

“Hawaii’s Public Records,” Nathan Eagle, Nick Grube – Civil Beat

Comments: “Great stuff. Journalists need to explain in laymen’s terms to readers about public records, and this package does a terrific and compelling job.”

Breaking News Reporting

First Place – “Tropical Storm Flossie,” Melissa Tanji, Eileen Chao, Chris Sugidono, Lila Fujimoto – Maui News

Comments: “Comprehensive deadline coverage of a storm, its impact on services, infrastructure, personal stories and emergency preparedness information for readers. Well done.”

Finalists

“Plane makes emergency landing,” Chris Sugidono, Brian Perry, Lee Imada – Maui News

Comments: “Excellent footwork in getting to the crash site, sticking with pursuit of survivors and capturing the aircraft’s final plunge into the ocean.”

“Shark attack,” Chris Sugidono, Melissa Tanji – Maui News

Comments: “Diligent pursuit of a rare rash of shark attacks and in getting firsthand accounts from a tourist’s rescuers.”

Health Reporting

First Place – “The Doctor Is Out, June 2013,” David Thompson, Honolulu Magazine

Comments: “A comprehensive and highly readable story about an issue with high public impact. The author explains well the reasons for critical doctor shortages, potential solutions and programs in play.”

Finalists

“Dis Enabled,” Rylan Suehisa, Hawaii Business

“Transformation at Rehab Hospital,” Stacy Yuen, Hawaii Business

Sports Reporting

First Place – “Go Bows–Will We Ever Win Again? September 2013,” David Thompson, Lance Tominaga, Dave Choo – Honolulu Magazine

Comments: “This was a great read, a thorough look at the athletic director’s efforts to improve a struggling program. The example of the replacement of the light bulbs was classic.”

Finalists

“Camacho conquers Kaiwi Channel,” J.R. De Groote, West Hawaii Today

Comments: Hats off to the writer for an in-depth look at the swimmer’s accomplishment — especially after very painful jellyfish stings.

“Farmers facing shortfall,” Robert Collias, Maui News

Comments: “The school sports teams on these islands face unique travel problems, and the writer did a great job telling us about them. ”

Arts/Entertainment Writing

First Place – “Na Kumu,” Maureen O’Connell, HAWAI‘I Magazine

Comments: “Wonderful work, fine tributes to artisans who deserve the media coverage. Great photos too. Elegant piece!”

Finalists

“Hula Lives: Fifty Years of Renaissance and Revival through the Merrie Monarch Festival,” Jade Eckardt, Ke‘opulaulani Reelitz – Mana Magazine

Comments: “Page design and photos strengthen this submission, which starts with solid writing.”

“The Extra, May 2013,” David Thompson, Honolulu Magazine

Comments: “Very nice story about one man’s dreams and his willingness to wait for his big break.”

Editorial Opinion

First Place – “After tough start, Rosenthal enters golden chapter of his life,” Walter Chihara, Lahaina News

Comments: “A simple but compelling account, plainly and powerfully expressed.”

Finalist

“History Repeated,” Ke‘oplaulani Reelitz, Mana Magazine

Editorial Cartoon/Illustration

First Place – “Favorite Perks,” Jon Murakami, Hawaii Business

Comments: “An amusing presentation that enlivens a familiar business ranking. Lots of content in a compact space.”

Finalists

“He Mana Ko Ka Leo,” Jessica Kamaka‘aina Siepp, Mana Magazine

Comments: “Haunting and well executed, complemented by clever page layout.”

“I Feel So Much Safer Now,” John Pritchett, Civil Beat

Informational Graphic

First Place – “Quality of Life”,” Kristin Lipman, Hawaii Business

Comments: “Pie charts, bar graphs, graphic tid-bits and color visuals that impart a lot of information.Graphics blend with the stories nicely to complete incredibly comprehensive package.”

Finalists

“Balancing Act,” Jen Tadaki Catanzariti, Hawaii Business

Comments: “Clean way to present a lot of info in an easy-to-digest fashion.”

“The Poop Scoop: What happens after you flush,” Vincent Meadows, Molokai Dispatch

Comments: “Colorful ‘Flow’ chart tells the story visually.”

News Photography/Videography

First Place – “Heavy rains ran like rivers,” Matthew Thayer, Maui News

Comments: “Life and death in the balance. It doesn’t get more newsworthy than this well-composed, dramatic photograph.”

