Tsunami Advisory Has Been Cancelled

726 AM HST WED APR 02 2014

TO - CIVIL DEFENSE IN THE STATE OF HAWAII

SUBJECT - TSUNAMI ADVISORY CANCELLATION

THE TSUNAMI ADVISORY IS ENDED FOR THE STATE OF HAWAII EFFECTIVE
AT 0725 AM HST.

Another Wreck at Our Favorite Intersection

There appeared to be another wreck on Highway 130 at The Pahoa MarketPlace intersection. The round-a-bout will be installed soon.

Commentary – Mahalo Ho’omana Tree Service

I just received the following Facebook comment:

Harry Steele

  • Just wanted to let you know that Ho’omana Tree Service did a great job taking down twenty plus Albezia trees on our acre. Thanks for having them as a sponsor on your Facebook blog page. I would like to write something praising them to post. Please tell me how.

Hoomanu

Best of Vine HAWAII 2013 Compilation

Best of Vine Hawaii 2013 compilation featuring some of Hawaii’s best videos on Vine from Hawaii viners:

Another Wreck at Our Favorite Intersection

Another Car Wreck at the Pahoa MarketPlace Entrance!

Goodbye Gramma Su

Photography Is Not a Crime – Lawyer Threatens Me Over Today’s #WordlessWednesday Picture

Well once again I’m getting threatened by an attorney for something that seems ridiculous and I will ask this question now… Is taking photographs of cars and the signs that are on them illegal?

Earlier today, as I do on many Wednesdays, I posted a post entitled: “Wordless Wednesday – I Lost My Implants…” where I simply stated:  “I saw this truck parked at Island Naturals in Pahoa on the Big Island yesterday:” and then posted a picture of a truck that I saw parked at Island Naturals in Pahoa.

This afternoon I received an email from Honolulu Law firm WILLIAM J. NAGLE III, ESQ., Roeca Luria & Hiraoka LLP stating:

Mr. Tucker:

This firm represents Dr. ***********  in the matter of the photograph of the sign displayed on your blog dated 1/29/14.  We request that the photograph be removed from your blog (damontucker.com) as the contents of the sign are offensive to our client.  Because your blog is widely read on the Big Island, the photograph of the sign has disappointed and upset Dr. *********.
Mahalo for your kokua in this matter.

Well I don’t know what I should do really and feel that I have every right to post pictures I take in public.  I was just posting an observation I saw and really wasn’t making any statement other then it was “Wordless” in a sense.

I’ve left the blog post up… but have now removed the Doctors name from the picture.

IS PHOTOGRAPHY A CRIME?  Here is the incriminating photograph… minus the doctors name:

Dr. Who?

Dr. Who?

Big Island Police Department Identify Woman Who Died on Highway 130

Police traffic investigators have identified the 53-year-old woman who died Saturday (January 4) after being involved in a two-vehicle collision on Route 130, .2 miles south of the Route 139 intersection in Keaʻau.

HPDBadgeThe woman was identified as Anh Kim Tran of a Keaʻau address.

Local Hawaii Based Artist Chooses to Stay Local

In the world of lowbrow Tiki Art, Collectables and Souvenirs  there is no name more respected and famous than Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker.  His Big Island based company Tiki Shark Art Incorporated announced the signing of a exclusive distribution deal with Oahu based KC Hawaii.  This new arrangement will expand exposure of Tiki Shark Art to the mainstream buyers across the Hawaiian Islands and Nationwide.  A brand new line of “Souvenir Tiki” items is scheduled to hit the market as early as Spring of this year.

Tiki Shark Art’s recent high profile copyright infringement legal bout with California based internet giant Cafe Press.com has prompted the company to keep this deal local, in Hawaii.

“K C Hawaii has a great reputation as a local distributor in the Tiki-Gift Market” said Parker, “I have been approached by several company’s regarding a distribution deal…….but got a real sense of ALOHA when the owners of KC came forward” he added.

Brad "Tiki Shark" Parker signs with KC Hawaii.

Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker signs with KC Hawaii.

