• COMING SOON!

    2016 Big Island Film Festival
  • Breaking News

  • World Botanical Garden
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • RSS Mayor Kenoi’s Blog

  • Say When

    May 2016
    S M T W T F S
    « Apr    
    1234567
    891011121314
    15161718192021
    22232425262728
    293031  
  • When

  • RSS Pulpconnection

Jyselle Arruda Awarded Hawaii Rotary Youth Foundation Scholarship

Jyselle Arruda of Hilo High School has been awarded the 2016 Youth scholarship from the Hilo Bay Rotary Club.

Hilo Bay Rotarians congratulate Jyselle Arruda on her scholarship award. Left to right, Richard Cunningham, Kim Keahiolalo, Arruda and Bettye Williams, RCHB president.

Hilo Bay Rotarians congratulate Jyselle Arruda on her scholarship award. Left to right, Richard Cunningham, Kim Keahiolalo, Arruda and Bettye Williams, RCHB president.

Ms. Arruda will receive a cash award of $5,000 for her planned studies at the University of Hawaii-Hilo. A member of the National Society of High School Scholars and active in community service and school clubs, Ms. Arruda plans to study pre-med at UH-Hilo with a goal to become a pediatrician and set up a children’s health clinic on Hawaii Island. She lives in Honomu with her grandmother, and buses daily to Hilo High.

Hawaii Rotary Youth Foundation Scholarships (HRYF) are awarded to senior high school students across the state on a competitive basis of scholarship, campus leadership and service, and promise of future contributions to the community at large.

“Once again, Rotary Club of Hilo Bay had a number of outstanding scholar applicants. Jyselle impressed us not only with her academics, but with her drive to overcome obstacles on her path to meet her goals,” said Kim Keahiolalo, scholarship committee chair.

The Rotary Club of Hilo Bay is a staunch supporter of academic scholarships for future leaders, and is generally the Club with the largest contribution to the HRYF each year. This year alone, Hilo Bay contributed $6,100 to the scholarship fund. Richard Cunningham of Cunningham Galleries, spearheads scholarship donations in East Hawaii.

USDOE Grants Waiver Extension to Hawaiian Language Test

For the second consecutive year, the Hawaiʻi State Department of Education (HIDOE) will issue a specialized assessment to Hawaiian immersion students. The U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) granted HIDOE’s request for an extended waiver that allows Hawaiian Language Immersion Program (HLIP) students to take a specialized assessment in lieu of the state’s English language arts and math student assessments.

“The continued opportunity for our Hawaiian Immersion students to be tested in their language of instruction has been a highlight for the Department, and we appreciate the USDOE’s recognition of our progress in this initiative,”said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “The work continues as we are piloting an innovative Hawaiian Language State Assessment in science and look forward to federal approval next year.”

Click to view entire letter

Click to view entire letter

The double testing waiver response by the USDOE advised that HIDOE’s Ka Papahana Kaiapuni (Hawaiian Language Immersion) schools lacks the data required for a specialized science assessment to provide student results during this pilot year of testing.

Two years ago, HIDOE, in partnership with the University of Hawaii-Manoa (UHM), developed a field test for HLIP students that measures progress toward mastery of academic standards given in the English language Smarter Balanced Assessments. In Spring 2015, a field test in language arts and math for third and fourth graders enrolled in Ka Papahana Kaiapuni schools was used. This year, the pilot becomes operational and assessment scores will be recorded in the Kaiapuni students’ records.

The field test foregoes the statewide assessment, Smarter Balanced, which is administered to students in grades 3-8 and 11.

Last year, the Office of Hawaiian Education (OHE) was established under the Office of the Superintendent, a result of a policy audit of Hawaiʻi State Board of Education (BOE) policies 105.7 (2104) and 105.8 (2105) pertaining to Hawaiian Education and Hawaiian Language Immersion programs.

OHE is currently implementing a new policy, known as Nā Hopena Aʻo, which provides for the expansion of Hawaiian education across Hawaiʻi’s K-12 public education system for all students and adults. Together, this work helps HIDOE meet its obligations to both BOE policies and the Hawaiʻi State Constitution (Article X, Section 4 and Article XV, Section 4).

Hawaii Lawmakers Provide $100 Million for Cooling Schools and Energy Efficiency

House and Senate conferees today provided $100 million to the Department of Education to install air conditioning and heat abatement equipment to cool 1,000 public school classrooms throughout the state and to establish a sustainable schools initiative.

Capital

In his State of the State address, Governor David Ige proposed borrowing $100 million from the state’s Green Energy Market Securitization (GEMS) program to cool 1,000 public school classrooms.  In response, lawmakers drafted House Bill 2569 and Senate Bill 3126, proposing varying methods of funding, but in essence, working toward the same end.  Both bills were sent to conference with unspecified funding for the conferees to decide.

During negotiations, the conferees agreed to $100 million in general funding to immediately begin carrying out the work of installing cooling and energy efficiency upgrades.  The measure now goes to the full House and Senate on Tuesday, May 3, for approval.

“The faster we can reduce our electric costs, the more money we can put back into helping students and teachers.  If the DOE can make progress reducing electric costs even a couple percent per year, that could still save millions over the long term that could be better spent in our classrooms, rather than going to utility bills,” said Rep. Chris Lee, Conference Committee chair, who took the lead for the House on the pair of bills.

Hawaii Governor Names Every Student Succeeds Act Team Members

Gov. David Ige announced the names of the newly selected members of the Governor’s Team on ESSA – Every Student Succeeds Act. The team will work to develop a blue print for Hawai‘i’s public schools that is consistent with ESSA and will maximize opportunities and possibilities for Hawai‘i to transform education.

essa

The team was selected by Gov. Ige based on recommendations and applications, including one recommendation each from Senate President Ronald Kouchi and House Speaker Joe Souki.

“Our goal was to get a good cross-section of stakeholders with diverse backgrounds and experiences. The work of the ESSA team will be an inclusive process that will involve town meetings and a summit to allow all to participate,” said Gov. Ige.

