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Big Island Chocolate Festival Salutes Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Centennial

With the theme, “Lavalicious – A Chocolate Salute to the 100th Birthday of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park,” the fifth annual Big Island Chocolate Festival is May 13-14 with events headquartered from the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel. Indulge in the alluring, rich taste of chocolate—in both its sweet and savory forms—while participating in a host of delicious, fun and informative chocolate-themed activities.

Chocolate fest 2013 a

The two-day chocolate extravaganza includes a cacao plantation tour at Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory, a college culinary competition and several public foodie and agriculture-themed seminars. Activities culminate 5:30-9 p.m. Saturday, May 14 with the indoor-outdoor festival gala—enjoy a host of sweet and savory culinary stations presented by top isle chefs, chocolatiers and confectioners.

General admission tickets to the gala are $75 and VIP tickets are $100 and include early event access at 5 p.m., table seating and specialty wines.

This year’s event celebrates the 100th birthday of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and culinary booths will be judged on how they best depict the event theme that could include Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes, Hawaiian culture and the park’s native plants and animals. Biology, geology and culture define the 333,086-acre national park, which was established August 1, 1916.

Chocolate Demo

Culinary stations will also be vying for awards in a variety of categories judged by a panel of celebrity chefs: “best” bonbon, savory, bean-to-bar, plated dessert and Hawaiian cacao. Attendees can get in on the friendly voting by casting a ballot for two People’s Choice Awards: Best Savory and Best Sweet.

Festivities will include fine wines and handcrafted ales, chocolate sculptures—including one of the largest volcanoes ever created using fine chocolate, chocolate body painting, live entertainment, dancing and a silent auction.

Presented by the Kona Cacao Association (KCA), event proceeds benefit the ACF Kona Kohala Chefs Assn./University of Hawai‘i endowment fund for the culinary program at Hawai‘i Community College-Palamanui and programs at Kona Pacific Public Charter School in Kealakekua.

Chocolate Festival Chefs

“We are happy to commemorate the centennial of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park at the Big Island Chocolate Festival,” says KCA President Farsheed Bonakdar. “We look forward to the new booth decorating contest and how our theme will inspire participants.”

Find ticket info at www.BigIslandChocolateFestival.com. Special room/ticket packages for two start at $396.20 at the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel and can be conveniently booked through the Festival website under “Tickets.” Special room rates can be reserved directly at the hotel at www.HapunaBeachPrinceHotel.com/events or calling 1-888-977-4622 and mentioning “Big Island Chocolate Festival Group Rate.”

The Big Island Chocolate Festival is presented by the Kona Cacao Association, Inc. The mission and goal of KCA is to promote the cacao industry on the Big Island of Hawai‘i by presenting BICF as an educational and outreach opportunity for local cacao farmers, the hospitality industry and cacao enthusiasts. For information, visit www.bigislandchocolatefestival.com.

Waipi‘o Valley Stakeholders Alliance Offers United Voice on Bishop Museums Announcement to Sell Its Waipi‘o Valley Lands

On January 8, 2016, Bishop Museum issued a public announcement they are moving forward with the sale of the Amy Greenwell Ethnobotanical Garden in Capt. Cook and 537 acres of land in Waipi‘o Valley.

Green areas represent Bishop Museum Land.

Green areas represent Bishop Museum Land.

While the news has taken most of Hawai‘i by surprise, it is not the case for the Waipi‘o Valley community. Over the past 20 years, the Museum has periodically considered selling it’s Valley holdings, and there have been several proposals by State legislators for the state to purchase the lands, the most recent in 2014.

Since 2013, the Waipi‘o community has undergone major changes, with three of the most committed groups becoming more organized and actively seeking ways to work together collaboratively on matters that impact the Valley and surrounding communities.

In late 2015 the Waipi‘o Taro Farmers Association, the Waipi‘o Community Circle and Ha Ola o Waipi‘o Valley formed the Waipi‘o Valley Stakeholders Alliance as a mechanism to reach general consensus and provide a unified voice when communicating with government officials, Bishop Museum and the general community.

Founded in 1989, the Waipi‘o Taro Farmers Association (WTFA) is the oldest active organization in Waipi‘o Valley. The Association is made up of generational taro farming families who lease the majority of Bishop Museum ’s lands in the Valley. WTFA represents the surviving edge of the Native Hawaiian culture in Waipi‘o Valley and serves as Bishop Museum ’s primary land managers and local community advisors.

Formed in 2000, at the request of 13 community members, the Waipi‘o Community Circle (the Circle), serves as a general community forum. The Waipi‘o Valley Information & Education Officer Program was created by the Circle, as were the five large interpretive signs at the rock wall near the pavilion. A small group of Circle volunteers provided general oversight of the Information & Education Officer program from 2007 until 2014 when the program moved to the Department of Parks & Recreation. This group also represents the efforts of Auntie Ku’ulei Badua who was responsible for initiating “Friends of the Waipi‘o Community Park ” (the former Rice/Thomas property, at the Waipi’o lookout).

Founded in 2014 Ha Ola o Waipi‘o Valley (Ha Ola) is a membership organization of Valley residents, farmers, cultural educators and practitioners, and Waipi‘o tour operators. The organization is guided by elected Officers with support from the County of Hawaii , the State of Hawaii , Kamehameha Schools and Friends of the Future. Ha Ola was formed to provide representation for Valley stakeholders who were not recognized in the State’s 2013 proposed Senate Bill to purchase Bishop Museum’s lands in Waipi‘o. Among Ha Ola’s current projects are River Maintenance in collaboration with WTFA, stewardship of Kamehameha Schools Valley beach parcels, eradication of Little Fire Ants in the Valley and a 2016 Kalo Festival.

The Waipi‘o Valley Stakeholders Alliance, combines the strengths of all available community and advisory resources and is committed to protecting current lessees and ensuring the community has a lead voice in proactively engaging Bishop Museum in discussions about the future stewardship of its’ Waipi‘o Valley lands.

For more information about the Alliance contact:

Alliance Community Liaison: Jim Cain, Cell: 333-0457 kinglaulau@hotmail.com

Alliance Culture & Education Liaison: Ka‘iulani Pahio, Cell: 960-5272 kaiulani@kalo.org

Building and Design Expo Feb. 12-14 – Live Cooking Demo and Book Signing with Sam Choy

The Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce presents the 11th annual Building & Design Expo February 12 – 14 at the Sheraton Kona Resort at Keauhou Bay‘s Kaleiopapa Convention Center.

Celebrity Chef Sam Choy, known for his Hawaiian cuisine, will feature his newest kitchen accessories line, Sam Choy’s Hawaiian Kitchen. He will also do a live cooking demo and book-signing.

Abbas Hassan of Tiki Shark Art, Sam Choy and Kirstin Kahaloa, Executive Director of the Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce

Abbas Hassan of Tiki Shark Art, Sam Choy and Kirstin Kahaloa, Executive Director of the Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce

Touted as “Hawai‘i Island’s largest home show,” more than 40 vendor booths will exhibit their goods and services in the three-day event. From general contracting and materials to home design and décor including fine art, the expo often features furnishings, blinds and shutters, window-tinting, kitchen countertops, cabinets and flooring, pest control PC solar and financing.

Event sponsors include Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union, Hawaii Gas, P.A. Harris Electric, Renewable Energy Services, Sam Choy & Tiki Shark Art and West Hawaii Today. Contact the Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce office at marketing@kona-kohala.com or 808.329.1758.

Breakdancing, Hip Hop, and Gender Roles in Opposing Forces

Kahilu Theatre presents AmyO’Neal’s Opposing Forces.

In Amy O’Neal’s Opposing Forces, five B-Boys from different generations and cultures come together in curiosity, strength, vulnerability, and grace in this dance performance that has one foot squarely in street style dance (hip hop) and one foot in contemporary dance story telling.

