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‘KULEANA’ Wins Audience Choice Narrative Feature in its North American Premier

‘KULEANA’ added another top prize to its growing list of successes with an “Audience Choice Narrative Feature” award in its second film festival screening; this time in Texas at the 23rd annual San Antonio Film Festival.

In ‘KULEANA’, set on Maui in 1971, a disabled Vietnam vet rediscovers the Hawaiian warrior within to protect his family, defend their land, and clear his father’s name. ‘KULEANA’ held its World Premiere screening for an attendance-record 3,100 enthusiastic viewers outdoors at the 2017 Maui Film Festival in June, where it also received an ‘Audience Choice’ Award.

Critics report of ‘KULEANA’: “An original blend of Hawaii’s history, spirituality and culture. Kuleana introduces a unique new film genre: Hawaiian Noir. While the setting may be tropical paradise, it’s set against a shocking and densely plotted mystery that twists and turns like a Raymond Chandler thriller. With its easy-going pace, lived-in characterizations, emphasis on domestic cruelties and layered, twisty storytelling, the movie this most reminded me of was Chinatown” MauiTime (6/17). And: “Kuleana is certainly a unique experience, merging unlikely genres and providing a cast of characters whom audiences can identify with no matter where they live” Arts Beat LA (8/17).

A rising star in the ’KULEANA’ all-Hawaii cast, Sonya Balmores, appears this fall in a no-nonsense role as Auran in Marvel’s INHUMANS co-produced by ABC and IMAX. A first in television, the series debuts in IMAX theaters worldwide followed by a premiere on ABC. The model/actor from Kauai will also be seen in a guest-starring role in the upcoming season of Dwayne Johnson’s HBO television series BALLERS, and in Gerard Butler’s action feature DEN OF THIEVES alongside Curtis ’50 Cent’ Jackson.

Balmores, writer/director Brian Kohne, and other key cast and crew will appear in support of the movie at select Film Festivals. Among them, ’KULEANA’ is slated to screen in the Tribal Film Festival in Oklahoma, the Louisville International Film Festival in Kentucky, the Guam International Film Festival, the Santa Cruz Film Festival in California, and in a November preview screening in the Hawaii International Film Festival on Oahu on its steady march toward a statewide theatrical run in Hawaii.

‘KULEANA’ is the Hawaiian word for Spiritual Responsibility. The provocative new mystery/drama was written and directed by Brian Kohne, produced by Stefan Schaefer, and stars native Hawaiian Moronai Kanekoa, Sonya Balmores (Marvel’s INHUMANS), Kristina Anapau (TRUE BLOOD), Augie T, Marlene Sai, Branscombe Richmond, and Mel Cabang. Hawaii’s legendary Willie K provides the original score with Johnny Wilson; and the hypnotic soundtrack boasts hits by Joni Mitchell, Procol Harum, Tony Orlando and Dawn and others, with classic Hawaiian recordings of the sixties by Genoa Keawe, Lena Machado, Sunday Manoa, Sons of Hawaii, Marlene Sai, and Myra English.

‘KULEANA’ Trailer (2017) from Hawai’i Cinema on Vimeo.

2017 Queen Lili’uokalani Festival Set for Saturday, September 9

The He Hali’a Aloha no Lili’uokalani Festival, Queen’s Birthday Celebration, will take place on Saturday, September 9, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Lili’uokalani Gardens Park in Hilo.

This year’s Festival to honor Hawai’i’s last reigning monarch is being held in conjunction with the Centennial Celebration of Lili’uokalani Gardens, and is being coordinated and sponsored in part by the Friends of Lili’uokalani Gardens.

The day-long festival includes music, hula, arts, crafts, food, demonstrations, children’s games and cultural activities.

Entertainment will include Darlene Ahuna, Taishoji Taiko, Komakakino with Halau Ha’akea a Kala, the Waiākea Ukulele Band, Tahitian by Merahi Productions, with the finale featuring Mark Yamanaka, recipient of multiple Na Hoku Hanohano Awards.

Hula is the major focus of the Festival and each year, festivities are kicked off with a mass hula featuring more than 250 hula dancers throughout the Park performing a traditional mele.

Dancers from throughout the State will dance together, symbolizing the Queen’s vision of sharing Hawai’ian culture with the rest of the world.  During this performance, more than 50,000 orchid blossoms will rain from the skies above the park.

Activities include Japanese Tea Ceremony, a Jumping Castle and Water slide, Coconut Weaving, Hawai’ian Printing & Stamp Pads, Hawai’ian Herbs, Hawai’ian crafts, and children’s coloring activities designed to provide historical information about the garden.

Community and educational organizations will be on hand to offer information on available services for families on Hawai‘i Island.

A bountiful variety of local foods will be available for purchase.

Admission to the Festival is free of charge.  Additional public parking is available at the Afook Chinen Civic Auditorium and Hawai’i County Mass Transit will be providing free shuttle service from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The County of Hawai’i is proud to partner with the Queen Lili’uokalani Trust, Pacific Radio Group, Hilo Fire Extinguishers, Blue Hawai’ian Helicopters, Grand Naniloa Hotel, KWXX, Honolulu Skylark Productions CJ Promotions, the Hawai’i Tropical Flowers Council and the Friends of Lili’uokalani Gardens to present this cultural experience to residents and visitors.

For more information, please call the Department of Parks and Recreation’s Culture and Education Section at 961-8706.

Mai Tai Festival and Battle of the BBQ Winners Are…

The 9th Annual Don the Beachcomber’s Mai Tai Festival happened this past Saturday at the Royal Kona Resort.  Over 20 of the top bartenders from around Hawaii and the mainland participated for a chance at $17,500 in prize money.

The day began with a “Battle of the BBQ” at the courtyard of the Royal Kona Resort where 13 restaurants competed for the coveted “People’s Choice Award” and the “Judges Choice Award”.

Broke Da Mouth Grindz took home the “People’s Choice Award” with a BBQ Beef dish topped w/ shrimp:

The Kona Butcher Shop took home the “Judges Choice Award” with a smoked brisket dish:

After the Battle of the BBQ was finished folks mingled throughout the courtyard as there were lots of craft vendors selling local Big Island Made products.

Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker’s booth was one of the more popular shops.

People then moved on over to the Resort’s pool area where Henry Kapono performed in concert while folks enjoyed a casual pool party for a few hours.

Then at 4:30 the Mai Tai Festival began inside Don the Beachcombers where hundreds of folks gathered to watch some of the best bartenders compete in ten minute mix-offs with the judges getting to sample each of the Mai Tai’s after the mix-off.

