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UH Hilo Students to Participate in Conservation Congress Gathering

Four cohorts of students from the Kūʻula Integrated Science class in the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Marine Science program have been invited by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Marine Program to open the Marine World Heritage Reception on September 5. The reception is part of the Internal Union of Conservation of Nature World Conservation Congress (IUCN WCC) that will be held in Honolulu September 1-10.

UH Hilo Moniker

The Kūʻula students will present a chant and hula describing human relationships with the ocean and coral reefs. One of these chants, Uku ʻĀkoʻakoʻa, was composed specifically for Kūʻula by Dr. Taupōuri Tangarō, the director of Hawaiian Culture and Protocols Engagement for UH Hilo and Hawaiʻi Community College through the Uluākea Program. The students presented the same chant and hula to open the International Coral Reef Symposium in Honolulu attended by 2,500 people in July.

Kū’ula students integrate western and Native Hawaiian scientific knowledge and research methodologies to understand the environment of Hawai’i. Their research has enabled them to establish personal and meaningful connections to the places they study, which have included Midway Atoll and Ha’ena, Kaua’i. Most Kū’ula graduates have gone on to graduate schools or to jobs in natural resource management and education.

“This is a significant achievement for our students majoring in natural sciences, Hawaiian Studies, and social sciences, who worked together through the Kūʻula class experience,” said Dr. Misaki Takabayashi, professor, marine science. “The recognition they are receiving is well-deserved.”

For more information about Kūʻula, contact Takabayashi at 932-7095 or email
misakita@hawaii.edu.

134 Kids Participate in HI-PAL Basketball Tournament

A total of 134 youths from 15 teams participated in the HI-PAL “Click It or Ticket” Back 2 School Bash basketball tournament this past weekend at Papaʻikou Gym.

In the 10-and-Under division finals, Kohala’s NSP defeated Fly Girls 21-14 to claim the title. Layden Kauka led NSP with 7 points. Maela Honma tallied 9 points for Fly Girls

NSP

NSP

Members of the champion NSP squad included Landon and Layden Kauka, Isaac Salvador, Tiras Perez, Kayzen Ittner, Jayden Hook and Isaiah Omalley.

In the third place contest, Warriors out-gunned Keaʻau Chargers 20-14. Javan Ferry led the Warriors with 8 points. Kiai Yasso scored 7 points for the Chargers.

In the 8-and-Under division, Warriors defeated B-Elite 18-2, avenging a 26-22 loss in pool play. Kawohi Huihui and Zoe Silva each tallied 6 for the champions.

Warriors

Warriors

Members of the champion Warriors included Huihui and Silva, Hayzen Ferry, Kai Kahana-Rowe, Kaiea Peterson, Keinan Mattos, Micah Chung, Rayden Handy and Waimalu Kahana-Machida.

Keaʻau Chargers finished third.

“Click It or Ticket” is a national education and enforcement campaign to increase seat belt usage and decrease traffic fatalities and injuries. The Hawaiʻi Police Department encourages all youth, teens and adults to use their seat belts.

McDonalds of Hawaii Offering Free Coffee on Tuesdays for Teachers During “Teacher Appreciation Month”

McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii honors teachers during “Teacher Appreciation Month” with a free medium cup of hot or iced McCafe Royal Kona Blend every Tuesdays during the month of September at all participating McDonald’s restaurants in Hawaii.
McCafe

DETAILS:

McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii wants to thank teachers for all they do for our keiki.                       

Details are as follows:

  • No purchase necessary
  • Teachers must present their valid 2016 school ID upon ordering
  • Limit one free cup of coffee per person, per visit
  • Offer dates: September 6, September 13, September 20 and September 27
  • Offer times:  Entire day

Real-Life CSI Coming to Kona

The College of Continuing Education and Community Service (CCECS) at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo is offering a class on Introduction to Forensics: Real-Life CSI in Kailua-Kona.

CSI

Classes will be held at Kealakehe Intermediate School (Room TBA) on Tuesdays from 5 – 7 p.m., September 13 to November 22, with no session on November 8. Tuition is $150. The textbook Criminalistics: An Introduction to Forensic Science, 8th edition by Richard Saferstein is required.

This non-credit class will introduce participants to the field of forensic science. Evidence collected at a crime scene can often tell the story of a criminal act if properly interpreted. Detection and analysis of DNA traces, fiber, hair, body fluids, fingerprints, footprints, toxic substances and illegal drugs are fundamental to the forensic scientist’s craft.

The instructor is Dr. Kristal Uhl-Blacksmith, an environmental engineering consultant and former mortician, who has taught biology, anatomy and forensics.

For more information and to register, contact CCECS at 932-7830 or visit http://hilo.hawaii.edu/ccecs/.

That “KMT” Sticker on the Back of University of Hawaii Football Team Helmets

The University of Hawaii Football team will be taking on the California Bears tomorrow in a game that will be played overseas in Australia.

The team will have a special sticker on the back of the helmet that will be worn the entire the season:

Photo via Na Koa Football Club

Photo via Na Koa Football Club

The photo honors the late K. Mark Takai, US House of Representative, UH alum and Letterwinner.

HI-PAL Click It or Ticket Endless Summer Statewide Invitational Basketball Classic Results

A total of 122 youths from 13 teams, included four teams from Oahu and Maui, participated in the HI-PAL Click It or Ticket Endless Summer Statewide Invitational Basketball Classic this past weekend at Waiākea-Uka Gym.

