Pahoa Woman Arrested in Connection of Truck Theft

Hawaiʻi Island police have arrested a Puna woman in connection with the theft of a pickup truck with a handgun inside.

On July 9, a 51-year-old Kailua-Kona man reported that his truck had been stolen from the parking lot of a supermarket on Palani Road in Kailua-Kona. A registered, unloaded handgun in a case was reportedly in the stolen truck.

Ashley Faustina

Ashley Faustina

During the investigation, police recovered the truck and handgun and identified a suspect, 31-year-old Ashley Faustina of Pāhoa.

Faustina was arrested Thursday (July 23) in Hilo and charged with unauthorized control of a propelled vehicle, first-degree theft and violating terms of release on bail. Her bail was set at $60,000 for the property crimes. She is being held at Hawaiʻi Community Correctional Center.

Gupton and Parker Top Best of the West Art Show

Kona Oceanfront Gallery hosted its 6th Annual Best of the West Art Show tonight. With 35 + local Big Island artists showing off their talent to over 400 guests in attendance, the gallery broke all its past records!

Alex Gupton, Ernest Young, Penny Gupton, Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker, Mark Hanna, Clint Sloan & Josh Lambus

Alex Gupton, Ernest Young, Penny Gupton, Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker, Mark Hanna, Clint Sloan & Josh Lambus

“This event is our way of supporting the local art community” commented Owner and CEO of Kona Oceanfront Gallery, Mark Hanna “and judging by tonight’s record breaking attendance, our local Big Island community is loving every minute of it” he added.

The top 6 winners were announced by tonight’s guest of honor – the publisher of West Hawaii Today News – Ms. Tracey Fosso. The results are as follows:

  1. Alex Gupton
  2. Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker
  3. Penny Gupton
  4. Josh Lambus
  5. Clint Sloan
  6. Ernest Young

5.0 Magnitude Earthquake Rocks Volcano Area of the Big Island

EDIT:  IT HAS NOW BEEN UPGRADED TO A 5.0 Magnitude Quake

A huge earthquake just shook the Volcano area of the Big Island of Hawaii.

Preliminary reading of the magnitude reported it at 4.8 5.0 Magnitude:

4.8 hiloUPDATE:50 Big Island

Big Island Medical Marijuana Collective Open for Business

Alternative Pain Management Pu`uhonua’s Collective is celebrating being open for 6 months.

medical marijuana in jarsThe Big Island’s First Medical Cannabis Collective is dedicated to providing a medical cannabis community, access to an uninterrupted supply of medical cannabis in all forms, safe disposal of excess medical cannabis for compensation, expert consultations, legal resources, access to other members strains and techniques, professional advise on the safe consumption of medical cannabis in all forms, discount medical supplies and much more. As member’s health and safety is important, MyDx purity testing device is coming soon and starting in July all medicine will be analyzed prior to being transferred.

It is free to join! All members must have a valid medical marijuana certification, state ID, complete an intake and agreement form and sign a confidentiality statement.

The Collective is located in Mountain View and is your one stop shop for all of your medical cannabis needs. New members are processed on MondaysWednesdays and Fridays. Once you’ve joined, the Collective is open 7 days a week from 8 A.M. to 4 P.M.. Call 968-0633 and ask for Mike to make your appointment to join.

Big Island Police Identify Body as Woman Reported Missing

Hawaiʻi Island police have identified the body of the woman found Monday (June 1) in Umauma Stream.

She was identified through fingerprints Tuesday (June 2) as 62-year-old Bobbie Jackie Carnathan of Kailua-Kona, who was reported missing Saturday (May 30).

An autopsy conducted Wednesday (June 3) determined that she died from traumatic injuries consistent with a fall from a height. Police do not suspect foul play.

Detectives from the Area I Criminal Investigations Section continue to investigate this incident, which is classified as a coroner’s inquest. They ask witnesses who may have seen Carnathan on a “Hele On” bus or who had any contact with her at the World Botanical Gardens and Waterfalls park in Hakalau to contact Detective Dean Uyetake at 961-2379 or dean.uyetake@hawaiicounty.gov.

Man Drowns Off OTEC Beach

The lifeless body of the swimmer who went missing Monday morning (June 1) in waters off OTEC Beach was located Monday afternoon.
HPDBadgeFire Department personnel located him approximately 25 yards off short submerged in the ocean. He was taken to Kona Community Hospital, where he was officially pronounced dead.