The winners of the Mai Tai Festival were:

  1. Kevin Beary – 3 dots and a dash Chicago with the “Tricky Tricky Wiki Wiki”
  2. Justin Kipapa – Myna Bird – Honolulu
  3. Paul Schreuder – Bar Leather Apron Honolulu

Mai Tai Festival Director Jeff Isbister said, “These are 3 great bartenders all carrying the torch of the classic Tiki Cocktail into the mainstream. Both Justin and Kevin are returnees and both have finished in the top 3 in past events. We couldn’t ask for better representation than that. Paul is a first time competitor but he represents bar Leather apron which is owned by a two time winner and two time judge, Justin Park. These top tier mixologists are testament to how big the Mai Tai Fest has become. Kevin has come all the way from Chicago twice to compete. We’ve had competitors from all over the country and beyond.”

Television personality DJ Maleko helped emcee the event and Celebrity Chef Sam Choy was one of the Judges.

Bacardi USA was on hand and was giving folks a chance to win bottles of Bacardi by posting pictures of the event on Instagram and Twitter under the hashtag #BacardiUSA.

Isbister continued, “Another great event, we went into the planning for the 9th annual Mai Tai Festival with our sights firmly set on our tenth anniversary next year. Everyone’s focus was of course this year but we kept in the back of our minds the idea of what can we do bigger better and bolder for next year. I know Gary Hogan, Tom and Liz Bell and the staff here at the hotel promise the best event yet.”

Silver Anniversary of Hawaii’s Woodshow

Celebrating the Silver Anniversary of Hawaii’s Woodshow will be a highlight for all wood art enthusiasts. The exhibition is free and open to the public and will run September 23 through October 8, 2017, Tuesday through Sunday from 10 am until 5 pm at the Honolulu Museum of Art School at Linekona.

In celebration of Hawaii’s Woodshow 25th anniversary, HFIA is launching the first annual Innovation + Imagination (I²) Challenge. This fun, competitive division provides participating students with a mixed bundle of 10 board feet of locally-grown woods to construct either a wall-hung or free-standing piece. Student entries will be on display at this year’s Hawaii’s Woodshow.

Voyaging Table by Tai Lake. Photo: Brad Goda 2016

“I² is a creative way to engage students and get them excited about working with wood and creating wonderful pieces,” said Marian Yasuda, longtime coordinator of Hawaii’s Woodshow. “We are really looking forward to imaginative and inspired art pieces.”

Hawai’i Tourism Authority (HTA) awarded HFIA $7,000 through the Community Enrichment Program (CEP) for Hawaii’s Woodshow™ Silver Anniversary exhibition. The CEP Program fosters community-based tourism projects to improve and enrich Hawaii’s product offerings. CEP supports community-based projects that provide unique, authentic and highly-valued visitor experiences and represents activities that are developed by our community, for our com. munity, and are things the community is willing to and wants to share with our visitors.

Hawai’i Craftsmen (HC) awarded HFIA $250 through their Strategic Partnership Program (SPP) for the Masters Award of Distinction for the 2017 Hawaii’s Woodshow. In addition, Hawai’i Craftsmen is providing a free one year membership to two Woodshow participants chosen by the jurors. The goals of the SPP, marking Hawai’i Craftsmen’s 50th anniversary, are to support Hawaii craft organizations’ projects to add value to those activities, strengthen Hawai’i Craftsmen’s relationships with those partners, expand workshop and exhibition opportunities for their members, and build awareness of and membership in Hawai’i Craftsmen.

Mango Concert Ukulele by David Gomes. Photo: Brad Goda 2016

The exhibition brings attention to artisans using Hawai’i-grown tree species as well as the importance of sustainable forest management. Hawaii’s Woodshow helps HFIA tell the story of Hawaii’s forests, conservation and sustainability by limiting the types of wood allowed. Woodshow entries are created from interesting and beautiful Hawai’i grown woods, especially non-native species that are available but underutilized.

HFIA is honored to have three distinguished artists who have graciously volunteered to jury this year’s entries: Mark Sfirri, who runs the Fine Woodworking Program at Bucks County Community College in Newtown, Pennsylvania; John Gonczar who has been designing and building fine furniture for more than 30 years; and Noe Tanigawa who works primarily in encaustic (wax) and gold leaf or in wax and oil on lutrador. In addition to Hawai’i Tourism Authority and Hawai’i Craftsmen, 2017 Hawaii’s Woodshow sponsors to date are DLNR – Division of Forestry & Wildlife, Hawai’i Forest Institute, Hawai’i State Foundation on Culture and Arts, Tusher Architectural Group, Woodcraft Hawai’i, Ron Kent, C. Barton Potter, Co., Peter & Heather Simmons, Thomas Loudat, Scheurenbrand Guitars, Shaun Fleming-Wooden Touches LLC, Steven Hill, and WhiteSpace Architects.

Tomorrow – Battle of the BBQ’s and Mai Tai Festival at the Royal Kona Resort

Tomorrow, August 19th 2017, the Royal Kona Resort celebrates the legendary Mai Tai cocktail at the ninth annual Don the Beachcomber Mai Tai Festival.

Watch as over 20 of the world’s top bartenders converge on the Big Island of Hawaii to mix it up in a battle for the title of World’s Best Mai Tai and a $10,000 cash prize.

Festival Highlights include:

  • Mai Tai Marketplace: Shop for crafts and island treats from local artisans and merchants from 11am-4pm
  • Battle of the BBQ: Taste and vote for Hawaii’s best barbecue from 11am-2pm
  • Pool Party: Listen to live music from local Hawaiian artists by the pool from 2:30pm-4pm

Mai Tai Mix-off: From 4:30pm – 7:30pm watch bartenders from around the world vie for the title of World’s Best Mai Tai and cash prizes. First place winner receives $10,000, second place winner receives $5,000, and third place winner receives $2,500.

For the past eight years, the Don the Beachcomber Mai Tai Festival has drawn bartenders from around the globe to compete for the title of World’s Best Mai Tai and cash prizes. This annual festival is a full-day, fun-filled event with live entertainment, a pool party, arts and crafts displays, a BBQ Cook-Off Contest, food booths, and lots more. The main event is the exciting action-packed Mai Tai Mix-Off contest. Watch and cheer for the competing bartenders as they create their own potent and signature spin on the historic Mai Tai, an island favorite.

