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Online Bachelor of Social Work Option Extends Education Opportunities Statewide

A new Distance Education (DE) Option for the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree delivered by the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa will launch in Fall 2018, providing increased accessibility for students statewide to pursue the degree.

Developed by the Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work in partnership with Outreach College, the online degree is designed for eligible students who have completed the General Education Core Requirements and BSW prerequisites.

Courses are offered in a five-week, asynchronous format that allows for flexibility and busy schedules. Students take the online courses sequentially as a cohort, and practice real world skills under the supervision of social work professionals in community agencies.

Students and community members are invited to attend informational sessions regarding the BSW-DE Option:

• Maui. UH Maui College, 9/20/17, 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Transfer and College Fair, Ka Lama Building. Also, 2 to 3 p.m.: Outreach College on Maui hosted session in HITS (for Moloka‘i, Lāna‘i, Hāna and Lahaina).

• Hawaiʻi Island. Hawaiʻi Community College Manono Campus (Hilo), 10/03/17, noon to 1 p.m., Building 379A, Room 6B. Hawai‘i Community College – Palamanui (Kona)10/03/17, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., Koali 101.

• Kauaʻi. Kaua‘i Community College, 10/06/17, noon to 1 p.m., Learning Resource Center, LRC-124B.

For more information, contact the Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work at (808) 956-9470 or by email sent to sswde@hawaii.edu.

For more information, visit: www.hawaii.edu/sswork/

2016-17 Strive HI Performance System Results

The Hawaii State Department of Education shared its 2016-17 Strive HI Performance System results this evening during the Board of Education community meeting. The school accountability system focuses on state and schools’ progress on Strategic Plan Student Success Objectives and provides educators and communities with information to take action for student learning.

“The results are encouraging and show our focus moving in the right direction with college and career readiness measures remaining steady, including some growth in Science,” said Superintendent Dr. Christina Kishimoto. “As we move forward, we will be very specific and purposeful in our approach to address the achievement gap and chronic absenteeism. We will take what we have learned about effective student-centered practices since 2005 and raise our implementation work to another level.”

While statewide overall results in English Language Arts, Math and Science have shown growth over the past three years; the results have been mixed compared to 2016:

  • Science – up 4 percentage points from 2016
    (2015: 41%; 2016: 42%; 2017: 46%)
  • Mathematics – no change from 2016
    (2015: 41%; 2016: 42%; 2017: 42%)
  • English Language Arts/Literacy – down 1 percentage point from 2016
    (2015: 48%; 2016: 51%; 2017: 50%)

While overall state results were stable, the following schools showed the most growth in English Language Arts and Math over the past three years (scroll to the bottom of the release for an extended list of top performing schools):

  • English Language Arts/Literacy – Three-year average gains in percentage of students meeting/exceeding standards:
    • Kauai High – up 17 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 25%; 2016: 59%; 2017: 59%)
    • Kapaa High – up 17 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 33%; 2016: 58%; 2017: 66%)
    • Kahuku High & Intermediate – up 15 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 20%; 2016: 54%; 2017: 50%)
    • Kaiser High: up 14 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 51%; 2016: 74%; 2017: 79%)
    • Pauoa Elementary – up 11 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 56%; 2016: 78%; 2017: 77%)
  • Math – Three-year average gains in percentage of students meeting/exceeding standards:
    • Pauoa Elementary – up 17 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 47%; 2016: 72%; 2017: 81%)
    • Kohala High – up 16 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 15%; 2016: 22%; 2017: 47%)
    • Kapolei Elementary – up 13 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 30%; 2016: 52%; 2017: 56%)
    • Kealakehe High – up 13 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 19%; 2016: 39%; 2017: 44%)
    • Haleiwa Elementary – up 11 percentage points from 2015
      (2015: 49%; 2016: 49%; 2017: 71%)

Strive HI was launched in school year 2012-13 as the state’s locally designed performance system that was a waiver from the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law. The accountability system includes multiple measures of school performance including proficiency in Science, Math and Language Arts/Literacy; chronic absenteeism; school climate; graduation rates; and achievement gaps. The system was modified earlier this year to address the federal requirements under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and the revised DOE/BOE Strategic Plan. The law replaces both NCLB and the state’s waiver. ESSA requires full implementation including the provisions related to school accountability this school year.

English Language Arts and Math scores are derived from the Smarter Balanced Assessment, and Science scores are from the Hawaii State Assessment in Science.

Click here to view the 2016-17 State Snapshot of Strive HI indicators. For more information about the Strive HI performance system, click here.

Below are lists of top performers across indicators in the Strive HI System. Results for schools with small student populations are suppressed to protect student privacy.

 

​Highest Achieving Schools in Meeting English Language Arts/Literacy Standards
Statewide: 50%
Lanikai El 88%
Kaelepulu El 84%
Mililani Ike El 82%
Momilani El 81%
de Silva El 80%
Mililani Uka El 79%
Hickam El 79%
Kaiser High 79%
Koko Head El 78%
Pauoa El 77%
Manoa El 77%
Aina Haina El 77%
Roosevelt High 77%
Waikiki El 76%
Noelani El 75%
Highest Achieving Schools in Meeting Math Standards

Statewide: 42%

Lanikai El 89%
Momilani El 87%
Pauoa El 81%
Noelani El 79%
Waikiki El 79%
Mililani Ike El 78%
Maemae El 76%
Wilson El 76%
Kaelepulu El 75%
Aliiolani El 75%
Mililani Mauka El 75%
Mililani Uka El 75%
Palisades El 74%
Laie El 73%
Pearl Ridge El 73%
Highest Achieving Schools in Meeting Science Standards