In the Varsity Girls division finals, Maui Sparks edged Wahine Ryders 41-39 in overtime, with Mikayla Tablit hitting the game winning three-pointer in the waning seconds of the game. Tablit led the Sparks with 21 points. Mandy Kawaha topped the Ryders with 19.

Maui Sparks

Maui Sparks

Members of the champion Maui Sparks squad included Tablit, Nel Mae Bumanglag, Kaylee and Kyra Cambra, Kamaile Cugal, Jordyn Mantz, Honeylet Padasadao, Ashley Taylor Peralta, Kealia Sjostrand, Mikiala Sniffen and Tanniya Uchida.

In the third-place contest, Waiākea defeated Keaʻau 43-15. Madison Hwang tallied 10 for Waiākea.

In the Girls Rising Stars finals, Kona Stingrays withstood a furious comeback from Hoop Dreams to claim the championship 26-25. Gracie Hing scored 11 points for the Stingrays and Keani Midel had 10 for Hoop Dreams.

Kona Stingrays

Kona Stingrays

Members of the champion Stingrays included Hing, Kassie and Lanie Alapai, Kiera Ambrosia, Tayvia Cabatbat, Dallas Carlos, Rebekah Fong, Peyton Healeamau, Gabryela Kaipo, Iolani Kamakau, Caiyle Kaupu and Juliana Losalio.

In the third-place contest, Honokaʻa outscored Maui Sparks 26-15. Kaliana Salazar-Harrell led Honokaʻa with 14 points.

In the boys Rising Stars division, Hoop Dreams out-gunned St. Joseph 62-32 to claim the title. Keawe Silva scored 18 points, Kobe Kahele added 16 and Kiaʻi Apele tallied 11 for the champions. Stan Mawry led the runners-up with 10 points.

Hoop Dreams

Hoop Dreams

Members of the champion Hoop Dreams included Silva, Kahele, Apele, Kaukahi Alameda, Macmillan Aloisio, Isaiah Cordero, Chance Simeona, and Kaupena Yasso.

In the third-place contest, Hawaiʻi Storm ran past PGU 42-7. Enzo Mazzulli scored 10 for the Storm.

“Click It or Ticket” is a national education and enforcement campaign to increase seat belt usage and decrease traffic fatalities and injuries. The Hawaii Police Department encourages all youth, teens and adults to use their seat belts.

Hawaii’s Public High School Graduates Improve in ACT College Preparedness Test Scores

A national report released Tuesday shows an increase in Hawaii public schools’ Class of 2016 graduates meeting college readiness benchmarks. ACT, a research-based non-profit organization, issued The Condition of College and Career Readiness 2016 report, which includes information on students taking the ACT test in every state, including Hawaii.

2016 act

Hawaii’s Class of 2016 public high school graduates meeting ACT’s college readiness benchmarks saw these year-over-year changes:

  • A 2 percentage point improvement in Mathematics
  • A 1 percentage point improvement in English and Science
  • Unchanged Reading scores

Approximately 10,525 Hawaii public school graduates in the Class of 2016 took the ACT college preparedness test as juniors. All of Hawaii’s public school juniors now take the ACT test as part of a range of recent transformational efforts to increase students’ college and career readiness. Learn more about these efforts in an Expectation of College . These efforts have produced strong increases in college enrollment, enrollment in early college programs at the high school level, as well as significant declines in college-level remediation in English and Mathematics.

The ACT results provide students information about their readiness for postsecondary education, a score that they can use for college admissions and placement, and information about how to better prepare for postsecondary education during their senior years. The ACT includes a student survey to gauge their plans for life after high school.

“Eighty percent of 2016 graduates who took the ACT test indicated their desire to earn a two- or four-year college degree, and we are encouraged by steady gains in our students’ college preparation and enrollment,” said Kathryn Matayoshi, HIDOE Superintendent.  “However, we recognize the need for more of our students to be ready for the rigors of work and study after high school.”

Over the past three years, Hawaii public school students have seen steady improvements in the individually tested ACT subjects:

  • 4 percentage points up in English
  • 3 percentage points up each in Mathematics, Reading and Science

While Hawaii’s scores have been rising, ACT scores nationwide have shown declines and fluctuating results. Also, not all states administer the ACT to all juniors.

Improvements in the recent ACT scores are a promising reflection of college readiness in Hawaii’s public high school graduates. The ACT is one of only two readiness examinations used for U.S. college and university admissions and was taken by approximately 2.09 million 2016 graduates nationwide.

Click here to view The Condition of College and Career Readiness 2016 report.

 

Jennifer Greenwell Earns Licensed Q Grader Certification

Greenwell Farms knows that keeping the quality of Kona’s world famous coffee is important to ensure its sustainability for seasons to come. Quality assurance at Greenwell Farms has been enhanced as Jennifer Greenwell recently earned a prestigious Coffee Quality Institute’s Q Grading certification.

Earlier this summer, Jennifer Greenwell spent an intense week pursuing the prestigious and respected certification as part of a seven-person group testing under the direction of Jodi Dowell Wieser. This was the first Q Grader and Training exam in Hawaii. Greenwell had to successfully pass over 20 intense test sections on coffee related subjects, such as green grading, roast identification, coffee cupping, sensory skills and sensory triangulation.

jennifer greenwell

Prior to the exams, Greenwell prepared and for 30 + days engaged in an Olympic-type coffee cupping training with Chai Neo, the other certified Q Grader at Greenwell Farms. Greenwell had to train her taste buds to respond to the sweet, sour, and salt areas of the tongue and together, Greenwell and Neo cupped and cupped coffee samples from around the world as Greenwell grew more and more confident in her skills. Armed with heavy training, Greenwell headed to Oahu, knowing the difficult and demanding testing she would be up against.