In Opposing Forces, choreographer Amy O’Neal examines the paradoxical nature of B-Boy culture as it relates to femininity and the value systems of dance battling, commercial dance, stage performance, and freestyle cyphers (jam circles). How do these different environments affect expression? Where are stereotypes changing and where do they remain the same? O’Neal pries open these topics and more via conversation, collaboration, and transfixing dance moves.

Breakdancing

Opposing Forces Performers and Movement Collaborators consist of:

  • Alfredo “Free” Vergara Jr.
  • Brysen “Just Be” Angeles
  • Fever One
  • Michael O’Neal Jr.
  • Mozeslateef

Amy O’Neal is a dancer, performer, choreographer, and dance educator based in Seattle. For fifteen years, she has taught and performed throughout the US, Japan, Italy, and Mexico, and she has choreographed for stage, commercials, rock shows, galleries, dance films and music videos. Her work is an amalgam of her diverse movement and life experiences presenting social commentary with dark humor and heavy beats.

She teaches Contemporary Dance and Urban Styles at Velocity Dance Center and House dance at The Beacon: Massive Monkees studio in Seattle. She teaches dance composition and improvisation for Seattle Theater Group’s “Dance This” program. She spent seven years developing and teaching for Young Choreographer’s Lab and Seattle Youth Dance Collective. She hasworked extensively with musician/comedian Reggie Watts since 2002 both on stage and screen.

Amy O’Neal will also give a Master Class on Friday, February 12 at 4pm. Their master class will provide lessons in stylistic and cultural differences between Hip Hop (which is Breaking, Popping, Locking, and Party Dances), House, Vogue, Whacking, Commercial Hip Hop, Street Jazz, and Amy’s signature amalgam of all these things. The cost is $10, and reservations are available online.

This presentation of Opposing Forces by Amy O’Neal was made possible by the New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Dance Project, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, with additional support from the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as sponsorship by the Western Arts Federation.

Kahilu Theatre doors open at 6pm for evening shows, with food and beverages available for sale.

Tickets are $68 / $58 / $47 / $20 and available for purchase online at www.kahilutheatre.org, by calling (808) 885-6868, or at the Kahilu Theatre Box Office, at 67-1186 Lindsey Road, Kamuela, HI 96743, Monday-Friday, from 9am to 1pm.

Coming Up – Award Winning Magicians at the Honoka’a Peoples Theatre

Award-winning magicians Bruce and Jennifer Meyers will bring their amazing feats of original magic to Honoka’a Peoples Theatre on Sunday, February 28 at 4 p.m., presented in collaboration with the Peace Committee of Honoka’a Hongwanji Buddhist Temple.

Magician Bruce Meyers

Magician Bruce Meyers

Designed with keiki in mind, the creative show involves the audience in surprising ways—as Bruce might levitate children in the audience, cut a local politician in half, make dozens of roses, or chickens, appear and disappear. As a prelude to The Magic of Bruce Meyers, aerial artist Luna Sophia will “fly” above the audience in a gracefully athletic performance on the aerial silks.

“Our goal is to provide positive, affordable activities for kids and youth,” said Peace Committee Chair Miles Okumura, “We have this in common—we value the next generation, and depend on them to carry on the traditions, values and messages we share today. And that’s the magic.”

To help further that goal, the team has reached out to the Hamakua Youth Center (HYC), who will be assisting with ticket sales from their Mamane Street location. They are also recruiting business and individual sponsors to help send children and youth to the performance. A $100 donation can provide a classroom of students, a sports team or school club with tickets to attend.

Bruce Meyers Magician

In addition to performing, Bruce and Jennifer run four-day Magic Camps for keiki age 6 and up, where they learn multiple tricks and illusions, and build their own magic kit to take home and practice for a lifetime. (For information on Magic Camp, please call 982-9294.)

“For children, as with music, magic can be an inspiring and fun way to share wonder and learn about achieving goals, to build self-esteem, poise, confidence and teamwork. The mystery of magic inspires children to want to know more and to learn and to do. It inspires that thirst for knowledge. They learn that to give and share wonder is an act of kindness,” says Bruce.

Bruce continues, “We are constantly and diligently involved in providing pathways and direction for the young to carry the torch as the wonder workers and peacemakers of tomorrow. It is they who will spread happiness and joy and remind the audiences of the future that, despite all of its faults, it’s still a breathtakingly beautiful and mysterious world.”

On Bruce’s website is the Hawaiian phrase, “Aka‘aka Loko I Ka Ike A Ke Aloha,” which translates to; “The secrets within me are seen through Aloha.”

Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 at the door, available online at www.BruceMeyers.com or at Hamakua Youth Center, 775-0976. For information on sponsoring a classroom, club or team contact Miles Okumura, misterokumura@yahoo.com .

HI-PAL Elementary and Intermediate Basketball Championships Crowned

Eighty-five youths from eight teams participated in the HI-PAL “Click It or Ticket” elementary and intermediate basketball championships this past weekend at Papaʻikou Gym.

 Members of the Intermediate Champion Waiākea Titans (from left)—Dominic Rodrigues, Chance Simeona, Kiai Apele, Macmillain Aloisio, Guyson Ogata, Vergil Henry.


Members of the Intermediate Champion Waiākea Titans (from left)—Dominic Rodrigues, Chance Simeona, Kiai Apele, Macmillain Aloisio, Guyson Ogata, Vergil Henry.

In the Intermediate Division, Waiākea Titans finished the round robin event with an undefeated 4-0 record to claim the championship. Titans defeated St. Joseph Gold 57-51 led by Kiai Apele’s 20 points, Kaʻū 56-35 led by Chance Simeona with 19 points, Waiākea 49-26 led by Apele’s 18 points and St. Joseph Red 48-34 led by Apele with 14 points. St. Joseph Gold finished second with a 3-1 record. Members of the championship Titans squad included Apele, Simeona, Macmillan Aloisio, Vergil Henry, Guyson Ogata and Dominic Rodrigues.

In the Elementary Division finals, the St. Joseph Cardinals edged Kealakehe Blue 31-28 to claim the title. Jayden Villena led the Cardinals with 11 points, Forrest Mckinney added 8 points and Zayre Fuiava tallied 6 points. Second-place Kealakehe was led by Shammah Talley with 9 points and Elayo Malapit and Edward Lai who added 6 points apiece. In the third place contest, Haʻaheo defeated Kealakehe White 26-18. Zamar Brres led Haʻaheo with 15 points. Members of the champion St. Joseph squad included Villena, Mckinney, Fuiava, Tiffany Castillo, Thomas Costa, Aidyn Cruise, Kavis Davies, Blayden Grace, Landry Ishii and Stanislaw Stack.

“Click It or Ticket” is a national education and enforcement campaign to increase seat belt usage and decrease traffic fatalities and injuries. The Hawaiʻi Police Department encourages all youths, teens and adults to use their seat belts.

Hokulea Departs Fernando de Noronha for Natal

After a four-day stop at Fernando de Noronha, an archipelago off the Brazilian coast, Hokulea departed the UNESCO Marine World Heritage site yesterday at 11:00 a.m. Brazil time (3:00 a.m. HST) and is now headed to Natal, Rio Grande do Norte. Note: Fernando de Noronha is eight hours ahead of Hawaii Time. During their stay, crewmembers were able to learn about efforts to protect the marine life and other natural resources of the pristine island.

Hokulea21a

The Hokulea crew is now sailing approximately 241 miles to reach Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, located in northeastern Brazil. The arrival to the coastal city will mark Hokulea’s first visit to the South America continent. The leg will take approximately two days.

Hokulea21c

After stopping in Brazil, Hokulea will continue the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage and stop in several ports in the Caribbean before sailing north and visiting cities along the East Coast of the United States. She is scheduled to arrive in New York City by June 8, 2016 to celebrate World Oceans Day.