He has been identified as 26-year-old Richard Demby of Kailua-Kona. An autopsy conducted Tuesday (June 2) determined that he died from saltwater drowning

2015 Big Island Film Festival Announces Winners

The 2015 Big Island Film Festival held at the Fairmont Orchid is wrapping up tonight with a concert by the Rough Riders.

Arielle Kebbel received the 2015 Golden Honu Award for "Rising Actress" from Big Island Film Festival Director Leo Sears.

Arielle Kebbel received the 2015 Golden Honu Award for “Actress On The Rise” from Big Island Film Festival Director Leo Sears.

This years celebrity honorees were Arielle Kebbel and Will Estes.

Will Estes with his Golden Honu Award for Best Actor.

Will Estes with his Golden Honu Award for Actor of the Year.

This morning at a luncheon reception, winners of this years awards were announced:

Screenplay Awards
· Finalists – Debbie the Viking, War 2.0
· First Place – Garbagemen

Golden Honu Awards
· Shorts
Best Student Short – Sin Frontera
Best Hawaii Short – The Fishing Club Movie
Best Family Short – Butterfiles
Best Foreign Short – The Rabbit
Best Short – Our Father
Best Special Effects – The Sun Devil and The Princess

· Features
Best Foreign Feature – Patterson’s Wager
Best Family Feature – Under The Blood Red Sun
Best Feature – WildLike
Barbara Award – Jilel – The Calling of the Shell Microwave Films of the Marshall Islands

Audience Choice Feature – Honeyglue

Audience Choice Short – Butterflies

2015 Big Island Film Festival 110Congrats to everyone who submitted films and were selected to participate in this years festival.  All the films were excellent!

Lava Breakouts Continue – Lava Lake in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater Reaches New High Level

Breakouts on the June 27th lava flow remain active northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō. A new, small, breakout appeared recently from the tube adjacent to Puʻu Kahaualeʻa, the small forested cone near the center of the photograph.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō is in the upper right portion of the photo.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō is in the upper right portion of the photo.

The new breakout is the light-colored curved flow in the left portion of the photograph.

The farthest active breakout on the June 27th flow reached about 8 km (5 miles) northeast of the vent on Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō is at the top of the photograph.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō is at the top of the photograph.

The tip of this breakout was narrow and burning forest.

A small breakout from an inflated portion of the June 27th flow. Large gas bubbles reach the surface near the source of the breakout, and are then carried and deformed as the surface advances and cools.

A small breakout from an inflated portion of the June 27th flow. Large gas bubbles reach the surface near the source of the breakout, and are then carried and deformed as the surface advances and cools.

The June 27th flow covers much of the top of the photograph, and recent expansion of the flow margins has sent lava cascading into one of the ponds on the 2007 perched lava channel.

This 2007 lava fills the bottom of the photograph, and is covered with yellow alteration.

This 2007 lava fills the bottom of the photograph, and is covered with yellow alteration.

Over the past week small flows have filled the bottom of Puʻu ʻŌʻō Crater.

This 2007 lava fills the bottom of the photograph, and is covered with yellow alteration.

These flows originated from vents in the south portion of the crater, and one of the flows can be seen near the center of the photograph.

hvo141The Overlook crater lava lake, within Halemaʻumaʻu Crater at Kīlauea’s summit, has been rising over the past few days, and today reached the highest point yet measured for the current summit eruption.

The lava lake this afternoon was 20 meters (66 feet) below the Overlook crater rim.

 Another view of the lava lake, with several areas of spattering active.

Another view of the lava lake, with several areas of spattering active.

The lava level was high enough at the lava lake this evening that bits of spatter were reaching the rim of the Overlook crater.

hvo143

 

World-Class Pastry Chefs and Cacao Experts at the Big Island Chocolate Festival

Make chocolate from scratch. Get the insider scoop on growing cacao—the bean needed to make chocolate—and find out why it must be fermented properly. See how to make chocolate dessert sensations—and taste them— by the nation’s leading pastry chefs.

Big Island Chocolate Festival 020All these compelling educational offerings are part of the fourth Big Island Chocolate Festival May 7-9 at various West Hawai‘i venues. The fun demonstrations and informative seminars lead up to the festival gala 5:30 p.m. May 9 at The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i.