“I’m personally so grateful to Jackie and Ray Suiter of Kona Coffee Purveyors for making the Q Grader certification possible here in Hawaii. They are really the ones that made it happen by certifying their lab, rearranging roasting schedules and getting Jody out here to Hawaii to conduct the certification,” said Jennifer Greenwell.

With this prestigious certification, Jennifer Greenwell joins an elite group of coffee industry experts. Greenwell and Chai Neo are both qualified to cup and grade coffee based on the Specialty Coffee Association of America’s standards and methods. The Q Grading Certification program was created in 2004 to train coffee professionals to better identify the scientific tasting protocols, coffee grading, coffee knowledge and develop sharp sensory skills critical in identifying the common aromatic scents found in coffee.

With two Q Graders now on the farm, Greenwell Farms has doubled the quality-based guarantee that its coffee has been strictly evaluated by coffee experts to ensure quality. These two Greenwell Farms Q-Graders will continue to contribute greatly to the Greenwell Farms quality control efforts and the goal of producing the highest quality Kona coffee possible.

“As Hawaii continues to lead the US coffee growing industry, having cupping certification opportunities is important for the industry as a whole,” stated Tom Greenwell, proud husband and Greenwell Farm President. “With every Q Grader certification, expertise in industry knowledge grows and naturally branches out into the consumer market, making coffee drinkers ultimately more aware of the importance of high quality coffee in their cup.”

Three Big Island Residents Selected for Omidyar Fellows Program

Omidyar Fellows Program is excited to announce Cohort V of the Omidyar Fellows! Please join us as we warmly welcome these 14 outstanding local executives from various sectors and islands.

Omidyar FellowsEach new Fellow will bring their own insights and experiences as they expand their leadership horizons together. Cohort V is ready to heed the call as they learn, discover, and collaborate to collectively impact the future of Hawaii.

  • Brad Bennett (Kaumana, Hawaii Island), complex area superintendent, Department of Education Hilo-Waiakea Complex Area
  • Kyle Chock (Kamuela, Hawaii Island), assistant executive secretary-treasurer, Hawaii Regional Council of Carpenters
  • Elisia Flores (Hawaii Kai, Oahu), vice president and chief financial officer, L&L Franchise, Inc.
  • Elizabeth Ignacio (Waialae Iki, Oahu), orthopedic surgeon and managing partner, IMUA Orthopedics, Sports & Health
  • Malia Kaaihue (Kaimuki, Oahu), president, DTL, a Hawaiian strategy studio
  • Nalani Fujimori Kaina (Hawaii Kai, Oahu), executive director, Legal Aid Society of Hawaii
  • Micah A. Kane (Kaneohe, Oahu), president and chief operating officer, Hawaii Community Foundation
  • Shelee Kimura (Aiea Heights, Oahu), vice president of corporate planning and business development, Hawaiian Electric Company
  • Keoni Lee (Kaimuki, Oahu), co-founder and owner, Oiwi TV
  • Richard Matsuda (Waimea, Hawaii Island), chief of operations, W. M. Keck Observatory
  • Alicia Moy (Kakaako, Oahu), president and chief executive officer, Hawaii Gas
  • Cameron Nekota (Kaimuki, Oahu), vice president, D.R. Horton Schuler Homes LLC
  • Susan Tai Kaneko (Lihue, Kauai), president and chief executive officer, Kauai Economic Development Board
  • Nicole Velasco (Lower Kalihi, Oahu), executive director, Office of Economic Development for the City & County of Honolulu

Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorder Offered

The College of Continuing Education and Community Service (CCECS) at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo is offering Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) with Dr. Stephanie Dodge.

UH Hilo MonikerClasses will be held on Tuesdays from 4:30 – 6:30 p.m., September 20 – October 18, at UH Hilo’s Sciences and Technology Building (STB) 225. Cost is $75.

The series is open to anyone who would like to learn more about ASD, including parents, caregivers, educators and practitioners. It will provide an overview of diagnosis, prevalence and etiology of ASD, as well as an introduction to interventions. Also included is information about behavioral assessments and programs, assistive technology and advocacy for services.

Dodge received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from UH Manoa. She specializes in helping young children who have problems with attention, focus, following instructions, hyperactivity, impulsivity, and disobedience. She also specializes in autism treatment and is trained to administer two gold-standard evaluation tools.

For more information and to register, contact CCECS at 932-7830 or visit http://hilo.hawaii.edu/ccecs/.

Hawaii is 2016’s Best State for Women’s Equality

With Women’s Equality Day just three days away and the U.S. in 28th position on the Global Gender Gap Index — falling eight places since 2014 — the personal-finance website WalletHub conducted an in-depth analysis of 2016’s Best & Worst States for Women’s Equality.
equalityIn order to determine the most gender-egalitarian states, WalletHub’s analysts compared the 50 states across 15 key metrics. Our data set ranges from the gap between female and male executives to the disparity between women’s and men’s unemployment rates.