Finalists

“10 years in fatal crash,” John Burnett, Hawaii Tribune-Herald

Comments: “Human tragedy and remorse compel viewers to lock onto this excellent photograph of a sentencing and to read the story behind it.”

“Same Sex Marriage Special Session – Jubilation,” PF Bentley, Civil Beat

Comments: “Foreground and background merge into one powerful photograph capturing one powerful issue in the news.”

Feature Photography/Videography

First Place – “One Last Look: Volcano,” Grant Kaye, HAWAI‘I Magazine

Comments: “Everything works in this photo of the continuing creation of the Earth: beauty, disfigurement, power, light and dark, detail, shape, form, tones, and ultimately, transformation.”

Finalists

“Hawaiian Language Immersion Program – Student with Book,” PF Bentley, Civil Beat

Comments: “The composition and great use of depth of field bring this simple photo into powerful three-dimensional life and visual immersion.”

“Fleetwood And Company,” Matthew Thayer, Maui News

Comments: “Lighting, composition, mood, depth of field and low noise make this a concert photo deserving of special recognition.”

Sports Photography/Videography

First Place – “Va’a Va’a Va’a Voom!” Kunio Hayashi, Sonny Ganaden, Elyse Butler, Leigh Morrison, Samuel Lee, Hana Hou!

Comments: “A striking composition with all the elements of a first-rate sports photo: action, people, dramatic lighting and rich warm tones.”

Finalists

“Lawai‘a,” Sterling Kaya, Mana Magazine

Comments: “A compelling photo in terms of angle, composition, tones and detail.”

“Safe Under The Tag,” Matthew Thayer        , Maui News

Comments: “Exactly what a good baseball photo should be: dramatic and human.”

Photo/Video Essay

First Place – “Women of the Water,” Johann Meya, Janelle Kalawe, Mary Alice Ka‘iulani Milham – Mana Magazine

Comments: “A great story told exceptionally well in high quality, compelling images.”

Finalists

“Hele on to Hamakua,” David Croxford, HAWAI’I Magazine

Comments: “A large variety of excellent images tell the story of an entire region.”

“Hooverball hits Hawaii,” Christine Cabalo, Hawaii Marine

Comments: “The slides deftly edited into a video and the accompanying narration bring visual life and interest to an unusual but entertaining topic.”

Headlines

First Place – “Va’a Va’a Va’a Voom!” Kunio Hayashi, Sonny Ganaden, Elyse Butler, Leigh Morrison, Samuel Lee—Hana Hou!

Comments: “Excellent play on Va’a, canoe, and the topic: Speed.”

Finalists

“I Want Candy”/“The Daytrippers”/“Get Baked”/“Big Shrimpin”/“Dry Idea,” Derek Paiva, HAWAI’I Magazine

Comments: “The Daytrippers”: Perfect headline for a travel story written for locals and visitors with only hours to spare.”

“Prime Example; A Spoonful of Noni; Lost in Translation; Morning Board Meeting; Hawaiian Enough,” Ke‘opulaulani Reelitz, Janelle Kalawe, Malia Ka‘aihue, Mana Magazine

Comments: “ ‘Lost in Translation’: Captures the controversy over a language immersion program, the goals behind testing, and the students themselves.”

Best Reporting Using Social Media

First Place – “Lucky We Live Hawaii: What Hawaii Can Teach Us About Seizing The Day,” Chloe Fox, HuffPost Hawaii

Comments: “Enjoyable way to cover the beauty of Hawaii, though I was left wondering: why only six photos?”

Special Section

First Place – “Quality of Life,” Steve Petranik, Stacy Yuen, Beverly Creamer, Kristin Lipman—Hawaii Business

Comments: “Stunning use of graphics, photos and well reported stories to create an outstanding public service package.”

Finalists

“Merrie Monarch Festival 50th anniversary,” Staff, Hawaii Tribune-Herald

Comments: “Wow. This package is very well designed and obviously comprehensive. While outsiders might not fully understand, they would after reading this special section. It’s the ‘spirit and the culture of the Hawaiian people.’”

“Accountable for Results,” Dennis Hollier, Stacy Yuen, Beverly Creamer—Hawaii Business

Comments: “The writing is descriptive: ‘bloated, inefficient and sometimes corrupt …’ Incredibly comprehensive report. Well-researched and clearly written.”