Gov. Ige appointed Darrel Galera as chairman of the ESSA team earlier this month.

Here is a complete list of members:

  • Philip Bossert – Community member, Director of Strategic & International Program, HAIS
  • Catherine Caine – Elementary School Teacher, Waikīkī Elementary
  • Kamana‘opono Crabbe – CEO – Office of Hawaiian Affairs
  • Darrel Galera – Chariperson, Executive Director, Education Institute of Hawai‘i
  • Keith Hayashi – Principal, Waipahu High School
  • Michelle Kidani – State Senator, Chair of Senate Education Committee
  • Brennan Lee – Student, State Student council
  • Ann Mahi – DOE – Complex Area Superintendent Waianae/Nanakuli
  • Hubert Minn – Member, Board of Education
  • Lauren Moriguchi – Executive Director, Office of Early Learning
  • Steve Nakasato – Principal, Pearl Ridge Elementary School
  • Alan Oshima – President, CEO Hawaiian Electric Co.
  • Catherine Payne – Chairperson, Charter Schools Commission
  • Amy Perruso – Teacher, Mililani High School
  • Stacey Roberts – UH Professor, Chair of Educational Administration Program
  • Carol Shikada – DOE – Educational Specialist (Kaua‘i)
  • Linda Takayama – Workforce – Director of Labor & Industrial Relations
  • Stephen Terstegge – Parent/Military, Castle High School
  • Takashi Ohno – State Representative

The team had its first preliminary, introductory meeting today. Meeting minutes will be regularly distributed to the Legislature, Schools Superintendent, Board of Education, Department of Education and will be posted on the governor’s website at: governor.hawaii.gov.

The ESSA team will ultimately be responsible for assessing the current public school system and identifying areas of need.

An Education Summit will be scheduled this summer to give organizations and individuals the opportunity to discuss possibilities for a future-focused education system and solicit input on key recommendations to the state’s ESSA plan.

Fight The Tuition Hike – Rally and UH Hearings Tomorrow

The University of Hawai’i will be holding 2 hearings in Hilo this Thursday to discuss the proposed tuition increase. Students at Hawai’i Community College and UH Hilo are organizing a “Fight the Hike” Rallies on both campuses.

Click to view

Click to view

“These tuition increases are making public education too expensive for the public. We need affordable higher education,” said Associated Students of Hawai’i Community College (ASUHawCC) Member Asia Olsen.

On Friday, 4/22/16 ASUHawcc passed a resolution opposing the tuition increase highlighting rapidly increasing student debt and tuition see resolution here.

The proposed tuition increase comes in the wake of a student led lawsuit alleging mismanagement of student fees see 4/11/16 Hawaii Tribune Herald article here.

Lack of fiscal record keeping is currently being addressed at UH Hilo. UH Hilo business student Jen Ruggles recently requested a Hawai’i State Audit after numerous Freedom of Information (FOI) requests went unanswered see FOI requests here.

“UH Hilo Campus Center has not been able to provide basic fiscal records on how student fees are being spent including entire months of budgets, agendas, and minutes. How can UH request a tuition increase when there is still 11 months of student money that remains unaccounted for?” Ruggles said.

Students, the university community and public are invited to listen to a presentation on the University’s proposed tuition schedule and to present testimony (written or oral) at the meeting. The proposed tuition schedule and supporting documentation are available at www.hawaii.edu/offices/aa/tuition.html. Contact or email testimony to:tuition@hawaii.edu.

Students will organize rallies on both upper and lower campuses.

Toyota Hawaii Awards Nine Local Student Winners in Toyota’s 2016 Dream Car Art Contest

Toyota Hawaii is announcing the local finalists and People’s Choice Competition winners for the 2016 Toyota Dream Car Art Contest. Among the hundreds of entries received, only nine works of art (three from each age category) were selected to move on to the Toyota MotorCorporation World Contest held in Japan.

Category 2 (Ages 8-11) winners

Category 2 (Ages 8-11) winners

KHON2’s evening news weather anchor Justin Cruz, KITV’s news anchor Yunji de Nies and Shriners Hospitals for Children – Honolulu’s Director of Public Relations Mahealani Richardson emceed the awards ceremony held over the weekend.

“We received hundreds of creative works of art,” said Glenn Inouye, Senior Vice President representing the Toyota Hawaii Dealers. “Family and friends really rallied for their loved ones as well by voting for their favorite entries in the People’s Choice Competition on our Facebook page in February.”

Finalists:

Category 1 (Ages 7 and under):
1st Place WINNER: Aja Middleton, age 6, Punahou School (Hawaii Kai)
2nd Place: Sarah Asato, age 7, Iolani School (Honolulu)
3rd Place: Phoebe Hirashima, age 6, Iolani School (Honolulu)

Category 2 (Ages 8-11):
1st Place WINNER: Ryan Handa, age 9, Kainalu Elementary School (Kailua)
2nd Place: Camille Quindica, age 11, Kapolei Middle School (Kapolei)
3rd Place: Raphael Stark, age 9, Home School (Honolulu)

Entry by Angelica Devers

Entry by Angelica Devers

Category 3 (Ages 12-15):
1st Place WINNER: Angelica Devers, age 13, Kapolei Middle School (Kapolei)
2nd Place: Min Hua Tsou, age 14, Mililani High School (Mililani)

3rd Place: Melia LaFleur, age 14, Kapolei Middle School (Kapolei)

People’s Choice Winners

From February 15 – 28, 2016, Toyota Hawaii’s Facebook friends had the opportunity to view all eligible entries and vote for their favorites in each of the three age categories. The Facebook contest received an overwhelming response of 6,105 votes and 5,791 unique visitors to the contest page.