Women’s Equality in Hawaii (1=Best; 25=Avg.):

  • 1st – Earnings Disparity
  • 7th – Executive Positions Disparity
  • 5th – Work Hours Disparity
  • 1st – Educational Attainment Disparity (Among Bachelor’s Degree Holders)
  • 5th – Minimum-Wage Workers Disparity
  • 1st – Unemployment Rate Disparity
  • 8th – Entrepreneurship Rate Disparity
  • 1st – Political Representation Disparity

For the full report, please visit:
https://wallethub.com/edu/best-and-worst-states-for-women-equality/5835/

Free ‘Imiloa Membership for All UH Hilo Students

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo has announced an exciting new benefit for its students. For the very first time, the University’s ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center is offering a complimentary individual membership to every student with a valid I.D. who is registered for the 2016-2017 academic year.

Free Imiloa
“Very few universities can boast an on-campus resource like the ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center, which showcases Mauna Kea and its cultural and scientific value, especially way-finding and astronomy,” said Chancellor Don Straney. “We greatly appreciate this gesture and encourage all of our students to take advantage of the benefits ‘Imiloa has to offer throughout the academic year.”

‘Imiloa is located on the upper campus, and housed in a striking titanium-clad conical structure. The Center is open to the public six days a week (Tuesday-Sunday). Student members will be able to enjoy four free daily shows in the full-dome planetarium, full access to the interactive exhibit hall, plus discounts on special events and purchases at ‘Imiloa’s award-winning Sky Garden Restaurant and on-site store.

For Astronomy majors Shelby Wood and Micah English, an ‘Imiloa membership is something they’ll make extensive use of.

“I’m from New Mexico, and have never been to ‘Imiloa, so I appreciate the opportunity to check it out,” Wood said. “I think it’s really great that they are doing this, because I have been to the planetarium and it was really cool,” English added.

Hawaiian Studies Major Kehaulani Esteban sees ‘Imiloa as a valuable resource for learning more about the Hawaiian culture.

“I’m really looking forward to the Mauna Kea show because we get to learn about how the Hawaiian Islands were created,” Esteban said.

`Imiloa Executive Director Ka’iu Kimura sees the memberships as an effective avenue for advancing ‘Imiloa’s mission to inspire exploration through the sharing of Hawaiian culture and science.

“One of the goals ‘Imiloa has set for our second decade is to take our programming across the island, the state and beyond. At the same time, however, we are committed to amplifying our impact here at home,” Kimura said. “What better way to inspire the next generation than to deepen our ties to UH Hilo and the community of students at our doorstep?”

Students can activate their free membership by visiting: http://blog.imiloahawaii.org/general-information/free-imiloa-membership-for-all-uh-hilo-students/.

Island Air Expands College Student Standby Program

As Hawai‘i college students start the new semester, they can look forward to their next interisland getaway with Island Air’s expanded College Student Standby Program. Students enrolled in Hawai‘i Pacific University (HPU), Chaminade University of Honolulu and Brigham Young University-Hawai‘i (BYUH) now have the opportunity to stand by for any Island Air interisland flight for the student-friendly price of just $45* each way.

Island Air PlaneIsland Air launched its college standby fares last October as a pilot program available to students enrolled at University of Hawai‘i (UH) schools and community colleges on O‘ahu and Maui. As Island Air added routes to Līhu‘e and Kona, the standby program was expanded to include all universities and community colleges in the UH system. The program’s popularity among UH students, along with growing requests from students at other Hawai‘i universities led Island Air to extend the standby fares to HPU, Chaminade and BYUH students.

To qualify for the College Student Standby rate, students must present a valid University of Hawai‘i, Hawai‘i Pacific University, Chaminade University or Brigham Young University-Hawai‘i student identification to a customer service agent at any Island Air ticket counter. There is no maximum number of times a student may participate in the offer.

“As an island business, we support our students who are pursuing their higher education goals, and we want to make traveling interisland more convenient and affordable for them,” said David Uchiyama, president and CEO of Island Air. “We know the importance of getting away from hitting the books for a little exploration or taking some time to visit family and friends. We hope students will take advantage of this opportunity and ‘Fly the Island Way’.”

*$45 is a standby rate, subject to seat availability and can be changed without notice.  Fare includes one (1) federal transportation segment tax and one (1) security fee.  Other taxes, fees, and restrictions may apply.

ABOUT ISLAND AIR

Island Air is the value leader in the Hawaiian Islands, offering 238 convenient flights each week between O‘ahu, Maui, Kaua‘i and Hawai‘i Island. The affordable alternative for interisland travel, Island Air’s 64-seat ATR-72 aircraft are able to provide captivating aerial views of Hawai‘i’s remarkable landscapes. Founded in 1980 as Princeville Airways, the company was renamed Island Air in 1992 and has been proudly serving the islands of Hawai‘i for more than 35 years.

For more information about Island Air or to make a reservation, visit www.islandair.com or call (800) 652-6541. Let us know how we are doing on Yelp or TripAdvisor or just stay connected by liking Island Air on Facebook at www.facebook.com/islandairhawaii, or follow @IslandAirHawaii on Twitter and @IslandAir_Hawaii on Instagram.

Golden Anniversary of Kalakaua Basketball Clinic Recognized by Senator Kim and Clinic Alumni

Before a large and appreciative crowd in the Moanalua High School Gymnasium, the man behind the renown Kalakaua Basketball Clinic today was honored for five decades of serving the community and helping thousands of students find success both on and off the court.

Photo via Senate Communication

Photo via Senate Communication

State Senator Donna Mercado Kim (Dist. 14 – Kapalama, ‘Alewa, Kalihi Valley, Ft. Shafter, Moanalua Gardens & Valley, portions of Halawa and ‘Aiea) was on hand to present a proclamation to Coach Dennis Agena and his staff in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Kalakaua Basketball Clinic during a surprise ceremony at the end of practice.