Hokulea21b

Since departing Hawaiian waters in May 2014, Hokulea has sailed more than 20,000 nautical miles and made stops in 11 countries and 46 ports, weaving a “Lei of Hope” around the world. Along the way, more than 160 volunteer crewmembers have helped to sail Hokulea accompanied by escort vessel Gershon II to spread the message of malama honua (or taking care of Island Earth) by promoting sustainability and environmental consciousness, as well as exchanging ideas with the countries she has visited.

Hokulea21d

So far, crew members have connected with over 45,000 people in communities across the South Pacific, Tasman Sea and Indian Ocean including Samoa, Aotearoa (New Zealand), Australia, Indonesia, Mauritius and South Africa. For a midway recap of the Worldwide Voyage, please view http://www.hokulea.com/2015-worldwide-voyage-recap/

Hokulea first set out on the Pacific Ocean in 1975. Since then, she has traveled to multiple countries across the globe, reawakening a Hawaiian cultural renaissance in the process through reviving the traditional art of wayfinding – navigating the sea through means of using natural resources like ocean swells, stars, and wind.

Open Application Period Begins Today for Preschool Open Doors Program 2017 Assistance

The Department of Human Services encourages families to apply for its Preschool Open Doors (POD) program between Monday, February 1 and March 31, 2016.  Applications received during this period will be considered for preschool participation between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017.

Patch HawaiiThis program, which is currently serving more than 1,100 children statewide, provides child care subsidies to eligible low- and moderate-income families to pay preschool tuition. POD aims to provide children whose families might otherwise not be able to afford preschool the opportunity to gain essential skills to be successful in school and in life.

To qualify for the program, children must be eligible to enter kindergarten in the 2017-2018 school year (born between August 1, 2011 and July 31, 2012). Families are reminded that a child must be 5 years old on or before July 31 to enter kindergarten. Families may choose any one of the 438 state-licensed preschools. Underserved or at-risk children receive priority consideration for the POD program, and funds are limited.

Interested families may request an application beginning February 1, 2016 from the Department’s POD contractor, PATCH, by visiting www.patchhawaii.org or calling 791-2130 or toll free 1-800-746-5620.  PATCH can also help families locate a preschool convenient for them.

Applications must be received by March 31, 2016 to be considered for the July 1, 2016-June 30, 2017 program period. Applications should be dropped off, mailed or faxed to the following:

PATCH – POD
560 N. Nimitz Hwy, Suite 218
Honolulu, HI 96817
Fax: (808) 694-3066

Eligibility and priorities for POD program selection are detailed online in HAR §17-799, which is available online at humanservices.hawaii.gov/admin-rules-2/admin-rules-for-programs.  For more information about other DHS programs and services, visit humanservices.hawaii.gov

UH Hilo Celebrates International Nights February 19th & 20th

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo International Student Association presents International Nights 2016 on Friday, February 19 and Saturday, February 20, at 7:30 pm in the UH Hilo Performing Arts Center. This annual event features performances from around the world and is a favorite among students, the community, and visitors.

International Night 2016

This year’s shows feature 18 different performances spanning Asia, the Pacific, Europe and the Americas. Crowd favorites such as Tupulaga O Samoa Mo a Taeao representing Samoa, and Taishoji taiko drumming representing Japan, are back. Other performances showcase the cultures of the Philippines, Burma, France, Micronesia, Ireland, Kiribati, Okinawa, Palau, the Marshall Islands, and the USA. There will also be a unique “Tour de France” performance.

Tickets are $12 for general admission and $5 for students, children, and senior citizens. Tickets may be purchased with cash or checks at the PAC Box Office from 9 am – 1 pm, Tuesday through Friday, or at the door if tickets are still available the night of the shows. Advance ticket purchase is recommended as tickets typically sell out.

For ticket information, contact the PAC Box Office at 932-7490.

For more information, visit http://hilo.hawaii.edu/international/IN.php.

Parents Encouraged to Provide Feedback on Their Child’s Public School

​ The Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) begins its annual School Quality Survey (SQS) this week to gather important feedback from students, parents/guardians and staff about our public schools. The deadline to complete and return the SQS is March 15, 2016.

Photo Credit: Department of Education

Photo Credit: Department of Education

The survey provides information on how schools are doing with respect to school culture, satisfaction and engagement. The feedback gathered is used to support school planning and improvement efforts, and meet legislative and Board of Education requirements.​

Students in grades 4, 5, 7, 8, 9 and 11 will take the survey online at school, as will teachers, administrative office staff, and instructional support staff.

A parent or guardian of the students in the surveyed grades will have the option to take the survey online or via a paper format. Each school communicates to parents on how to complete the SQS whether digital and/or hard copy.

“We’re hoping for more parents to respond this year since last year’s return rate was 24 percent,”said Tammi Chun, assistant superintendent, Office of Strategy, Innovation and Performance. “This feedback is very important to us as we continue to work on ways to improve learning experiences for our children.”

Responses will remain anonymous. The SQS deadline is March 15, 2016.

The public can view the SQS for their community schools and statewide results via the Report Finder on HIDOE’s website: bit.ly/ReportFinder. Search for “School Quality Survey”and add the name of a school for school-level results.

Anyone with questions about the survey is encouraged to contact HIDOE at 808-733-4008 (Neighbor Island toll-free at 855-276-5801), or via email: SQS@notes.k12.hi.us.

 

Scientist Sequence Genome of the ‘Alalā (Hawaiian Crow)

In collaboration with PacBio, scientists at San Diego Zoo Global and the University of Hawaii, Hilo have fully sequenced the genome of the ‘Alalā, or Hawaiian crow and shared the results of this effort at the recent annual Plant and Animal Genomics XXIV Conference in San Diego. The ‘Alalā was once reduced to a population of about 20 birds, and the sequencing of the species’ genome will be important to track any genetic challenges that may occur due to the reduced genetic diversity now seen in the species.

The sequencing of its genome comes at the beginning of what is hoped to be an important year for the Hawaiian crow. Conservationists hope to reintroduce this species into prepared habitat on the island of Hawaii later this year. The ‘Alalā has been extinct in the wild since 2002, preserved only in the program run by San Diego Zoo Global at their bird centers in Hawaii.

“We have been working for many years to build up a large enough—and genetically diverse enough—population to allow us to begin putting the ‘Alalā back in the wild,” said Bryce Masuda, conservation program manager of the San Diego Zoo’s Hawaii Endangered Bird Conservation Program. “We have achieved our goal, and are now preparing to release birds into the wild in 2016.”

The program’s goal has been to increase the ‘Alalā flock to 75 or more individuals before releasing them into their native forests on the island of Hawaii. The ‘Alalā is a member of the crow family that was brought to the brink of extinction by loss of habitat, and introduced predators and diseases. For species that have been at the brink of extinction, genetic fitness and the information stored in their genome may prove an important tool in the fight to save them.

“Learning more about the genome of the species can help us understand more about how that species will interact with and fit back into its native habitat,” said Jolene Sutton, assistant professor at the University of Hawaii, Hilo. “Through scientific collaboration with PacBio, we now have a map of ‘Alalā DNA that could prove critical to their long term recovery. We are absolutely thrilled with the quality of the sequencing, and we have already identified several gene locations that we think could have a big influence on reintroduction success.”

Lyman Museum Lecture – Why Early Hawaiians Moved to Mainland

Even before Kamehameha I founded his kingdom, Native Hawaiians were traveling to distant ports and visiting far-off lands. Kanaka labor is credited with helping to settle the northwest coast of North America, from fur trading to gold mining, and Hawaiians also participated in the U.S. Civil War. But what would be sufficiently attractive to draw them away from paradise … and why would some choose to make their new homes permanent?