The following entrants were awarded $100 cash and were automatically entered for final judging in the local competition for receiving the most votes in each category:

  • Category 1 – (Ages 7 and under): Justice Wakamatsu, age 6, Pu’ukukui Elementary School (Maui)
  • Category 2 – (Ages 8-11): Dylan Yanazakiage, age 9, Waikele Elementary School (Waikele)
  • Category 3 – (Ages 12-15): Angelica Devers, age 13, Kapolei Middle School (Kapolei)

This year’s judging panel included Honolulu Museum of Art School Director Vince Hazen; KITV’s Yunji de Nies; KHON2’s Justin Cruz; Hawaii News Now’s Stephanie Lum; Shriners Hospitals for Children – Honolulu’s Director of Public Relations Mahealani Richardson; 94.7 KUMU FM Radio DJ Bryan “Brudduh Bryan” Min; Hawaii Association of Independent Schools Executive Director Robert Landau; APP-AIR Resource Teacher Una Chan; and Toyota Hawaii’s Glenn Inouye.

This international art contest was established in 2004 with the goals of creating an opportunity for children to have fun and to understand the importance of having a dream, while at the same time to encourage them to become interested in cars through drawing their “Dream Cars” using their creative imaginations.

About Toyota Hawaii

Toyota has been Hawaii’s top-selling automotive brand since 1997 with seven dealership locations statewide — Big Island Toyota (Hilo and Kona); Maui Toyota; Servco Toyota Kauai; Servco Toyota Honolulu, ServcoToyota Waipahu, and Servco Toyota Windward. For more information about Toyota Hawaii, visit ToyotaHawaii.com.

North Hawaii Community Hospital Scholarship Opportunities

North Hawaii Community Hospital has several scholarship opportunities available for students in the field of nursing.

North Hawaii Community HospitalThe Peggy Dineen-Orsini Scholarship offers a $2,000 award to a resident of Hawaii County who is enrolled in or accepted for enrollment in a National League of Nursing accredited program in Hawai‘i or on the mainland. Private donors along with the Medical Staff at North Hawaii Community Hospital fund this scholarship in memory of Peggy Dineen-Orsini, who was a Registered Nurse at North Hawaii Community Hospital from 1996 to 2004, remembered for her compassion for her patients, colleagues and friends.

The second scholarship is funded by the North Hawaii Community Hospital Medical Staff and offers two $1,000 scholarships to residents of Hawaii County who are enrolled in or accepted for enrollment in a National League of Nursing accredited program in Hawai‘i or on the mainland.

Applications are available online by visiting www.nhch.com (see Community/Education Scholarships). Completed applications and required documents must be received or postmarked by May 6, 2016. Please mail completed applications and required documents to North Hawaii Community Hospital, Attention: Development Department, 67-1125 Mamalahoa Hwy, Kamuela, HI 96743.

For more information, contact the Development Department at North Hawaii Community Hospital at 881-4420.

UH Hilo Announces 2016 Dorrance Scholarship Recipients

Ten high school seniors from Hawaiʻi Island who are enrolling this fall at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo have been awarded the Dorrance Scholarship.
UH Hilo Moniker
The 2016 Dorrance Scholarship recipients and their schools are:

  • Lexi Dalmacio, Honoka’a High School
  • Twylah Marie Morelli, Konawaena High School
  • Alec Goodson, Kealakehe High School
  • Jordan Drewer, Hawai’i Academy of Arts and Science
  • Keinan Agonias, Pahoa High School
  • Kaylyn Ells-Hookano, Hilo High School
  • Eva Abraham, Waiakea High School
  • Duke Escobar, Waiakea High School
  • Kahele Joaquin, Ka ʻUmeke Kāʻeo PCS
  • Yukio Ishii, Kamehameha Schools Hawai’i

The Dorrance Scholarship was established by Bennett and Jacquie Dorrance at the Arizona Community Foundation in June 1999. The innovative, four-year, need-based award provides local students, who are the first in their family to attend college, up to $10,000 a year in direct financial assistance. Recipients will also participate in a custom-designed summer bridge program, international travel, conservation experience, an entrepreneurship program and employment preparation, bringing the total estimated value of each award to more than $90,000.

“Providing educational opportunities for first-generation college students is a core part of UH Hilo’s mission,” said Chancellor Don Straney. “The Dorrance Scholarship has become a model for how to effectively address that need.”

The Dorrance Foundation began offering up to 10 scholarships a year to Hawai’i Island high school graduates attending UH Hilo in 2012. The latest awards bring the total number of recipients to 49.

For more information about the Dorrance Scholarship, visit
www.dorrancescholarship.org or contact Mathew Estrada, program coordinator,
Dorrance Scholarship Programs, at mestrada@azfoundation.org or (808) 339-4500.

New Federal Education Law Prompts Governor to Form Team to Develop Blueprint for Hawaii’s Education

Gov. David Ige today announced the formation of the Governor’s Team on the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). The new law calls for the most significant reduction in federal authority over public education in decades. The law returns authority to the 50 states to set the direction for their own public schools.

Elementary and Secondary Education Act. President Obama signs the Every Student Succeeds Act into law on December 10, 2015.

Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
President Obama signs the Every Student Succeeds Act into law on December 10, 2015.

The governor’s team will work to develop a blue print for Hawai‘i’s public schools that is consistent with ESSA and will maximize opportunities and possibilities for Hawai‘i to transform education.

Gov. Ige has appointed Darrel Galera as chairman of the Governor’s ESSA team and is in the process of appointing 16 additional members representing all stakeholders in public education.

Under the new education law, Gov. Ige will be involved in the development of the new state education plan and will have final approval over the plan.

“This is a major opportunity to change the face of public education in Hawai‘i for the better. Our innovation economy depends on a well-educated workforce to meet the state’s goals in renewable energy, locally grown food production, environmental stewardship and more. It is my hope that the public will participate in this process to help our education system prepare students for high-skill careers in the 21st century,” said Gov. Ige.

The ESSA team will ultimately be responsible for assessing the current public school system and identifying areas of need.

