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Hawaii Wildlife Fund Releases New Marine Debris Prevention Curriculum for Elementary School Students

Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund (HWF) is excited to announce the release of our new marine debris prevention curriculum designed for elementary school students around Hawaiʻi.

hwf-kidsOver the past two school years, HWF mentors piloted this curriculum in 20 public schools working with over 52 different teachers and 1,140 students (grade kindergarten to 5th).  HWF mentors worked with students at schools around Hawaiʻi Island: in Kona, Kohala, Kaʻū, Hāmākua, Hilo, and Puna.

beach-clean-up-hwfThe “Marine Debris Keiki Education & Outreach” program teaches children about:

  • Understanding aquatic life and ecosystems (basic marine biology concepts)
  • Marine debris and how land-based litter sources find their way into the sea
  • Exploring what a “discard” really is and how our daily choices affect the amount of trash we produce
  • Vulnerability of island ecosystems and communities and the responsibility (kuleana) that we each have to protect them.

The curriculum was designed as a 3-visit program that challenged students to put forward innovative solutions to this global marine-debris problem.  The lessons are aligned with all Common Core and Next Generation Science and other benchmarks relevant to the elementary school level.

innovations-posterAll of the lessons and activities are available for free download from the HWF website or at the following link: http://wildhawaii.org/MDKEO/Su mmaryTeacherEdition.pdf

“It was a great pleasure guest teaching in the many different classrooms around the island.  We look forward to deepening our relationships with Hawaiʻi Island students and teachers in the coming years” said HWF mentor and Education Coordinator, Stacey Breining.


In addition, nine cleanup events were conducted as an optional follow-up component of this program (6 beach cleanups, 2 stream cleanups, 1 campus cleanup).   During these nine cleanup events, 286 students participated in removing over 1,500 lbs. of marine and land-based debris items from the coastline, stream banks, or their campus.

Please contact HWF at marine.debris.KEO@gmail.com or 808-769-7629 for more information or visit the HWF website (www.wildhawaii.org).

Kaiser High Hosts Cultural Exchange With Students From Japan

Kaiser High’s gymnasium was filled anticipation and excitement this morning as the school welcomed more than 300 students from Hokkaido Sapporo Intercultural & Technological High School (HSITHS). The visitors arrived for cultural exchange activities, which included musical performances, speeches and traditional Japanese dance demonstrations.

kaiser-elementary2Before the assembly started sophomore Noah Matsumoto said, “I’m looking forward to meeting the students from Hokkaido. I’m Japanese and have never been to Japan, so it’ll be interesting to have a chance to talk with them and learn about their culture and be able to teach them about ours.”

kaiser-elementary3The group comprised of 13 dignitaries from Hokkaido including Vice Governor Yoshihiro Yamaya who presented a gift to Principal Justin Mew and shared his goal of increasing educational opportunities between Hokkaido and Hawaii.

“Sharing music is a wonderful way to showcase any culture,” said Principal Mew. “We were honored to be able to make our visitors feel welcomed this morning by having our Kaiser High band play the Hokkaido school song to conclude the assembly. It was heartwarming to hear their song and our alma mater played with such pride in front of a packed gym.”

MCLC at Kaiser High.

MCLC at Kaiser High.

Following the assembly, students spread out in small groups throughout the campus to discuss a variety of topics such as Foreign Studies, Science, Engineering, and Global Business. The students also discussed pop culture.

“I was really excited to talk to the students from Hokkaido about fashion,” said sophomore Grailee Caldwell. “This was an incredible opportunity and experience because we were able to meet with them one-on-one and really get to talk about our similarities and differences, like our high school experiences.”

This morning’s cultural exchange was part of ongoing efforts to establish a Sister-State agreement between Hokkaido and Hawaii in 2017. It will be the fifth prefecture in Japan to establish a formal relationship with the State.

The Hokkaido students will be in Hawaii until Oct. 23. Their only school visit was with Kaiser High because of the school’s prestigious International Baccalaureate accreditation.

For more information about Kaiser High School, visit www.kaiserhighschoolhawaii.org. Information about the State of Hawaii’s current Sister-States is available at http://bit.ly/2ed14Sl.

Donations Secured to Replace Kids Stolen Laptops

Senator Donovan M. Dela Cruz  secured donations to help in replacing some of the 27 Chromebooks that were taken in a burglary at Wahiawa Middle School last month. Sen. Dela Cruz and the Leilehua Alumni and Community Association will be launching a fundraising drive to raise additional funds to replace the remaining stolen items.

chromebookThe computers that were stolen are needed for a proper learning environment. Sen. Dela Cruz, who is an alumnus of Wahiawa Middle, wanted to act quickly so students would not be without the computers for a long period.