Statewide: 46%

Lanikai El 98%
Maunawili El 96%
Haleiwa El 96%
Kaelepulu El 92%
Mililani Ike El 92%
Manoa El 91%
Maemae El 91%
Kamalii El 91%
Pearl City El 91%
Waikiki El 90%
Mililani Mauka El 89%
Hickam El 88%
Aikahi El 88%
Waiau El 88%
Koko Head El 87%

 

​Highest Achieving Schools in English Language Arts/Literacy Growth (3-Year Average Gains)
Kauai High +17 percentage points
Kapaa High +17 percentage points
Kahuku High & Intermediate +15 percentage points
Kaiser High +14 percentage points
Pauoa El +11 percentage points
Kaewai El +11 percentage points
SEEQS +10 percentage points
Waialua High & Intermediate +9 percentage points
Waiakea High +9 percentage points
Makawao El +9 percentage points
Kapolei El +9 percentage points
Kalihi Uka El +8 percentage points
Kalaheo High +8 percentage points
Aliamanu Middle +8 percentage points
Na Wai Ola +7 percentage points
Kealakehe High +7 percentage points
​Highest Achieving Schools in Math Growth (3-Year Average Gains)
Pauoa El +17 percentage points
Kohala High +16 percentage points
Kapolei El +13 percentage points
Kealakehe High +13 percentage points
Haleiwa El +11 percentage points
Aliiolani El +11 percentage points
Kauai High +11 percentage points
Kaewai El +11 percentage points
Waiau El +9 percentage points
Kekaulike High +9 percentage points
Palolo El +9 percentage points
Waiahole El +8 percentage points
Kalihi Uka El +8 percentage points
Wheeler Middle +8 percentage points
Highest Achieving Elementary Schools in Reducing Chronic Absenteeism
Maunaloa El -21 percentage points
Mountain View El -6 percentage points
Keonepoko El -6 percentage points
Na Wai Ola -6 percentage points
Lincoln El -5 percentage points
Naalehu El -5 percentage points
Maunawili El -5 percentage points
Sunset Beach El -5 percentage points
Kamalii El -5 percentage points
Kamehameha III El -5 percentage points
Likelike El -4 percentage points
Konawaena El -4 percentage points
Waimalu El -4 percentage points
Waiahole El -4 percentage points
Royal El -4 percentage points
​Kalihi Waena El ​-4 percentage points
​Kaunakakai El ​-4 percentage points
Highest Achieving Middle Schools in Reducing Chronic Absenteeism
Ilima Intermediate -5 percentage points
Wahiawa Middle -4 percentage points
Waiakea Intermediate -4 percentage points
Kapaa Middle -4 percentage points
Lahaina Intermediate -3 percentage points
Stevenson Middle -3 percentage points
Aliamanu Middle -3 percentage points
Iao Intermediate -3 percentage points
Highlands Intermediate -3 percentage points
Washington Middle -2 percentage points
Waimea Canyon Middle -1 percentage point
Waipahu Intermediate -1 percentage point
Kalakaua Middle -1 percentage point
Ka Umeke Kaeo -1 percentage point
Moanalua Middle -1 percentage point
 
Highest Achieving High Schools in Reducing Chronic Absenteeism
Niihau O Kekaha -12 percentage points
KANAKA -8 percentage points
Kanu o ka Aina -7 percentage points
Laupahoehoe Community PCS -4 percentage points
Lahainaluna High -4 percentage points
Kekaulike High -4 percentage points
Kailua High -3 percentage points
Molokai High -3 percentage points
Anuenue -3 percentage points
Thompson Academy -3 percentage points
Kauai High -3 percentage points
Waialua High & Intermediate -2 percentage points
Mililani High -2 percentage points
Moanalua High -2 percentage points
Highest Achieving Schools in Graduation Rate (Four-Year Rate)
University Laboratory 100%
Thompson Academy 97%
Anuenue 97%
Moanalua High 95%
Ehunuikaimalino 95%
Mililani High 94%
Radford High 94%
Kauai High 90%
Kalani High 90%
Kapaa High 90%
​Highest Achieving Schools in College-Going Rate
16-month enrollment rate
University Laboratory 86%
Kalani High 81%
Roosevelt High 75%
Kaiser High 74%
Mililani High 72%
McKinley High 67%
Kalaheo High 66%
Moanalua High 64%
Radford High 61%
Pearl City High 60%
Waimea High 58%
​Hawaii Academy ​58%
​Kapaa High ​57%
​Kauai High ​57%
Molokai High 56%

Nine Awarded Native Hawaiian Health Scholarship

Papa Ola Lōkahi is pleased to announce that nine scholars in diverse medical and allied health training programs have been awarded the Native Hawaiian Health Scholarship.

Click to enlarge

“The students in this 2017-2018 cohort are stellar scholars and committed to serving the needs of our medically underserved communities,” asserted Keaulana Holt, director of the Native Hawaiian Health Scholarship Program (NHHSP), which is administered by Papa Ola Lōkahi. “I’m proud of each one.”

Three awardees are studying to be physicians, one a dentist, one a masters level social worker, and one public health worker. Three are in nursing programs at three different local schools at three different levels.

Six are in school in Hawai’i; and three are in accredited programs on the continental United States.

NHHSP scholars may attend any accredited program at any college or university in the United States. Eventually, they’re called home to Hawai’i to fulfill their service obligation.

The objective of the NHHSP is to address access to health care by developing a Hawaiian health work force committed to serving the unique needs of Hawaiian communities. Once licensure is complete, these scholars will work full-time in medically under-served areas in Hawai’i for two (minimum) to four (maximum) years, relative to the length of scholarship support.