Hawaii in CaliforniaOn Monday, February 8, from 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Lyman Museum, Hawai‘i Island historian Boyd D. Bond shares this little-known aspect of Hawaiian history.

The nationally accredited and Smithsonian-affiliated Lyman Museum showcases the natural and cultural history of Hawai`i. Located in historic downtown Hilo at 276 Haili Street, the Museum is open Monday through Saturday, 10:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Admission to this program is free to Museum members, $3 for nonmembers. First come, first seated. For additional information, call (808) 935-5021 or visit www.lymanmuseum.org.

84 Hawaii Public Schools to be Awarded for Wellness

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) is announcing a record number of Hawaii public schools that will be receiving “Excellence in Wellness” awards this spring.

Since 2013, public schools have received the award based on their outstanding implementation of the Department of Education’s Wellness Guidelines. The Guidelines are a set of standards for foods and beverages provided to students that include goals for school-based wellness committees, health and physical education, and other practices that support student health.

Click to view the report

Click to view the report

According to the annual Safety and Wellness Survey (SAWS), a total of 84 Hawaii public elementary, middle, and high schools met over 90 percent of the Wellness Guidelines during the 2014-2015 school year, up from 45 schools in 2013-2014.

“Excellence in Wellness” banners will be presented to school principals during annual fitness meets and at recognition events statewide. The awards are co-sponsored by the Hawaii Department of Health and Action for Healthy Kids.

“The increase in support for wellness in our schools is notable and we hope that this momentum will continue” said Director of Health Virginia Pressler, M.D. “This data demonstrates the successful partnership we have with the DOE to strengthen implementation and monitor the Wellness Guidelines as we move forward.”

The Hawaii Departments of Education and Health jointly administer the SAWS annually to track implementation of the Guidelines. Results indicate a consistently high level of achievement with survey respondents meeting an average of 82 percent of the DOE Wellness Guidelines in 2014-2015.

Highlights from the 2014-2015 SAWS include:

  • All school meals (100 percent) continue to meet or exceed federal nutrient standards;
  • Health and Physical Education classes align with the Hawaii Content and Performance Standards III at 94 percent and 97 percent of schools, respectively;
  • Students have at least 20 minutes a day of supervised recess, during which they are encouraged to be physically active at 84 percent of schools.

“Healthy habits not only result in a student’s physical wellness but also contribute to a successful pathway in college and career readiness,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “Implementing wellness practices is an important element to ensuring that students are prepared for life after high school. Congratulations to all the schools that have made this a priority.”

The Wellness Guidelines, SAWS, and public reporting of SAWS data fulfills requirements of the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act (2004) and the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (2010).

The Safety and Wellness Survey Data Report for School Year 2014-15 is available at: http://bit.ly/1QeM3HY.

More information about the Wellness Guidelines, visit: http://www.hawaiipublicschools.org/TeachingAndLearning/HealthAndNutrition/WellnessGuidelines/Pages/home.aspx

Schools Achieving Excellence in Wellnessin School Year 2014-2015(SAWS score of 90 percent or higher):

  • Ahuimanu Elementary
  • Kamalii Elementary
  • Nanakuli Elementary
  • Aiea High
  • Kaneohe Elementary
  • Nanakuli High & Intermediate
  • Aiea Intermediate
  • Kanoelani Elementary
  • Noelani Elementary
  • Aina Haina Elementary
  • Kapolei Elementary
  • Olomana
  • Ala Wai Elementary
  • Kapunahala Elementary
  • Paauilo Elementary & Intermediate
  • Aliiolani Elementary
  • Keaau High
  • Pahoa High & Intermediate
  • August Ahrens Elementary
  • King Intermediate
  • Palisades Elementary
  • Castle High
  • Kipapa Elementary
  • Pearl City Elementary
  • de Silva Elementary
  • Kohala High
  • Pearl Harbor Elementary
  • Hahaione Elementary
  • Koloa Elementary
  • Pope Elementary
  • Hana High and Elementary
  • Kuhio Elementary
  • Pu’u Kukui Elementary
  • Hauula Elementary
  • Laie Elementary
  • Red Hill Elementary
  • Hawaii Center for the Deaf and the Blind
  • Lehua Elementary
  • Salt Lake Elementary
  • Heeia Elementary
  • Liholiho Elementary
  • Scott Elementary
  • Helemano Elementary
  • Lokelani Intermediate
  • Solomon Elementary
  • Highlands Intermediate
  • Lunalilo Elementary
  • Sunset Beach Elementary
  • Hilo Intermediate
  • Maemae Elementary
  • Waialua Elementary
  • Honaunau Elementary
  • Makaha Elementary
  • Waianae Elementary
  • Iliahi Elementary
  • Makakilo Elementary
  • Waimea Canyon Middle
  • Kaaawa Elementary
  • Maunawili Elementary
  • Waipahu Intermediate
  • Kaahumanu Elementary
  • Mililani Ike Elementary
  • Webling Elementary
  • Kaala Elementary
  • Mililani Mauka Elementary
  • William McKinley High
  • Kahala Elementary
  • Mililani Uka Elementary
  • Wilson Elementary
  • Kahuku Elementary
  • Moanalua Middle
  • Waianae High
  • Kailua Elementary
  • Mokapu Elementary
  • Waikele Elementary
  • Kailua Intermediate
  • Molokai High
  • Waikiki Elementary
  • Kaimiloa Elementary
  • Momilani Elementary
  • Waikoloa School
  • Kalihi-uka Elementary
  • Nanaikapono Elementary
  • Waimanalo Elementary & Intermediate

 

UH Hilo Offers Youth Basketball Teams Free Admission to Home Basketball Games

Hawai‘i Island’s youth basketball players can show their support for the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo’s basketball teams by taking advantage of free admission Vulcan Athletics is offering for remaining men’s and women’s home games.

UH Hilo 2016 mens team

All registered keiki basketball players and coaches, including those participating in Department of Parks and Recreation’s leagues and Hawai‘i Police Activities League (HI-PAL) tournaments, are eligible for free home game general admission. The offer covers each team’s players, head coach, one assistant coach, and the coaches’ significant other for the remainder of the 2015-2016 UH Hilo basketball season.

Due to recruiting restrictions for high school athletes, the free admission can be offered only to keiki currently attending kindergarten through the eighth grade.

Games will be played at Hawai‘i County’s Afook-Chinen Civic Auditorium located in Hilo. The following is the remaining schedule, starting times (women play first) and opponent:

  • Monday, January 25 (5 p.m./7:30 p.m.) – California Baptist University
  • Saturday, February 13 (11 a.m./1 p.m.) – Chaminade University
  • Monday, February 15 (5 p.m./7:30 p.m.) – Notre Dame de Namur University
  • Thursday, February 18 (6 p.m.) – Brigham Young University-Hawai‘i
  • Tuesday, February 23 (5 p.m./7:30 p.m.) – Point Loma Nazarene
  • Saturday, February 27 (5 p.m./7:30 p.m.) – Azusa Pacific University

Coaches wishing to participate in the program must provide their team’s name, roster, players’ ages, and coaches’ contact information. Coaches of multiple youth teams must submit separate rosters.

For more information, please contact Kelly Leong, UH-Hilo sports information director, at 932-7177, 895-0929 or kellyl@hawaii.edu.

Conference – Science Behind Medical Marijuana at Psychopharmacology

A leading researcher on the science of medical marijuana will speak as part of a conference at the Outrigger Reef on the Beach Hotel, Waikiki on O`ahu February 3-5. Although the conference is targeted toward health care providers, the public is welcome to register.