“Coach Agena is an absolutely remarkable, generous individual who deserves all the accolades being bestowed on him today,” said Sen. Kim. “How he’s given so much of his time and his own resources for the last fifty years is an inspiration to us all.  He exemplifies selflessness and strong leadership through his coaching and guidance by teaching students how to be a good athlete and even greater citizen.”

Kalakaua Basketball Camp2

Sen. Kim’s son, Micah, was a participant in the clinic as a youngster and she witnessed how the program helps build character. “I was proud to see Micah blossom not only in his basketball skills but also as a responsible young man who learned the rewards of hard work and team work,” she said.

Coach Agena is recognized as one of the most respected basketball coaches in the state and founder of the renown Kalakaua Basketball Clinic.  Thousands of students have gone through the clinic that stresses the importance of mastering fundamental basketball skills, as well as team building skills.  Equally important are the values students learn through the program that they carry with them through life: respect, commitment, dedication, and humility.

While the clinic has moved locations over the years, the program has consistently been led by Dennis Agena, who along with his wife Lani, have made it their life mission to keep kids off the streets and out of trouble. He and his staff conduct the clinic on a completely voluntary basis.  The fee for the clinic goes towards maintaining the equipment and covering the expenses for the athletes to travel for tournaments.

Some of the players who have gone through the clinic to become successful athletes at the high school,college and professional level include Derrick Low, Kyle Pape, Blaine Gaison, Cliff LaBoy,Bobby Nash, Dean Shimamoto and Kahi Villa. Also, Nani Cockett, Brandy Richardson, Teddi Pila, BJ Itoman, Iwalani Rodrigues, Tiana Fuertes, and Melanie Azama.

“I’m proud of all the kids. You develop them, you mentor them, you see them grow up, get married, they have kids and I think soon it will be my third generation of coaching these kids and I’m happy for doing that,” said Dennis Agena. As for today’s honors, Agena was humbled. “It’s not about me, it’s about the product you produce out of the program that makes Coach Agena and Coach Myles (Akamine) look good.”

UH Hilo Basketball Team Announces Six New Recruits

The 2015-16 University of Hawai’I at Hilo men’s basketball team won four of its last five games, just missing out on a post-season berth in the Pacific West Conference tournament.

Needing to replace three starters off of that squad and two other graduated players, head coach G.E. Coleman has accomplished that with the signing of six standout players. The list includes four transfers and two freshmen.

One of those transfers brings NCAA tournament experience to the Vulcan camp. 6’6″ wing Brian Ishola played two seasons at North Dakota State, including a freshman campaign that saw the Bison win the Summit League and advance to the Big Dance, falling to Gonzaga in the first round (86-76).

Brian Ishola

Brian Ishola

A junior, Ishola hails from Woodbury, Minnesota and prepped at East Ridge High School.

Coleman also landed three junior college players. Junior point guard Ryley Callaghan comes to the UHH campus from Peninsula Community College (Wash.), where he was named the Most Valuable Player of the North Division of the Northwest Athletic Conference (NWAC) after averaging 14.7 points a game and nearly three assists a contest.

Ryley Callaghan

Ryley Callaghan

The 6’1″ Port Orchard, Wash. native drilled 69 three-pointers on the season. He prepped at South Kitsap High School.

Wing Donavan Taylor is a 6’3″ starter from Chaffey CC (Calif.), where he averaged nine points and 6.5 rebounds a game.

Donavan Taylor

Donavan Taylor

Taylor played at Silverado High School in Compton, Calif.

Arnold Silva is a 6’5″ forward that played the past two seasons at Santa Rosa JC (Calif.), averaging 7.1 points and a team-best 7.2 rebounds a contest.

Arnold Silva

Arnold Silva

He came to Santa Rose from Healdsburg, Calif.

The most noticeable recruit is 6’11” freshman Onyx Boyd.

Onyx Boyd

The Virginia Beach native missed half of his senior season at Bishop Sullivan Catholic High School with an injury, but prior to that was on the radar of a number of NCAA Division I programs.

As a junior, he ranked sixth in the state of Virginia in scoring.

Rounding out the class is freshman Eric Wattree, a 6’3″ wing from South Kitsap, Wash.

Eric Wattree

Eric Wattree

Wattree, a former high school teammate of Callaghan, averaged nearly 25 points a game and three assists a contest for the Wolves. His father Eric, Sr., was a collegiate standout at Wyoming and Azusa Pacific.

“This is a great recruiting class for us,” Coleman said. “We’ve added height and talent, and I feel like we finally look like a full-fledged Division II team. That’s a start for where we need to be, because we play in what I think is the toughest D-II league in the country in the Pacific West Conference.”

The Vulcans will open the 2016-17 season on the road, taking on west region schools Simon Fraser (Nov. 11), Seattle Pacific (Nov. 12) and Saint Martin’s (Nov. 15). UHH will also play sister school and 2015-16 NCAA tournament squad UH Manoa, at the Stan Sheriff Center on Nov. 22.

Community Voices Sought for Input on Public Education Plans

Since April, the Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) and Board of Education’s (BOE) has engaged the community as it reviews its joint Strategic Plan. BOE members have hosted meetings in Waimea (Hawaii Island) and Wailuku, and the public has more opportunities to provide feedback at upcoming community meetings on Oahu, Kauai and Molokai.