An Education Summit will be scheduled this summer to give organizations and individuals the opportunity to discuss possibilities for a future-focused education system and solicit input on key recommendations to the state’s ESSA plan.

Town hall meetings will also be scheduled to share information with the public and to collect public input for the ESSA plan.

To apply to serve on the Governor’s ESSA Team, go to: https://forms.ehawaii.gov/pages/board-survey/

Deadline for applications is April 22, 2016.

2015-2016 American Family Insurance ALL-USA Hawaii Girls Basketball Team Announced

USA TODAY High School Sports is proud to announce the 2015-16 American Family Insurance ALL-USA Hawaii Girls Basketball Team. Players were selected based on their athletic achievements from the 2015-16 season.

For the complete list of American Family Insurance ALL-USA state teams, click here.

COACH OF THE YEAR

Bobbie Awa, Konawaena (Kealakekua)
The Big Island Interscholastic Federation Coach of the Year, Awa guided Konawaena to its second straight state title and the seventh overall during her tenure. The Wildcats finished the year 26-1 and were undefeated against Hawaii competition.

FIRST TEAM

Player of the Year
Chanelle Molina, G, Konawaena (Kealakekua), 5-7, Sr.

Chanelle Molina

Chanelle Molina

A three-time Gatorade Hawaii Girls Basketball Player of the Year and four-time Big Island Interscholastic Federation Player of the Year, Molina earned Most Outstanding Player of the tournament honors after leading Konawaena (26-1) to its second straight Division I championship. She scored 24 points in the state final and averaged 19 points, eight rebounds and 7.6 assists for the year. Molina has signed to play at Washington State this fall.

Cherilyn Molina, G, Konawaena (Kealakekua), 5-3, So.
The younger Molina sister averaged 16.2 points, 5.3 rebounds and 2.1 assists in helping Konawaena to a state championship.

Naai Solomon-Lewis, C, Kohala (Kapaau), 5-8, Sr.
Solomon-Lewis averaged 14.3 ppg and was named Most Outstanding Player of the Div. II tournament, despite falling in the semifinals—when she grabbed 16 rebounds and scored 14 points.

Keala Quinlan, G, Roosevelt (Honolulu), 6-0, Sr.
A University of Portland signee, Quinlan averaged 19.6 points per game to lead Roosevelt to the first round of the Division I state tournament.

Keleah-Aiko Koloi, F, Lahainaluna (Lahaina), 5-11, Sr.
Koloi averaged 16.3 points per game for a Lahainaluna team that advanced to the Division I semifinals.

SECOND TEAM

Ihi Victor, F, Konawaena (Kealakekua), 5-10, Sr.

Cameron Fernandez, F/G, Lahainaluna (Lahaina), 5-8, Sr.

Tyra Moe, F, Punahou (Honolulu), 6-1, Sr.

Roselynn Shimaoka, G, Kaiser (Honolulu), 5-6, Sr.

Ally Wada, G/F, Hawaii Baptist (Honolulu), 5-8, So.

What Does the New Rural Hawaii Look Like and Who/What Controls its Agricultural Future?

Agricultural Land Use will be the topic of a public presentation at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo on Wednesday, May 4, from 6 – 7:30 p.m. in UCB Room 100.
Ag Lands
The State of Agricultural Land Use in Hawai‘i 2016: Crops, Locations and Trends will highlight the findings of the 2015 Statewide Agricultural Land Use Baseline produced by UH Hilo’s Geography Department’s Spatial Data Analysis and Visualization (SDAV) Lab for the State Department of Agriculture to help guide discussions and to set Hawaiʻi’s agricultural priorities.

Project Manager Jeffrey Melrose and Principal Investigator Dr. Ryan Perroy will address a number of critical questions during their presentation, including:

  • What happened to over 200,000 acres of former sugar and pineapple fields?
  • What does the new Rural Hawaiʻi look like and who/what controls its agricultural future?
  • How has the supply of agricultural water fared in the post-plantation transition?
  • What forces shape the future of Hawaiʻi’s food self-reliance?
  • What is the status for export and niche crops in Hawaiʻi’s agricultural mix?

The presentation is hosted by UH Hilo’s Geography and Environmental Studies Department, College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management, and the College of Continuing Education and Community Service.

For more information, contact Jeffrey Melrose at (808) 989-8322 or Dr. Bruce Mathews at (808) 217-7393.

On Equal Pay Day, Senator Hirono Leads Measure To End Gender Barriers In STEM Careers

Senator Mazie K. Hirono today marked Equal Pay Day by introducing the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Opportunities Act, legislation that would improve inclusion of women, minorities, and people with disabilities in STEM careers. Equal Pay Day marks the day in 2016 when, on average, women’s wages catch up to what men earned in 2015.

mazie 412“It’s unacceptable that we are more than 100 days into 2016, but women’s salaries are only now catching up with what men made last year,” said Senator Hirono. “While the gender pay gap affects women across all fields, women in STEM careers continue to face barriers that can limit their opportunities for employment and equal pay. The STEM Opportunities Act takes a comprehensive approach to combatting factors that limit the advancement of women and other underrepresented groups in STEM. For America to remain competitive in a 21st century economy, we must break down barriers for working women through passing the Paycheck Fairness Act and the STEM Opportunities Act.”

Senator Hirono also took to the Senate floor to mark Equal Pay Day and highlight disparities in STEM fields. For example, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in school year 2014-2015, men earned more than five times the number of computer science bachelor’s degrees and three times as many bachelor’s degrees in the College of Engineering as women.

The STEM Opportunities Act helps federal science agencies and institutions of higher education identify and share best practices to overcome barriers that can hurt the inclusion of women and other underrepresented groups in STEM, and also allows universities and nonprofits to receive competitive grants and recognition for mentoring women and minorities in STEM fields. The STEM Opportunities Act builds on legislation championed by Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX), Ranking Member of the U.S. House of Representatives Science, Space, and Technology Committee.