“As schools move forward with an education based in science, technology, engineering, and math, the right equipment is vital to building their skills,” said Sen. Dela Cruz. “The Leilehua Alumni and Community Association will play a critical role as schools make this transition. Whether it be donating computers or receiving grants for educational programs, the Association exists to assist all schools in the Leilehua complex.”

Additional Chromebooks, along with a MacBook Pro laptop, and an LCD projector are still needed. The Leilehua Alumni and Community Association is asking the community to make a small donation so they can continue to support our students. More information on the fundraising drive is forthcoming.

Anyone with information on this case is asked to call the Honolulu Police Department. Police are still seeking leads on the suspects wanted for the burglary.

Kids Halloween Party Moved to Edith Kanaka‘ole Multi-Purpose Stadium

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation announces it has moved the Halloween Hilo Kids Party from Pana‘ewa Park to Edith Kanaka‘ole Multi-Purpose Stadium located at 350 Kalanikoa Street in Hilo.

halloween-partyOpen to all ages, the free event will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Monday, October 31.

The Department of Parks and Recreation apologizes for any inconvenience the venue change might cause and thanks the public for its understanding to utilize a different venue with more parking to accommodate the large number of participants.

For more information, please contact Jason Armstrong, Public Information Officer, at 961-8311 or Jason.Armstrong@hawaiicounty.gov.

UH Hilo Appointment of Administrators

University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Matthew Platz announces the appointment of two deanship positions following the UH Board of Regents meeting held today on O`ahu. The positions take effect November 1, 2016.

uh-hilo-monikerDr. Bruce Mathews has been appointed permanent dean of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management. He previously served as acting dean from January – July 2012, then interim dean to present.

A 1986 graduate of UH Hilo, Mathews joined the University in 1993 as a Temporary Assistant Professor of Soils & Agronomy and became a tenure-track assistant professor two years later. His areas of research include plant nutrient cycling and soil fertility as affected by environmental conditions and crop management, assessment of the impact of agricultural and forestry production practices on soil, coastal wetlands, and surface waters, and the development of environmentally sound and economically viable nutrient management practices for pastures, forests, and field crops in the tropics.

He received an M.S. in agronomy from Louisiana State University and a Ph.D. in agronomy & soils from the University of Florida.

“As a graduate, faculty member and most recently interim dean, Bruce has unrivaled knowledge of this College, its mission, and its potential,” said Chancellor Don Straney. “I can think of no one else who better understands our responsibility to the community and the entire state of Hawaiʻi than Bruce Mathews.”

Dr. Drew Martin will serve as interim dean of the College of Business and Education. He joined UH Hilo in August 2004 and most recently served as professor of marketing. He has over 25 years of higher education teaching experience that spans three countries. Currently, he is also an affiliate faculty member of Daito Bunka University’s (Japan) Business Research Institute and the University of Hawaiʻi at Manoa’s Center for Japanese Studies.

Martin received a B.A. and an MBA in business administration from Pacific Lutheran University, and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Hawai’i at Manoa.

His intellectual contributions include extensive research on consumer behavior. He has published 65 research papers and book chapters.

“Drew is an intellectual heavyweight with an extensive professional background in business, government and academia,” Platz said. “His extensive research and publications have earned him international acclaim and numerous invitations to speak with emerging scholars on how to get their research published in leading academic journals.”

Farrah-Marie Gomes Appointed UH Hilo Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs

University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Chancellor Donald Straney today announced the appointment of Farrah-Marie Gomes as the University’s new permanent vice chancellor for student affairs following the UH Board of Regents meeting held today on O`ahu. The appointment is effective December 1, 2016.

uh-hilo-monikerGomes currently serves as interim associate vice president for student affairs for the UH System, a position she has held since April 1, 2016. Prior to that, she served as founding director of the North Hawaiʻi Education and Research Center since its inception in 2006, and from 2011-2016, also served as interim dean of the College of Continuing Education and Community Service. She is active in numerous university and community committees.

Gomes received her B.A. in psychology and sociology from UH Hilo in 1998, Masters in counseling psychology from Chaminade University in Honolulu in 2000, and a Ph.D. in educational studies with a specialization in educational leadership and higher education from the University of Nebraska in Lincoln in 2016.

“Farrah is a dynamic leader who has effectively served our students and community in numerous administrative roles,” Straney said. “She also possesses tremendous energy, vision and a special capacity to connect with various constituencies, which will help the Division of Student Affairs serve the needs of our students.”

Gomes succeeds Interim Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Gail Makuakane-Lundin, who returns to the position of Executive Assistant to the Chancellor.

“We all deeply appreciate the outstanding and tireless job Gail has done as interim vice chancellor for student affairs,” Straney said. “I now look forward to her putting those same unique skills and versatility to work again as a member of my executive team.”