A group brainstorms ideas during the Maui Community Meeting on Aug. 8.  Photo: Department of Education

A group brainstorms ideas during the Maui Community Meeting on Aug. 8. Photo: Department of Education

“It is important for us to dialogue with members of all sectors of our communities as we work on strategies towards achieving student success,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “Education affects all of us, that’s why we appreciate the public input provided so far and urge others to attend the few meetings we have left before finalizing plans that will set the direction for public education in the upcoming years.”

The public has the remaining opportunities to lend their voice at the following community meetings:

  • Aug. 22: Kailua High School College and Career Center, 451 Ulumanu Drive
  • Aug. 31: Manoa Public Library, 2716 Woodlawn Drive
  • Sept. 1: Kaunakakai Elementary School, 30 Ailoa Street
  • Sept. 14: Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School, 4431 Nuhou Street
  • Sept. 15: Waianae Public Library, 85-625 Farrington Highway

All meetings will be held from 5:00 – 6:30 p.m.

Storyline Consulting, a third-party facilitator, brought in to ensure the objective report of community input, reported on the first phase of HIDOE’s community outreach, which included 108 focus groups on six islands and 1,429 online survey responses. The Phase I report noted the following emerging themes as community-based descriptors of student success:

  • Giving back to the community, environment, and world;
  • Discovering and pursuing passions so students can reach their full potential;
  • Demonstrating strong academic and soft skills, and showing an ability to think critically, solve problems, and apply knowledge to new situations or contexts;
  • Being prepared for life after high school, including setting clear goals and developing short-term and long-term engagement in learning;
  • Exhibiting strength, confidence, and resilience in their every day lives and being generally healthy and happy; and
  • Gaining a strong sense of cultural understanding and appreciation for Hawaii.

For more information, view the digital and print reports.

The Department and BOE are updating the description of student success, and strategies for school and community innovation, professional development, leadership and more. A draft plan will be presented to the BOE in mid-October, and final plan will be presented to the BOE in December.

“Since we embarked on community engagement in April, we have received tremendous amounts of valuable information that will help us craft a Strategic Plan that meets the ever-changing needs of our students and community,” said Tammi Chun, assistant superintendent, Office of Strategy, Innovation and Performance. “The process has been two-fold as we’re also using the feedback from the community to help us with our state plan in response to the new federal education law, ESSA, that is required to receive federal funds.”

HIDOE continues to monitor the national changes for the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), and has offered feedback to the U.S. Department of Education (USED) on how the rules and timelines will impact Hawaii.  The Department took issue with the draft regulations appearing to be more prescriptive than what is described in the spirit of the law. HIDOE anticipates submitting the state’s plan for ESSA funding on the USED’s March 6, 2017 deadline.

For more information about the Strategic Plan and HIDOE’s ESSA efforts, click here; to join the conversation on social media use #HIQualityEd.

Senator Schatz Accepting Applications for High School Internship Program

Schatz Seniors Internship Program Open to High School Seniors from Across the State

The office of U.S. Senator Brian Schatz (D-Hawai‘i) is currently accepting applications for this year’s Schatz Seniors High School Internship Program.

Sen. Schatz in Puna after Iselle hit the area.

Sen. Schatz in Puna after Iselle hit the area.

The Schatz Seniors program provides a hands-on learning opportunity about the U.S. Senate and encourages students to be advocates in their schools and communities.   Schatz Seniors will work with outreach staff, identify issues of interest to their communities, and attend and staff special events.

“Each year our Schatz Seniors show a commitment to service and our state that keeps me optimistic about Hawai‘i’s future.  I encourage all high school seniors who want to help make a difference in their communities to apply to be a part of our team,” said Senator Schatz.

This is not an office position.  Students will complete the majority of assignments in their homes, schools, and communities and should miss little or no class time.  The internship runs from October 2016 – April 2017, and interns must commit for the full term.  Public, private, charter, and homeschool seniors may apply.  Students must have a GPA of 2.5 or better and have personal access to email throughout the internship.  Schatz Seniors will be selected based on their involvement in their community, diversity of interests and life experiences, and demonstrated leadership.

The application is available on his website at schatz.senate.gov and must be completed no later than 6:00pm on Friday, September 16, 2016.  Please contact our Honolulu office at 808-523-2061 with any questions.

Internships for undergraduate and graduate students are also available year-round in our Washington, D.C. and Honolulu offices.  More information can be found on his website.

Did You Know… 2015 State of Hawaii Data Book Released

The Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) released the “2015 State of Hawaii Data Book” today. The resource is available on the DBEDT website at dbedt.hawaii.gov/economic/databook/ and may be downloaded in whole or in part as either PDF or Excel files.

2015 Data BookThe state’s Data Book is the most comprehensive statistical book about Hawaii in a single compilation. With more than 800 data tables, it covers a broad range of statistical information in areas such as population, education, labor, energy, business enterprises, government, tourism and transportation.

“The state’s Data Book provides comprehensive information from all sources, both public and private,” said DBEDT Director Luis P. Salaveria.  “It’s the most popular product on the DBEDT website and has been consistently produced for 47 years.”

“We try to add more data series to the Data Book to accommodate a wide range of data needs,” said Chief State Economist, Dr. Eugene Tian.  “Among the new data series in this Data Book are the Hawaii homes purchased by origin of buyers.”