Since 1991, more than 275 awards have been made in 20 different primary and behavioral health care disciplines. More than 200 have already been placed into the workforce on six islands impacting the well-being of the communities they serve. Of those who have fulfilled their service obligations, nearly 90% have continued to serve medically underserved areas and populations in Hawai’i.

More significantly, NHHSP scholars have risen to positions of leadership, impacting change in health perspectives, policy, promising practices, and emerging technologies among their patients, colleagues and the communities they serve. They are the role models for other Kānaka Maoli who aspire to be of service in a healing profession.

Visit www.nhhsp.org for more information about the Native Hawaiian Health Scholarship Program.

Catch a Wave to the Surf-a-Book Festival

The Hawaii State Public Library System and Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) of Hawaii are happy to launch the Surf-a-Book Festival, in celebration of children’s literature in Hawaii!  Catch a wave and join us at the Hawaii State Library on Saturday, September 23, 2017, 10:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

The Surf-a-Book Festival is an opportunity for keiki and their families to meet and listen to local authors and illustrators share their stories. Participating local authors and illustrators include: Joy Au, Chris Caravalho, Kristen Carlson, Ellie Crowe, David Estes, Leslie Hayashi, Dani Hickman, Lavonne Leong, Christin Lozano, Alina Niemi, Elizabeth Oh, Jessica Orfe, and Tammy Yee.

The event will also include activity centers throughout the library to inspire our young readers, authors, and artists, book signings, a book exhibit and panel discussions for children’s book writers and illustrators.  Local authors and illustrators will also share their creative process with aspiring new authors. First Lady Dawn Amano-Ige will be the welcoming speaker.

“We are excited to work with SCBWI to offer a great free Saturday event for keiki and their families to celebrate reading by meeting wonderful authors and artist illustrators. We hope the experience will inspire future dreamers, authors, and artists,” said State Librarian Stacey Aldrich.

For more information, link to https://www.librarieshawaii.org/2017/08/31/surf-a-book-festival-saturday-september-23rd/ or call the Hawaii State Library – Edna Allyn Room for Children at 586-3510.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s October 2017 Events

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park (ADIP) programs with the public throughout 2017. In addition, the community is invited to lend a hand to save native rainforest through the park’s Stewardship at the Summit volunteer program.
ADIP and Hawaiian cultural programs are free, but entrance fees apply.

Programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Stewardship at the Summit. Volunteers are needed to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. No advance registration is required, and there is no cost to participate, but park entrance fees apply. Visit the park website for additional planning details: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm.
When: October 7, 13, 21, and 27 at 9 a.m.
Where: Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. on any of the above dates.

Lomi. Lomi is the traditional massage practice of the Hawaiian people.

Lomi massage demonstrated in the park. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson

There are many different styles of lomi used throughout Hawai‘i, and most are used as a way to heal body and mind. Lomi practitioner Annie Erbe will demonstrate this popular healing art. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Oct. 11 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Footprints in the Ash. Hawaiians once traversed Kīlauea on foot to travel between Puna and Ka‘ū, and during the 18th century, explosions from the volcano rained volcanic ash down on the people, preserving their footprints in the sands of “Keonehelelei.”

Footprints fossilized in volcanic ash in the Ka‘ū Desert will be the subject of October’s After Dark in the Park. NPS Photo.

Park Ranger Jay Robinson discusses new interpretive displays in the Ka‘ū Desert and explains what we know today about the impact of these explosive eruptions on native society. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Oct. 17 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium

Mark Yamanaka in Concert. Join local recording artist Mark Yamanaka for a free concert.

Mark has been awarded multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano awards since the debut of his first album, Lei Puakenikeni. His next album, Lei Maile, has also received critical acclaim. Mark’s crisp, clear falsetto and rich baritone voice will mesmerize you. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., Oct. 18 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kahuku ‘Ohana Day. Families are invited for a day of fun, culture and discovery at the Kahuku Unit! Learn about the hidden powers that plants have to keep us healthy through the teachings of Aunty Ka‘ohu Monfort, a practitioner of lā‘au lapa‘au (Hawaiian herbal medicine).

Aunty Ka‘ohu Monfort demonstrates lā‘au lapa‘au at the 2017 Cultural Festival. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson

Collect seeds from native plants and help park rangers bring new life to Kahuku. Kids 17 and under and their families must sign up by October 13 to participate by calling 808-985-6019. Bring water, lunch and snacks, sunscreen, hat, long pants, shoes and reusable water bottle. Kahuku is located between the 70 and 71 mile markers on Highway 11.
When: Sat., Oct. 21, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (Registration required by Oct. 13).
Where: Kahuku Unit

Lau Hala. Join park staff and learn one of the great traditional arts of Hawaii, ulana lau hala. Hawaiians have used the hala (pandanus) tree to create many useful and beautiful items for centuries. Learn to weave lau hala and take home your own piece of lau hala art. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Oct. 25 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Pahoa High Alumna Awarded Audrey S. Furukawa (ASF) Study Abroad Scholarship

Chrisovolandou Gronowski, a senior psychology major and chemistry minor at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, has been awarded the Audrey S. Furukawa (ASF) Study Abroad Scholarship in the amount of $1,000 for the fall 2017 semester.
Gronowski, a Pahoa High and Intermediate School alumna who carries a cumulative 3.96 grade point average, is currently attending Anglo-American University in the Czech Republic.

The ASF Study Abroad Scholarship was created to provide a UH Hilo student with the opportunity to study abroad and begin their global education journey. The recipient must have at least a 3.2 GPA with preference given to Hawaiʻi high school graduates.