Past participants

The 2016 Festival crowned Art Deakins of Bar Leather Apron in Honolulu, HI the winner of the $10,000 first prize and title of “World’s Best Mai Tai”. Second place was Tim Rita of the Cosmopolitan in Las Vegas, NV. The third best mai tai recipe was created by Kevin Beary of Three Dots and a Dash in Chicago, IL.Also part of the Festival’s activities was the battle of the barbeques. The Judge’s Award for “Best BBQ” was taken by Cool Runnings Catering of Kailua-Kona, HI. The People’s Choice award winner was Umeke Restaurant also in Kailua-Kona, HI.

Forever In Our HeARTS – In Honor of Stephanie Becher

Forever In Our HeARTS: A night of scenes, songs, memories, love and laughter in honor of Stephanie Becher.

The variety show will be at Hilo’s Historic Palace Theater, Thursday August 24, 2017 at 7:30pm. Stephanie Becher was a mother, friend, attorney, and beloved member of the Hilo theatre community. Sadly we lost her after complications of a necessary heart surgery in July 2017. This concert will be performed in her memory by her many friends in the theater community.

The show will feature scenes, songs, and dances from a variety of shows in which Stephanie has performed. This evening of laughter and loving memories will honor Stephanie and help to raise funds for her husband and two young sons.

Please join us in remembering Stephanie for all of the brightness she brought to our world through the arts. A $20 donation is suggested; all proceeds benefit the Becher ‘ohana. Tickets are available in advance from performers and at the Palace Theater box office in Hilo and remaining tickets will be available at the door. For ticket information, call the Palace Theater at (808) 934-7010.

Polynesian Voyaging Society Launches Hōkūleʻa Mahalo, Hawai’i Sail

Hōkūleʻa departed the Marine Education Training Center (METC) at Sand Island today to begin the Mahalo, Hawai’i Sail. The Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS) announced some of the stops that the canoe will be making during this six-month voyage throughout the Hawaiian Islands:

Mahalo, Hawai’i Sail – *Ports and dates are subject to change:

  • August and September: Maui (Honolua), Oʻahu (Haleʻiwa), Kauaʻi
  • October: Moku O Keawe, Maui (Hana)
  • November: Maui Nui – Maui (Maʻalaea/Wailea), Lānaʻi, Molokaʻi
  • Late-November to mid-December: Windward Oʻahu
  • January: Leeward, East and South Oʻahu

The Mahalo, Hawai’i Sail will give PVS an opportunity to thank Hawaiʻi’s people, bring Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia home to all of Hawaiʻi, share lessons learned from the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage and deepen the organization’s connection and understanding of the important work being done here in the islands to care for the earth. During the port visits, PVS will engage with schools and organizations through outreach events, service projects, crew presentations and canoe tours.

The first stop will be at Honolua Bay, Maui, where Hōkūleʻa first departed on her maiden voyage to Tahiti in 1976. The crew will begin to mahalo and mālama Hawai’i by participating in the planting of 1,000 koa seedlings as part of a series of community engagement events in West Maui. In partnership with the Maui Land and Pineapple Company, Inc. through the conservation department of the Pu’u Kukui Watershed Preserve, State of Hawaiʻi DLNR, The Nature Conservancy of Hawaiʻi and Kamehameha Schools Maui, Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia crewmembers will be engaging with schools and the community in West Maui where they are scheduled to conduct presentations and canoe tours (see detailed schedule below).

Voyaging canoe Hikianalia is scheduled to depart Sand Island on Friday, August 18, and will join Hōkūleʻa at Honolua Bay on Saturday, August 19.

Honolua Bay Engagement Schedule (Events are free and open to the public):
*All dates and times schedule to change

Thursday, August 17
4 pm Hōkūleʻa arrives at Honolua Bay, Honolua Bay Ramp
6 pm Huliau Film & Lecture Series presents Ola ʻo Maui Nui featuring speakers from the 1976 Voyage and Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage crew at
Kamehameha Schools Maui, Keōpūolani Hale

Friday, August 18
9:30-12:30 pm Kamehameha Schools Maui students and teachers visit with Hōkūleʻa crew at Honolua for informational activities and service project

6:30 pm Crew Talk Story at Westin Nanea
(Participating crew members: Max Yarawamai, Archie Kalepa, Lehua Kamalu and Billy Richards)

6:30-8:00 pm Crew Talk Story at Kaanapali Beach Hotel
(Participating crew members: Mark Ellis, Kekaimalu Lee, Kaʻiulani Murphy and Pua Lincoln)

Saturday, August 19
8-8:30 am Cultural welcome at Honolua Bay
9 am-5 pm Informational activities
10:30 am-1 pm Planting of koa and native plants with Pu’u Kukui Watershed Preserve makai conservation area. For information, visit puukukui.org
2-5 pm Public canoe tours and informational activities at Honolua Bay Ramp
7 pm Hōkūleʻa Revisted: 1976 Crew Member Talk at Ritz Carlton Kapalua
(Participating crew members: Buffalo Keaulana, Snake Ah Hee, Billy Richards, John Kruse, Gordon Piʻianaia, Penny Martin, Kimo Lyman, Marion Lyman-Mersereau, Makaala Yates and Kainoa Lee)

Sunday, August 20
8 am-5 pm Public canoe tours at Honolua Bay Ramp
TBD Crew Talk at Sheraton Maui
(Puu Kukui Watershed representatives and and Hōkūleʻa crew)
6:30 pm Crew Talk at Montage Kapalua Bay
(Participating crew members: Kalepa Baybayan, Kalā Tanaka and Austin Kino

Merrie Monarch Festival – RE: Halau Overnight Stay at Parks & Recreation Facilities

2017 Hula Kahiko from the Merrie Monarch Website

Hawaii County Mayor Harry Kim sent the following letter on August 9th, 2017 to the President of the Merrie Monarch Festival, Aunty Luana Kawelu:

Dear Ms. Kawelu:
RE: Halau Overnight Stay at Parks & Recreation

As you know, historically, the Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) has allowed overnight stays at Kawananakoa Gym, Papa`ikou Gym, Waiakea Recreation Center, and Waiakea Uka Gym by halau participating in the annual Merrie Monarch Festival (MMF). According to the MMF website, the 2017 festival included a total of 23 halau, 21 of which were not Hilo-based. The breakdown of people overnighting in the various County Department of Parks & Recreation (DPR) facilities are as follows:

  • Kawananakoa Gym – 24 people housed for one night and 25 people housed for 8 nights
  • Papa`ikou Gym – 35 people housed for 4 nights
  • Waiakea Recreation Center – 25 people housed for one night
  • Waiakea Uka Gym – 51 people housed for 4 nights

This year, the Hawaii County Fire Department (HFD) alerted DPR of specific Fire and Building Codes that are being violated by allowing this practice. To immediately address these violations and allow overnight stays at this year’s MMF, DPR required, per Fire Code and exemption, an approved fire watch at each facility. Following the conclusion of this year’s MMF, at my instruction, DPR conducted an extensive study of DPR Administrative Rules, and Hawaii County Building and Fire Codes, to ascertain whether this practice should be allowed to continue.