Marijuana Book

Dr. Kevin Hill, author of “The Unbiased Truth About The World’s Most Popular Weed,” will discuss recent statistics, why marijuana is complicated and marijuana myths and the science behind them. Dr. Hill is the director of the Substance Abuse Consultation Service at McLean Hospital, the largest psychiatric hospital affiliated with Harvard Medical School. He also is on faculty in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

The presentation is part of the 2016 Psychopharmacology Conference presented jointly by the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (DKICP), the University of Hawaiʻi at Manoa John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) and the American Association of Professional Nurses (AAPN). The main topics for the three-day seminar are depression, substance abuse disorders and medical marijuana.

“As the State Department of Health in Hawaiʻi begins considering applications for medical marijuana dispensaries, we’re fortunate to access a leading national clinical and research expert on a topic that’s certainly not new to Hawaiʻi,” said Karen Pellegrin, DKICP director of continuing education and strategic planning. “Many people, professionals and lay people alike are looking for answers in order to understand the science behind its use. Dr. Hill is well qualified to provide some substance to the conversation.”

Additional speakers include:

  • Dr. Brett Lu, attending physician of treatment-resistant and geriatric psychiatry consult clinics, Queen’s Medical Center, and associate professor, Department of Psychiatry, UH Manoa. Dr. Lu will talk about pharmacogenomics, new procedures for depression treatment and provide a general workup for difficult-to-treat depression.
  • Dr. Karen A. Miotto, director of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Addiction Psychiatry Service, and associate professor, UCLA’s Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences. Dr. Miotto will give an update on alcohol pharmacotherapy and discuss challenges in treating prescription medication-use disorders.

    Cost to attend is $200 per day, or $500 for all days, with a 20 percent discount for kama`aina. The event is eligible for APA CE, ACPE, and CME credit.

    To register, call (808) 933-2914 or online at http://pharmacy.uhh.hawaii.edu/ce/ceevents.php

Keaau High School Students to Unveil Space Shuttle Replica… Public Invited

During the 2014-2015 school year, many students at Keaau High School had their lives turned upside down when the lava flow threatened their community. After overcoming adversity, the Cougars are soaring to new heights with a reconstruction of a space shuttle replica, which will be unveiled to the public on Jan. 28, 2016 at 4 p.m.

KHS Space Shuttle

Keaau High School Principal Dean Cevalos explains, “I’m extremely proud of our students for their maturity and hard work in overcoming a stressful situation and turning it into something positive,” said Principal Dean Cevallos. “The space shuttle project, which was possible through our community partners, is something that not only our island, but also our state can be proud of. Our students’ talents and abilities are really highlighted in this reconstruction and show how much they have matured and grown.”

Last semester, 25 automotive and construction academy restored a one-of-a-kind space shuttle replica. This project, in conjunction with the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES), Hawaii Community College, and the Hawaii Civil Air Patrol was made possible with the support of many community donors including K. Taniguchi Ltd., KTA Super Stores, Isemoto Contracting, W.H Shipman, Big Island Toyota/De Luz Chevrolet and Young Brother’s Shipping Company.

This project unveiling is open to the public on Thursday, Jan. 28 at 4 p.m. at Keaau High School’s Automotive and Construction Academy. The event marks the 30th anniversary of the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter Challenger mission and will honor NASA astronaut, hero, and Big Island native Ellison Onizuka, who lost his life with other crewmembers when the spacecraft failed to launch into outer space.

To RSVP please email khs.restoringhistory@gmail.com

Coming Up – Waimea Cherry Blossom Heritage Festival

The 23rd annual Waimea Cherry Blossom Heritage Festival has a full lineup of free multi-cultural performing arts and hands-on demonstrations, plus nearly 150 crafters and food booths 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 6 at various venues sprawling through town—look for pink banners identifying site locations.

Mochi Pounding

Festival parking is available at Parker Ranch Center, the soccer field across Church Row Park and Church Row Park. Festival shuttles offer free transportation among most venues 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. by Roberts Hawaii. A map of the shuttle route and festival venues is available in a detailed festival program available at each venue location February 6.

Organized by members of the upcountry community and the county’s department of parks and recreation, the festival marks the blooming of the historic cherry trees at Church Row Park and celebrates the age-old Japanese tradition of hanami, which translates to “cherry blossom viewing party.” After a seasonal winter chill, the trees typically are blooming in early February.

Mochi Sake

This year’s festival is dedicated to the Waimea Bonyu Kai Bonsai Club, which marks its 60th anniversary this year, and Waimea Arts Council, which celebrates 40 years in 2016. Honorees will be recognized at the festival’s opening ceremony. Time is 9 a.m. on the main entertainment stage at the rear of Parker Ranch Center and will be attended by Governor David Ige, Mayor Billy Kenoi, Consul General of Japan Yasushi Misawa and Hawaii Council Representative Margaret Wille

The 2016 event artwork is a photograph by Barbara Schaefer, “Imiola Church.” The photo will appear on a limited number of collector posters available for $10 at the Waimea Arts Council’s Firehouse Gallery.

Mochi Taiko

A quick rundown of festival activities at various locations follows (times are 9 a.m.-3 p.m. unless specified otherwise).

Church Row Park

  • Historical Cherry Tree Display: Waimea Lions’ Club offers a pictorial history of the cherry trees and serves as the festival’s official Lost and Found station.
  • Entertainment: Hawaii Lion Dance Association of Oahu at 9 a.m., Shamisen by Ayano Uema at 10 a.m., Beamer-Solomon Halau O Poohala with Kumu Hula Hulali Solomon Covington at 11 a.m. and Hui Okinowan Kobudo Taiko at noon.
  • Cherry Pie Cook-off: Sponsored by District 9 County Councilmember Margaret Wille, senior clubs from Waimea, Waikoloa and North Kohala vie in the 3rd Cherry Pie Bake Off with judging at noon. Club members sell pie slices, recipe books and crafts.
  • Bonsai: The Waimea Bonyu Kai Bonsai Club offers a display and sale of bonsai, ongoing demonstrations and a clinic to discuss and work on the art of bonsai.
  • Japanese Craft Lessons at Kamuela Hongwanji: Learn the time-honored art of furoshiki (gift wrapping).
  • Asian Collectibles/Food Sales at Kamuela Hongwanji: Church organizations sell Asian-themed collectibles, lanterns made from recycled beverage cans, cherry tree seedlings and cherry blossoms in mugs; plus Asian foods: Inari sushi, chicken bowl, nishime bento, andagi and prune mui.
  • Cooking Demos at Kamuela Hongwanji: Kona-Kohala chefs offer cooking demonstrations with free samples on the hour starting 9 a.m.: Chef Jason Kanekoa of Waikoloa Beach Marriott, Chef John Iha of Sansei Waikoloa, Chef Shintaro Takizawa of Shiono Sushi at the Mauna Lani Restaurant and Chef TK of the Lemongrass Express.

Parker Ranch Center- Hwy. 19

  • Festival Entertainment Stage: In the back parking lot. Opening 9 a.m. dedication ceremonies kick off continuous entertainment until 3 p.m.: Bon Odori Taiko accompanied by Kona Taiko, Kumu Hula Michael Pang’s Hula Halau O Ka Noeau, Boni & Doug, Darlene Ahuna, Michael Strand Band and Tai Shoji Taiko.
  • Craft Fair: Nearly 150 crafters inside Center and in the back parking lot.
  • Mochi Tsuki Pounding: Help pound mochi using 500 pounds of rice with the Kona Hongwanji Mission outside the Fireside Food Court starting 10 a.m.; samples.

Kahilu Theatre – Lindsey Road/Parker Ranch Center

  • Cultural Demos: From 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Enjoy ritual Japanese tea ceremony led by Emi Wakayama, origami with Bonnie Cierni, feather lie and Japanese ikebana with Chikako Powers and hanafuda card playing.
  • Performing Arts: From 9 a.m.3 p.m. Japanese and international music led by Annu Shoko Shionoya with vocalist Kauilani Trainer and Marius Stranger, flutist Roy Kimura and dancer Shizuno Nasu; lyre harp by Miyuki Ikesue of Tokyo, flutist Yumi Kikuchi and guitar by Gen Morita. Dance concerts “Sakura Sakura” at 11 a.m. and “The Dream” at 1 p.m. Drop-in classes in hula, street jazz and circus arts.
  • Art and Film: Art displayed by Susumu Sakaguchi of Volcano and “Voyager Exhibit.” Screening of “Canefield Songs-Holehole Bushi” at 2:15 p.m.