The Senate measure is cosponsored by Senators Cory Booker (D-NJ), Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Maria Cantwell (D-WA), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), Edward Markey (D-MA), Jeff Merkley (D-OR), Barbara Mikulski (D-MD), Patty Murray (D-WA), Gary Peters (D-MI), and Brian Schatz (D-HI).

“Science, technology, engineering and math are drivers of innovation in states like New Jersey, and across the country. If we are to remain globally competitive, we have to ensure all Americans- including women and minorities- are prepared to succeed in these important fields,” said Senator Booker. “I am pleased to support the STEM Opportunities Act to create inclusive career pathways that will help grow our economy and create opportunities for more Americans.”

“The STEM fields are critical to driving innovation and economic growth,” said Senator Gillibrand. “But we limit our potential when our STEM workforce does not reflect the diversity of our nation. I was proud to lead a successful bipartisan amendment to the recently enacted Every Student Succeeds Act to increase access to high-quality STEM coursework in K-12 education for students who are members of groups underrepresented in STEM fields. The STEM Opportunities Act will improve opportunities for advancement in STEM fields for women and underrepresented minorities further down the pipeline – in higher education, in early careers, and for STEM academics and professionals.”

“Increasing women and minority participation in the STEM economy will keep the United States at the forefront of scientific discovery and technological innovation in the 21st century,” said Senator Markey. “The diversity of STEM professionals will help fuel the diversity of discoveries in science, technology, engineering and math. For our future scientific endeavors to produce the next generation of life-changing results, we need to ensure that our universities, laboratories and research institutions reflect the rich diversity of our nation and continue to receive the support that fosters breakthroughs and helps maintain American leadership in science and technology.”

“If we’re serious about empowering more young women and communities of color to take on STEM careers and compete in the 21st century economy, we need to ramp up our research efforts to identify and share best practices so that we can diversify the next generation of STEM professionals,” said Senator Murray. “STEM skills are so important for Washington state’s economy, so making these fields more inclusive will ultimately strengthen our workforce and our economy in the years to come.”

“By expanding access to STEM disciplines in schools and sharing best practices for recruitment and retention in STEM careers, we can help more women and minorities become engaged in science, technology, engineering and math, boosting economic success and strengthening America’s competitiveness in the 21st-century global economy,” said Senator Peters. “The STEM Opportunities Act of 2016 will improve inclusion of women and minorities in STEM fields by tapping into and fostering their talents.”

The American Association for University of Women, American Women in Science, Girls, Inc., MAES- Latinos in Science and Engineering, Maui Economic Development Board, National Council of Asian Pacific Americans, Society for Women Engineers, Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science, and the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center support the STEM Opportunities Act.

“When we reduce barriers that deter women and other underrepresented minorities from pursuing careers in STEM fields, American businesses get a leg up on the rest of the world. The STEM Opportunities Act will open doors for a more diverse science community, and in so doing help spur innovation and increase our global competitiveness,” said Lisa Maatz, Vice President of Government Relations at American Association of University Women. “Any serious attempt to modernize our science workforce and our nation’s science priorities is incomplete without this measure.

“In Hawaii, high-paying STEM jobs are boosting our island economy,” said Leslie Wilkins, Vice President, of the Maui Economic Development Board and Director of the Women in Technology Project. “To grow the education to workforce pipeline needed to keep up with STEM job demand, our Women in Technology initiative continues to engage girls and women who are under-represented in technology fields. WIT’s hands-on STEM curriculum, training, mentoring and internship programs have had a significant impact statewide but still need ongoing support.  Mahalo to Senator Hirono for introducing the STEM Opportunities Act, a comprehensive bill that could strengthen our efforts, as well as others throughout Hawaii and the nation.”

“Investing in STEM is an investment in our nation’s future, and it is imperative that women and people of color are represented and empowered to succeed in these fields. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are underrepresented in STEM leadership roles, and despite stereotypes, some AAPI subgroups are underrepresented in STEM overall. Disaggregated data on AAPIs at institutions of higher education and federal science agencies will highlight the need for more investment in AAPIs in STEM fields, and this legislation would benefit all women and people of color in STEM. Senator Hirono has been a strong advocate for STEM inclusion, and we also thank her for her ongoing leadership on behalf of AAPI communities in all areas,” said National Council of Asian Pacific Americans National Director Christopher Kang.

“Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) enthusiastically supports the STEM Opportunities Act of 2016 and applauds its sponsors for their efforts.  Improving data collection, research and sharing best practices across federal science agencies and institutions of higher education to address systemic factors impeding the inclusion of underrepresented groups in STEM fields are all key elements in the Nation’s interest.  The PAESMEM awards are particularly essential in bringing all groups into STEM; SACNAS was a PAESMEM recipient in 2004 and 20 of SACNAS’ members have received PAESMEM awards.   In order to keep our nation competitive in science and engineering, such legislation as this Act is essential. As classical Clayton Christensen ‘disruptive thinking’ implies, helping the unserved and underserved—women and underrepresented minorities in STEM in this case—enables the greatest movement forward. SACNAS has over 6,000 paid members and serves a larger constituency of over 18,000—over half of whom are females—with particular emphasis on minorities underrepresented in STEM,” said Robert E. Barnhill, Ph.D, Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science Vice President, Science Policy & Strategic Initiatives.

“SEARAC commends Senator Hirono’s proposed STEM Opportunities Act for taking a thoughtful, comprehensive approach to strengthening and diversifying the STEM workforce through grants for evidence-based efforts, the creation of a federal inter-agency group to create policies that include a more diverse STEM workforce, and the collection of data to examine progress towards increasing STEM opportunities for underrepresented groups.  SEARAC is especially pleased that the STEM Opportunities Act collects disaggregated data for AAPI students — which will illuminate the disparities in access and participation to STEM opportunities within the AAPI community,” said Quyen Dinh, Executive Director of the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC).