To help support future students from Hawaiʻi to study abroad, or to learn more about the study abroad program, call UH Hilo’s Center for Global Education and Exchange at 932-7489 or visit www.hilo.hawaii.edu/studyabroad/.

Call for Nominations for the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents

The Candidate Advisory Council (CAC) of the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents has initiated the recruitment process for four (4) seats on the Board of Regents.

Nominations are now being accepted for one (1) At Large seat; one (1) Hawaiʻi County seat; and one (1) Maui County seat for five-year terms.  Nominations are also being accepted for one (1) Student seat for a two-year term.  All terms begin July 1, 2018.

Candidates for the Hawaiʻi County and Maui County seats must reside in the geographic area that they represent.  Candidates for the Student seat must be a University of Hawaiʻi student.

Application materials, procedures and descriptions of regent responsibilities are available online at www.hawaii.edu/rcac.  This information may also be requested by calling (808) 692-1218 or by email at borapp@hawaii.edu.

Completed applications must be received by CAC or postmarked by 11:59pm on Friday, October 13, 2017.

Members of the UH Board of Regents as well as the Candidate Advisory Council, who represent various constituent groups, serve voluntarily and are not paid.

HPA Receives 2017 Healthy School Award

Hawaii Preparatory Academy (HPA) was one of three schools selected nationally to receive a 2017 Healthy School Award from The Healthy Facilities Institute (HFI), in partnership with School Planning and Management and College Planning and Management magazines.

Hawaii Preparatory Academy uses dry steam vapor for cleaning and disinfecting.

An expert panel selected winners based on submitted applications, interviews, and a strong commitment to facility health and practical steps. Health factors assessed included indoor air quality, chemical exposure, water quality, sound levels, lighting, cleaning and disinfecting, sanitizing and food service, integrated pest management, and ergonomics (musculoskeletal, strains, slips/falls).

“We’re very pleased to be recognized for our efforts to achieve environmental excellence and to make our school environment better and safer for everyone,” said Robert McKendry, head of school.

Hawaii Preparatory received the Healthy Facilities Advocate award “for its mission to promote healthful, place-based learning on a site with access to 80 percent of the world’s ecosystems.” HPA was commended for:

  • Monitoring the indoor environment using devices that detect carbon dioxide, temperature, and sound levels.
  • Making standing desks and anti-fatigue mats available to employees.
  • Using dry steam vapor for cleaning and disinfecting, and a hydrogen peroxide-based cleaner, having reduced annual spending on chemical cleaners by about $4,000.
  • Using low-toxicity plant-based intervention to control insects.

The school’s Energy Lab achieved Living Building Challenge certification by the International Living Building Institute (ILBI) in 2011 and also received Platinum-level LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) for Schools 2.0 certification from the U.S. Green Building Council in 2010. In 2012, HPA also was one of a select group of schools throughout the state of Hawaii to receive the Green Ribbon Schools (GRS) award from the U.S. Department of Education.

Other 2017 Healthy School Award winners were Aurora Public Schools in Aurora, Colorado, and Elk Grove USD (EGUSD) in Elk Grove, California. Winners were announced in the July/August 2017 issues of School Planning and Management and College Planning and Management magazines.

Winning schools will be featured in a webinar on November 2, Thirty Days to Healthy Schools at Lower Cost[webspm.com/articles/2017/07/01/healthy-facilities.aspx?m=1]. The webinar will focus on how healthy schools promote learning, savings, and attendance-based funding, and how any school can develop a framework for a healthy facility and budget within 30 days.
For more information, visit http://www.healthyfacilitiesinstitute.com.

UH Shines in 2018 U.S. News and World Report Rankings

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, UH West Oʻahu and UH Hilo once again made the U.S. News and World Report’s Best Colleges Rankings, along with UH Mānoa Shidler College of Business. The 2018 U.S. News and World Report rankings were released on September 12.

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa moved up 10 spots to 159 on the 2018 U.S. News and World Report’s Best Colleges Rankings. UH Manoa is also ranked 6 in Best Ethnic Diversity (National Universities), 83 in Top Public Schools, and 177 in High School Counselor Rankings.

“We continue to be gratified by the upward movement in recent academic and research rankings, both on national and international levels,” said Michael Bruno, UH Mānoa interim vice chancellor for academic affairs and vice chancellor for research. “They show that our faculty and staff are working hard, and working together, to give students the best and most accessible higher education experience.”

The announcement of UH Mānoa’s upward mobility on the U.S. News and World Report ranking follows the 2018 Times Higher Education World University Rankings that rated UH Mānoa 63 in the U.S., up from 69 last year—representing its best showing ever in the Times ranking.

UH West Oʻahu ranked 25 among Best Regional Colleges (West), placing it in the top 38 percent of schools in their respective category.

“The faculty, staff and students are thrilled to be recognized as it is an affirmation of the great work we do to prepare 21st Century leaders—career creators who are making a positive difference in our communities!” said UH West Oʻahu Maenette K. P. Ah Nee-Benham.

UH Hilo ranked 66 among Best Regional Universities West, placing it in the top 47 percent in their respective categorory.

“We are very pleased to see UH Hilo recognized for its excellence in providing a quality educational experience,” said UH Hilo Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai. “This ranking is a testament to the work of our faculty and staff, who are deeply committed to providing our students with the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed when they graduate and enter their chosen professions.”

The U.S. News and World Report rankings surveyed 1,600 colleges among more than 3,000 four-year institutions throughout the U.S. Its methodology considers, among various factors, endowment size, rate of alumni giving and student-to-faculty ratio, which tend to favor private institutions.