Big Island, UH Hilo to Host PWC Cross Country Championships

When the University of Hawai`i Hilo hosts the Pacific West Conference Cross Country Championships this Saturday (Oct. 22), one thing is certain… the course will be unlike any other that the teams have run on this season, or maybe ever.

uhh-xcThe jungle trail at Kamehameha School Hawai`i will feature grass, gravel, mud and likely, standing water. There will be a mixture of hill and flat. There could be rain, and it will be warm and humid.

In other words, this is no walk in the park.

“It is a true cross country course,” said Vulcan head coach Jaime Guerpo. “Other than the Hawaii schools that were here for our meet early in the year, this will be a new experience for everyone else. It’s a fair course, and it is challenging, which in my mind is perfect for a championship meet.”

14 schools will make their way to Hilo and Keaau, flying in from Utah, northern California, southern California and Oahu. 14 men’s teams will compete in the 7:30 a.m. race, and 12 women’s squads (including UHH) will run at 8:30 a.m.

In both races, California Baptist University is the defending champion. In fact, the Lancers have won the last five championships on the men’s side, and the last two trophies in the women’s race. Individually, 2015 PacWest champion Eileen Stressling from Azusa Pacific is back. The junior is running strong again this season and was named the PacWest Runner of the Week earlier in the month after crossing the line as the top Division II finisher at the Stanford Invitational.

CBU is ranked 17th nationally this week in the men’s NCAA Division II poll, with Academy of Art at No. 24. On the women’s side, the Lancers are No. 8 in this week’s national listing, with Point Loma at No. 16.

Hawai`i Hilo hosted the very first PacWest Cross Country Championships in 2006, on their campus. The conference was much smaller back then, but now nearly 250 student-athletes will race and many more coaches, administrators, parents and fans will travel to the Big Island for the event.

“We are pleased to host this event for a number of reasons,” said Vulcan athletic director Patrick Guillen. “We are excited to show off the Big Island to our fellow PacWest universities and we look forward to putting on a quality event. At the same time, these championships bring in significant tourism dollars to Hilo and the surrounding communities, and we feel privileged to partner with local businesses to help make this a great experience for all involved.”

Dr. Tam Vu, Chair of the UHH Business Administration and Economics department, confirmed that teams visiting Hilo bring in significant dollars.

“Between airfare, rental vehicles, hotel rooms, restaurants and shopping, there will be significant spending,” said Vu, who along with
Dr. Eric Im compiled the long-run impact for this event. “That includes spending in Oahu and the Big Island. The number on the Big Island can be estimated at over a half million dollars ($556,100) including the leakage spending due to the larger number of Big Island residents shopping in Oahu in the future, and with Oahu as the base for Hawaiian Airlines, their number is close to $400,000 ($390,700). That brings you close to a million dollars ($946,800) in long term impact.”

United Nations Official to Address Global Refugee Crisis at UH Hilo

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo observes United Nations Day with a public lecture by Robert Skinner, director of the United Nations Information Centre in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, October 25 at 2 p.m. in UCB Room 100. Skinner’s talk, entitled “Global Refugee Crisis: Finding a Way Forward,” will focus on the current crisis and discuss UN efforts to mitigate such crises.

Robert Skinner

Robert Skinner

Skinner was appointed to his current position by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on November 9, 2015. He previously held leadership positions in the United Nations Foundation New York Office as executive director and the United States Department of State as deputy spokesperson at the United States Mission to the United Nations in New York. He was also a public affairs officer for the United States Embassy in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago.

The talk is sponsored by the UNA-USA Hawaiʻi Chapter, the UH Hilo Political Science Department, and the UH Hilo International Student Services & Intercultural Education program.

For more information, contact Dr. Su-Mi Lee at 932-7127 or email sumilee@hawaii.edu.

Hilo Elks Drug Awareness Contests Announced

The Drug Awareness Program of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (BPOE) is dedicated to preventing the use of illicit drugs by the youth of our country as well as informing them of the dangers caused by the use of legal drugs such as alcohol and tobacco. As part of the program, Hilo Elks Lodge is inviting east Hawaii youth to send in their submissions to the Drug Awareness Poster, Essay, and Video contests.

just-say-noThe theme for this year’s contests is “Just Say No”. The following is information about each contest.


  • All students in the 3rd to 5th grades are eligible to participate.
  • Poster size is 8.5” x 11”. Posters should be grammatically correct.
  • Use of copyrighted characters on the poster, except Elroy the Elk, is prohibited. All entries will become the property of BPOE.
  • Posters are judged based on the theme, originality, neatness, grammar, and without copyrighted characters (except Elroy).
  • Judging goes through local lodge (Hilo), district (Hawaii State), and state (California-Hawaii) levels. State winning poster will be submitted for entry into the National Elks contest and for inclusion in the Elks Drug Awareness Program Coloring Book.