“We are excited and proud to be associated with Brad’s Art and believe we can carry his unique work to yet another level in distribution”, said Bobby Chang – Vice President of KC Hawaii.

About Tiki Shark Art Incorporated:  Headquartered in Kailua Kona, Tiki Shark has been quoted as “one of the fastest growing island lifestyle companies in Hawaii” by Hawaiian Style magazine. They pride themselves in the production of cutting edge items with Tiki design.  The company also exclusively designs products for surf giant Body Glove International.

About KC Hawaii – KC Hawaii is a major distributor and supplier of authentic Hawaiian souvenirs, gifts and tropical merchandise supplying to thousands of retail stores and resorts in the USA and worldwide.  With long term, in depth industry experience KC is a world class distributor of “Tiki and Hawaiiana gifts”.

Big Island Police Investigating New Years Day Robbery in Kona

Hawaiʻi Island police are investigating a robbery in Kona during the early morning hours of New Year’s Day.

HPDBadge

On Wednesday (January 1), Kona Patrol officers responded to a 2:22 a.m. report of a robbery in the parking lot of a store on the 74-5000 block of Kamakaeha Avenue in Kailua-Kona.

The victims, a 19-year-old Hilo man and two 18-year-old Hilo men, reported that they were in the parking lot when a dark gray Toyota Tundra pickup truck pulled up. The truck’s passenger got out of the Toyota with something concealing his face, approached them with a handgun and robbed them of a red backpack, personal identification, credit cards, cellular phones and an undisclosed amount of cash. He then fled on Makala Boulevard in the truck with the stolen items.

The victims recovered their cell phones, which thrown out of the truck as it left the area.

The gunman was described as a skinny local male, about 5-foot-8 who spoke pidgin.

Police ask anyone who has any information about this case to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at 935-3311.

Tipsters who prefer to remain anonymous may call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300 in Hilo or 329-8181 in Kona and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Crime Stoppers is a volunteer program run by ordinary citizens who want to keep their community safe. Crime Stoppers doesn’t record calls or subscribe to caller ID. All Crime Stoppers information is kept confidential.

My 2013 Year in Review

Well 2013 was another interesting year.

Some quick site stats:

  • In 2013, 817,155 people visited this site with the most being in the month of November with 114,001 people visiting it:
  • The average amount of people that visited this site each day was 2,239 with the most average amount also being in November with 3,800 people per day:

    2013 Site Stats

    Click to enlarge

2013 Average per day

Click to enlarge

I appreciate all my sponsors, family, friends and readers that have given me the opportunity to do some of the things I’ve gotten to do in the past year.

Andrew and I

Vincent, Mayor Kenoi and Kate at the Big Island Film Festival

Vincent, Mayor Kenoi and Kate at the Big Island Film Festival

  • May was also the month that one of my best friends from when I was younger decided to have his bachelor party in Las Vegas.  Besides going go-karting, attending the Last Cowboy Standing Rodeo Competition, hitting comedy clubs up and just partying in general… well I also jumped off the Stratosphere!
Pierre Omidyar and Arianna Huffington at Imiloa Astronomy Center announcing the beginning of HuffPost Hawaii.

Pierre Omidyar and Arianna Huffington at Imiloa Astronomy Center announcing the beginning of HuffPost Hawaii.

Family members of the Body Glove International Company

Family members of the Body Glove International Company

Billy Meistrell (2nd generation Owner and Co-Founder of Body Glove), Russ Lesser (President), Abbas Hassan and Mayor Kenoi

Billy Meistrell (2nd generation Owner and Co-Founder of Body Glove), Russ Lesser (President), Abbas Hassan and Mayor Kenoi

My Uncle and Aunt on the back end of the USS Lake Erie.

My Uncle and Aunt on the back end of the USS Lake Erie.

  • And at the end of 2013, I got to spend time in Ko Olina while my uncle and aunt renewed their 50th wedding vows:

James Tucker Ohana

Twitter Owes Me $6,524 for Being a Tweeter

So Time Magazine came out with this unique tool that calculates how much Twitter would owe you.