U.S. News and World Report profiles:
UH Mānoa
UH West Oʻahu
UH Hilo

Hawaii Pacific University and Honokaa High Launch Virtual Classroom

Hawaii Pacific University (HPU) and Honokaa High School today kicked off their new partnership that gives Honokaa students access to HPU’s new, virtual college-credit program. The 17 Honokaa students who are enrolled in the program will connect with HPU professors using video technology that allows for real-time learning.

The 17 Honoka’a students who are enrolled in the program will connect with HPU professors using video technology that allows for real-time learning.  Photo Credit: HPU

“This innovative partnership with Hawaii Pacific University helps us equip students for success at the next level, empower them to explore their potential, and inspire them to reach their aspirations,” said Suzanne Mulcahy, Hawaii State Department of Education. “Together, as a community, we can meet and exceed our goal to successfully guide students to become leaders for Hawai’i’s future.”

“We are grateful to HPU for this partnership as it gives our students direct access to a post-secondary education trajectory,” said Rachelle Matsumura, principal of Honokaa High & Intermediate School. “Programs like this encourage our students to strive for their highest potential and provides a valuable head start on earning college credits that will potentially save them time and money.”

This program is the first of its kind for the private university, which provides real-time, distance learning for high school students. To increase access and opportunities for Honokaa students, HPU tuition has been waived so the high school students may earn college credits and experience the university’s rich curriculum.

“HPU is deeply committed to making higher education increasingly cost-efficient, attainable, and expedient for the students in our local communities,” said John Gotanda, HPU president.  “We recognize an opportunity to not only provide our keiki o ka aina with their best chance to attain their desired goals, but also attract and cultivate high achievers within our islands who will one day be leaders of our community making a profound impact on Hawai’i and beyond.”

L to R: Rachelle Matsumura, principal of Honoka’a High & Intermediate; Assistant Superintendent Suzanne Mulcahy; Complex Area Superintendent Art Souza; John Gotanda, president of HPU; Carol Mon Lee.  Photo Credit: HPU

Dual Credit allows Hawaii DOE high school students to take classes that satisfy requirements for both a Hawaii high school diploma and a University degree.

The Dual Credit program is also made possible through generous support from Carol Mon Lee, a retired lawyer and educator.  Ms. Lee’s investment makes higher education more attainable for local students. She noted, “President Gotanda’s vision for educating the youth of Hawaii, especially those in our public schools, is not just inspiring but vital to our state.”

Ms. Lee currently volunteers as executive-vice president and chief operating officer of ThinkTech Hawaii, a non-profit media company. She also sits on the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education and the Board of Governors, UC Hastings College of Law, San Francisco.

The partnership highlights HPU’s expertise as the state leader in online education and expands its services to support public high school students. The university has been providing online education for deployed students in the military and have provided dual-credit programs with high schools around the state. In 2016, HPU became the first school in Hawaii to be approved by a state agency to participate in NC-SARA, a national authorization program to reciprocate online education across state lines.

Finalists Announced for Dean of the College of Education at UH Mānoa

Three finalists have been identified for the position of Dean of the College of Education (COE).  The three finalists are scheduled to participate over a two day period of visits on the Mānoa campus.  The visits include department discussions; meetings with senior administrators, faculty, staff, students, and internal and external constituents; and a public presentation.

Campus and community members, as well as the general public, are encouraged to attend.

The campus visits of the three candidates have been scheduled as follows:

Dr. Michael Sampson

Dr. Michael Sampson, visiting September 21-22, 2017
Dean and Professor
School of Education
St. John’s University
Public Presentation:  Friday, September 22, 3:00-4:15 p.m./Art Building Auditorium 132

Dr. Nathan Murata

Dr. Nathan Murata, visiting September 28-29, 2017
Professor and Department and Graduate Chair
Department of Kinesiology
College of Education
University of Hawaii at Manoa
Public Presentation:  Friday, September 29, 3:00-4:15 p.m./Art Building Auditorium 132

Dr. DeLacy Ganley

Dr. DeLacy Ganley, visiting October 2-3, 2017
Professor and Director
Department of Teacher Education, School of Educational Studies
Claremont Graduate University
Public Presentation:  Tuesday, October 3, 3:00-4:15 p.m./Bilger Building Auditorium 150

“We were fortunate to have received a highly qualified pool of candidates.  The Search Advisory Committee did a terrific job in identifying these three finalists and I would like to thank them for their outstanding effort and commitment to the search,” said Interim Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Vice Chancellor for Research Michael Bruno.  “As always, we encourage UH faculty, staff, students and the public to come out and meet the candidates, and we look forward to receiving their input to assist in hiring the best person for the position.”

For more information about the search process, including a list of the members of the search advisory committee, the campus visit daily schedule and the candidate biographies, see the search website at http://www.manoa.hawaii.edu/executivesearch/educ.

For more information about the College of Education, please visit https://coe.hawaii.edu/.

Student Debate Competition to Highlight Opening Day of Global Tourism Summit

Perpetuating sustainable tourism and encouraging young people to become more involved in determining the travel industry’s future, both in Hawaii and internationally, is a key objective of the Global Tourism Summit, September 19-21, at the Hawaii Convention Center.

The 2017 Global Tourism Summit Student Debate is a highlight event fulfilling that need. Featuring 18 debate teams, 10 teams from outside Hawaii and eight within the State, the round-robin tournament is taking place on the Summit’s opening day, September 19. The central topic for the debate program is “Resolved: Tourism Helps to Preserve Culture.”