  • All students in the 6th, 7th, & 8th grades are eligible to participate.
  • Essays are to be 250 words or less and typed, computer generated text, hand written or hand printed on 8.5” x 11” paper.
  • Each Essay must be in a single file folder.
  • Essays are judged based on closeness to the theme, neatness, originality, and correct grammatical structure.
  • Judging will go through local lodge (Hilo), district (Hawaii State), and state (California-Hawaii) levels.


  • Individual or group entries from pre-high school, high school, and post graduate are welcome.
  • Videos should be 2 minutes to 5 minutes long on a flash drive or similar “mobile” media in readable format.
  • Videos should be based on this year’s theme “Just Say No” and have an anti-abuse message or making the right choice (e.g. anti-bullying, etc.)
  • Videos should not depict any copyrighted characters or Trademarks with the exception of “Elroy the Elk”.
  • All video entries will become the property of BPOE.

Judging will be based on closeness to the theme, neatness, originality, age and language appropriateness, positive message, and quality of video.


If selected, submitter will be contacted to fill out consent and waiver forms.

There will be 19 district winners of $100 each. State winners include one 3rd place of $300, one 2nd place of $400, and one 1st place of $500.

For more information, please contact the Hilo Elks Lodge at 935-1717 or email hiloelks@gmail.com.

Temple Children Brings Global Artists, Public Art to Hilo

This week, seven globally renowned artists are on Hawai‘i Island to paint large-scale, sustainability-themed murals throughout Downtown Hilo.
The concerted effort to beautify and revitalize the community is the third public art activation of its kind driven by Temple Children, an arts and sustainability organization that coordinates projects to strengthen communities, promote social and environmental innovation, and incite positive global change.
The public and media are invited to drop by the following locations between Wednesday, October 19 and Saturday, October 21, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. to view artists paint live:

  • Hilo Backpacker’s Hostel on Waianuenue Ave // Artists: Rick Hayward and Emily Devers (Brisbane, Australia)
  • Agasa Furniture Store on Ponahawai St // Artist: Yoskay Yamamoto (Toba, Japan)
  • Downtown KTA Super Stores on Keawe St // Artist: Kai Kaulukukui (Puna, Hawai‘i)
  • Former Ebesugawa Flower Shop on Furneaux Ln // Artist: Jet Martinez (Oakland, California)
  • Hana Hou Hilo on Bayfront // Artist: Brandy Serikaku (Hilo, Hawai‘i)
  • Nikisa Properties Building on Ponahawai + Kinoole // Artist: Sam Yong (Auckland, New Zealand)

The public art and sustainability project is made possible with financial support from Novo Painting (Cole and Lisa Palea), OluKai, K. Taniguchi, Ltd., Hana Hou Hilo, Agasa Furniture Store and PUEO.

HPM Building Supply donated Pratt & Lambert paint; ladders and lifts supplied by Takamine Construction; and artist meals donated by Sweet Cane Café, Aloha Mondays and Loved by the Sun. Additional local donations were provided by Moon and Turtle, Big Island Booch, OK Farms, The Locavore Store, Island Naturals and Shark’s Coffee. Onsite support and keiki volunteers provided by Circle of Life Hilo’s Leandra Keuma and local artist Kathleen Kam.
Aside from painting, artists participated in a lo‘i restoration workday in Waipi‘o Valley organized by local non-profit Pōhāhā I Ka Lani. To round out the artists’ stay, Kilauea EcoGuides will lead an educational hike to the lava flow prior to artists’ departure.

The October project is led by Temple Children founders, Miya Tsukazaki and David “MEGGS” Hooke, and Regional Director Ashley Kierkiewicz. It is being documented by Cory S. Martin, a freelance cinematographer, director and editor based in Buffalo, New York.

The murals are expected to be complete by Sunday, October 23.

Hawaii Governor Appoints Darrel Galera to Board of Education

Gov. David Ige has appointed former public school teacher and principal Darrel Galera to the Board of Education.

Darrel Galera was appointed to the Board of Education today.

Darrel Galera was appointed to the Board of Education today.

Galera has a rich background in public education in Hawai‘i. He is the School Leadership Consultant and Coach for the Hawai‘i Center for Instructional Leadership and is currently serving as chairman of the Governor’s ESSA Team (Every Student Succeeds Act).