I entered my twitter name @DamonTucker and it said that Twitter would owe me $6,524.00 for being a tweeter.

Click to find out how much twitter owes you!

Click to find out how much twitter owes you!

Methodology

In its IPO paperwork filed to regulators last month, Twitter stated its 230 million active users are producing 500 million tweets per day, noting, “We deliver more than 200 billion Tweets per day to our users.”

Twitter appears to define a “delivered tweet” as any tweet seen by a follower of another user. If the 200 billion figure is to be believed, then each of the 500 million daily tweets is delivered to an average of 400 people.

A $24.9 billion value divided by 200 billion tweet deliveries a day comes out to 12.45 cents per daily eyeball on the site.

We know how many times per day a person tweets on average. We also know how large each user’s audience is. That audience may not be the world’s most engaged. At least one study suggests that around three-quarters of tweets are ignored. To estimate a user’s current number of daily readers, we reduce the potential audience by 75%.

The size of this daily audience times 12.45 cents gives you your share of the Twitter largesse.

 

 

Honoring Granker on Veteran’s Day

grandpa

My Granker (Grandpa) fought in WW II. He was also a Military Doctor the second time he served.

I could only find some of his medical background as he is long gone now and the Internet databases only go so far back:

Dr. Perry E. Rowe was born in Everett, Washington on October 1, 1910. He received his medical degree from the University of Oregon Medical School in 1941. He interned at Swedish Hospital in Seattle, Washington 1941-42. He served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps 1942-45. He was in private practice in Lynden, Washington for 15 years. He was Clinical Instructor in General Practice at the University of Washington Medical School 1954-61. In 1962 he came to Hawaii to be the physician for the Hawaiian Agricultural Company and lived in Pahala, Hawaii. Dr. Rowe became the medical officer on Yap in the Trust Territories in 1965. He moved to Carmel, California in 1970.

Grandpa at a Tribal Meeting in Yap back in the Sixties

He was a member of the Hawaii Medical Association, Hawaii County Medical Society, American Medical Association and the Hawaii Industrial Medicine Association. Dr. Rowe and his wife, Betty, were the parents of Michael Dean, Susan Lane and Robert Spencer. Dr. Rowe died on June 24, 1997; his last residence was listed as Friday Harbor, San Juan, Washington.

Diver Uses Green Laser to be Rescued by Coast Guard

A diver is receiving treatment after being rescued by a Coast Guard helicopter crew 2 miles off of Kaena Point, Oahu, Friday.

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

A Coast Guard MH-65 Dolphin helicopter

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector Honolulu Command Center received a call from the Honolulu County Fire Department regarding a missing diver 2 miles off of Kaena Point on the Makaha side.

The missing diver’s friend contacted the fire department when he didn’t see him surface.

At 6:33 p.m., an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Barbers Point, Oahu was launched to begin a search.

The Dolphin aircrew was vectored to a position where a green laser had been spotted by a fire department helicopter aircrew.

The missing diver had been in the water for approximately four hours. He filled his dry suit with the remaining air left in his dive tank to remain afloat.

Once on scene at approximately 7:30 p.m., a Coast Guard rescue swimmer was lowered into the water to assist the diver in distress.

He was then hoisted into the helicopter and was transported to Kuakini Health System in Honolulu for decompression chamber treatment.

Happy Halloween!

When my son said he wanted to be a “Centaur”… My wife was able to make his wish come true!

Hawaii Police Bust Hilo Couple With Stolen Credit Card After Owner of Card Tracks Them Down

Hawaiʻi Island police have charged a Hilo couple with several offenses involving a stolen credit card.

Around 4 p.m. Wednesday (October 23), police received a phone call from a 22-year-old woman, who reported that she and her husband were following a sports-utility vehicle that was occupied by a man and woman suspected of using her husband’s stolen credit card. The vehicle was subsequently stopped by patrol officers, who arrested both occupants at 4:20 p.m. The SUV was recovered as evidence.

The victim, a 21-year-old Hilo man, informed police that at about 2:30 p.m., the same vehicle and its occupants had arrived at a repair shop on Railroad Avenue in Hilo to inquire about a possible repair. After a short time, the couple abruptly left in the SUV.