DPR’s findings are as follows:

While there are no DPR Administrative Rules that explicitly prohibit overnight stays at DPR facilities, pertinent excerpts from Chapter 15 of the Hawaii County Code indicate/state:

  • Section 15-3 defines “Camper’— means any person who remains in a park area between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m., and “Camping” – means the act of remaining in a park area between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m.
  • Section 15-8 designates the authority of the Director to establish visiting hours and states in part: “all persons shall observe and abide by the officially -posted signs and designated closed areas and visiting hours.”
  • Article 4, beginning with Section 15-39 and continuing through Section 15-48, designates Camping and all rules associated, including the names of the parks where camping is allowed.

Based on these DPR Administrative Rules, overnight stay at the facilities listed above are prohibited.

With respect to the Hawaii County Building Code, fire sprinklers and/or alarm systems are required for any facility used for sleeping, with the R-1 designation as described below.

County gyms can possibly be evaluated as transient accommodations, but must meet the standards of this section of the code:

302.1 General. Structures or portions of structures shall be classified with respect to occupancy in one or more of the groups listed below. A room or space that is intended to be occupied at different times for different purposes shall comply with all of the requirements that are applicable to each of the purposes for which the room or space will be occupied. Structures with multiple occupancies or uses shall comply with Section 508. Where a structure is proposed for a purpose that is not specifically provided for in this code, such structure shall be classified in the group that the occupancy most nearly resembles, according to the fire safety and relative hazard involved.

The current occupancy type of a gymnasium is Assembly Occupancy. Use of
gymnasiums for sleeping would change the occupancy type to R -I Occupancy.

  • Fire Sprinkler Requirement. R-1 Occupancy in Section 903.2.7 of the Building Code requires a fire sprinkler system; therefore, a gym or other facility used for sleeping shall have a fire sprinkler system.
  • Fire Alarm Requirement. R-1 occupancies in Section 907.2.8 of the Building Code require a Fire Alarm system and smoke alarm system.

The restriction/constraint regarding the use of a gym as a sleeping space is the need for fire sprinklers. The codes also require audio/visual fire alarms. These are not commonly present in older buildings, and therefore, upgrades would be required to accommodate sleeping.

HFD has allowed sleeping in these facilities under the exemption found in the NFPA 1, Uniform Fire Code, Hawaii 2006 Edition, regulation 20.2.3.6 Use of School Facilities for Sleeping, which reads:

“Educational occupancies that allow sleeping on a temporary basis shall prohibit smoking or open flames, and shall be provided with one of the following:

  1. Smoke alarms shall be provided in the designated sleeping area. When the facility is provided with a fire alarm system, the smoke alarms shall be connected to the fire alarm system, or
  2. An approved fire watch shall be provided.”

None of the DPR facilities above are school facilities, with the exception of perhaps Kawananakoa Gym, which is also governed by rules included in the lease agreement with the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands (DHHL).

DHHL lease agreement #44, amendment #2, with DPR, item #8, states in part: “it is agreed that for the health and safety of those using the facilities, and to address potential damages to the gymnasium, NO FOOD OR DRINK AND OVERNIGHT STAY at the facilities are allowed.” (Emphasis as it appears in document.)

The DHHL lease agreement would disqualify Kawananakoa Gym in any event,
regardless of any safety -protection systems that may be in place.

Based on this research, DPR has recommended against the continued practice of allowing overnight stays at DPR recreational facilities. However, DPR/Hawai’i County recognizes and fully supports the cultural and historical significance of the MMF, and is aware of the shortage of accommodations available for this important event. As such, every effort will be made to work with your organization to identify potential alternate sites.

DPR would like to offer the usage of the Mauna Kea Recreation Area cabins to visiting halau in 2018. There are two bunkhouses, capable of holding 24 people each, plus seven cabins, capable of holding six people each, for a total of 90 people. Each bunkhouse and cabin has its own bathroom with shower. There are potable water, a dining hall, and ample parking.

DPR is ready to assist the Merrie Monarch Festival in addressing any potential
concerns you may have with these suggested alternate accommodations, and looks forward to working with you.

Kahilu Theatre Hosts Talk by Nationally Recognized Artist and Hawaiian Cultural Practitioner Bernice Akamine

Kahilu Theatre presents an Artist Talk by nationally recognized artist, Bernice Akamine, on August 19, from 10:30 – 11:30am. Ms. Akamine will give a presentation describing the scope of her art practice, and will discuss how her roots as a Hawaiian cultural practitioner informs her work. The talk is being held in conjunction with her solo exhibition at Kahilu Theatre, and during the presentation Akamine will also discuss her work on display in the galleries. Coffee and light pastry will be on offer.

Bernice Akamine speaking about her installation with to Lulani Arquette , CEO of the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation (NACF) Photo by Mark Ley

“Bernice Akamine is a treasure for our state, both as a contemporary artist and as a cultural practitioner, and we are delighted to bring her work to Waimea,” says Deb Goodwin, Executive Director of Kahilu Theatre. “Her installations, Hinalua‘iko‘a and Kalo, exemplify deeply engaged and profoundly moving art, creativity we aim to showcase at Kahilu Theatre, both on stage and in our galleries. At the opening reception on August 3, Bernice spoke passionately about what inspires and influences her, giving the art richer meaning for those in attendance. Kahilu Theatre is honored to offer an additional opportunity to hear Bernice speak.”

Kahilu Theatre Development Associate David Clark describes the experience of viewing Kalo and hearing Bernice speak about it at the reception. “The large field of mixedmedia taro plants that make up the installation Kalo is beautiful in its own right, but it was so much more significant to learn about it from Bernice. Each newsprint “leaf” contains the printed signatures of residents that signed the1897-98 Ku’e: the AntiAnnexation Petitions, as well as maps of the districts in which those signatories resided. Each paper kalo plant “grows” out of a pohaku, or lava rock, donated by community members from each of the main Hawaiian Islands. This layering of source material makes the installation a living invocation of past generations and serves to remind each viewer (whether resident or visitor) of their kuleana or responsibility to protect the natural environment, the cultural traditions, and the history of this special place.”