Presented by the Kona Cacao Association (KCA), event proceeds benefit the “Equip the Kitchens” campaign for the future Hawai‘i Community College-Palamanui and a capital campaign to build a community kitchen at the Waldorf-inspired Kona Pacific Public Charter School in Kealakekua.

Here’s a quick rundown of activities:

Thursday, May 7

  • 9 a.m.-noon: Chocolate-Making Class. Una Greenaway instructs participants on how to make chocolate at her Kuaiwi Farm in Captain Cook, $50. Register at 808-328-8888.

Friday, May 8

The following four activities are at The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai’i; $75 for all in advance or $30 at the door individually. Tix at www.bigislandchocolatefestival.com:

  • Noon-12:45 p.m. Seminar: “Cacao Fermentation & Chocolate Micro-Terroir.” Dr. Nat Bletter of Madre Chocolate tells why fermenting is the most important step for determining flavor in tree-to-bar chocolate making.
  • 1-1:50 p.m. Seminar: “Hawai‘i Cacao Farming-Tree to Bar.” Presenters Tom Menezes of Hawaiian Crown Hilo and Una Greenaway of Kona’s Kuaiwi Farms discuss plant varieties and where to get them, how to plant and where, plus current business opportunities for Hawaiian-grown cacao.
  • 2-3:30 p.m. Demonstration with Tasting: “How to Make Your Own Decadent (but Simple) Chocolate Dessert Creation.” Derek Poirier, Valrhona Pastry Chef Western USA, gives step-by-step instruction to make Tarte Baba Cool. An international pastry competitor, Poirier develops recipes and teaches master classes for the famed L’Ecole du Grand Chocolate in France.
  • 3:30-5 p.m. Demonstration with Tasting: “How to Make Your Own Decadent (but Simple) Chocolate Dessert Creation.” Stanton Ho, “Top 10 Pastry Chef in America 1994- 1995,” shows how to concoct a chocolate/coconut/salted caramel dessert called Cocoa Puffs.
    Pastry Chef Stanton

    Pastry Chef Stanton Ho

    After seeing Chef Ho in action, you’ll know why the Hawai‘i native was named Pastry Chef of the Millennium by Paris Gourmet in 2000.

Saturday, May 9

  • 9-11 a.m.: Cacao Farm Tour. Take a cacao farm and soap factory tour at Kona’s Kokoleka Lani Farm to see how cacao is grown and used in the production of Kona Natural Soap Company products, $25. Tix at www.bigislandchocolatefestival.com.

Chocolate decadence culminates 5:30-9 p.m. May 9 with the festival gala in the Fairmont’s Grand Ballroom. Taste sweet and savory creations by chefs, chocolatiers, confectioners and beverage purveyors, plus vote for the People’s Choice Award. Also on tap will be fine wines and handcrafted ales, chocolate sculptures, chocolate body painting, entertainment and a silent auction.

Gala admission is $75 with VIP tickets for $100. Tix info at www.bigislandchocolatefestival.com. Find festival updates on facebook and Twitter, #BIChocoFest. Questions? Phone 808-324-6100.

Special room rates of $299 including breakfast for two are offered by the Fairmont Orchid. For accommodations, book with the hotel at 808-885-2000 and mention “Big Island Chocolate Festival.”

The Big Island Chocolate Festival is presented by the Kona Cacao Association, Inc. The mission and goal of KCA is to promote the cacao industry on the Big Island of Hawai‘i by presenting BICF as an educational and outreach opportunity for local cacao farmers, the hospitality industry and cacao enthusiasts. For information, visit www.bigislandchocolatefestival.com.

Governors Statement on TMT Construction Postponement

Today, the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) leadership informed me that construction will continue to be postponed. Any further announcements about the construction schedule will come from TMT.

Top View of TMT Complex

Top View of TMT Complex

My understanding is that TMT followed an almost 7 year planning and permitting process, which included public hearings and community input. Following this process, project permits were issued. The TMT team is legally entitled to use its discretion to proceed with construction.

I understand that not everyone will agree with this and recognize and respect their right to appeal through the court system.

We have used this time to listen and learn about Maunakea from various stakeholders. I learned about other issues that need our attention to create and implement a better plan for the stewardship of Maunakea. This may include:

  • Decommissioning and removing older telescopes and facilities to restore the summit
  • Reducing the level of activity on the summit
  • Integrating culture and science

My administration will be working with the University of Hawai‘i, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, and the community to actively pursue these outcomes.