Investigative Reporting

First Place – “Living Hawaii: Why Is the Price of Paradise So High?” Kery Murakami, Nathan Eagle, Adrienne LaFrance— Civil Beat

Comments: “Amazing series. Good mix of facts, history/context and storytelling. Bonus points for the bar charts on the first story as a way of presenting big data points in a digestible format.”

Finalists

“State Hospital Investigation,” Keoki Kerr, Hawaii News Now

Comments: “Fine journalism!”

“GMO Hawaii: A war is waging in the islands,” Tom Callis, Hawaii Tribune-Herald

Comments: “Wide-ranging stories give a very good overview of GMO in the state, with perspective from both sides.”

Public Service Reporting

First Place – “In the Name of the Law,” Nick Grube, Patti Epler—Civil Beat

Comments: “A clear winner in a very competitive category. The depth and breadth of this series was impressive … an extraordinary and chilling investigation into law enforcement misconduct and its ability to operate beyond public scrutiny.”

Finalists

“GMOs and the Hawaiian Community,” Britt Yap, Ke‘opulaulani Reelitz—Mana Magazine

“Hawaiian Education in the DOE,” Kathryn Wagner, Alyssa Navares, Mary Alice Ka‘iulani Milham, Ke‘opulaulani Reelitz, Janelle Kalawe—Mana Magazine

DAILY NEWSPAPERS

Spot News Reporting

First Place – “10 years in fatal crash,” John Burnett, Hawaii Tribune-Herald

Comments: “Compelling narrative spot reporting of a painful sentencing hearing that deftly includes key elements of a tragic accident.”

Finalists

“Flossie strikes,” Eileen Chao, Melissa Tanji, Lila Fujimoto, Chris Sugidono—Maui News

Comments: “A comprehensive account of a storm and the damage it inflicted that provides nearly everything a citizen should know — all done in difficult conditions.”

“Priest-Crash kills health director,” Chris Sugidono, Maui News

Comments: “Excellent spot reporting on deadline that overcame logistical challenges while taking care to insist that the health director’s death had yet to be completely confirmed.”

General News/Enterprise Reporting

First Place – “Pop Warner embezzlement,” John Burnett, Hawaii Tribune-Herald

Finalists

“Food thrown out,”    Nancy Cook Lauer, West Hawaii Today

“Isle mortgage broker facing court hearing on bankruptcy,” Melissa Tanji, Nanea Kalani—Maui News

Feature Writing/Short Form

First Place – “Making it official,”    Colin Stewart, Hawaii Tribune-Herald

Comments: “Well written story on an issue of high interest.”

Finalists

“Fixing pools gone amuck,” Carolyn Lucas-Zenk, West Hawaii Today

Comments: “Story brings light to an environmental issue in a community in a compelling manner.”

“Ocean swim part of an active life,” Rich Van Scoy, Maui News

Comments: “Good human interest story on changing senior adult lifestyles.”

Feature Writing/Long Form

First Place – “’I was supposed to die’” Lila Fujimoto, Maui News

Finalist

“15 years later, man’s slaying still unsolved,” Brian Perry, Maui News

Feature Page Design

First Place – “Got rocks?” Brenda Jensen, West Hawaii Today

Finalists

“Google: Peering into social mindset,”           Nathan Christophel     , Hawaii Tribune-Herald

“GMO Hawaii: A war is waging in the islands,” Meg Scarbrough, Hawaii Tribune-Herald

INTERNET

Online News Reporting

First Place – “Diane Lee’s Reporting on the Same-Sex-Marriage Special Session,” Diane Lee, Honolulu Magazine

Comments: “I like the presentation as a package, sort of a non-linear way to tell the story. I wish the layout on the landing page had better use of headline font sizes so they’d stand out more. And in the “”man on the street”” interviews, I wish they could have been done in video instead of text, just to underscore this is online journalism. But those are quibbles. Great job done in a different way, on a big news story.”

Finalists

“Fo Teach Pidgin o Not Fo Teach Pidgin ? Das Da Question,” Alia Wong, Civil Beat

Comments: “Fascinating topic, though for an outsider, a little long of a package to absorb. But fascinating… and important. Also like the video support materials with the reporter’s voiceover, too.”