Mana Christian Ohana Church – (Former Kahilu Town Hall) Behind Parker Ranch Center

  • Ka Hui Kapa Apana O Waimea’s Third Biennial Festival of Quilts: Extensive quilt display and craft sale, members offer a “learn how” area and pattern tracing.
  • Kamaaina Motors Car Show: New display of vehicles at Hamakua side of parking lot.
  • Minuke‘ole Park Hanam Ceremony: 11 a.m. with planting of cherry trees

Waimea Historic Corner-Hwys. 19/190 intersection

  • Firehouse Gallery Art Demos/Exhibition: Waimea Arts Council presents art with a cherry blossom theme, sidewalk chalk drawing for all ages, plus event poster sales for $10.

Waimea School Playground-Lindsey Road/Back of Post Office

  • Waimea Homestead Farmers Market: 7 a.m.-2 p.m.

Parker School-Lindsey Road

  • Waimea Town Market/Performing Arts: Outdoor market with fresh produce, food and artisan booths open 7:30 a.m.-noon with drum performances by Ryukyukoku Matsuri Daiko Kohala-Waimea at 10 and 11 a.m.

Pukalani Stables-Pukalani and Ala Ohia Roads

  • Kamuela Farmers Market: 7 a.m.-2 p.m.; cherry tree planting 9:30 a.m., museum free all day.

Kamuela Liquors-Hwy. 19

  • Sake Tasting: Noon-3 p.m.

Ginger Farm- (old Anderson Homestead) MM 55 across from Puu Nani St. on Hwy. 19

  • Japanese Home Tour/Tea Tasting/Craft: Self-guided tour through traditional Japanese-style home and garden. Cherry tea is served and art students assist attendees to make a cherry blossom-hanging scroll. Petting zoo.

Kukio Hale Hawaiian Homes-MM 55 on Hwy. 19

  • Waimea Nui Farmer’s Market: 7 a.m.-noon

The Waimea Cherry Blossom Heritage Festival is produced by the Hawaii County Parks and Recreation’s Culture and Education Section. Overseen by the park’s culture education administrator, Roxcie Waltjen, the festival is a community-wide effort by a dedicated team of volunteers, 961-8706.

Department of Health to Hold Weekly Dengue Information Sessions

The Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) will hold weekly dengue information sessions in Kona and Hilo to provide timely updates and answer questions from the community about the Hawaii Island dengue outbreak.

Mosquito Bite

Participants will learn about the prevalence, transmission, and symptoms of dengue fever; outbreak response efforts; how to interpret case counts and maps; and the best ways to fight the bite.

Weekly sessions will be held every Thursday at 11:30 a.m. at the State Office Building, Rooms A, B, and C located at 75 Aupuni St. in Hilo, and at the West Hawaii Civic Center, Mayor’s Conference Room located at 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy. in Kailua-Kona.

Beginning Jan. 19, weekly sessions will be held every Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. at Yano Hall located at 82-6165 Mamalahoa Hwy. in Captain Cook.

These sessions are open to the public and scheduled to continue through February.

Contact the Department of Health Hawaii District Health Office at 974-6001 for more information.

UH Hilo College of Arts and Sciences Dean’s List for Fall 2015

UH Hilo Moniker

The following students in the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo College of Arts and Sciences have been named to the Dean’s List for the fall 2015 semester:

Jozie Acasio, Shelie M. Acoba, Anthony Actouka, Charlemagne Adams, Kendra Adams, Sebastian Afaga, Alexandria Agdeppa, Brandon Aguiar, Chelsea Ahsing, Rhonda Akano, Leahi Akao, Eric Alabanza, Daryl Albano, Losalia Aloisio, Alia Alvarez, Tyler Amaral, Victoria E. Amundsen, Erica Amundson, Lauren Anczak, Madeleine Andersen, Stina E. M. Andersson, Paul Ang Sheng, Shantel Antonio, Zion Apao, Shaylyn Arakaki,

David Arakawa, Justin Araki-Kwee, Jerome Arellano, Keanu Arke, Riley Arroyo, Yuki Asama, Leslie Asato, Scott Ashida, Cameron Atsumi, Lyle Auld, Salamasina Aumua, Dennis Ayap, Hunter Bailey, Jessica Bailey, Michael Bailey, Jim Baker, Sharlene Bala, Jamae Balagot, Landon Ballesteros, Zoe Banfield, Kaitlin Barcoma, Abigail Barhite, Ashley Barhite, Benedick Baris, Tiana Barrios, Ruth Bascar-Sellars, Crystal-lynn Baysa,

Conor M. Beaton, Laa Pi Bell, Chase Benbow, Justine Bernard, Lealoha Bernardo, Anthony Berson, Aspen Billiet, Ida Bing, Allexandria Blacksmith, Julianna Blair, Henry Blake, Kalaiakea Blakemore, Casey Blanchette, Thomas Bolton, Stephen Bond, Rebecca Boutin, Tyler Jo Branco Hedke, Courtney A. Brock, Veronica Brockway, Matthew Brown, BreAnna Brown, Harley Broyles, Kailah Buchanan, Ashlee Burbano, Merritt Burch, Ridge Cabaccang, Sydney Cabanas, Cheyrub Cabarloc, Jerold A. Cabel, Alexis Cabrera, Rachelle A. Cabrillas, Aldrin Calilao, Leischene Calingangan, Joseph Camara,

Keala Campbell, Amanda Canda, Alton Cantan, Jessicamae Caravalho, Frances M. Cariaga, Sheila M. Cariaga, Sheryl L. Cariaga, Imelda A.D.C. Carlos, Nicholas Carrion, Julie Carter, Micah Carter, Cjay Carvalho, Kanoeuluwehianu Case, Lily Cash, Susan Castillejos, Cibyl Chan, Roget Chan, Justin Chandler, Andy Chang, Emily Charman, Maggie Chen, Edward Cheng, Kate Chikasuye, Cheuk Wang Chiu, Adam Chong, Tahiti Chong, Christina Chow, Haylee Chung, Leilani Clark, Kobie Clarke, Rachel Clay, William Cleary, Heather Coad, Zoe Coffman, Seana Cofsky, Stefan Coney, Katherine Conners,

Taylor Contreras, Cletus Correia, Seneca Cox, Cory Craig, Tanya Craig, Leanne Crain, Trixie A. Croad, John Crommelin, Kawelina Cruz, Justin Cueva, Jasmin Curiel, Kanani Daley, Pearl Dasalla, Renee I. David, Desiree Davis, Pierre De Poyo, Kaylee Decambra, Axel Defngin, Edwina Degrood, Le’Shell Dela Cruz, Audrey Deluca, Billi Derleth, Ileana Derouin-Loando, Maluhia Desha, Erin Dewing, Amanda DiFrancesco, Cassidy Dixon,

Danielle Dodge, Amelia Dolgin, Shaylin Domingcil, Lorelei M. Domingo, Princess Dianne Domingo, Ryan Domingo, Pedro Dos Santos, Sadie Dossett, Cortney Dougherty, Mike Dowsett, James Drescher, Jayahmie Drio, Alejandra Duarte, Keanu Dudoit-Isa, Julie Duhaylongsod, Sarah Dunaway, Jennifer Eastin, Jacqueline Economy, Jamie Economy, Jon Ehrenberg, Bryce Engelland, Remedios Epp, Tiffany Erickson, Corey Eshpeter, Raynell Espaniola, Kelsie Espiritu-Tanabe, Riley Essert, Damon Ewen, Elecia Faaiuaso, Charles Fenenbock, Sarah Ferguson, Sharrylei Fernandez, Glenn Ferrier,