Bernice Akamine is a sculptor and installation artist based on Hawai‘i Island. She uses a variety of media to express her ideas, and recurring themes include environmental and cultural issues. She is a recognized cultural practitioner with deep roots in Kapa and waiho‘olu‘u, Hawaiian natural dyes. Her solo exhibition at Kahilu Theatre Galleries, presents two bodies of work in both galleries.

Kalo, is a mixed media installation that consists of 83 taro plants made of stone and leaves. Hinalua‘iko‘a are suspended and free standing beaded sculptures that present an immersive environment inspired by traditional Hawaiian fish traps, sea creatures, talk radio and the Hawaiian Creation Chant, the Kumulipo.

Akamine has exhibited her work in numerous solo and group exhibitions, both nationally and internationally. Her selected awards include; a 2015 Native Hawaiian Artist Fellowship from the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation; a 2012 Community Scholar Award from the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History; and a 1999 Visiting Artist Award at the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of the American Indian in New York City.

Kahilu Exhibits, the visual arts exhibition program of the Kahilu Theatre, presents solo and thematic group shows and features local and global works of art from both emerging and established visual artists.
The Akamine exhibition, organized by Sally Lundburg, is on display through September 8. The galleries are free and open to the public Monday thru Friday, from 9am – 1pm, and during all performances and events. For more information, visit http://kahilutheatre.org/Exhibits, email gallery@kahilutheatre.org, or call (808) 885-6868.

For more information about Bernice Akamineʻs work, visit https://www.nativeartsandcultures.org/bernice-akamine or contact the artist at bamakamine@gmail.com.

Free Concert in Lili`uokalani Gardens August 17

A free concert of classical and Hawaiian music will be held in Lili`uokalnai Gardens on Thursday, August 17, from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Bring your own mats, blankets, or beach chairs to the lawn between the Pahoa-side gate and the restrooms.

“This free concert is part of the second annual Hawaii International Music Festival,” said K.T. Cannon-Eger of Friends of Lili`uokalanin Gardens.

Eric Silberger

Founded by internationally acclaimed virtuoso violinist Eric Silberger, Metropolitan Opera soprano Amy Shoremount-Obra, and esteemed pianist and photographer Carlin Ma, the 2017 Hawaii International Music Festival includes interdisciplinary classical music concerts and appearances on the islands of Oahu, Hawaii.

Carlin Ma

Joining the founders at Lili`uokalani Gardens will be cellist Sung Chan Chang (Hawaii Symphony), world-renowned Argentinean Bandoneon Player JP Jofre, and Mexican Tenor Manuel Castillo. Their program will include classical music and Argentinian tango music as well as selected compositions by Lili`uokalani, Queen of Hawaii for whom the gardens are named.

Desmon Haumea

Preceding the performances by the artists of the Hawaii International Music Festival and opening the afternoon entertainment will be local musicians including guitarist Desmon Haumea, harpist Cymber Lily Quinn and flutist Kathy Dorn.

Cymber Lily Quinn

The free concert in Lili`uokalani Gardens is a prelude to an evening Hawaii International Music Festival concert, “Tastes, Sights, and Sounds of the Big Island,” where specialty coffee from Rusty’s Hawaiian and estate chocolate courtesy of Hawaiian Crown Chocolate Plantation will be served. The evening event begins at 6:30pm at First United Protestant Church Hilo, 1350 Waianuenue Ave. Tickets for the evening concert and artisanal tastings are $30 in advance and $35 at the door.

Tickets for the evening are available online at http://himfhilo.bpt.me .

For further information, please go to the Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens page on Facebook or visit the festival website: www.HIMusicFestival.com.

Medical Marijuana Dispensary Allowed to Open on Oahu

The Hawai‘i Department of Health issued a formal notice to proceed to Aloha Green LLC today after the dispensary completed laboratory testing requirements and passed its final onsite inspection. Aloha Green is the second licensed medical cannabis dispensary in the state, and the first on O‘ahu, to receive approval to begin sales of medical cannabis to registered patients and their caregivers.

The licensed retail center for Aloha Green is at the Interstate Building at 1314 South King Street in Honolulu. The retail center is licensed to begin selling dried medical cannabis flowers when it opens to registered patients.

“The opening of a licensed dispensary on O‘ahu is a major milestone for the more than 5,000 qualified patients and caregivers in Honolulu,” said Health Director Dr. Virginia Pressler. “Our staff continues to work with all the licensees as they build their facilities and business operations in compliance with county and state laws to ensure product and patient safety.”

The rigorous dispensary approval processes to open and begin selling medical cannabis are based on the requirements of Hawai‘i Revised Statutes Chapter 329D and Hawai‘i Administrative Rules Chapter 11-850. Dispensaries are required to comply with all state and county, health, safety, and sanitation regulations, and are subject to unannounced inspections by DOH.

Registered patients and their caregivers may purchase up to four ounces of medical cannabis during a 15 consecutive day period and purchase a maximum of eight ounces over a 30 consecutive day period. All use of medical cannabis must be on private property and may not be used in a car while on the road, at work, at the beach, on hiking trails, or in any other public space. It is illegal to use or possess medical cannabis on any federally owned property such as military installations and national parks. When bringing medical cannabis home after purchasing it from a dispensary, the medical cannabis must be in a sealed container and not visible to the public.

There are eight licensed dispensaries in Hawai‘i. There are three on O‘ahu: Aloha Green Holdings Inc.; Mānoa Botanicals LLC; and TCG Retro Market 1, LLC dba Cure Oahu. There are two in Hawai‘i County: Hawaiian Ethos LLC and Lau Ola LLC. Two on Maui: Maui Wellness Group, LLC dba Maui Grown Therapies and Pono Life Sciences Maui, LLC; and one on Kaua‘i, Green Aloha, Ltd. These dispensaries are now at different stages of development by the licensees, and at varying stages of the approval process.

Free Floral Design Event to Celebrate the Centennial of Lili`uokalani Gardens

Hitomi Gilliam, an award winning floral artist, author and educator, will lead a floral design event in Hilo August 19, 20, and 21 to celebrate the centennial of Lili`uokalani Gardens.

Hitomi Gilliam

Registration is free through the Hawaii Floriculture & Nursery Association. Request a registration form from Judy Schilling at HFNAJUDY@gmail.com

Hitomi is a member of the American Institute of Floral Designers (AIFD) and is one of a very few recipients of AIFD’s Design Influence Award. In 2006, Hitomi was the recipient of the American Horticultural Society’s Frances Poetker Award that recognizes outstanding contributions as designer, author, and lecturer in the art and science of American horticulture. In 2008 she won Gold and Best of Show at the invitation only international entry at Singapore Garden Festival .She is the author of seven books including Neotropica: Hawaii Tropical Flower and Plant Guide.