“Learning Hilo,” Alia Wong, PF Bentley—Civil Beat

Comments: “Nice writing, strong individual stories.”

Online Feature Reporting

First Place – “Waikiki’s Venetian Nightmare: Natural Disasters in Paradise?” Sophie Cocke, Civil Beat

Comments: “Like her Ala Wai Canal package, this is written with crisp prose, solid reporting and obvious depth of knowledge of the topic. She owns this beat. ”

Finalists

“Making Waves: Tommy Russo Is ‘Fighting for Change’ on Maui,” Nathan Eagle, Civil Beat

Comments: “Always good to read about a butt-kicking journalist who loves his community.”

“Bones in Purgatory: 660 Skeletal Remains Languish in Church Basement,” Sophie Cocke, Civil Beat

Comments: “Compelling story. Only nit is wish there could have been a photo of the bones in the basement, though I can guess the church turned it down.”

Category comments: “Some fine work! Sort of wish Civil Beat wasn’t so dominant, but the quality is there….”

Best Multimedia Presentation

First Place – “Ala Wai Canal: Hawaii’s Biggest Mistake?” Sophie Cocke, Joe Rubin, PF Bentley—Civil Beat

Comments: “Wow, comprehensive and incredibly well-done. Tackles a difficult, dense subject in digestible chunks and organizes the issues well. Also like that you’re including links to ‘Ongoing Coverage.’”

Finalist

“In the Name of the Law,” Staff, Civil Beat

Comments: “Solid reporting, interesting look at how law enforcement is working (or not working). Wish there were more ways to incorporate video, but the infographic is good, and the searchable database is very nice to have.”

Best Overall News Site

First Place – Honolulu Civil Beat, Staff, Civil Beat

Comments: “It’s hard to deny CB. Such great deep reporting nicely presented…”

Finalists

“HuffPost Hawaii” Chloe Fox, Gabriela Aoun, Carla Herreria—HuffPost Hawaii

Comments: General Interest Site. Good reporting though w/o bylines these read a bit anonymous…

“All Hawaii News – Top Hawaii government and political news from all the islands,” Nancy Cook Lauer, All Hawaii News

Best 1-Person Online News Site/1-Person News Blog

“All Hawaii News- Top Hawaii government and political news from all the islands,” Nancy Cook Lauer , All Hawaii News

Comments: “This site glows with the passion of its creator. The writing isn’t elegant, it’s straight-on journalism and unvarnished commentary, and it’s alive with the moment and depth of knowledge and love for the state. Awesome, and an example of one future for journalism.”

Best 1-Person Online Features Site/1-Person Features Blog

First Place – “Martin Luther King, Jr. Wearing a Lei in Selma, Alabama (and Other Blogs),” Ray Tsuchiyama, Pacific Visions and Memories

Comments: “Very strong, evocative writing steeped in history. As a reader, I get drawn in and taken to the past in each piece submitted. One nit is not a criticism of the writer, but of the site that publishes him: The photos are dreadfully presented. And in the case of “”Hawaiian Eye,”” someone — if not the writer, then a producer or even an editor at the paper, should have embedded the TV show’s theme, which is easily available on YouTube.”

Finalists

“Sugar + Shake: Sweets, Savories, Sips & More,” Dawn Sakamoto Paiva, Sugar + Shake

Comments: “Nice, very good foodie blog with a strong local base.”

“Social Encore,” Jermel-Lynn Quillopo, www.honolulupulse.com

Comments: “Her writing can be a little rough, but her passion and love for her home state is obvious. Like the photos too.”

MAGAZINES

Business Reporting

First Place – “Twins?” Dennis Hollier, Hawaii Business

Comments: “This crammed an easy-to-understand semester’s worth of information about how banks invest and make money into one story. Comparing the practices of these two banks was a public service.”

Finalists

“Million Dollar Microbes,” Dennis Hollier, Hawaii Business

Comments: “A terrific examination and clear explanation of how much a research center can mean to a college or university. Plus, the story provided many meaningful examples of how this all works.”

“Parking In Paradise,” Michael Keany, Matt Kain—Honolulu Magazine

Comments: “My kingdom for a parking space … a well-done examination of what’s behind the high prices and aggravation, plus interesting side notes, such as the Hall of Shame. ”

Category comments: “This was a tough category to judge. All six entries stood out: interesting topics, strong research and most of all, these subjects affect readers.”