Presented by the Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA), the Global Tourism Summit offers a diversity of sessions covering topics and trends vital to Hawaii’s future, including Hawaiian culture, eco-tourism, innovation and technology. According to George D. Szigeti, HTA president and CEO, the Student Debate is an essential program because of how it brings teens into the discussion on tourism’s future.

“We need to provide our young people with the incentive and opportunity to express their views on how to make tourism better for all of society” said Szigeti. “The future is theirs and they need to help chart its course for all of us. The Student Debate tournament is intended to seed their interest in tourism and inspire them to be future leaders.”

The 10 teams from outside Hawaii consist of two teams from both Japan and Hong Kong, and one team each from China, Taiwan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Canada and the U.S. mainland. Some teams won local competitions to earn the right to participate in the Global Tourism Summit Student Debate.

The eight Hawaii teams in the Student Debate tournament include three teams from Parker School, two teams each from Kamehameha Schools and the Home School League, and one team from Hilo High School.

Among the international debate teams is The Forensics Society from the Taipei American School representing Taiwan. In May, The Forensics Society won the International Division of the U.S. National Tournament of Champions in Public Forum Debate at the University of Kentucky. The team’s coach, Dr. Nick Coburn-Palo, said the students are thrilled to be in Honolulu for the debate tournament.

“We are tremendously excited to embrace this incredibly generous opportunity to match wits with debate teams from some of the top schools in the world, as well as experience the hospitality for which Hawaii is internationally famous,” said Dr. Coburn-Palo. “Furthermore, our debaters are excited to dip their toes into professional waters by learning more about the rapidly evolving international travel industry at the conference.”

On the morning of September 19, the 18 teams will be paired off in rounds of timed competition with a multi-tiered format that challenges the debate members to present and defend their case through the following process.

  • Presentation of the team’s case.
  • Crossfire with opposing speakers asking and answering questions of each other.
  • Rebuttal to refute the opposing team’s arguments.
  • Summary highlighting the main points of the debate.
  • Final focus with each team explaining why they won the round.

All of the teams participate in three rounds of debates, with the scores tabulated for each one. The two teams that emerge with the top scores will compete in the 2017 Global Tourism Summit Student Debate Finale from 2:00-2:45 p.m. in the Liliu Theater.

PATA Hawaii Student Forum: Planning for a Career in the Global Tourism Environment

Following the debate finals is the PATA Hawaii Student Forum on the topic of Planning for a Career in the Global Tourism Environment. Presented by the Hawaii Chapter of the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA) the forum features prominent tourism industry leaders providing students majoring in hospitality, tourism or transportation management with valuable career advice. The PATA Hawaii Student Forum takes place from 3:00-4:55 p.m. in the Liliu Theater.

Registering for the Global Tourism Summit, September 19-21
Interested attendees can participate in the Global Tourism Summit by registering online at www.GlobalTourismSummitHawaii.com. Registration also includes lunch on the days registered for and participation in the Aloha Reception, featuring entrées from 20 restaurants, on September 20.

Several options are available for registration:

  • Individuals: Full Summit, September 19-21: $395
  • Groups of Eight or More: Full Summit, September 19-21: $365 per person (Groups can mix and match different attendees during the summit)
  • Student and Faculty Members: Full Summit, September 19-21: $150
  • Individuals, Partial Summit, September 19-20: $275
  • Individuals, Partial Summit, September 20-21: $265

Previously known as the Hawaii Tourism Conference, HTA changed the name of the annual event this year to the Global Tourism Summit to more accurately reflect Hawaii’s emergence as a leader in international travel and tourism.

Additional Open Application Period Begins Today for Preschool Open Doors Program

The Department of Human Services (DHS) has opened an additional application period for its Preschool Open Doors (POD) program and encourages families to apply between September 11, 2017 and October 31, 2017.  Applications received during this period will be considered for preschool participation during January 1, 2018 and June 30, 2018.

This program, which currently serves more than 1,400 children statewide, provides child care subsidies to eligible low- and moderate-income families to pay preschool tuition. POD aims to provide children whose families might otherwise not be able to afford preschool the opportunity to gain essential skills to be successful in school and in life.

To qualify for the program, children must be eligible to enter kindergarten in the 2018-2019 school year (born between August 1, 2012 and July 31, 2013). Families are reminded that a child must be five years old on or before July 31 to enter kindergarten. Families may choose any one of the 426 state-licensed preschools. Underserved or at-risk children receive priority consideration for the POD program, and funds are limited.

Interested families may request an application beginning Monday, September 11, 2017 from the Department’s POD contractor, PATCH, by visiting patchhawaii.org or calling 791-2130 or toll free 1-800-746-5620.  PATCH can also help families locate a preschool convenient for them.

Applications must be received by Tuesday, October 31, 2017 to be considered during the January 1, 2018-June 30, 2018 program period. Applications should be dropped off, mailed, faxed, or emailed to the following:

PATCH – POD

560 N. Nimitz Hwy, Suite 218

Honolulu, HI 96817

Fax: (808) 694-3066

Email: PODAdmin@patch-hi.org

Eligibility and priorities for POD program selection are detailed online in HAR §17-799, which is available online at humanservices.hawaii.gov/admin-rules-2/admin-rules-for-programs.  For more information about other DHS programs and services, visit humanservices.hawaii.gov.

Hawaii Department of Education Announces 2017-18 Enrollment Figures for Public and Charter Schools

Hawaii’s public and charter schools saw a slight decrease in enrollment for a total of 179,255 for school year 2017-18 compared to 179,902 last year. This year, Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) schools enrolled 168,095 students (down 1,173 from last year), and charter schools saw an increase of enrollment with 11,160 students (up 526 from last year) and the addition of two new charter schools.