Galera began his career in education as a social studies teacher at Moanalua High School where he was named Teacher of the Year in 1984. He has also served as principal at Shafter Elementary, S.W. King Intermediate, ‘Aiea Elementary, Moanalua High and Castle High. Galera has been recognized as the Hawai‘i National Distinguished High School Principal of the Year, Central O‘ahu District Principal of the Year and the U.S. Presidential Scholar Program’s Distinguished Teacher, 1989 (Washington, D.C.).

A graduate of Waipahu High School, Galera earned a master’s degree in Educational Administration and bachelor’s degree in Secondary Social Studies at the University of Hawai‘i.

“Darrel has been instrumental in engaging the public all across the state to help build the blueprint for our public school system. His service on the board will help bridge the work of the Board of Education and the ESSA Team,” said Gov. Ige.

“It’s truly an honor and privilege to serve our students and schools. I’m inspired by Governor Ige’s vision and plan for public education in Hawai‘i,” Galera said.

Galera replaces Jim Williams who resigned from the board last month.

Hawaii DOE Renames School to Honor Late US Senator Daniel K. Inouye

The Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) celebrated the renaming of Daniel K. Inouye Elementary School, formerly Hale Kula Elementary, this morning with a special ceremony and unveiling of the school’s multimillion-dollar renovation. The Hawaii State Board of Education approved the renaming earlier this year in honor of the late US Senator and his contributions to public education and military-impacted families and students in Hawaii.

Dignitaries, administrators and students help Sen. Inouye's son, Ken, unveil the new school sign. Photo Credits: Department of Education

Dignitaries, administrators and students help Sen. Inouye’s son, Ken, unveil the new school sign. Photo Credits: Department of Education

“Senator Inouye was a stanch supporter of our public schools, and his commitment to education has resulted in millions of dollars in federal resources for our students,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “It is an honor to name the school after Hawaii’s beloved Senator, and we are proud to be able to carry on his legacy through the work of our administrators, teachers and students.”

Daniel K. Inouye Elementary is located at Schofield Barracks, which was the home the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the unit that Senator Inouye served in during World War II. The school recently underwent a $33.2 million dollar renovation, which was funded largely by the U.S. Department of Defense ($26.6 million) and HIDOE ($6.6 million). The upgrades included a new two-story classroom building, student center, additional classrooms, library-media center, a new covered play court, and facelifts to the administration building and existing classrooms.

“This school has historic ties to Senator Inouye,” Principal Jan Iwase said. “This school was opened in 1959 when Hawaii became a state and Senator Inouye was first elected to Washington. He always cared about education and the military, and this campus is a combination of both.”

Ken Inouye shared that his father would be grateful for the naming of the school adding, “My father would always say that education isn’t just about learning – it’s about transformation.”

The senator’s family donated several items to the school that are featured for students and visitors to see, including Senator Inouye’s Purple Heart, photos and military coins he earned in the military as given while a lawmaker.

Major General Christopher Cavoli praised the renaming of the school stating, “His legacy showed each of us that service is at the heart of a community. I don’t believe there is a more fitting role-model for the students who learn within these walls.”

  Photo #1 The remodeled library is just one part of the multimillion-dollar campus-wide renovation.

Photo #1
The remodeled library is just one part of the multimillion-dollar campus-wide renovation.

The school’s new buildings include state of the art designs that allow for natural lighting, and heat reducing roofing material.

Daniel K. Inouye Elementary School currently services more than 800 students from special education pre-school to fifth grade. For more information about the school, visit http://www.inouye.k12.hi.us/.

Got Drugs? Drug Take-Back Booth Joins UH Hilo College of Pharmacy Health Fair

Student pharmacists from the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (DKICP) will be assisting the National Take-Back Initiative at DKICP’s 8th Annual Health Fair on Saturday, October 22, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m, at the Prince Kuhio Plaza. This is the first time the national event has coincided with DKICP’s health fair.

got-drugs-2016The purpose of the Prescription Take-Back booth is to turn in any unused or expired medications for safe, anonymous disposal. New or used needles and syringes will not be accepted.

The student pharmacists also hope to educate the general public about the potential for abuse of medications. In Hawai’i, more than 22,300 pounds of drugs have been safely collected and disposed. Nationwide, the take-backs have collected over 3,200 tons of pharmaceuticals.

The National Take-Back Initiative is a nationwide effort led by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in partnership with the Department of Public Safety, Narcotics Enforcement Division and Department of the Attorney General, Crime Prevention and Justice Assistance Division.

For more information, contact Tracey Niimi at 932-7139.

Hawaii Innocence Project Event Will Test Reliability of Eyewitness Identification

Could you be a reliable eyewitness? Want to test your skills with some expert attorneys?


On Tuesday, October 4, 2016, in recognition of “International Wrongful Conviction Day,” the Hawai‘i Innocence Project will challenge audience members to see how well they can identify a possible suspect in a mock exercise at the UH Law School.