“Flowers enhance every occasion,” said Hitomi on a recent visit to Lili`uokalani Gardens. “This is such a big space with so many different viewpoints. Floral designers will be given a site and do their magic here.”

The theme of the three-day event is “Celebrate with Local Flowers – Joy in Lili`uokalani Gardens.” Sixteen different floral designers or teams will be provided a bamboo structural base plus flowers and foliage in order to create designs that carry out that theme on Saturday afternoon. The exhibition will be open to the public on Sunday with voting for People’s Choice. The installation in the Gardens will come down Monday afternoon.

The program is presented by the Hawaii Floriculture & Nursery Association and Friends of Lili`uokalani Gardens with sponsorship from the Hawaii Department of Agriculture and Hawaii County Department of Research & Development.

UPDATED FAQ’s on National Park Specialty License Plates – Available Statewide for Limited Time Only

Updated FAQs: National Park Specialty State License Plates Available at DMV locations throughout Hawai‘i.

License plate frame not included!

Q: Are there any plates left?
A: Yes! There are plenty of plates statewide. (Editors Note – Plate availability is very limited and note that many offices have run out on their first batch received already).

Q: How much do the plates cost?
A: $35.50, and $18 goes to support the corresponding park. There is an annual renewal fee of $25, and $18 is again donated to the corresponding park.

Q: Can I get personalized license plates in the specialty design?
A: The plates are pre-numbered, so customizing isn’t an option.

Q: I have two vehicles. Can I get one of each?
A: Yes! Visit your local DMV, and go to www.hawaiiparkplates.com for the location nearest you.

Q: Can I get the specialty plate for my electric vehicle?
A: You can exchange your EV plates for the specialty plates, however, it does not come with the EV designation so you’d have to forego the benefits of having an EV plate.

Q: Can I get the specialty plate for my motorcycle?
A: There is not a motorcycle option at this time.

Q: Can I get a military/veteran plate transferred to a national park plate?
A: You can exchange your military/veteran plates for the specialty plates, however, you can’t have both.

Q: Are the plates tax deductible?
A: Individuals would have to check with their tax accountants, but specialty plates haven’t been tax deductible in the past.

Q: Can I pay with a credit card?
A: No. The DMV accepts cash or check only (at least that’s the case in Hilo)

We hope to see you on the road and in the park with your gorgeous new license plates soon! Post a photo to Instagram, Facebook or Twitter with the hashtag #FindYourVolcano to show your park pride!

Mahalo for supporting your local parks!

About Those New Volcanic License Plates…

On Tuesday, August 1, (the 101st anniversary of both Hawai‘i Volcanoes and Haleakalā), staff from Hawai‘i Volcanoes and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association exchanged their plates at the Hilo DMV. It was a very exciting morning, and DMV was a pleasure to work with!

HVNP Superintendent Cindy Orlando and new plates

Lots of questions have come up. Here are a few answers:

Q: How much do the plates cost?
A: $35.50, and $18 goes to support the parks.  UPDATE*  $25.00 per year increase in car registration fee which goes to the National Parks.

Q: Can I get personalized license plates in the specialty design?
A: The plates are pre-numbered, so customizing isn’t an option

Q: I have two vehicles. Can I get one of each?
A: Yes! The Hilo DMV now has the Haleakalā plates. (But they are running low on the Hawai‘i Volcanoes plate). Call your local DMV to double-check availability.

Q: Can I get the specialty plate for my electric vehicle?
A: You can exchange your EV plates for the specialty plates, however, it does not come with the EV designation so you’d have to forego the benefits of having an EV plate.

Q: Can I pay with a credit card?
A: No. The DMV accepts cash or check only (at least that’s the case in Hilo)

We hope to see you on the road and in the park with your gorgeous new license plates soon! Post a photo to Instagram, Facebook or Twitter with the hashtag #FindYourVolcano to show your park pride!

Project Vision Celebrates 10 Years with Inaugural Eye Ball

September 2017 marks 10 years of Project Vision Hawaii (PVH) providing free vision and health screenings to underserved and low-income communities across the State of Hawaii.To celebrate, this visionary non-profit is hosting its inaugural Eye Ball fundraiser on Friday, September 22 at Waialae Country Club. The goal is to raise $150,000. The vintage-Hawaii themed gala will feature traditional Hawaiian food, entertainment and an “eyegasmic” silent auction.

For every dollar raised, 91 cents will go toward vision and health care programs and services for people in need. Money raised will help allow Project Vision to work towards its goal to provide 15,000 children with eyeglasses, thousands of seniors with vision screening and public health education and thousands of homeless people with much-needed health and education services.

“We are proud and grateful to be celebrating a decade of vision and public health services throughout the state of Hawaii,” said Annie Valentin, PVH executive director. “Project Vision Hawaii is all about the strength of our partnerships, sponsors, volunteers, board and staff. Eye Ball is our opportunity to share our accomplishments, and most importantly a time to thank everyone helping some of Hawaii’s neediest communities.”

There are a limited sponsorship opportunities available. For more information, contact call (808) 282-2265 or email eyeball@projectvisionhawaii.org

Project Vision operates four mobile screening units across the islands – one to serve Oahu, Molokai and Lanai, and one each on Hawaii Island, Maui and Kauai – in an effort to increase access to health care as well as identify and address eye diseases early on. Project Vision partners with other nonprofits including Vision To Learn, local ophthalmologists and civic groups such as Lions Clubs to conduct screenings.

Tropical Fruit Growers Conference Goes Statewide Sept. 22-29

The 27th Annual Hawaii International Tropical Fruit Conference is September 22-29, starting at the Kaikodo Building in Hilo and then traveling to Kona, Maui, Molokai, Oahu and Kauai for mini-conferences.Geared to farmers, educators, orchard managers and proponents of sustainable agriculture, the eight-day event is presented by the statewide Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers (HTFG) and open to the public.

The conference is titled “Facing Challenges” and offers a lineup of visiting researchers and agro experts sharing information and breakout sessions on a variety of topics. They include Ed Stover on “Huanglongbing and the U.S. Citrus Industry: Status and Ongoing Research,” Lindsay Basik on “Durian Cultivation Around the World,” and David Karp on the “History and Genealogy of Citrus.”

HTFG Executive Director Ken Love says Hilo activities include UH, USDA and NASS updates, a report and survey on specialty crops, Q & A with guest speakers, Sunday tour of OK Farms with Brian Lievens, networking and fruit tasting.