Shortly thereafter, the victim received phone calls from his financial institution reporting suspicious transactions at two retail stores on Makaʻala Street. The victim then discovered that his wallet and its contents, which had been at the repair shop, were missing.

After observing the same SUV on Makaʻala Street, the victim and his wife began to follow it and called police to report its location.

Brandi Heather McKee

Brandi Heather McKee

After their arrests, 30-year-old Brandi Heather McKee and 33-year-old Steven Robert Giatroudakis, both of Hilo, were taken to the Hilo police cellblock while detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigation Section continued the investigation.

Steven Robert Giatroudakis

Steven Robert Giatroudakis

At 11 p.m. Thursday (October 24), after conferring with prosecutors, detectives charged both McKee and Giatroudakis with theft/forgery of a credit card, second-degree identity theft, third-degree identity theft, second-degree theft, third-degree theft, fourth-degree theft and two counts of fraudulent use of a credit card. Bail was set at $15, 750 each. They were scheduled to make their initial court appearance Friday afternoon.

Police were able to recover the victim’s wallet and merchandise allegedly purchased with his credit card.

“Immediate reporting of crimes involving a stolen credit or debit card is critical to a timely solution,” said Lieutenant Greg Esteban of the Area I Criminal Investigation Section. “Other factors in preventing victimization include keeping credit cards and debit cards in a safe location and conducting periodic and regular checks on your statements.”

Office of Mauna Kea Management Hires Wally Ishibashi as Cultural Officer

The Office of Mauna Kea Management (OMKM), charged with the management of approximately 12,000 acres of State-owned land on Mauna Kea, continues to advance its mission to malama (take care of) Mauna Kea resources with the recent hiring of Wallace “Wally” Ishibashi Jr. as Cultural Officer. 

Wallace Ishibashi

Wallace Ishibashi

“The University of Hawai‘i through the Office of Mauna Kea Management is committed to protecting the cultural resources and fostering a greater understanding of the rich cultural heritage of Mauna Kea.  Wally’s role as cultural officer is to help OMKM instill awareness and understanding about Mauna Kea’s deep cultural significance through outreach and educational programs.  As long as the University has a presence on Mauna Kea, OMKM will continue to monitor, document and protect the archaeological and cultural sites for future generations,” stated OMKM’s Director Stephanie Nagata.

Ishibashi will assist with implementation of OMKM’s Cultural Resource Management Plan and will develop and provide a cultural training program for those using Mauna Kea for cultural, scientific, and recreational purposes. In addition, Ishibashi will serve as cultural monitor and as a cultural advisor for staff including Rangers and the Visitor Information Station at Hale Pohaku. He will assist with outreach efforts within the Hawaiian community and the general public, and will work closely with the Kahu Ku Mauna Council.

“I look forward to promoting a greater understanding of the rich cultural heritage of Mauna Kea and ensuring that Native Hawaiians continue to have a voice in the management and stewardship of the mountain,” said Wally Ishibashi.

A Hawaii Island native of Hawaiian, Japanese and Chinese ancestry, Ishibashi was born in Hilo and raised in the Keaukaha Panaewa Hawaiian Homestead. His KealohaPoliahu and Makuakane families have ties to the Kaohe ahupuaa (land division) and specifically to Kukaiau Ranch, Kukuihaele and Waipio Valley. Poliahu is known in Hawaiian mythology as one of the snow goddesses and is believed to have lived on Mauna Kea.

Every year we would go up Mauna Kea to learn about different areas of the mountain. Lessons we learned from my uncles who were rangers for the Department of Land and Natural Resources included respect and proper care for animals and the aina (land). I was always taught the importance of balance between the old ways and new ideas. Cultural preservation is essential and balance is pono (righteous),” said Wally Ishibashi.