The program, titled “Eyewitness Identification,” is scheduled from 12 noon to 1:15 p.m. in Classroom 2.  Lunch is available in the courtyard; donations are welcome.  Similar programs are taking place across the nation and around the world.

“Eyewitness Identification” aims to demonstrate pitfalls in the standard technique that has been used in courtrooms for decades. Documentation has begun to show that faulty eyewitness identification accounts for as much as 75 percent of all wrongful convictions, according to Innocence Project data.

The Hawai‘i Innocence Project is run by faculty members at the William S. Richardson School of Law, with assistance from community attorneys. In 2011, using advanced DNA testing technology, the Hawai‘i project succeeded in having Alvin Francis Jardine exonerated after he spent almost 20 years in prison for a rape and burglary he consistently maintained that he did not commit. The national organization has freed several hundred wrongly incarcerated people by using advanced DNA testing.

As part of the national Innocence Project network, Faculty Specialist Kenneth Lawson and Associate Dean Ronette Kawakami head the project and work with other attorneys on cases in Hawai‘i.  Said Law Dean Avi Soifer, “Our faculty and students, along with our cooperating attorneys, deserve great admiration for their passionate, tireless work to free those who have been unjustly imprisoned.”

The October 4 program will help show just how fallible eyewitness testimony can be.

Mark Alan Vocal Works Brings A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias to Hilo

Local singing students from Mark Alan Vocal Works, Mark Sheffield’s voice studio, together with singers from his UH Hilo voice studio, will present a recital of (mostly) classical songs and arias.  Together with legendary pianist Quack Moore and the new vocal ensemble VOICES, they bring their unique interpretations of classics and modern favorites to Hilo. Showtime is Friday, September 30, at 7:30 p.m. at Hilo’s Church of the Holy Cross. Admission is free.  For more information, call 238-6040.


A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias presents singers in various stages of vocal development – from young beginners to experienced performers – in a recital designed to showcase and celebrate their particular strengths.  Singers include RyAnne Raffipiy, Landon Ballesteros, Samantha Saiki, Rachel Edwards, Amy Horst, and Bridge Hartman, along with Mark Sheffield, who teaches the other singers. Students from Mark’s private Vocal Works studio join singers from his UH Hilo voice studio to bring to life songs of love, heartbreak, joy, and beauty.

VOICES, a new vocal ensemble also led by Mark Sheffield, joins the concert with a return to their roots. They will perform their signature motet, “The Silver Swan” by Orlando Gibbons.  The solo singers follow, celebrating classics including old Italian songs “O cessate di piagarmi” and “Caro mio ben;” while bringing to life arias such as “Si, mi chiamano Mimi” from La Boheme and Rachmaninoff’s haunting “Vocalise.” The recital earns its (mostly) classical label with the performance of pop tunes by Adele and Billy Joel, and sizzling Broadway hits including Sondheim’s great song “Being Alive.”

Mark Sheffield maintains a busy private voice studio in Hilo, where he has taught both privately and at UH Hilo for ten years. 2016 saw the inauguration of Mark’s Vocal Works program, designed to provide both individual training and theory-based practical education in the vocal arts. This year also saw the inception of VOICES, a vocal ensemble comprised of Mark’s advanced students from both his Vocal Works and UH Hilo studios. Mark is joined at the helm of this recital by Quack Moore, the Grammy-winning pianist of Hilo Palace Theater and Saturday Night Live fame, who now devotes much of her time to supporting and promoting young musicians.

When asked how he came to create A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias, Mark said, “For a decade now, my students have performed in joint studio recitals given by my wife, piano teacher Katie Sheffield, and I. Beyond this, my students have performed to acclaim in shows locally and around the country, as they pursue studies, work, and dreams of Broadway success. Now we invite our friends and our community to a recital of our very own.  Thank you, Hilo, for supporting vocal music. We look forward to singing for you.”

A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias comes to Hilo September 30, 2016, at 7:30 p.m. at Hilo’s Church of the Holy Cross for one show only.  Admission is free.  Call 238-6040 for more information.

UHH Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy 8th Annual Health Fair

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy presents its 8th Annual Health Fair on Saturday, October 22, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Prince Kuhio Plaza in Hilo.

(l-r) Late Sen. Gilbert Kahele, a big supporter of the pharmacy college, stands with Class of 2016 students Josen Ho, David Ung and Miraya Talavera, who were tending a booth at the fair in 2014.

(l-r) Late Sen. Gilbert Kahele, a big supporter of the pharmacy college, stands with Class of 2016 students Josen Ho, David Ung and Miraya Talavera, who were tending a booth at the fair in 2014.