Some of the interesting data in this newest edition show that:

  • About 60 percent of the 58,144 domestic in-migrants to Hawaii in 2014 were between the ages of 20 to 44 years old. (Table 1.65)
  • A majority of marriages (55 percent) were interracial in 2014 in situations where at least one partner was a Hawaii resident. (Table 2.44)
  • The tuition per semester for a full-time resident undergraduate student at University of Hawaii at Manoa in 2015 was $5,172, or 5 percent higher compared to previous year. (Table 3.25)
  • Hawaii State Library system circulated 475,652 copies of electronic media up 33.6 percent compared to previous year and an increase of 644 percent compared to five years ago. (Table 3.28)
  • In 2015, there were 4,068 people in state adult and juvenile correctional facilities which was a 4 percent increase from the year before. (Table 4.20)
  • There are 15 dams throughout the state that have a Maximum storage of 600 acre-ft. or more, 13 out of 15 of those dams are on either Oahu or Kauai. (Table 5.23)
  • In 2015 Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide measurements at Mauna Loa exceeded 400 parts per million for the first time since measurements have been taken starting in 1958. (Table 5.44)
  • U.S. Department of Defense procurement prime contracts awarded with Hawaii as the “place of performance” ranged from $1.7 billion to $2.8 billion over FY 2011 to FY 2015.  Over this period the value of prime contracts awarded to small business ranged from 38.1 percent to 50.2 percent of the total.  An average 75 percent of the small business contracts went to minority businesses over the period. (Table 10.25)
  • As of Sept. 30, 2015 there were 17,600 military retirees in Hawaii, of which almost half (46.3 percent) were over 65 years old.  Of the military retirees, 37.8 percent retired from the Army; 28.1 percent Navy; 6.3 percent Marines, and 27.8 percent Air Force. (Table 10.35)
  • In 2016 there were 1,047 licensed child care centers in the state, double the number of centers in 2004 when there were 523. (Table 11.22)
  • The occupation with greatest employment in Hawaii in 2015 was “Retail salesperson” with 24,770 employment and $11.46 average hourly salary. The next highest occupation was “Waiters and waitresses” with 15,299 employment, followed by cashiers (14,790 employment) and general office clerks (13,660 employment). (Table 12.36)
  • According to the Regional Price Parities from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis the “All Items” price level in Hawaii was 16.8 percent higher than the overall national price level in 2014.  “Goods” component was 8.9 percent higher while “Services: rents” component was 58.4 percent higher than the national average in the year. (Table 14.02)
  • The three banks in Hawaii with assets of more than $1 billion in 2015 employed more than 5,000 full-time equivalent employees. (Table 15.05)
  • There were 3,324 fires in 2015 resulting in 5 deaths and losses of more than $23 million. (Table 15.14)
  • In Hawaii, 85.6 percent of the population had access to a computer with an internet subscription in 2014.  Comparing by age group, persons under 18 years of age had the highest percentage at 90.2 percent, whereas persons 18 to 64 had 87.4 percent and persons 65 years and older had 72.3 percent. (Table 16.12)
  • The average electricity price for residential customers was 30 cents per kWh in 2015, 7 cents per kWh or 19 percent decrease from the previous year. (Table 17.09)
  • A majority of the more than 19,000 home purchases in 2015 were by local buyers (78 percent) with an average sales price of $546,146; followed by mainland buyers (19 percent) with an average sales price of $751,210; and lastly foreign buyers (3 percent) with an average sales price of $783,774.  (Table 21.38)
  • Duty free store revenue in 2015 was $135.6 million, which was a decrease of 18.5 percent compared to 2014. (Table 23.12)
  • Another record year in the State of Hawaii for hotel occupancy and room rates in 2015 as the average hotel occupancy reached 78.8 percent, 1.8 percentage point increase, and the average daily room rate reached $243.93, $9.08 or 3.9 percent increase compared to the previous year. (Table 23.39)
  • Foreign Agricultural Exports, on a farm receipts-basis, have grown from $151.5 million in 2000 to $400.4 million in 2014. Of that total about 90 percent on average has been of plants products, such as fresh and processed fruits and vegetables, tree nuts, coffee, and horticulture products. (Table 24.11)

DBEDT’s Research and Economic Analysis Division (READ) also maintains the historical series of tables and updates the data continuously throughout the year.

The historical series and the update can also be found on the DBEDT website at dbedt.hawaii.gov/economic/databook/.

Kahilu Performing Arts Classes Fall Semester Registration Opens August 18

Registration for the fall semester of Kahilu Performing Arts Classes (KPAC) opens Thursday, August 18. The semester begins Wednesday, September 7 and classes run through Thursday, December 15, concluding with a music and theatre showcase on Saturday, December 17.

trapeze

There are a total of 26 classes on offer for the fall semester, including the addition of four new classes – Dance Improv & Choreo, Backstage Tech, Conditioning, and Acting the Song.

Formerly Prince Dance Institute and smArt Academy, these two programs have merged into the Kahilu Performing Arts Classes (KPAC). Directed by Angel Prince, former Artistic Director of Prince Dance Institute, this newly renamed Kahilu Theatre education program will continue to offer excellence in training in the performing arts with many of the same teachers and classes returning for the new semester.

New Classes:

Dance Improv & Choreo is a fun and explorative class, which will use interactive games as a tool to create movement, enhance creativity and inspire new ideas. Basic composition lessons will aid in developing individual creative expression in a relaxed and supportive environment.

Backstage Tech is a hands-on, audio-visual class for those who are interested in theatre production experience. Students will learn the basics of lighting, sound, set building, and various technical performing arts world skills. There is no experience needed to join this class.

Conditioning class optimizes neuromuscular connections, alignment, strength and flexibility. It supports dancers in training or anyone wishing to move with the skill and grace of a dancer. An ideal after-ballet class, all levels of experience are welcome to join to lengthen, tone and reconnect.