Misty Figueira, Taysia Figueroa, Doug Fitzpatrick, Kyla Fox, Jeena Franco, D’Jon Franklin, Ella R. Fregeau Olmstead, Lilia Fremling, Brittany Fuemmeler, Kaitlyn Fujii, Shaylyn Fujii, Kendra Fujioka, Justin Fujiwara, Trent Furuta, Dylan Gable, Sarah Gallagher, Angelina Gallegos, Philip Gamiao, Everette Ganir, Jeremy Ganir, April Gaoiran, Mary Jane Garcia, Nicole Garcia, Jessica-Ann Garett, Xue Garrett, Zachary Geisterfer, Carola Geitner, StacyMae Gelacio, Tyler Gerken, Hattie Gerrish, Tuan Giai Giang, Kahri Golden, Kassidy Gonsalves, Annabel Gonzalez, Acacia Goo, Maya Goodoni,

Samantha Gordon, Rachel Gorenflo, Beverly A. Gorospe, Alyssa Grace, Marc D. Grande, Nathan Green, Siera Green, Zechariah Greene, Lori Greenhouse, Olivia Grodzka, Kylie Grogg, Chrisovolandou Gronowski, Riana Grothmann, Rihei Grothmann, Alexander Guerrero, Juan F. Guerrero Arnaiz, Adrienne Gurbindo, Brittany Hale, Quinn Hamamoto, Yu Hamaoka, Michelle Hanson, Arielle Harnik, Jocelin Haro, Molly Harris,

Rose Hart, Bridge Hartman, Hannah Hawkins, Connor Hedrick, Dakota Helfrich, John Herman, Brad Higa, Linsie Hiraoka, Misaki Hirayama, Jaclyn Hirohama, Tyler Hoffman, Eric Holub, Tiana Honda, Lauren Hong, Trenton Hooper, Abbey Horsman, Alyssa Hoshide, Jordan Howard, Kainoa Howard, Samantha Howell, Sandra Huang, ZhiLing Huang, Adrian Huff, Brianne Huggins, Thomas Hughes, Courtney Hurt, Thien Huynh, Laura Ibbotson, Andi Igawa, Kadi Igawa, Joshua Ignacio, Derek Inaba,

Kayla Ing, Gabriela Iniguez-Isaacs, Elise Inouye, Ching Ip, Courtney Ip, Joanne Isabella, Alexa Jacobs, Rebecca Jardin, Austin Jennings, Michelle Jimenez, Lindsay Johnson, Malina Johnson, Kailani Jones, Kyle Jones, Mikayla Jones, Terrence Jordan, Jamie Josephson, Jessica J. Julian, Kahuliau Kaai, Keaolani Kaaialii, Shanise Kaaikala, Puanani Kahai, Shaylyn Kahawai, Kawena Kahui, Kelii Kailipaka, Kahoruko Kajiya,

Ellie-Jean Kalawe, Bree Kalima, Steven Kalua, Kevin Karvas, Nellie Kati, Melvalee Kaulia, Germaine Kaululaau, Angela Kauwe, Hokuto Kawashima, Tori Kaya, Jay Kayhill, Jill Keely, Joanne Keliikoa, Bianca Keohokapu, Ada Kettner, Chantelle Kiessner, Chan Gyeom Kim, Mary Louise Kimura, Andrew J. H. Kinloch, Angalee Kirby, Rachel Kishimoto, Keely Kitamura, Sheena Kobayashi, William Kobus, Rochelle Koi,

Cody Kojima, Felicia Kolb, Leina Konashi, Hyesun Kong, Kaili Kosaka, Krystle Koshiyama, Lisa Kosilla, Keisha Kotake, Maya Kottwitz, Nolan Kua, Kyle Kua-Ramirez, Johann Kuipers, Morgan Kultala, Bonnie Shuk Ping Kwok, Liezl L. Lagua, Keohikai Laikupu, Samantha Lambert, Mia Lamirand, Kailey Lapenia, Caterina LaRocca, Danielle Larson, Samantha Lathrop, Brandon Lau, Angela Laureta, Valerie Lazickas,

Da Hai Lee, Jon-Pierre Leone, Shalyn Lewis, QiXin Li, Sonia Lipka, Hannah Lipman, Eileen Liu, Sheena Lopes, Kawehi Lopez, Catherine Lord, Joyce Lovell, Kristi Lovell, Michael Lovell, Rebekah Loving, Chari-Ann Luis-Calvo, Jacob Lunz, Deanna R. Macapulay, Natasha Machado, Brandon Mahle, Desmond Mahor, Alohilani Maiava, Wilson Malone, Michael Mandaquit, Alison Mansfield, Jordyn Mansinon, Danielle Marrufo, Katherine Martinez, Lashay M. Masami, Chantelle Mashreghy, Shae Massie,

Anna C. Masuda, Carle-Ann Mata, Moriah Mathson, Rosella Mathson, Eli Matola, Nicole Matsu, Kasey Matsumoto, Kelley Matsumoto, Aspen Mauch, Shaina McEnroe, Austin McGuire, Jared McLean, Korin Medeiros, Leslie Medina, Georgette Mercado, Marina Merkulova, Anna Meyer, William Midgley, Anna B. Mikkelsen, Chelsea Miles, Bryce Miles-Leighton, Brock Miller, Brooke Miller, Amberlyn Milum, Zayin Minia, Jessica Minick, Amanda Minney, Risako Mise, Lauren Mizuba, Nicole Monette,

Ariel Moniz, Michael Moore, Ariyana Moran, Juliann Morris, Kialoa Mossman, Shane-Earl Naeole, Kenneth Nagata, Jenny Nagatori, Brandon Naihe, Lorelei Nakagawa, Tori Nakagawa, Angela Nakamura, Richard Nakamura, Blayne Nakasone Sakata, Joseph Nakoa, Kirstie Naone, Ariel Navarro, Brandon Neal, Sean Nearhoof, Christopher Nelson, Kelsey Nguyen, Sarah Nichols, Cameron Nicholson, Karen Nishimoto, Reyn Nishioka, Kelsey Noetzelmann, Eloisa Obero, Jordan Ocol,

Jasmine Oher, Shantel Okinishi, Briana Oliver, Nicole Ortiz, Sarah A. Ota, Jamie Ouye, Ryan Ozaki, John D. Padapat, Kehaulani Pakani-Tells, Keirsa Pakani-Tsukiyama, Bronson Palupe, Christiane Pang, Isaac Pang, Jessica Pang, Jannah Pante, Pauleen Pante, Ciarra-Lynn Parinas, Kirsty Parker, Stephanie Pasco, Kailey Pascoe, Ishani S. S. Patel, Michael Patterson, Breanne Patton, Christian Patton, Hannah Pavao, Tyson Pavao, Casey Pearring, Leomanaolamaikalani Peleiholani Blanenfeld, Carlota Perez Pla Urbistondo, Graham Pernell, Shaun Perry, Trevor Perry, Mark Petner, Sharon Petrosky,

Terri Pinyerd, Rhealiza Pira, Chelsea Poe, Margot Pontius, Arwen Potochney, Debra Potter, Brett T. Pruett, Kylee Quevedo, Natalie Quinajon, Misti Quintel, Alethia Quintero, Akemi Rair, Crystal Rances, Anita Randall-Packer, Kaydee Rapozo, Evangeline Raza, Robyn Rector, Keana Rees, Angela I. Reich, Samantha Reis, William Renz, Ashley A. Resurreccion, Chloe Richards, Taumie Richie, Emily Risley, Karla Robles Moreano, Kainoa Rosa, Megan Rose, Justine Rosemond, Nina Sabahi, Josiane Saccu, Melanie Sacro, Julie Anne Sagabaen, Karl Sakai, Reese Sako, Angelica Salom,