Ka’u Coffee Festival – April 24 to May 3

Showcasing all that makes the rural District of Ka’u so special, the Ka‘u Coffee Festival perks with activities for all ages April 24-May 3. Now in its seventh year, the festival not only showcases Ka‘u’s multi, award-winning coffees at numerous events, but also features stargazing, a rainforest hike and much more.

Kau Mountain Water System. Photo by Jesse Tunison

Kau Mountain Water System. Photo by Jesse Tunison

“We’ve got something for everyone to enjoy over 10 days,” says Chris Manfredi, festival organizer. “While all of last year’s great events return to the festival, we’re always trying to exceed the expectations of our guests. When you have a vibrant community producing some of the finest coffee grown anywhere, my job is actually pretty easy. We’ve added a second mauka hike to keep up with popular demand.”

One popular reprise is the tasty recipe contest using Ka’u coffee as an ingredient. The Ka’u Coffee Recipe Contest offers friendly competition in pupu, entrée and dessert categories Saturday, April 25 at the Ka’u Coffee Mill. During the 2 p.m. judging, enjoy free entertainment, coffee and recipe sampling.  Contest entry is free and the deadline is April 19. Visit www.kaucoffeefestival.com.

The Pahala Community Center is the new venue for the annual Miss K‘au Coffee Pageant where doors open at 6 p.m. on Sunday, April 26. Contestants aged 17-24 are judged in talent and gown categories and win prizes and local fame, according to pageant chair Gloria Camba.  Participants also vie for Most Photogenic, Miss Congeniality and Miss Popularity.  Admission is $10 with additional donations appreciated; door prizes will be awarded.

The highlight of the 10-day activity lineup is the free Ka’u Coffee Festival Ho‘olaule‘a on Saturday, May 2 that sprawls both inside and out of the Pahala Community Center. New this year, admission into the tasty Ka‘u Coffee Experience is free and coffee enthusiasts can sample professional barista-guided tastings of Ka‘u coffees prepared a variety of ways—like a pour-over. French press or cold brew—9:30 a.m.-noon and 1 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

Outside, ho‘olaue‘a attendees can talk story with friendly coffee farmers at gaily decorated booths with free sampling. Also on tap are “broke da mouth” food booths serving hot plate lunches, fresh baked goods and ethnic, local-style treats by local community organizations. Enjoy lunch in the outdoor pavilion or grassy lawn while treated to non-stop, local entertainment. Keiki can enjoy outdoor games.

Find out how coffee is grown, picked and processed during informative Ka’u Coffee Farm & Mill Tours. Sign up at the ho‘olaule‘a for the informative $20 tours, complete with shuttle transport, departing 9:30 and 11 a.m., plus 12:30, 2 and 3:30 p.m.

Enter the Buy Local It Matters promotion by visiting festival sponsors and redeeming purchase receipts and business cards at the ho‘olaule‘a for chances to win exciting prizes.

The festival is supported by the County of Hawai‘i Department of Research & Development, Hawai‘i Tourism Authority and Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture. Most events are free while others require a nominal fee. A full schedule of events and Ka‘u activity recommendations follows. Visit www.kaucoffeefest.com to learn more.

On Friday, April 24, 5:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. Pa‘ina & Open House at historic Pahala Plantation House featuring music, hula, food and house tours. Corner of Maile and Pikake in Pahala. Hosted by Pahala Plantation Cottages, Ka‘u Chamber of Commerce and The Ka‘u Calendar newspaper. Free, donations accepted for Miss Ka‘u Coffee Scholarship Fund.  www.kaucoffeefest.com, www.pahalaplantationcottages.com. 808-928-9811.

On Saturday, April 25, 2 p.m. The free Ka‘u Coffee Recipe Contest hosts a cooking competition at Ka‘u Coffee Mill. Entries made with Ka’u coffee are accepted in pupu, entree and dessert categories. Free coffee tasting. Find contest entry info at www.kaucoffeemill.com or call Lisa at 808-928-0550.

On Sunday, April 26, the annual Miss Ka‘u Coffee Pageant showcases the crowning of Miss Ka‘u Coffee and Miss Ka‘u Peaberry. Doors open 6 p.m. at the Pahala Community Center. Visit www.KauCoffeeFest.com.