Industry or Trade Reporting

First Place – “The Everything Guide to Ahi,” Martha Cheng, Mari Taketa, Tiffany Hill, Katrina Valcourt—Honolulu Magazine

Comments: “A lively, detailed, colorful biography of an iconic fish, bolstered by dazzling art and design. The best of a highly competitive category.”

Finalists

“Biofuel Industry on the Big Island,” Patricia Tummons, Environment Hawai’i

Comments: “Tales about things going wrong are hard to tell, but can be compelling when relayed with as much intelligence and detail as this entry.”

“GMOs and the Hawaiian Community,” Britt Yap, Mana Magazine

Comments: “An insightful examination of an important issue.”

Profile

First Place – “Flight Instructor,” Kunio Hayashi, Sonny Ganaden, Greg Vaughn, Leigh Morrison, Samuel Lee–Hana Hou!

Comments: “Great writing, pictures and layout! Love it!”

Finalists

“The Fighter,” Kunio Hayashi, Aaron Kandell, Dana Edmunds, Leigh Morrison, Samuel Lee—Hana Hou!

Comments: “Tightly written. Very nice package.”

“Can Ben Jay Save UH Sports?” David Thompson, Honolulu Magazine

Comments: “Very strong package. It was hard to choose between this and the other winners.”

Category comments: “Very impressive entries in this category. I’d like to give an honorable mention to CEO of the Year: Stanley Kuriyama. Lots of hard work went into that piece”

Feature Writing/Short Form

First Place – “Ode to Red Cinder Road,” Derek Paiva, HAWAI‘I Magazine

Finalists

“Into The Black,” Kunio Hayashi, Hunter Haskins, Leigh Morrison, Samuel Lee—Hana Hou!

“Field Notes: God Wants You to Be a Millionaire,” David Thompson, Honolulu Magazine

Feature Writing/Long Form

First Place – “From Souvenirs to Saks: The Rise, Fall and Rebirth of the International Marketplace,” David Thompson, Honolulu Magazine

Comments: “Comprehensive, well researched, interesting sources and well written. A worthy tribute an icon of the past.”

Finalists

“Go Fish!” Kunio Hayashi, Michael Shapiro, Monte Costa, Leigh Morrison, Samuel Lee—Hana Hou!

Comments: “Intriguing slice of life in a remote and romantic place with unusual characters well described. Conveys sense of place and lostness.”

“Georgia & Ansel in Hawai‘i” Maureen O’Connell, HAWAI’I Magazine

Comments: “Elegant story benefits from tight focus and generous display of artwork, deep research, as well as local connection.”

Page Design

First Place – “75 Places to Eat Like A Local,” Cody Kawamoto, HAWAI‘I Magazine

Comments: “Clean, professional, clear. Something I’d want to keep on hand for reference. Nice use of complementary fonts and colors.”

Finalists

“Eddie Went,” Janelle Kalawe, Mana Magazine

Comments: “Very clever design. Good mix of design elements yet the package maintains a cohesive feel.”

“Boom!” Mary Pigao, Hawaii Business

Comments: “Layout really grabs the reader’s attention. Nice use of white space.”

Category comments: “Some excellent entries in this category.”

Magazine Cover

First Place – “HONOLULU Magazine, April 2013,” Erik Ries, Honolulu Magazine

Finalists

“Kaho‘olawe: Kanaloa Rising” Janelle Kalawe, Olivier Koning, Ke‘opulaulani Reelitz—Mana Magazine

“Huakai: Fall 2013” Cody Kawamoto, HAWAI’I Magazine

NEWSPAPERS

Business Reporting

First Place – “Isle mortgage broker facing court hearing on bankruptcy,” Nanea Kalani, Melissa Tanji—Maui News

Comments: “Nanea Kalani does a service by shedding light on the shady dealings of mortgage brokers.”

Finalists

“Out of its shell,” Colin Stewart, Hawaii Tribune-Herald

Comments: “A clearly-told look at a budding industry.”

“Kona Village laying off last workers,” Erin Miller, West Hawaii Today

News Page Design

First Place – “Design: Snow and Ironman preview,” Joseph Mountain, West Hawaii Today

Comments: “Nice use of photo with banner. Good headline with color splash ‘m’ in middle.”