More than 150 student pharmacists will host education booths, health screenings, and giveaways. There also will be live demonstrations, entertainment, and a keiki poster contest for elementary- and middle-school students.

Participating organizations include Aloha Care, Bone Marrow Registry, Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes, Crisis Line of Hawaiʻi, Hawaiʻi Island Diabetes Coalition, Hawaiian Islands AIDS and HIV Foundation, HMSA, Hui Malama Hawaiʻi, Medical Reserve Corps, NAMI – National Alliance of Mental Illness – Big Island, Partners in Developments, Senior Medicare Patrol, The Arc of Hilo and The Food Basket.

For more information, contact Tracey Niimi at 933-7663 or tniimi@hawaii.edu.

Dept. of Education Reminds Parents to Secure Vehicles in School Parking Lots

The Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) reminds parents to always secure their vehicles in school parking lots to prevent thefts.  Five vehicle break-ins using similar methods of entry have occurred at East Oahu public schools in September during after-school hours.  In each case, vehicle windows were broken and small items inside were stolen, including purses, bags, cell phones and laptop computers.


“Parents are reminded to be vigilant and always remove valuables or hide them from direct sight,”said HIDOE spokesperson Donalyn Dela Cruz.  “Although there is normally lots of activity on campuses during afterschool hours, such crimes of opportunity can take place in seconds, especially when valuables are left in plain sight.”

Parents can take actions to make their vehicle less attractive to property theft, including avoiding leaving valuables inside in open view, locking valuables in the trunk and installing anti-theft alarm systems.  Bags, such as backpacks and shopping bags, may be seen as a carrier of valuables by thieves and should be hidden from view.

Hawaii Preschool Open Doors Application Period Begins Today

The Department of Human Services encourages families to apply for its Preschool Open Doors (POD) program between Monday, September 19 and Monday, October 31, 2016.  Applications received during this period will be considered for preschool participation during January 1, 2017 and June 30, 2017.

preschool-open-doorsThis program, which currently serves more than 1,300 children statewide, provides child care subsidies to eligible low- and moderate-income families to pay preschool tuition. POD aims to provide children whose families might otherwise not be able to afford preschool the opportunity to gain essential skills to be successful in school and in life.

To qualify for the program, children must be eligible to enter kindergarten in the 2017-2018 school year (born between August 1, 2011 and July 31, 2012). Families are reminded that a child must be five years old on or before July 31 to enter kindergarten. Families may choose any one of the 438 State-licensed preschools. Underserved or at-risk children receive priority consideration for the POD program, and funds are limited.

Interested families may request an application beginning Monday, September 19, 2016 from the Department’s POD contractor, PATCH, by visiting www.patchhawaii.org or calling 791-2130 or toll free 1-800-746-5620.  PATCH can also help families locate a preschool convenient for them.

Applications must be received by October 31, 2016 to be considered during the January 1, 2017-June 30, 2017 program period. Applications should be dropped off, mailed, or faxed to the following:

560 N. Nimitz Hwy, Suite 218
Honolulu, HI 96817
Fax: (808) 694-3066

Eligibility and priorities for POD program selection are detailed in HAR §17-799, which is available online at humanservices.hawaii.gov/admin-rules-2/admin-rules-for-programs. For more information about other DHS programs and services, visit humanservices.hawaii.gov

“Sea to Sky” – Rebuilding Hōkūalaka’i

A free youth event called “Sea to Sky” will be held this weekend.  This event is designed to bring different aspects of our island together with the common purpose of rebuilding the voyaging canoe, Hōkūalaka’i.  The Hōkūalaka’i will be used for teaching purposes on Hawaiʻi Island and beyond. Hōkūalakaʻi’s home is in the same location (Palekai) that the historic Hōkūleʻa departed from on its world wide voyage.

hokulakaiThis will be the first of many “Sea to Sky” events at Palekai in Hilo.  It will be an all day event with something for everyone to enjoy.  We have invited many members of the scientific field to have fun educational learning stations available for kids and all participants will be hosted with great food and activities. The focus of the monthly events are structured to:

  • Unite community in helping to restore the voyaging canoe, Hōkūalaka’i.
  • Promote indigenous knowledge in science programs
  • Increase cultural relevance
  • Create opportunities to pursue careers in science and culture education fields

The schedule for the September 24th will be:

  • 8:00-8:30am Informal meet, setup and discuss days activities and work planned for the canoe.
  • 8:45-9:30am ‘awa ceremony and welcome
  • 9:30-11:30am Work on Hōkūalakaʻi, Visit Learning Stations, and Site Beautification Project
  • 11:30-12:30pm Lunch
  • 1:00-4:30 Paddling, Sailing, Swimming (Ocean Activities)
  • 4:30-5:00 Closing talk and cleanup

We will have “Learning Stations” and a variety of organizations joining us each week. Come down to Palekai and join in the community effort to restore Hōkūalakaʻi and help our youth learn about the science and culture that is happening on the Big Island.