During the week visit Ka‘u coffee farms. Enjoy the scenic and historic beauty of Ka‘u, Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach, Honu‘apo fishponds, the cliffs of Ka Lae – the southernmost place in the U.S., and the nearby Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Stay in one of the many accommodations in Ka‘u. Visit www.kaucoffeefest.com for participating coffee farms and accommodations.

On Wednesday, April 29 and Thursday, April 30 explore flume systems of the sugarcane era and development of hydroelectric power on a Ka‘u Mountain Water System Hike in the Wood Valley rainforest 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Limited to 30, $40 includes lunch.  Visit www.kaucoffeemill.com or phone 808-928-0550.

On Friday, May 1 enjoy Coffee & Cattle Day 10 a.m. at Aikane Plantation Coffee farm.  Find out how descendants of Ka‘u’s first coffee farmer integrate coffee with other agriculture.  $25 fee includes an all-you can eat buffet. Visit www.aikaneplantation.com or phone 808-927-2252.

On Friday, May 1 observe the heavens from the summit of Makanau at Ka‘u Star Gazing, 5:30-10 p.m. $35 with refreshments and shuttle transportation. Sign up at www.kaucoffeemill.com or call 808-928-0550.

On Saturday, May 2 tantalize your taste buds at the friendly Ka‘u Coffee Festival Ho‘olaule‘a, with a full day of local music, hula, food booths, local crafts, keiki activities, educational displays, coffee tastings and farm/mill tours headquartered inside and out of the Pahala Community Center. Festival entry is free; Ka‘u Coffee Experience offers guided coffee tastings 9:30 a.m.-noon and 1 p.m.-3:30 p.m. Farm tours with shuttle transport are 9:30 and 11 a.m., plus 12:30, 2 and 3:30 p.m., $20. Call 808-929-9550 or visit www.KauCoffeeFest.com.

On Sunday, May 3 learn about the coffee industry at the Ka‘u Coffee College at Pahala Community Center. The Coffee College hosts educational seminars and a reverse trade mission. Free, donations appreciated. Call 808-929-9550 or www.KauCoffeeFest.com.

Ka‘u Coffee Festival: Founded in coffee traditions hailing to the 1800s—plus the hard work of former sugar plantation workers—Ka‘u coffee burst onto the specialty coffee scene by winning numerous coffee quality awards. These accolades highlight the unique combination of people and place that makes Ka‘u coffee a favorite across the globe. The festival’s mission is to raise awareness of Ka‘u as a world-class, coffee-growing origin.

Ka‘u Coffee Festival vendor and sponsorship opportunities are available. For more information and festival updates, visit kaucoffeefest.com, follow Ka‘u Coffee Festival on Facebook and @kaucoffeefest on Twitter, or call 808-929-9550.

 

Nā Kuana`ike Pāheona o Hawaii: Artistic Perspectives of Hawaii

The Lyman Museum will present a new special exhibit to the public from April 17, 2015 through September 19, 2015.  The exhibit, Nā Kuana`ike Pāheona o Hawai`i: Artistic Perspectives of Hawai`i, will bring together paintings, prints, and photographs from the 18th to the 21st centuries, covering five major themes:  The Time of Contact, Hawaiian Royalty, Hawaiian Culture, The Volcano, and Hawaiian Landscape.

Halemaumau Crater in Kilauea Caldera, by D. Howard Hitchcock, 1893.

Halemaumau Crater in Kilauea Caldera, by D. Howard Hitchcock, 1893.

Each section will include a selection of paintings, most from the permanent collection of the Lyman Museum and some on loan for the exhibit.  The paintings featured are by artists from the time of Cook’s visit until the recent past.  Contemporary photographs will provide a recent perspective on similar themes from two local photography organizations, the Kona Camera Club and the Hilo Photo Club.

Since 1778, when the Resolution and the Discovery under Captain James Cook made contact with the thriving culture and beautiful islands of Hawai`i, artists have been using their skills to bring their perspectives of “paradise” to a wide audience.  Some of the works will be familiar to many, and others have never been seen before in any exhibit.  Many of the works of art in the special exhibit have come to the Museum through the generous bequest of Donn Carlsmith.  Others have been donated to the Museum by a number of individuals and some have been loaned specifically for this exhibit.  The Isaacs Art Center of Hawai`i Preparatory Academy has been a generous source of works by Herb Kane.