In 2017-18, the five largest HIDOE public schools by grade level are:

  • High Schools (all grades 9-12): Campbell (3,110), Mililani (2,571), Waipahu (2,554), Farrington (2,309), Kapolei (2,035).
  • Intermediate (grades 7-8)/Middle (grades 6-8): Mililani Middle (1,873), Kapolei Middle (1,521), Waipahu Intermediate (1,294), Maui Waena Intermediate (1,176), Kalakaua Middle (1,075).
  • Elementary Schools: August Ahrens (1,249), Holomua (1,163), Ewa (1,070), Keoneula (1,037), Waipahu (1,026).

The five smallest HIDOE schools in the state include: Waiahole Elementary (81), Olomana School (69), Hawaii School for the Deaf and Blind (53), Maunaloa Elementary (41), Niihau High and Elementary (9).

The five largest charter schools are: Hawaii Technology Academy (1,111), Kamaile Academy (858), Ka Waihona O Ka Naauao (653), Hawaii Academy of Arts and Sciences (644), Myron Thompson Academy (582).

The five smallest charter schools are: Kula Aupuni Niihau A Hakipuu Learning Center (63), Ke Kula Niihau Kekaha (54), Kula Aupuni Niihau A Kahelelani Aloha (49), Kapolei Charter School (49), Ke Ana Laahana (43).

View Report

 

Hawaii Ranks Among Top 20 States for Percentage of Graduates Taking ACT College Prep Test

This was the fourth year that HIDOE 11th graders were required to take the ACT, which landed Hawaii in the top 20 states for the percentage of graduates taking the college prep test according to the ACT’s Condition of College & Career Readiness 2017 report.

The Condition of College & Career Readiness 2017 report released today by the ACT, a research-based non-profit organization, shows that Hawaii’s public school students have continued to see steady growth in meeting college readiness benchmarks in Reading and Science. This was the fourth year that Hawaii State Department of Education (HIDOE) 11th graders were required to take the ACT, which landed Hawaii in the top 20 states for the percentage of graduates taking the college prep test.

“The growth that Hawaii graduates have shown in college readiness since the state began administering the ACT to all students in 2013 has been remarkable. Steady gains in states are not unusual, but we rarely see this type of improvement over such a short period of time,” said Paul Weeks, ACT senior vice president for client relations.

Hawaii’s public school students continue to show improvements in performance since the test became part of the curriculum four years ago. The 0.7 point composite score increase (36 point scale) outpaced the national average, which remained flat during the same time period.

The results for The ACT’s college readiness benchmarks for HIDOE’s Class of 2017 resulted in these year-over-year changes for the state:

  • A 2 percentage point improvement in Science and Reading
  • A 3 percentage point decrease in Mathematics
  • Unchanged English scores

In each of the four subjects, ACT sets a college-readiness benchmark – the minimum score needed on an ACT subject-area test to indicate a 50 percent chance of obtaining a B or higher or about a 75 percent chance of obtaining a C or higher in the corresponding credit-bearing college course. The benchmarks are set based on national-level data. Similar to the composite scores, Hawaii’s percentage increases in meeting college readiness benchmarks outpaced the national increases.

“The results from the ACT provides valuable insight and highlights areas we should focus our efforts and resources in order to help our students compete with their peers on a national level,” added Superintendent Dr. Christina Kishimoto. “We will continue to work towards improving our testing portfolio to align with our ESSA and Strategic plans, and will rely on our students to continue to tell us what we can do to help them achieve their college and career goals.”

HIDOE supports high schools that administer the ACT by providing funding and support. The department views it as part of the college and career readiness process.

The ACT results provide students information about their readiness or postsecondary education, a score they can use for college admissions and placement, and information about how to better prepare for postsecondary education during their senior years. It is one of only two readiness examinations used for U.S. college and university admissions and was taken by approximately 2 million 2017 graduates nationwide, and 10,051 Hawai’i public high school students.

Click here to view The Condition of College and Career Readiness 2017 report.

Annual Stop Flu and Schools Vaccination Program Limited to Selected Public Schools Statewide

The state’s annual school-located vaccination program, Stop Flu at School, will be offered to all elementary and intermediate public schools in Kauai, Maui, and Hawaii Counties later this year. On Oahu, the program will be made available to selected public schools. Stop Flu at School, which provides free flu shots to students in kindergarten through eighth grade, will no longer be offered in private schools.Information packets and vaccination consent forms will be distributed to families in participating schools in early October. Vaccination clinics are scheduled to begin November 1.

“We recognize that many families relied on the Stop Flu at School program as a free and convenient way to vaccinate their children, so scaling back the program’s offerings was not a decision taken lightly,” said Health Director Dr. Virginia Pressler. “After careful consideration, we understood it was critical to prioritize eligible schools based on students with the greatest need for assistance, which allowed us to maximize the benefit to the public while utilizing the limited funds and resources available.”

The program will be offered to approximately 90 Oahu public schools which in previous years had at least 40 percent of their student enrollment participating in the Department of Education’s Free and Reduced-Price Meal Program. All neighbor island public schools will be eligible to participate in this year’s program as access to healthcare in those counties can often be a challenge.

“Parents of students attending schools no longer eligible for the Stop Flu at School program are encouraged to have their child vaccinated by their healthcare provider,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park. “As an additional resource, pharmacies are now able to provide flu vaccine to children ages 11 through 17 with a prescription from their healthcare provider.”