UH Hilo School of Nursing Accreditation Renewed

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo School of Nursing was recently awarded full reaccreditation for its Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing (BSN) program by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN).
UH Hilo Moniker“A full 8-year accreditation for our nursing school is a wonderful accomplishment,” said Director Katharyn “Kay” Daub. “I’m especially pleased that we were commended for our value in the educational pipeline with the expansion of our RN to BSN program.”

The announcement followed last October’s site visit when a review team met with the School’s administrators, students, hospital staff, faculty and community members. Daub said the team was impressed by the students and overwhelmed by the support of the advisory board and UH Hilo administration. She applauded the faculty‘s work on the rigorous self-study report, which led one reviewer to describe the curriculum alignment with American Nurses Association standards as the best that they had reviewed.

The ACEN accreditation process provides for the maintenance and enhancement of educational quality through continuous self-assessment, planning, and improvement. The next review is scheduled for Fall 2023.

78 UH Hilo Vulcan Athletes Honored on National Student-Athlete Day

On National Student-Athlete Day, the University of Hawaii at Hilo recognizes 78 Vulcan student-athletes for their academic, athletic and community service excellence.
National Student Athlete DayCreated by the National Consortium for Academics and Sports in 1987, student-athletes must earn a 3.0 grade point average or higher while engaging in community service.

This year’s recipients include:

Baseball (11) – Micah Carter, William Cleary, Nathan Green, Jacob Grijalva, Reece Kato, Jaron Manago, Timothy Mendonca, Sean Nearhoof, Jonathan Segovia, Phillip Steering, Morgan West

Women’s Basketball (9) – Alia Alvarez, Lauren Hong, Alexa Jacobs, Pilialoha Kailiawa, Felicia Kolb, Sydney Mercer, Kimberly Schmelz, Keani Shirai, Patience Taylor

Cross Country (4) – Riley Arroyo, Crsytal-Lynn Baysa, Anna Mikkelson, Kaylee Rapoza

Women’s Golf (5) – Shannon Abarra, Shantel Antonio, Andi Igawa, Keely Kitamura, Kristen Sawada

Men’s Golf (4) – Kyeton Littel, Conor Morley, Casey Tamura, David Tottori

Men’s Soccer (11) – Max Darris, Andrew Dawrs, Juan David Diaz Casallas, Cassidy Dixon, Tyler Hoffman, Trenton Hooper, Joshua Jasper, Anton Lund, Omar Machado, Zachary Solarte, George Wakefield

Women’s Soccer (11) – Kailah Buchanan, Kayla Clarke, Kahri Golden, Annabel Gonzalez, Meghan Langbehn, Nicole Rascon, Kayela Santiago, Alexa Smiley, Danika Steele, Leighana Weaver, Abcde Zoller

Softball (11) – Angela Aguinaga, Billi Derleth, Cyanne Fernandez, Bailey Gaspar, Brittany Huff, Mari Kawano, Cristina Menjivar, Stephanie Pasco, Danielle Pulido, Maria Steadmon, Danielle Wilson

Men’s Tennis (4) – Stefan Coney, Ryuta Ogawa, Kainoa Rosa, Ryan Torio

Women’s Tennis (3) – Trixie Croad, Bianca Novotna, Chelsea Sato

Volleyball (5) – Trixie Croad, Siera Green, Mariya Heidenrich, Marley Strand-Nicolaisen, Kyndra Trevino-Scott

Hawaii Robotics Teams Receive $45,000 From McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii

McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii donated $45,000 to the Hawaii robotics teams participating in the 2016 FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) in Hawaii Robotics Regional Competition, which took place on April 1 and 2 at the University of Hawaii Stan Sheriff Center in Manoa.

L-R: Stephanie Steuri, Robotics Competition emcee; Glenn Waki, McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii owner/operator; Victor Lim, McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii owner/operator; Lenny Klompus, Friends of Hawaii Robotics president; Shannon Scott, McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii marketing consultant; Ed Yamamura, McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii owner/operator; Rafael Zayas, Robotics Competition emcee.

L-R: Stephanie Steuri, Robotics Competition emcee; Glenn Waki, McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii owner/operator; Victor Lim, McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii owner/operator; Lenny Klompus, Friends of Hawaii Robotics president; Shannon Scott, McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii marketing consultant; Ed Yamamura, McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii owner/operator; Rafael Zayas, Robotics Competition emcee.

During the competition’s opening ceremony on Saturday, April 2, McDonald’s owner/operators presented a check for $45,000, which will be divided among the 26 competing Hawaii robotics teams. The five (5) Hawaii schools (Baldwin High School, Iolani School, Kapolei High School, Kealakehe High School, Waialua High School) that will be advancing to the FIRST World Championship competition in St. Louis, Mo. in April each received an additional $1,000 from McDonald’s.

“We are honored to continue our support of Hawaii’s robotics teams,” said Victor Lim, McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii owner/operator. “We are dedicated to helping our communities thrive, so it’s great to be able to lend a hand to help our local schools. To watch the students’ creativity and innovation come to life in these competitions is inspiring. Congratulations to all the schools that competed this year.”

The money was raised through a statewide fundraiser that ran from March 21 to 27 where McDonald’s donated $1 from every Egg McMuffin and Egg White Delight sandwich, and Egg McMuffin and Egg White Delight Extra Value Meal sold between 5 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Additionally, throughout the fundraising period, Hawaii teams conducted robot demonstrations at selected McDonald’s restaurants across the state. This was the fifth consecutive year that McDonald’s was the FIRST in Hawaii official breakfast sponsor, providing breakfast sandwiches to all participating teams.

“We are so very thankful for the overwhelming generosity of McDonald’s Restaurants of Hawaii in supporting the FIRST in Hawaii Robotics Regional Competition,” said Lenny Klompus, president of Friends of Hawaii Robotics. “This is the fifth consecutive year that McDonald’s has not only brightened our students’ morning with a delicious breakfast sandwich ahead of the competition, but most importantly they have helped our local robotics teams excel as a result of their ever-growing monetary donation. McDonald’s unwavering impact with this donation enables a generation of young leaders in our state to build innovation today, for tomorrow.”