Paul Dahlquist, former Director and current Trustee of the Lyman Museum, serves as guest curator for the special exhibit.  “How exciting would it be to see a 19th-century painting of Kīlauea erupting displayed next to a contemporary photograph interpreting the same scene?  Or to compare an 18th-century print depicting the death of Captain Cook at Kealakekua Bay with a 19th-century image of the same event, and a 20th-century painting by Herb Kane based on meticulous historical research into Cook’s death?

Nā Kuana`ike Pāheona o Hawai`i: Artistic Perspectives of Hawai`i, will present artists’ perspectives of nature and culture in Hawai`i by joining 18th- and 19th-century paintings and prints with 20th- and 21st-century works by painters, printmakers, and photographers.  As curator, I am very excited to be bringing these works together in a single show at the Lyman Museum. Come enjoy this one-of-a-kind exhibit!”

The nationally accredited and Smithsonian-affiliated Lyman Museum showcases the natural and cultural history of Hawai`i.  Located in historic downtown Hilo at 276 Haili Street, the Museum is open Monday through Saturday, 10:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.  During the run of this special exhibit the Museum will be closed May 25 (Memorial Day), July 4 (Independence Day), and September 7, 2015 (Labor Day).  For additional information, call (808) 935-5021 or visit www.lymanmuseum.org.

Facebook and Instagram Goes Down – Social Media Users Panic

So Facebook and Instagram are down right now.  Some are reporting this outage due to the storms on the east coast.

What will the world do without Facebook and Instagram?

UH Hilo Students Involved In Free Speech Lawsuit To Speak At Grassroot Event

This Friday, January 30, 2015, a special event sponsored by the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii will feature the two UH Hilo students whose lawsuit against the university forced the school to revise their free speech policy.
UH Hilo Moniker
Merritt Burch and Anthony Vizzone are the leaders of the Young Americans for Liberty chapter at UH Hilo, and recently made news this year when they were restricted from passing out the U.S. Constitution on campus.

Merritt Burch

Merritt Burch

Merritt and Anthony sued the school and the university was forced to settle the case.

Anthony Vizzone

Anthony Vizzone

The Grassroot Institute will present Merritt and Anthony with the 2015 Unsung Hero Award for their work in challenging the free speech codes at the University of Hawaii at Hilo.

The head of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), Greg Lukianoff, will also join us via a Skype interview.

The event will take place:

Friday, January 30th
7:30 am to 9:00 am
Pacific Club – 1451 Queen Emma Street, Honolulu, HI 96813

Members of the media interested in attending should contact Mercedes Miller at mmiller@grassrootinstitute.org or 808-591-9193.

270 Acre Brush Fire Started By Puna Lava Flow

The brush fire sparked by the lava flow yesterday burned 270 acres in Puna yesterday.
270 AcresAs of 12:30 this evening… it looks like the lava flow is still active in the vicinity of today’s brush fires.
111415picI had family and friends reporting of falling ash on their properties in the Ainaloa and Orchidland Subdivisions of the Big Island today.

Will follow things tomorrow as this lava flow changes each and every day.

Big Island Police Recover and Identify Body at Hapuna

HPDBadgeHawaiʻi Island police have identified the body recovered from an underwater cavern system near Hapuna Beach on Wednesday (December 17) as 13-year-old Gwyneth Agustin Borromeo, also known as Jayson, of Waikoloa.

An autopsy conducted Thursday (December 18) determined the cause of his death was due to salt water drowning.

Keep Calm and Lava On

Lava On

Roy’s Restaurants to be Sold

Bloomin’ Brands, Inc., has announced an agreement for the sale of all of its interests in the Roy’s concept, including 20 company-owned restaurants, to United Ohana, LLC, a new company formed by Sunil Dharod. Dharod, President and Chief Executive Officer of Apple Texas and Apple Houston, is the owner and operator of 69 Applebee’s restaurants in Texas. The transaction is expected to close in the next 30-60 days.

roysRoy’s joined the Bloomin’ Brands portfolio in 2000. Roy’s was founded in Honolulu, Hawaii in 1988 by Chef Roy Yamaguchi and has become well-known for its Pacific Rim Cuisine – featuring the freshest local ingredients, European sauces and bold Asian spices with a focus on seafood. There are 29 Roy’s locations around the world – 21 in the continental United States, six in Hawaii, one in Japan and one in Guam.