In addition to vaccination for everyone ages 6 months and older, DOH recommends other flu prevention strategies, which include staying home when sick, covering coughs and sneezes, and washing hands frequently. For more information about the flu, visit http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/disease_listing/influenza-flu/.

The Stop Flu at School program is a continuing partnership between the Departments of Health and Education, and is made possible by the support of school administrators, health care providers, the American Academy of Pediatrics Hawaii Chapter, health insurers, and federal partners. For more information about Stop Flu at School, visit http://health.hawaii.gov/docd/about-us/programs/stop-flu-at-school/.

Confirmed Case of Mumps at Konawaena High School


The cases of mumps in Hawaii continues to climb.  The Department of Health has not been listing many of the recent cases, but today a case was confirmed here at a high school on the Big Island of Hawaii:

Aloha Konawaena Families,

We wanted to inform you that we do have a confirmed case of mumps on our campus. We have taken all the necessary steps to address this issue.

Today, all students received a pink letter with more information about mumps. Please ask your child about this letter. Those students who may have been in close contact with the student with mumps will receive an additional letter in the mail. All those students who need to be excluded from school have already been notified by phone.

Thank you for your attention to this matter.

Diane Spencer, Vice Principal

UH Mānoa Moves Up in Prestigious Ranking

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa has received more global recognition of its academic and research excellence in an international ranking released on September 5.

The 2018 Times Higher Education World University Rankings rated UH Mānoa number 63 in the nation, up from 69 last year—representing its best showing ever in the Times ranking. According to the U.S. Department of Education, there are more than 3,000 four-year universities in the nation.

“This upward movement on the Times ranking is a bright note recognizing the hard work and continued dedication of our faculty, who teach students and lead research efforts that make an impact on a global level,” said Michael Bruno, UH Mānoa interim vice chancellor for academic affairs and vice chancellor for research.

The Times rankings are the only global university league tables to judge research-intensive universities across all of their core missions—teaching, research, knowledge transfer and international outlook.

UH Mānoa also ranks among the top 100 U.S. universities in other international rankings, including number 71 in the Academic Ranking of World Universities, based at Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China, and number 69 in the United Kingdom-based QS World University Ranking.

For more information on rankings, see the Mānoa Institutional Research Office website.

UH Hilo Student Participates in International Human Rights Summit

A University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo senior from Timor-Leste (formerly East Timor) represented her country as a youth delegate at the 14th Annual International Human Rights Summit, held recently at United Nations (UN) Headquarters in New York City.

Josefina Pereira (right) seated with fellow delegates at the UN Trusteeship Council Chamber Room.

Josefina Pereira, who is majoring in administration of justice and political science, was one of 52 delegates selected for the summit, which teaches youth about human rights, specifically the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and inspires them to become advocates for tolerance and peace.

“It was an honor to represent Timor- Leste and UH Hilo as a delegate, and to learn more about important human rights issues from true human rights champions and activists from around the world,” Pereira said.

Pereira is a recipient of a United States Timor-Leste Scholarship funded by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs administered by the East-West Center. Her attendance at the summit was sponsored through a merit-based scholarship from Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI) and with financial assistance from the UH Hilo Office of International Student Services program.

“We were thrilled to have Josefina represent her country and UH Hilo at this important event,” said Jim Mellon, director of International Student Services at UH Hilo. “It is a testament to her dedication to human rights and to UH Hilo’s engagement with the global community.”

The summit brought together officials and advocates who work for equality and justice through human rights education, including ambassadors and other representatives of permanent missions to the UN. During the session, keynote speakers, youth delegates and ambassadors and observers from more than 45 countries were invited to share their thoughts and feelings on human rights issues in their home countries. Pereira addressed children’s rights in her homeland, with a focus on mitigating and eventually ending child abuse.

“This is an issue of great concern to me,” Pereira said. “I appreciate the opportunity the summit provided me to share my thoughts on this topic with an international audience.”

Participants also attended panel presentations on key human rights issues, including human trafficking, that featured leaders of the international effort to prevent human trafficking and a survivor who shared her own personal story. They later heard from noted human rights activists, including author and social entrepreneur Bryant McGill, Reach the World Director of Partnerships Christopher Ahearn, and radio and TV host Kerri Kassem. Pereira said she was deeply inspired by her experience and hopes to return.

“I feel I gained a lot from my experience, but have more to learn. So I would like to return next year as a youth ambassador,” Pereira said. “2018 will also be a very special year as the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights celebrates its 70th anniversary and YHRI marks its 15th anniversary. ”

Notices to Women Regarding Access to Family Planning Services Must Be Allowed, State Argues

Yesterday the Department of the Attorney General filed a memorandum opposing an attempt by certain religiously-affiliated organizations to prevent a new law concerning women’s access to information regarding reproductive health services from being enforced. The law, Senate Bill 501 (2017), was passed by the Hawaii state legislature on May 4, 2017, and signed into law as Act 200 on July 12, 2017. It requires limited service pregnancy centers to notify women in writing regarding the availability of state-funded reproductive health services.

The Department’s memo argues that the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, the federal appeals court with jurisdiction over several Western states including Hawaii, already upheld a similar law passed by California in 2015.
The opposition memo states in part:

The Legislature has found that “[m]any women in Hawaii … remain unaware of the public programs available to provide them with contraception, health education and counseling, family planning, prenatal care, pregnancy-related, and birth-related services.” To address this concern, [Act 200] was enacted into law. It requires “limited service pregnancy centers,” as defined in the Act, to disseminate a written notice to clients or patients informing them that Hawaii has public programs that provide immediate free or low-cost access to comprehensive family planning services.

A similar filing was made in a related case yesterday as well.