FIRST is a national organization that joins students, teachers and mentors to inspire youth interested in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) to pursue careers in these fields. Students are able to work directly with professionals, gaining first-hand knowledge of the industry. FIRST combines the competitiveness of sports with the rigors of science and technology to engage young people to solve problems in an intense and competitive way.

Agriculture Workshops Offered in West Hawaii

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Continuing Education and Community Service (CCECS) offers two agriculture workshops with Zach Mermel this month at the Hawai’i Community College Palamanui campus in Kailua-Kona. Both workshops will be held in Room B-125.

edible plants
The Secrets of the Soil series is held on Saturday, April 23. Part 1 meets from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will explore the basics of soil biology. Topics include soil formation, types of soils found on Hawaiʻi Island, the dynamics of the soil food web, and fundamentals of soil testing at the homestead and farm scale. Part 2 will be held from 2 – 5 p.m. This hands-on session will teach participants how to make a high-quality compost and includes constructing a biologically active compost pile. The cost is $40 for Part 1, $30 for Part 2, or $60 for both sessions.

Edible Landscaping will be held on Saturday, April 30 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Participants will learn how to transform their land into an abundant oasis of edible and multifunctional plants. Mermel will cover edible landscaping and provide hands-on experience in creating a basic landscape plan. Participants should bring an aerial photo or TMK map of their land as well as colored pens and pencils. Tuition is $55.

For more information and to register, contact CCECS at 932-7830 or visit http://hilo.hawaii.edu/academics/ccecs/.

UH Hilo Hosts Marine Noise Pollution Documentary Screening

A public screening and state premiere of the newly released film Sonic Sea will be shown at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo on Friday, April 8, at 3 p.m. in the Science and Technology Building Room 108.
Sonic Sea

The 60-minute documentary about marine noise pollution is narrated by Rachel McAdams and based on the true story of a former U.S. Navy officer. Ken Balcomb is credited with solving the tragic mystery involving a mass whale stranding in the Bahamas, forever changing how we understand man’s impact on the ocean.

Sonic Sea was produced by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Imaginary Forces in association with the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and Diamond Docs. The film, directed and produced by Michelle Dougherty and Daniel Hinerfeld, features musician, human rights and environmental activist Sting along with renowned ocean experts Dr. Sylvia Earle, Dr. Paul Spong, Dr. Christopher Clark and Jean-Michel Cousteau.

The screening is hosted by UH Hilo’s Marine Science (MARE) and Tropical Conservation Biology and Environmental Science (TCBES) programs.

For more information, call 932-7592.

NASA Mathematician Speaks to Parker Students on the Big Island of Hawaii

On Tuesday, March 8, Parker middle school students were treated to a presentation by Carol Davies, a mathematician who worked for NASA for more than 30 years.

Retired NASA mathematician, Carol Davies, recently spoke to Parker middle school students to show the connection between math and space travel, as well as to inspire girls to pursue STEM fields.

Retired NASA mathematician, Carol Davies, recently spoke to Parker middle school students to show the connection between math and space travel, as well as to inspire girls to pursue STEM fields.

Davies shared examples from her many projects at NASA to show students the connection between mathematics and space travel, as well as to inspire girls to pursue the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Students were engrossed with Davies’ presentation which discussed the accuracy of the mathematics behind the recent Hollywood blockbuster movie “The Martian”, the demotion of Pluto from being a planet and details behind some of Jupiter’s 67 moons.

Additionally, Davies showed students a copy of the plaques placed on Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecrafts sent into interstellar space in the 1970s.  These plaques were intended to provide information about Earth and humans should they be intercepted by extraterrestrial life.

Davies worked with NASA on the design of re-entry vehicles used in the space program including the Galileo mission to Jupiter and Pioneer missions. Retired from NASA, Davies volunteers as a docent at the W. M. Keck Observatory in Waimea.

Hawaii Secures Grant to Develop Bold Plan to Improve Career Preparation Systems for Young People

The Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) today announced it has secured a $100,000 grant to develop a detailed career readiness action plan, which is an essential step to expanding economic opportunity for young people across our state.

“This grant will go a long way in building upon the various partnership projects that are focused on preparing our students for the workforce,”stated Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “We’re seeing positive results throughout our high schools as students create their path towards college and careers. Partnerships and grants like this are essential in our efforts and we’re excited to expand on our collective initiatives to help students achieve their goals.”

HS to College

Hawaii is among 24 states and the District of Columbia to receive a New Skills for Youth grant that includes expert technical assistance to perform a diagnostic assessment of their career preparation system and prepare for implementation of a new action plan. The grants are one piece of a $75 million, five-year initiative developed by JPMorgan Chase, in partnership with the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and Advance CTE, aimed at increasing economic opportunity for young people by strengthening career-focused education, starting in high school and ending with postsecondary degrees or credentials aligned with business needs.

The grant enables HIDOE to begin a rigorous needs assessment to determine program strengths and necessary improvements.  With that baseline set, a new three-year career readiness action plan will be developed to set goals and targets toward providing students equitable access to career pathway opportunities, along with the identification and allocation of resources.

“States across the country are adjusting their career readiness programs to ensure they adequately prepare students for their next step after graduation,”said Chris Minnich, executive director of CCSSO. “States have seized this grant opportunity to pursue bold plans for pathways that will put kids on a course for success after high school and beyond.”

According to CCSSO, only about half of young Americans have a meaningful postsecondary credential that enables them to compete for good jobs, and the U.S. youth unemployment rate is more than double the national rate.

“We must address the youth career crisis, and it starts in our schools,”said Chauncy Lennon, Head of Workforce Initiatives, JPMorgan Chase. “These grants kick start an effort to ensure career and technical education systems are better aligned with the needs of business and leaders throughout states are committed to tackling youth employment.”