For the past 20-plus years, Ishibashi has served as a Business Agent and Division Director for ILWU Local 142. He was recently appointed by Governor Abercrombie to the Hawaiian Homes Commission representing East Hawaii. He is a member of the Royal Order of Kamehameha I Moku o Keawe, Moku O Mamalahoa Heiau, Hawaiian Community Representative for Hawaiian Homes Keaukaha Panaewa Association, Hawaii Island United Way Executive Board Member and the Democratic Party Precinct Chair for Papaikou.

Federal Worker to Eat Cow Ball for Charity During Government Shutdown

The following post first appeared on the HuffPost Hawaii Site:

After moving to Hawaii in 1993, I’ve had chances to eat things many folks don’t get an opportunity to on the mainland.

Unfortunately, I have a very weak stomach and I don’t take advantage of all the great foods that Hawaii has to offer. Whether a common food, such as raw fish, or a staple such as poi, I just can’t seem to stomach them.

Cow balls getting ready to be cooked.

Cow balls getting ready to be cooked.

The last few years I’ve been invited to the Big Island of Hawaii’s premier food and agriculture event, the Mealani Taste of the Hawaiian Range at the Hilton Waikoloa Village, where I’ve been able to sample and eat every part of a cow so far, except for, well… it’s BALLS, otherwise known as Rocky Mountain Oysters.

I don’t know why I’ve been so fearful of eating this part of a steer other then the thought of it pretty much disgusts me and churns my stomach. I’m sure I’ve probably had a few cow balls mixed in to my regular hamburger meat at times… it’s just I wouldn’t have known it.

I’ve always believed that if you have a fear of something, you should tackle that fear head-on. Why continue to live in fear of something when you can get over your fear and move past it?

I asked the following question to my friends on Facebook:

1. Have you ever eaten Rocky Mountain Oysters and what did they taste like to you?
2. If you had the chance to eat them in the past…. and didn’t eat them… why didn’t you?

Most of my friends said they tasted like chicken, but then I got this one comment from Leilehua Yuen: “I’ve eaten them prepared very well – tasted a bit like a cross between sweetbreads and brain. And I’ve eaten them prepared poorly – very salty and overcooked so they were too hard to chew. Both times, they had been breaded and deep-fried. Ono (good) with beer!”

Yes, Leilehua said, “BRAIN”!

As I said before, I have to move past my fears and I figured this year at the Taste of the Hawaiian Range I would volunteer to eat a Rocky Mountain Oyster if folks would pitch in for a non-profit charity. I will videotape my tasting and put it on my website.

"Snip"

“Snip”

I didn’t know what type of response I would get but then the offers to watch me choke down a cow ball started coming in. The local automobile magazine, Hawaii Motorhead was the first to pitch in so I offered them the opportunity to pick the non-profit and they have chosen The Food Basket, Inc. (a network that provides food for low income and homeless folks here on the Big Island of Hawaii).

After just a week of posting my offer to swallow down a cow ball and through generous contributions from Hawaii Motorhead, Craig Watanabe, Lucy Denise K. Mossman, Chris Henry, Dustin Acdal, Matt and Kehau Sproat (who don’t want to see the video as it’s too gross for them), Laura Kinoshita of Kinoshita Communications, Mahealani and Kevin Dayton as well as Mark Hinshaw I have now raised over $300 for the island’s food bank.

At the 18th Annual Taste of the Hawaiian Range, between 6-8 p.m. October 4, is where I will be filmed eating this cow ball… and yes, I will have a big glass of water next to me to wash it down. Wouldn’t it be funny if I actually ended up liking the “oyster”?

Thankfully Rocky Mountain Oysters are not the only thing on the menu as the “Taste” will offer 35 restaurants preparing numerous cuts of grass-fed beef–plus lamb, mutton, goat and feral and domestic pork.

And for all you vegetarians out there who I may have completely disgusted with this post, the Taste of the Hawaiian Range is not all about meat, although to this meat lover it seems like it at times but there will also be over 40 agriculture and educational booths for folks to peruse.

So I ask… how much money would it take for you to eat a Rocky Mountain Oyster?

Want to pitch in on this challenge?????