Finalists

“Ka Molokai Makahiki 2013,” Laura Pilz, Molokai Dispatch

Comments: “Colorful page with a lot going on, but not too busy to confuse reader. Liked the text flow on top of photo cutout.”

“GMO Hawaii: A war is waging in the islands,” Meg Scarbrough, Hawaii Tribune-Herald

Comments: “Good blend of stories graphics and pictures. Layout pretty conventional, but effective.”

NONDAILY NEWSPAPERS

General News/Enterprise Reporting

First Place – “Energy on Molokai,” Catherine Cluett, Molokai Dispatch

Comments: “Nice job balancing the different perspectives on this story. Lots of potential impact on the local community.”

Finalist

“K-Bay Marine linguist named best in DoD,” Christine Cabalo, Hawaii Marine

Comments: “Many people may not know about this award; it is good to let locals know one of their own received it.”

Feature Writing

First Place -“K-Bay Marines reap benefits from acupuncture in pinpoint solution,” Christine Cabalo, Hawaii Marine

Comments: “Intriguing story on use of alternative medicine for soldiers.”

Finalist

“Island Legend: Paniolo Jimmy Duvauchelle,” Catherine Cluett, Molokai Dispatch

Community Reporting

First Place – “Does the state’s new $7 million seawall at Ukumehame work?” Louise Rockett, Lahaina News

Comments: “A terrific investigation into whether an expensive highway project is really working, or whether it’s creating a potential public safety hazard. Good local color and anecdotes.”

Finalists

“The Poop Scoop: What happens after you flush,” Jessica Ahles, Molokai Dispatch

“Ready to launch: Marine aids Kalaheo High School robotics team,” Christine Cabalo, Hawaii Marine

RADIO

General News/Enterprise Reporting

First Place – “’Linsanity’ Details Rise of Asian-American Basketball Star,”          Heidi Chang, Faith Lapidus— Voice of America

Comments: “An important story about the challenges Jeremy Lin has faced, told in a very conversational way.

Finalist

“Special Legislative Session (Marriage Equality)” Wayne Yoshioka, Hawaii Public Radio

Feature Reporting

First Place -“Plugged In on the Streets,” Molly Solomon, Hawaii Public Radio

Comments: “Compelling exploration of homelessness from a unique perspective.”

Finalists

“Growing a New Crop of Young Farmers,” Molly Solomon, Hawaii Public Radio

Comments: “Insightful exploration of evolution in agriculture.”

“’If It Swings’: An Asian-American Jazzman’s Pioneering Career,” Heidi Chang, National Public Radio

Comments: “Well-written story on intercultural jazz movement.”

Student

Student News Reporting in Any Media

First Place – “My Wish is to Create a Business,” Ashley Shaffer, Hawaii Business

Comments: “Strong, nice presentation too.”

Finalist

“Yelp Me,” Ashley Shaffer, Hawaii Business

Comments: “Pretty interesting story on a topic that young people would be interested in.”

Student Feature Reporting in Any Media

First Place – “How I Learned to Love to Weed,” Ava Rose Prince, Environment Hawai‘i

Comments: “Wow, a high school student! Very impressive…”

Finalists

“Startup in a Cup,” Ashley Shaffer, Hawaii Business

Comments: “Cool story, nice writing and layout.”

“Boom!” Ashley Shaffer , Hawaii Business

Comments: “Solid look at the gun issue in Hawai’i. Good photos too.”

TELEVISION

Government Reporting

First Place – “PRISON GUARD SICK DAYS”   Keoki Kerr, Darin Akita—Hawaii News Now

Comments: “An astonishing analysis of the high percentage — nearly 50% — of prison guards calling in sick on Super Bowl Sunday, during March madness and a parade day for a local football player. Great explanation of the impact on coworkers and why it’s so easy to call in sick.”

Finalist

“Empty City Parking Garage,” Keoki Kerr, Hawaii News Now

Business Reporting

First Place – “Business booming on Lanai with new billionaire owner,” Keoki Kerr, George Hurd, Mahealani Kahoano—Hawaii News Now

Comments: “A fine report on the changes that are coming to the traditionally closed, remote island of Lanai.”

Finalist

“HE>I” Marisa Yamane, Travis Nishida—KHON2

General News/Enterprise Reporting

First Place – “Empty New City Parking Garage,” Keoki Kerr, Hawaii News Now

Comments: “This story, about a new parking garage sitting nearly empty while city workers scramble for parking elsewhere, is perfect for television. Very nicely done.”