In 2015, Hawaii’s youth unemployment rate for ages 16 to 19 was 13 percent.  For ages 20 to 24, the unemployment rate was 7 percent, compared to Hawaii’s overall rate of 3.7 percent for its entire labor force.

A growing number of Hawaii’s public high school students are taking college-level courses and earning dual credits –for both high school and college –before they graduate from the 12th grade, according to a College and Career Readiness Report (CCRI), released by Hawaii P-20 Partnerships for Education.

Hawaii, and the planning grant states, will be eligible to apply for a phase two grant opportunity, which will require states to demonstrate the commitment and capacity to execute the action plans developed in its first phase.

This grant opportunity builds on CCSSO’s Career Readiness Initiative, launched in 2015 to help close the country’s skills gap. It is guided by recommendations made in Opportunities and Options, a report of CCSSO’s Career Readiness Task Force.

 

Hawaii Public Schools Score Big in National TV Competition

Hawaii schools walked away with 34 awards at the 13th annual Student Television Network (STN) competition in Atlanta, held March 10-13. Scroll down for the complete list of Hawaii winners.

stn

Close to 3,000 middle and high school students from across the U.S. gathered to compete in on-site, time-restricted contests in video journalism, television production, filmmaking, music videos, commercials, and public service announcements. All of the Hawaii schools that attended the competition are public schools and participants in PBS Hawaii’s HIKI NŌ student news network.

Last year, Hawaii schools brought home 28 awards from the STN Convention. As in the last few STN competitions, the number of awards won by Hawaii schools was notably high in comparison to states with larger populations, such as California, Florida, and Texas.

“Without a doubt, the stellar performance by Hawaii schools at STN is due to the work our schools have done with HIKI NŌ and PBS Hawaii,” said Kevin Matsunaga, Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School media teacher and STN regional board member. “Our students have developed solid technical and storytelling skills through our workshops throughout the year. Our Hawaii media teachers have worked tirelessly, as well, and the outstanding work their students have done at these competitions is proof that HIKI NŌ is making a huge difference in the lives of our students.”

The Hawaii school awards count was led by Maui Waena Intermediate’s nine, followed by Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School with eight, and Waianae High School with six. There were a number of first-time awardees among the Hawaii schools, including Kapolei High School, Waipahu Intermediate School, and Ewa Makai Middle School.

Ewa Makai media teacher Ethan Toyota said his students were “in shock” when they won two honorable mention awards in the commercial and public service announcement categories. “We wouldn’t be here without all the training and help HIKI NŌ has contributed in getting us off the ground,” he said.

“HIKI NŌ offers students the ideal preparation for this national competition and it also readies them for different professional paths — by teaching them to work their way through challenges and deliver quality work on tight deadlines,” said Leslie Wilcox, PBS Hawaii President and CEO.

“Congratulations to all of the students that participated in this rigorous competition in which they represented their schools and our state well,” said Kathryn Matayoshi, Hawaii Department of Education Superintendent. “PBS Hawaii is a valued partner for providing opportunities like HIKI NŌ. The teamwork and use of technology needed to create these quality productions align with the Department’s mission to help our students connect with their communities and be lifelong learners.”

2016 Student Television Network – Hawaii Winners:

MIDDLE SCHOOL CONVENTION RE-CAP

2nd Place – CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

3rd Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE (Maui)

HIGH SCHOOL CONVENTION RE-CAP

Honorable Mention — WAIANAE HIGH SCHOOL (Oahu)

MIDDLE SCHOOL SPOT FEATURE

2nd Place — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

3rd Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

LEAD STORY

3rd Place — MOANALUA HIGH SCHOOL (Oahu)

MAN ON THE STREET

3rd Place — MOANALUA HIGH SCHOOL (Oahu)

MIDDLE SCHOOL MOVIE TRAILER

Honorable Mention — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

MIDDLE SCHOOL NAT. PACKAGE (No announcer, only interview soundbites and natural sound)

1st Place — WAIANAE INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Oahu)

2nd Place — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

Honorable Mention—MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

MIDDLE SCHOOL COMMERCIAL

1st Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

Honorable Mention — EWA MAKAI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Oahu)

MIDDLE SCHOOL PSA (Public Service Announcement)

1st Place — CHIEFESS KAMAKHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

3rd Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

Honorable Mention — EWA MAKAI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Oahu)

MIDDLE SCHOOL BREAKING NEWS

1st Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

MIDDLE SCHOOL ANCHOR TEAM

1st Place — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

MIDDLE SCHOOL MUSIC VIDEO

1st Place — WAIPAHU INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Oahu)

2nd Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

Honorable Mention — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC VIDEO

Honorable Mention — KAPOLEI HIGH SCHOOL (Oahu)

CRAZY 8’s (In these categories, schools had eight hours to complete an eight-minute show)

MIDDLE SCHOOL BROADCAST NEWS MAGAZINE

Honorable Mention — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

TV SCRIPTED SITCOM PILOT

Honorable Mention — WAIAKEA HIGH SCHOOL (Hawaii Island)

MIDDLE SCHOOL SHORT FILM—FICTION

1st Place — CHIEFESS KAMAKAHELEI MIDDLE SCHOOL (Kauai)

2nd Place — MAUI WAENA INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Maui)

3rd Place — WAIPAHU INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (Oahu)

STN FILM EXCELLENCE AWARDS (entries submitted prior to the competition)

BEST FILM – LIVE ACTION – Waianae High School (Oahu)

BEST FILM – ANIMATED –Waianae High School (Oahu)

BEST MONTHLY NEWS BROADCAST – SOUTH PACIFIC REGION – Waianae High School (Oahu)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY – Waianae High School (Oahu)

BEST SOUND DESIGN – ORIGINAL SCORE & MUSIC – Moanalua High School (Oahu)

BEST WRITING – Waianae High School (Oahu)

BEST DIRECTING – Moanalua High School (Oahu)