Lazard acted as the exclusive financial advisor to Bloomin’ Brands on the sale of Roy’s.

State Receives Judgement Against Modeling/Talent Agency – Company Ordered to Pay Restitution, $50,000 Fine

The Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs’ (DCCA) Office of Consumer Protection (OCP) announced today that it obtained a judgment against JRP International, Inc., dba John Robert Powers, to resolve allegations that the company failed to comply with Hawaii’s door-to-door sales law.

John Powers Agency

The complaint and judgment filed in Hawaii state court alleges that in October 2012, John Robert Powers, a mainland company, advertised on local radio stations soliciting people to attend a pre-screening talent-search audition being held at a Waikiki hotel. At the conclusion of the audition, parents paid the company substantial sums of monies to have their children attend training classes consisting of five rehearsals and one agent showcase.

OCP’s complaint alleged that the company violated Hawaii’s door-to-door sales law by failing to verbally inform these parents of their right to cancel the contract within three (3) business days of the transaction, and failing to include in its contract the written Notice of Cancellation language as required by HRS §481C-2.

“This action highlights the importance of Hawaii’s door-to-door sales law,” said OCP’s Executive Director Bruce B. Kim.“Consumers should exercise caution before signing contracts at any high-pressure sales event, whether it occurs at your home or in a hotel. Take the time to ask the salesperson to explain your cancellation rights and read the cancellation rights in the contract before signing.”

OCP was awarded $3,800 in restitution on behalf of an injured consumer, along with fines and penalties of $50,000 against the company.

The judgment also included injunctive relief against the company, requiring that it:

  • Furnish buyers with a fully completed receipt or copy of a contract pertaining to door-to-door sales, which contains all the information required by law
  • Furnish buyers with duplicate copies of the Notice of Cancellation form required by law
  • Include any copies of the Notice of Cancellation form, including all information required by law regarding the Notice of Cancellation in the specific format required by law
  • Verbally inform each buyer at the time the buyer signs the contract or purchases the goods or services, of the buyer’s right to cancel
  • Not misrepresent in any manner the buyer’s right to cancel
  • Honor any valid of notice of cancellation by a buyer
  • Promptly refund all payments made under the contract or sale after receipt of a timely notice of cancellation.

Consumers and businesses involved in door-to-door type sales as defined in HRS§ 481C-1 are advised that businesses are required to verbally inform consumers of their right to cancel the contract within three (3) business days and must also include in its contract the required Notice of Cancellation language as described in HRS § 481C-2.

A “door-to-door sale” is defined as:

  • A sale of goods or services solicited in person and signed by the buyer at a place other than the seller’s business address shown on the contract;
  • A sale of goods or services solicited in person or by mail or telephone; or
  • A public or private notice or advertisement if the solicitation includes an offer of a gift, prize premiums, stamps, coupons, tickets or other redeemable devices as an inducement for the person solicited or a member of the person’s immediate family to go to the seller’s place of business, whether the buyer signs at the seller’s place of business or elsewhere.

Businesses are advised that failing to comply with the door-to-door sales law may render the contract unenforceable.

Anyone who believes that they may have signed a contract involving a door-to-door type sale, and who believes they were not verbally informed and/or signed a contract that failed to provide the required written notice that they had the right to cancel their contract within three (3) business days of the transaction may file a complaint with the Office of Consumer Protection. Information about filing a complaint is available on the OCP’s website at

http://cca.hawaii.gov/ocp/consumer-complaint/or by calling the Consumer Resource Center at 587-4272 on Oahu or toll free from the Neighbor Islands at the following numbers:

  • Kauai                           274-3141x 74272
  • Maui                            984-2400 x 74272
  • Big Island                   974-4000 x 74272
  • Molokai &Lanai        1 (800) 468-4644 x 74272

Pahoa Police Station Remains Open – Secondary Location Being Finalized

The Puna police station in Pāhoa remains open and police have no plans to close it.

The Pahoa Police Station

The Pahoa Police Station

A misleading news report wrongly implied that the Pāhoa station was no longer occupied.

If and when lava blocks access to the Puna station to residents of lower Puna, police will set up a secondary location somewhere on the south side of the lava flow. That location has yet to be finalized.

Police will continue to patrol all occupied areas of the Puna District.