Feature Reporting

First Place – “Hawaii’s only elevator operator hopes to lift the spirit of others,” Olena Heu, KHON2

Comments: “Interesting human interest feature with vintage slant.”

Finalists

“Modern Cowboys,” Diane Ako, Tracy Arakaki—smalltalk.staradvertiserblogs.com

Comments: “Clever exploration of changing culture.”

“What a catch! Man reels in 759 lb. marlin off Kewalo Basin” Kristine Uyeno, KHON2

Comments: “Creative story on catching the big one.”

Spot News Reporting

First Place – “Haleiwa Fire,” Marisa Yamane, Taires Hiranaka, KHON2

Comments: “Vivid coverage of a wildfire threatening homes, seen through the eyes of worried residents. ”

Finalist

“Palolo Hikers Rescued,” Marisa Yamane, Taires Hiranaka—KHON2

Investigative Reporting

First Place – “State Hospital Investigation,” Keoki Kerr, Darin Akita, Mahealani Kahoano—Hawaii News Now

Comments: “This really is a terrific report.(Previous comments on the series from the other category.)”

Finalists

“Growing tab for UH head-hunts amid budget crunch,” Gina Mangieri, Greg Lau—KHON2

Comments: “Good story. A visual approach might be helpful — even a chart that shows actual revenue numbers instead of just saying the amounts swing wildly.”

“Careless disposal puts personal info at risk,” Gina Mangieri, Greg Lau—KHON2

Comments: “Good deeper research showing the cost of a variety of personnel searches at UH.”

Videography

First Place – “Modern Cowboys,” Tracy Arakaki, Diane Ako—smalltalk.staradvertiserblogs.com

Comments: “Strong, lively video work and narration, good storytelling. This story works better as a video package than text with stills.”

Series Reporting/Documentary/Special News

First Place -“Hokule’a: Her Farthest Journey,” Kathy Muneno, KHON2

Finalist

“Mysterious urn found on the beach,” Reid Shimizu, Tammy Mori, Ron Mizutani, KHON2

THANK YOU TO THE JUDGES OF THE TOP OF THE ROCKIES CONTEST. YOU HELPED MAKE THIS CONTEST POSSIBLE.

Board members:

  • Dave Briscoe
  • Teresa Dawson
  • Nancy Cook Lauer
  • Christy Strobel

Honolulu Star-Advertiser

  • Richard Borreca
  • Nanea Kalani
  • Stirling Morita
  • Curtis Murayama
  • Mary Poole
  • Dave Shapiro
  • Christie Wilson
  • Alan Yonan
  • Lucy Young-Oda

PacificBasin Communications

  • Jen Tadako Catanzariti
  • Dennis Hollier
  • Kristin Lipman
  • Lennie Omalza
  • Steve Petranik
  • Christi Young

UH Hilo College of Hawaiian Language Announces Dean’s List Spring 2014

UH Hilo Moniker

Ke kūkala aku nei ko Ke Kulanui o Hawaiʻi ma Hilo Ka Haka Ula O Keelikōlani i nā inoa o nā haumāna kaha oi no ke kau Kupulau 2014 (<a href="http://hilo.hawaii.edu">University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo</a> Ka HakaUla O Ke`elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language announces its Dean’s List for the Spring 2014 semester):

Jai Ho Choi, Samuel Clubb, Dillon Dominguez, Brandi Dugo, Shari Frias, Philip Gamiao, Alexander Guerrero, Kayla Ing, Linda Ixtupe, Erika Jardin, Kamalani Johnson, Tiphani Kainoa, Kamaleiku`uipo Kalehuawehe-Valentine, Micah Kealaiki, Jacqueline Kinge, Maile Kipapa, Gail Klevens, Dylon Koehn, Ciera Lamb, Hannah Lockwood, Daniel McDonald, Candice Miner-Ching, Lilia Misheva, Samantha Pa, Christopher Ramos, Kapuaonaona Roback, Koa Rodrigues, Ronald Santos, Nelli Semenko, You Jin Shin, Eric Taaca, Gabriel Tebow, Lindsay Terkelsen, Randall Yamaoka, and Cheyne Yonemori.