Waimea Women’s Center Receives OHA Grant to Offer Culturally-Relevant Prenatal Program for Native Hawaiian Women

North Hawaii Community Hospital’s (NHCH) Waimea Women’s Center (WWC) was recently awarded a two-year grant totaling $206,768 from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs (OHA). The purpose of this grant is to implement a culturally-relevant prenatal care program for Native Hawaiian women by using a group model of care known as CenteringPregnancy to address health and emotional wellbeing and improve pregnancy outcomes.

North Hawaii Community Hospital

North Hawaii Community Hospital

“We are honored to partner with the Office of Hawaiian Affairs in addressing these important issues,” said Dr. Patricia Gunter, North Hawaii Medical Group Director and OB/GYN Physician at Waimea Women’s Center. CenteringPregnancy offers a group approach to prenatal care, combining three essential elements of care every pregnant woman needs: health assessment, education and support to improve pregnancy outcomes. A certified nurse midwife from NHCH’s Waimea Women’s Center facilitates 10 two-hour sessions with 8 to 10 mothers-to-be and their partner. All women are due around the same time, and sessions start in the first trimester of pregnancy. Each session includes a comfortable environment, including food and an individual health prenatal assessment, with the majority of time focused on group discussions, creating a community and an opportunity to share common experiences and concerns.

“Rather than having traditional short and frequent one-on-one visits with their healthcare provider, this group model of prenatal care known as CenteringPregnancy will better meet the needs of our unique, rural Native Hawaiian

population, which makes up nearly 30 percent of the community we serve and 50% of delivering moms at NHCH,” says Robin Ramsay, NHCH Waimea Women’s Center Certified Nurse Midwife and CenteringPregnancy facilitator. Maternal health indicators show a higher rate of infant mortality, teen birth rate and an increase in social risk factors in Native Hawaiians that is in disproportion to other ethnic groups in the state. “Our hope is to enroll eighty Native Hawaiian women into this new culturally-relevant prenatal program per year over the next two years.”

“Benefits of the CenteringPregnancy model of care are many,” says Ramsay. “It creates a community for moms-to-be, focusing on a woman’s own experiences and sharing these experiences with each other.” Additional benefits of this new group model of care include: higher patient satisfaction, mothers-to-be are more involved in their prenatal care, are more likely to deliver healthy, full-term babies and to breast feed longer.

Working in conjunction with the Waimea Women’s Center, the hospital’s Kaheleaulani, a Native Hawaiian Health Program, will provide seamless primary care services within the same culturally-sensitive framework. “Kaheleulani provides primary care services by understanding and embracing a culturally-appropriate healthcare approach for Native Hawaiians and takes into account traditional Hawaiian healing principles that differ from those of Western medicine,” says Dr. Leina’ala Crawford, Kaheleaulani Medical Director and Primary Care Physician. “We are enthusiastic about this project and understand that it will benefit the community in ways that connect our people to preventive and interactive health care,” says Crawford.

NHCH’s Waimea Women’s Center is currently the only healthcare provider on Hawaii Island offering CenteringPregnancy. In addition, Waimea Women’s Center offers a full spectrum of services for women through every stage of life, including: preconception care, prenatal care, delivery services (in the hospital’s Level I Family Birthing Unit), post partum care and gynecology services for women of all ages. WWC provides services for 2,000 to 3,000 women per year, including nearly 600 births, and accepts all insurances. WWC accepts island-wide maternal care patients on a space available basis. Waimea Women’s Center is located in the Lucy Henriques Medical Center at North Hawaii Community Hospital at 67-1123 Mamalahoa Hwy, Suites 110 and 120, Kamuela, HI 96743. For more information on CenteringPregnancy, the Waimea Women’s Center or to make an appointment, please call 808-885-9606.

NHCH Background: North Hawaii Community Hospital (NHCH) is a rural 33-bed acute care hospital located in Kamuela, on Hawai‘i Island. Non-profit and locally governed, the hospital opened in May 1996 and cares for Hawai‘i Island residents and visitors. NHCH offers an extensive set of hospital services that are centered on patient needs, creating a healing experience for the whole person – mind, body and spirit. Please visit www.NHCH.com for more information.