Acting the Song is a musical theatre class that will teach students a technique for working on and performing songs from musicals. The same method acting technique that Beth Dunnington teaches in acting class will apply to this musical theatre class. Students will work on individual songs and one group number, both of which they will have the opportunity to perform in the December 17th showcase at the Kahilu. Students will be welcome and encouraged to audition for the June Kahilu Theatre Youth Troupe production of 13: The Musical.

Complete List of Fall Semester Kahilu Performing Arts Classes:

  • Trapeze 1, Trapeze 2
  • Contemporary 1, Contemporary 2, Contemporary 3
  • Aerial Silks 1, Aerial Silks 2, Aerial Silks 3, Aerial Silks 4
  • Keiki Dance
  • Ballet 1, Ballet 2
  • Hip Hop 1, Hip Hop 2
  • Breakdancing
  • Hula 1, Hula 2
  • Dance Improv & Choreo
  • Theatre Games
  • Singing
  • Acting the Song
  • Acting Technique & Improv
  • Circus Arts
  • Conditioning
  • Backstage Production

KPAC Faculty

  • Angel Prince (Director of KPAC): Contemporary, Improv and Choreography
  • Noelani Anderson: Theatre Games
  • Lynn Barre: Ballet and Conditioning
  • Paul Buckley: Backstage Tech
  • Beth Dunnington: Acting Technique and Acting the Song
  • Graham Ellis: Circus Arts
  • Chris “Mana” Ho’opai: Hip Hop and Breakin’
  • Leia Lawrence: Hula
  • Elizabeth McDonald: Contemporary and Trapeze
  • Kat Reuss: Aerial silks
  • Victoria Roos: Aerial silks
  • Val Underwood: Singing

Class Enrollment Information:

Classes will be held Monday through Thursday, between the hours of 3:00pm and 7:30pm, and will be held on the main stage and in the Mike Luce Studio.

Dance Class

Scholarships are available for qualifying applicants and will be accepted from August 18 through September 1. A panel will review applications and notification will be sent to all applicants before classes begin on September 7.

For more information regarding class schedules, registration, fees, and scholarship information, call the Kahilu Theatre Box Office at 808.885.6868 or visithttp://www.kahilutheatre. org.

Hawaii Rush Soccer Team Wins National Championship… Again!

Winning a National Cup Finals championship means you’ve joined elite company.

Hawaii RushAbout 1,000 teams compete over the course of National Cup Regionals and the Finals, and that doesn’t even incorporate total state cup participation, which exceeds that.

With only 20 teams capturing national titles last month at the National Cup XV Finals, mathematics alone proves that winning your last game of US Club Soccer’s cup-based national championship series is a rare feat. The Hawaii Rush ’02 girls team one-upped those odds by winning the U-13 Premier Group championship last year and then winning the U-14 Premier Group title this year. This year, that feat was only accomplished by Hawaii Rush ‘02.

“I feel that this championship impacts all of these players for a lifetime,” Hawaii Rush coach Brent Murakami said. “It may not just be holding on to the trophy at the end of the tournament, but all the work that was put in to achieve that success. These girls needed to sacrifice a lot for this championship: time spent on the field instead of with friends, waking up early, sleeping early, being pushed physically and mentally.

“I think that the determination to overcome all those frustrations and sacrifices will take them a long way in life. It’s important to understand that getting to the top does not come easy. Unfortunately, only one team can win and that teaches the players to be proud, but to be humble. I believe that had been displayed by them throughout the entire tournament.”

The ultimate results may have been the same at Grand Park in Westfield, Ind. as it was at Aurora Sports Park in Aurora, Colo., but Murakami said the similarities stop there.

National Cup XV Finals in Aurora, Colo.:

  • Hawaii Rush ’02 5, GPS ME Phoenix Elite 1
  • Hawaii Rush ’02 4, FC Stars ’02 NH United 0
  • Hawaii Rush ’02 1, NEFC Premier South 0
  • Hawaii Rush ’02 2, NEFC Premier South 0

National Cup XIV Finals in Westfield, Ind.:

  • Hawaii Rush ’02 2, Washington East SC ’01 2
  • Hawaii Rush ’02 1, Cincinnati United Premier Black 01/02 1
  • Hawaii Rush ’02 2, California Odyssey ’01 1
  • Hawaii Rush ’02 3, Cincinnati United Premier Black 01/02 0

“Last year was our first opportunity for these girls to make a US Club Soccer national appearance,” he said. “It was tough last year in the sense that it was their first. Everything was new to them. It was the first time playing beyond the West Coast for most of the girls.”

This year, Murakami admits that the girls weren’t playing to their potential heading into the tournament after a “roller coaster spring season.” But, the momentum started changing through good training sessions.

“This tournament was different, because we were now the defending champions and we were no longer flying under the radar. Although we had never played any of the teams in our pool before, they all knew that we were the defending champions. There was motivation for them.”

With any national championship event, scouting is difficult. The team and even the coaching staff weren’t familiar with the teams they faced in pool play (GPS ME Phoenix Elite, FC Stars NH United and NEFC Premier South). But, Hawaii Rush managed to score first in all of its games – and not only score first, but do it within the first five minutes of each game.

As the girls enjoy their back-to-back championship notoriety, Murakami insists they’ve not entertained the idea of a three-peat just yet. “We are just so happy for the girls to win this year,” he said, adding they welcome the challenge of being moved to the Super Group (most competitive) next year if they qualify to the National Cup XVI Finals. “To end the year playing the quality of soccer they played in the tournament was awesome.”