Mini-conference activities on the other islands include farm tours and speaker presentations and meetings.

Registration forms and fee schedule are available at www.HTFG.org or by contacting Love at kenlove@hawaiiantel.net or Mark Suiso at suiso@aloha.net. Conference room rates are available through August 9, 2017 at the Hilo Hawaiian Hotel using code HH7027. Conference is made possible through funding from the County of Hawaii and Hawaii Department of Agriculture.

Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers

Marking its 28th year, HTFG was incorporated in 1989 to promote tropical fruit grown in Hawaii. It is a statewide association of tropical fruit growers, packers, distributors and hobbyists dedicated to tropical fruit research, education, marketing and promotion; www.HTFG.org.

Hawaii Mayor Signs Emergency Proclamation for Homeless Folks – Suspends Some County Laws

Hawaii County Mayor Harry Him signed an emergency proclamation today due to the increasing homeless population in the Kona area of the Big Island of Hawaii:

Mayor Harry Kim

WHEREAS, Chapter 127A Hawaii Revised Statutes, provides for the establishment of County organizations for emergency management and disaster relief with the Mayor having direct responsibility and authority over emergency management within the County.

WHEREAS, Chapter 127A Hawaii Revised Statutes and Chapter 7, Articles 1
and 2 of the Hawaii County Code, establishes a Civil Defense Agency within the
County of Hawaii and prescribes its powers, duties, and responsibilities, and
Section 13- 23 of the Hawaii County Charter empowers the Mayor of the County to declare emergencies; and

WHEREAS, homeless individuals have established an encampment at the
County of Hawaii’s Old Kona Airport Park, District of South Kona, County and State of Hawaii; and

WHEREAS, the homeless individuals at the Old Kona Airport Park were removed from the park grounds; and

WHEREAS, these homeless individuals could be temporarily sheltered at the
grounds of the Hale Kikaha Project located in the District of North Kona County and State of Hawaii; and

WHEREAS, these unsheltered homeless individuals are without access to
adequate bathroom, shower and living facilities; and

WHEREAS, these unsheltered homeless individuals require health and social
services in order to maintain themselves safely and in reasonable health; and

WHEREAS, the lack of secure, safe and sanitary shelter, and adequate health
and social services for these homeless people is endangering the health, safety and welfare of these people and pose a threat to the environment and public health, and demands emergency action to prevent or mitigate suffering, injury, loss, or damage to persons and property; and County of Hawaii is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer

WHEREAS, pursuant to section 127A- 13( b)( 1) Hawaii Revised Statutes the
Mayor has the authority to relieve hardships and inequities, or obstructions to public health, safety or welfare found by the Mayor to exist in the laws of the County and to result from the operation of federal programs or measures taken under Chapter 127A Hawai’ i Revised Statutes, by suspending the county laws, in whole or in part, or by alleviating the provisions of county laws on such terms and conditions the Mayor may impose; and

WHEREAS, pursuant to section 127A- 13( b)( 2) Hawai’ i Revised Statutes the
Mayor has the authority to suspend any county law that impedes or tends to impede or to be detrimental to the expeditious and efficient execution of, or to conflict with emergency functions, including the laws by which Chapter 127A Hawai’ i Revised Statutes, specifically are made applicable to emergency personnel; and

WHEREAS, due to the possibility of threat to the environment and public health to residents of the District of South and North Kona, Hawaii Island, and the need for government agencies and representatives from the private sector to mobilize and provide immediate services to our island residents, a state of emergency is authorized pursuant to Chapter 127A Hawai’ i Revised Statutes, and Chapter 7, Hawaii County Code.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, HARRY KIM, Mayor of the County of Hawai’ i, do hereby proclaim and declare that an emergency contemplated by section 127A- 14, Hawaii Revised Statutes has occurred in the County of Hawai’ i and hereby proclaim an emergency for the purposes of implementing the emergency management functions as allowed by law, effective August 1, 2017, and continuing thereon for 60 days or until further act by this office.

I FURTHER DECLARE, that pursuant to sections 127A- 13( b)( 1) and ( 2) the following County laws are suspended during the emergency period as they relate to the grounds of Hale Kikaha Project located in the District of North Kona, County and State of Hawaii:

  1. Chapter 5 Building Code.
  2. Chapter 25 Zoning Code.
  3. Chapter 26 Fire Code.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the County of Hawaii to be affixed. Done this 1st day of August, 2017 in Hilo, Hawai’ i.

HARRY KIM
Mayor
County of Hawai’ i

Polynesian Voyaging Society to Launch Hokulea’s “Mahalo, Hawaii Sail” at Honolua Bay, Maui

Honolua will be first of 40 stops during the eight-month sail throughout Hawaiian Islands

On August 16, 2017, voyaging canoes Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia will depart the Marine Education Training Center (METC) at Sand Island to begin the MAHALO, HAWAI’I SAIL. The first stop will be at Honolua Bay, Maui, where Hōkūleʻa first launched for her maiden voyage in 1976 and where she will now begin to mahalo and mālama Hawai’i with a planting of 4,000 koa seedlings as part of a series of events in West Maui. After the Honolua Bay visit, the canoes will continue to approximately 40 additional ports and connect with nearly 80 communities throughout the Hawaiian Islands.

The Mahalo, Hawai’i Sail will give Polynesian Voyaging Society (PVS) an opportunity to thank Hawaiʻi’s people, bring Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia home to all of Hawaiʻi, share lessons learned from the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage and deepen the organization’s connection and understanding of the important work being done here in the islands to care for the earth. During the port visits, PVS will engage with schools and organizations through outreach events, service projects, crew presentations and canoe tours.

“Now that we have returned from our three-year voyage around the world, we are looking forward to reconnecting with and thanking the people of Hawai’i,” said Nainoa Thompson, president of PVS. “It’s also time now to discover and shine the light on what people and organizations are doing to turn inspiration into action for the betterment of our island home and the earth. This first engagement planned at Honolua Bay and Waokele ʻo Honolua by the West Maui community is an example of what we are hoping to support during this sail,” he added.

Honolua Bay was chosen as the first stop on the MAHALO, HAWAI’I SAIL because it was the location where the Hōkūleʻa’s maiden voyage to Tahiti was launched in 1976. In partnership with the Maui Land and Pineapple Company, Inc. through the conservation department of the Pu’u Kukui Watershed Preserve, State of Hawaiʻi DLNR, The Nature Conservancy of Hawaiʻi and Kamehameha Schools Maui, Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia crew members will be engaging with schools and the community in West Maui where they are scheduled to conduct presentations and canoe tours (see detailed schedule below).