If you would like to setup a booth to help educate kids, please contact us!  This will be an on-going event to share Hawaii’s Science and Culture with our youth and each other.  We will be publishing more details and our upcoming events on our website: http://alohapueo.org/pueo-events

THURSDAY: 6th Annual Kipimana Cup – Keaau vs. Kamehameha

The Keaau Cougars will host the 6th Annual Kipimana Cup challenging the Kamehameha Warriors Thursday, this time with a new head coach who happens to be a former coach for Kamehameha.

“We are excited to host the Kipimana Cup at our campus this year,” said Iris McGuire, Keaau High School’s athletic director. “We have a new coach and style of football at Keaau High School,” she noted, referring to Aurellio Abellera, who was the defense coach for the Warriors before opting to lead the Cougars.

Hosted by W.H. Shipman, Limited, which calls Keaau home, the Kipimana Cup is a goodwill football game between the public and private schools located within a few miles radius in Keaau.

“Every year it is encouraging to see the attitude of friendship tied to this particular competition,” said Bill Walter, president of W.H. Shipman, Limited. “Team leadership has been effective in instilling what we all hoped that attitude would be: we can play hard, we can compete to win a game and we can compete here in Keaau in a spirit of good will. Similarly, we encourage incoming businesses to recognize this as a special place to do business and to work together to create an environment where our customers want to come to do business.”

Dan Lyons, head football coach for the Kamehameha Schools Keaau campus, noted the Kipimana Cup is a way of “creating a competition” among the two schools and their athletes, “but also an acknowledgement of sportsmanship” that exists between the two schools. “I just think it’s a really good thing for the community, building community togetherness with both of us being in Keaau.”

He noted that W.H. Shipman, Limited is rooted in the history of both schools, with the land originally owned by the family owned company. As for Keaau’s new coach being one of his former staffers, Lyons thinks it’s “awesome.”

“’Leo’ is a really good guy and a really good catch,” Lyons said. Noting the Cougars have already won a couple of games, he said Abellera will bring “structure, organization, character, and integrity” to the Keaau team. “I mean, he’s a very good coach and great guy. It obviously leaves a void in our program, but it certainly helps Big Island football be better.”

“I coached with Dan for the last three years, and he helped me bring back the fun in coaching and football,” Abellera said. He has actually been a math teacher at Keaau High School for the last 16 years, and this is his second time coaching there. “My dad got sick and footballl didn’t seem fun anymore,” he said.

It was Lyons and the Kamehameha Warriors that got him back into coaching. With Kamehameha on solid ground, and the Cougars in need of help, Abellera returned to Keaau.

For the Kipimana Cup Thursday, Kamehameha will show up with four wins and one loss to Kealakehe, in their most recent game on Friday. Keaau, meanwhile, will face off with the Kamehameha Warriors with two wins and one loss, having defeated the Honokaa Dragons in their most recent game last week.

Thursday’s Kipimana Cup will be a league game for both teams. Kamehameha Schools and Keaau High School didn’t always play against each other, being in different divisions — Keaau being in Division 1 and Kamehameha being in Division 2.  The Big Island Interscholastic Federation League ultimately changed that, but not before W.H. Shipman, Ltd. first pitched the annual Kipimana Cup six years ago.

W.H. Shipman, Limited provides $500 to each of the school’s booster clubs following the game, and a trophy to the winning team.
The Kamehameha Warriors have won all five of the previous Kipimana Cups, but that may be a different story this year with Abellera leading the Keaau Cougars, Lyons acknowledged.

Kamehameha School’s Hawai‘i campus opened on former W.H. Shipman land in 2001 and has an enrollment of a little over 1,000 students, grades K-12, while Keaau High School has an enrollment of 880 children, grades 9-12.  The school first opened in 1998, also on Shipman property.

Kipimana is how Hawaiians historically referred to Shipman. W.H. Shipman, Limited staff came up with the idea for the Kipimana Cup six years ago.

Based in the Puna for the last 130 years, W.H. Shipman, Limited currently has 17,000 acres in and around Keaau, and is active in agriculture and commercial/ industrial development and leasing. Shipman holds a long-range view toward sustainability and planned development for balanced community use.

Thursday’s Kipimana Cup will be held at Keaau High School.  Kickoff for the varsity game is expected to start around 7:30 p.m., a half hour after the 5 p.m. junior varsity game ends. Expect to pay a nominal admission.

Contact Walter at 966-9325 for more details.