Gabriella Sanchez, Louise V. Santos, Teresinha Santos Da Costa, Chelsea Sato, Kristen Savea, Briana Savusa, Steven Sayers, Crystal Schiszler, Kimberly Schmelz, Dehrich Schmidt-Chya, Emily Schneider, Julia Schray, Kimberly Scott, Jiyoon Seo, Artem Sergeyev, Jolene Serrano De Guzman, Seth Shaikh, Marleena Sheffield, Sydney Shiigi, Albert Shim, Jaci Shinoda, Keani Shirai, Kayla Shiroma, Kathleen Shon, Keian Shon, Maria Sideleva, Malia Silva, Heather Simon, Maysyvelle Sistoza, Cheyenne Sitts, Alexa Smiley, James Smith, Kathleen Smith, Logan Snell, Kristan-Maria Snook, Kiana Soloria, Carrie Soo Hoo, Sophia P. Soriano-Castillo, Christina Sorte, Krismon Sotiangco,

India Southern, Ethan Souza, Megan Spath, Ashley Spencer, Lauren Spreen, Jacqueline St. Clair, Ashlin Stahlberg, Erin Stamper, Maria Steadmon, Angelica Steele, Phillip Steering, Emma Stevens, Taylor Stokesbary, Jeremiah Storie, Marley Strand-Nicolaisen, Cole Stremski-Borero, Paige Sumida, Taliesin Sumner, Tyler Sumner, Tanyalee Switzer, Dillon Tacdol, Dustin Tacdol, Dallas Tada, Randolph Tafua, Hazel Tagalicud, Peniamina Taii, Tara Takamori, Jolyn Takeya-Whitney, Devin Tanaka,

Yoshinori Tanaka, Morgan Tate, Reuben Tate, Patience Taylor, Zach Taylor, Temau Teikitekahioho-Wolff, Chariya Terlep-Cabatbat, Samantha Texeira, Gin Tezuka, Ginger Thomas, Nicolette Thomas, Melanie Thomason, Zachary Tman, Ashley C. Tomori, Brandon Tomota, Jianxing Tong, Ryotaro Toshima, Kyndra Trevino-Scott, Emma Tunison, Christine J. Ucol, Jenifer M. Ucol, Brenna Usher, Abigail Vandenberg, Rosella M. Vaughn, Aundrea Vidal, Joana Vierra, Lixie A. Villanueva, Rowell Villanueva, Leilani VisikoKnox-Johnson, Nelson Vo, Thomas Vogeler, Michael Voight,

Kaipoleimanu Wahinepio, George Wall, Emily Wallingford, Lucille Walsh, HeNaniNoOeKaWahineUioIkePono Wandasan, Kenton Wandasan, Donald Waner, Sondra Warren, Valerie K. Wasser, Mary Webb, Kelsea Wells, Kaira Whittington-Ramirez, John Whitworth, Ty Widhalm, Alexis Williams, Qiyamah Williams, Daisy Willis, Leah Wilson, Phillip Wilson, Skyla Wilson, Vanessa Winchester-Sye, Christina Wine, Michelle Winkler, Elijah Won, David Wong, Tiana Wong, Daniel Wright,

Chelsie Wung, Sharmaine Yacavone, Jessica Yamaguchi, Marilyn Yamamoto, Lia Yamashiro, Phillip Yawata, Shaniah Yogi, Cheyne Yonemori, Sayuri Yoshimura, Deanna Young, Kristen Young, Sable-Marie Young, Tyler Young, Anwar A. Yu, Bithiah Yuan, Trisha Yuen, Jacqueline Yuw, Marikka Zavas, Yeva Zobova, and Abcde Zoller.

HHS ‘Dragon Jazz’ Band to play with Marcia Ball and Johnny Nicholas in Four-Island Concert Tour

The Honokaʻa High School Jazz Band has created a musical legacy during the last four decades, under the award-winning direction of teacher Gary Washburn. This month, members of the Band will perform onstage with soulful blues storyteller Marcia Ball and career R&B bandsman Johnny Nicholas and his band Hellbent, in an unprecedented four-island concert tour.

honokaa Jazz Band 2016

Dragon Jazz Band photo by Sarah Anderson

“Johnny got in touch with me through a friend, said Washburn. “He’s been working with kids, involving kids in the music business—and he invited the band to play with them. I said OK,” said Washburn, himself winner of the Claes Nobel Educator of Distinction Award by the National Society of High School Scholars.

“So, on this island, the Band will play a 30-minute warm-up set for them at their two shows in Waimea and Hilo, and then we’ll play a few tunes with Johnny, and with Marcia, including ‘Foreclosed on the House of Love,’ which is on our CD,” said Washburn.

After a kickoff concert January 24 at Waimea’s Kahilu Theatre, eight young musicians will travel to Hilo, Kauai, Maui and Oahu, to perform with Ball and Nicholas (see schedule below). The new Dragon Jazz Band includes: Kamea Phenicie on tenor sax, Elliot Reddekopp on trumpet, Emma Reddekopp on piano, Kamaehu Arraujo-Duldulao on trumpet, Andrew Connors on trombone, Nick Rohfeld on drums, Ron-Jon Pira on bass, and Lexi Dalmacia on guitar.

This unique performance opportunity tops an already impressive list for the Band. They’ve played on National Public Radio’s “From the Top,” and opened for the Royal Hawaiian Band at Iolani Palace where they were recognized by the State Legislature. They do a yearly multi-concert tour of Oahu to celebrate National Jazz Appreciation Month, and their 14th CD (an annual fundraiser) has just been released. In 2011, they received a national Grammy Signature Schools Award.

Marcia Ball, courtesy Marcia Ball

Marcia Ball, courtesy Marcia Ball

Marcia Ball’s signature Gulf Coast blues is a sound described as “a one-of-a kind-musical gumbo.” Known as a musical storyteller, the New York Times says, “Marcia Ball plays two-fisted New Orleans barrelhouse piano and sings in a husky, knowing voice about all the trouble men and women can get into on the way to a good time.”

Four of her previous five releases received Grammy Award nominations. In 2014, Ball received the Blues Music Award (BMA) for the Pinetop Perkins Piano Player Of The Year, for a total of 10 BMAs and 44 nominations. She recently received a 2015 Living Blues Readers’ Poll Award for Most Outstanding Musician (Keyboard) and now holds eight Living Blues Awards in all. She was inducted into the Gulf Coast Hall of Fame in 2010 and into the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame in 2012.

Since the 60’s, Johnny Nicholas has played rhythm and blues with great bands from Rhode Island to Chicago, Louisiana and Texas. After some time off to raise a family, he returned to music in 1991, teaming up with Johnny Shines and Snooky Pryor on the album “Back to the Country.” Nichols has kept the momentum going with a studio album and three live albums on Topcat Records in addition to regular live shows.

The kickoff concert is Sunday, January 24, 2016 at 6 p.m., at the Kahilu Theatre in Waimea. Projected to be a sell-out, tickets for the show are available online at www.kahilutheatre.org.

The inter-island schedule for Marcia Ball, Johnny Nicholas and Dragon Jazz is:

  • January 24, 2016, Kahilu Theatre in Waimea
  • January 27, Hilo Palace Theater
  • January 28, Charley’s Restaurant and Saloon, Maui
  • January 29, Kauai Beach Resort, Lihue, Kauai
  • February 2, Hawaii Theatre Center, Honolulu

The Honokaʻa High School Jazz Band and their boosters have set up a GoFundMe account to help with travel costs. Contributions can be made online, https://www.gofundme.com/dragonjazz.