On Saturday, August 19, crew members will join the community and participate in a project to plant 4,000 koa trees and thousands of other native plants in the Pu’u Kukui Watershed Preserve ma kai conservation area. At one time, koa trees were used to make voyaging canoes, but today there are few of these native trees remaining which are large enough to do so.

Honolua Bay Engagement Schedule:
*ALL DATES AND TIMES SCHEDULE TO CHANGE

  • Wednesday, August 16, 11 p.m. – Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia depart METC at Sand Island
  • Thursday, August 17, 4 p.m. – Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia arrive at Honolua Bay
  • Thursday, August 17, 6 p.m. – Mālama Honua Voyage sharing by crew members of Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia at Kamehameha Schools Maui, Keōpūolani Hale (Free and Open to the public)
  • Friday, August 18, 9:30 – 12:30 p.m. – Kamehameha Schools Maui visit with Hōkūleʻa crew and planting
  • Saturday, August 19, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. – Planting of 4,000 koa trees and thousands of other native plants at Pu’u Kukui Watershed Preserve ma kai conservation area (limited parking available)
  • Saturday, August 19, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. – Public canoe tours, Honolua Bay Ramp
  • Sunday, August 20, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. – Public canoe tours, Honolua Bay Ramp
  • TBD– Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia depart Honolua Bay

About Pu’u Kukui Watershed Preserve:
Pu’u Kukui Watershed Preserve is the largest private nature preserve in the state of Hawaiʻi. Extending across more than 9,000 acres from ma uka to ma kai of Mauna Kahālāwai on Mauiʻs West side, it is home to some of the rarest endangered flora and fauna in the islands. This pristine area is a vital water source for Mauiʻs community and one of the wettest spots on earth. Most recently, under new management, the ancestral wisdom of Hawaiian elders has been laid as the foundation for conservation efforts in the preserve; providing a culturally sensitive and informed approach to managing the thriving native ecosystem of Puʻu Kukui. Conservation endeavors include non-native invasive species control, weed control, monitoring, research and most importantly protecting rare species.

About Polynesian Voyaging Society:
PVS was founded in 1973 on a legacy of Pacific Ocean exploration, seeking to perpetuate the art and science of traditional Polynesian voyaging and the spirit of exploration through experiential educational programs that inspire students and their communities to respect and care for themselves, one another, and their natural and cultural environments.

2017 Big Island ‘Ohana Fest – “Mele With The Mountains”

The First Annual Big Island ʻOhana Fest’s “Mele With The Mountains”, this summer’s Hottest Event is a family-friendly music festival. It is an entire weekend of family activities, ʻono locally sourced food, locally produced crafts and our island’s greatest musical talents featuring up to 28 artists, including a few off island musical talents.

There will be a variety of music for all tastes; reggae, rock, blues, Hawaiian, country, bluegrass, indie and more! Some bands will even be playing songs from popular kid’s movies for Keiki sing-alongs. Additional activities include a petting zoo, jump pad for kids and adults, Keiki Cart Train, and Pony/Horse rides

When: Friday, August 25 (4PM-11PM), Saturday, August 26 (10AM-11PM), Sunday, August 27 (10AM-7PM)

Where: Waikoloa Stables at Waikoloa Village, Hawaii Island, USA

Promoters: Alan Ku: as Jedi Yoda handling Marketing, Technology and Sound. Mikey Fiyah Hooser: as Zen Master handling Music Talent and Entertainment Benjie Kent: as Hulk Hogan handling Operations and Vendors

Why: We three promoters have listened to many island locals and feel the Big Island lacks in family-oriented, affordable, outdoor entertainment for our Island ʻOhana (family). We also know there are incredibly talented local musicians who struggle to find a venue to share their talents with the community, and off-island musicians who would welcome the opportunity to entertain an appreciative, island audience.

The Big Island ʻOhana Fest will be making a significant monetary donation on behalf of all event attendees to two local island nonprofits doing good deeds and providing education locally: – The Kohala Center’s Beginning Farmer & Rancher Development Program in the form of scholarships to aid in their mission of supporting and training tomorrow’s local island food producers. – PARENTS, Inc. to aid in their mission of informing, counseling and educating Hawaii Island families to be informed, educated, empowered and functioning.

Price: Three-day pass to the festival $40 at the door, $35 through presale. Keiki (Children) age 5-12 $15 at the door, $10 through presale; age 4 and under are free. Information on presale tickets at bigislandohanafest.com One day passes available at the gate: $30 adult. Keiki 5-12 $10, age 4 and under free. $5 discount for Teachers, Students, First Responders and all Military Active or Veteran. Appropriate ID required for discount. Parking is Free, and carpooling is highly encouraged due to limited parking availability and it’s the Mālama ‘Aina thing to do for our island home and planet. Other activities, food and crafts are pay to play and prices vary.

2017 Sponsors: KWXX and The Kohala Mountain Educational Farm’s October Pumpkin Patch festival. Visit the event’s website bigislandohanafest.com for the full musician lineup, where and how to purchase tickets and everything you need to know about this much anticipated family-friendly event! Check us out on Facebook at Big Island ʻOhana Fest for several contests to win free tickets! Listen to KWXX “Your Feel Good Island Music Station” 94.7 FM in Hilo & 101.5 FM in Kona for promotions and contest opportunities.

The Big Island ʻOhana Fest is a drug and alcohol free, best-behavior event expressing our unique style of Big Island Aloha and appreciation by all participants and attendees. Polite, professional security and parking attendants will be present for the entire event.

Free Presentation By Kona Daifukuji Orchid Club

The Kona Daifukuji Orchid Club offers a free presentation by Julie Goettsch at the August 9 meeting. Open to those interested in orchids, the gathering is 7 p.m. at the Daifukuji Soto Mission Hall. A potluck starts off the meeting and guests are invited to participate.

Goettsch is past president of the Hilo Orchid Society and leads the Orchid Isle Project, a public service initiative with the goal to beautify the island through orchids. She will present “Since Before Dirt: The Unlikely History of Orchids that Made the Orchid Isle.”

For info, phone 808-328-8375.

The Kona Daifukuji Orchid Club is West Hawai‘i’s oldest orchidaceae organization with a mission to learn and foster orchid culture and promote fellowship among orchid collectors. The club meets the second Wednesday of every month at the Daifukuji Soto Mission Hall on Hwy. 11 at mile marker 114, just north of Kainaliu. For information, visit www.facebook.com/orchidsinparadise.