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Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor Celebrates Living History Day with Smithsonian Museum Day Live

In recognition of Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor’s 10th anniversary and the upcoming 75th anniversary of the December 7th bombing of Pearl Harbor, Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor presented an expanded Living History Day with a multitude of historical exhibits, presentations by award-winning authors, and hands-on demonstrations highlighting the history, bravery and heroes of WWII and the sacrifices made by both military and civilians.

living-history-day2Living History Day saw more than 2,000 guests at the Museum on Saturday, September 24, held in partnership with Smithsonian Magazine’s Museum Day Live!. The Museum is a Smithsonian Affiliate and ranked one of the nation’s top 10 aviation attractions in the nation by TripAdvisor.

living-history-day3This year’s event included special tributes to the 100th Infantry Battalion and 442nd Regimental Combat Team, WWII exhibits created by local high school students, and meet and greets with WWII American military veterans of Japanese ancestry. Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaii presented a short documentary film called “Honouliuli: Hawaii’s Hidden Internment Camp” that sheds light on the longest operating and largest WWII internment and POW camp in Hawaii.

living-history-dayCostumed interpreters represented Rosie the Riveter, Cornelia Fort, USCG Lieutenant Frank Erickson, Japanese AFC Shigenori Nishikaichi who bombed Pearl Harbor, and more WWII characters of history.

living-history-day4There were presentations and book signings by WWII authors Dorinda Nicholson (Pearl Harbor Child) and Marc Wortman (1941: Fighting the Shadow War). Nell Calloway, granddaughter of General Claire Lee Chennault who led the “Flying Tigers” and the Republic of China Air Force during WWII, spoke, presenting her grandfather’s heroic feats.

Other activities included swing dance, aircraft riveting in Lt. Ted Shealy’s Restoration Shop, historic aircraft modeler demonstrations, open cockpits, and meet and greet time with the WWII veterans.

Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor is located on historic Ford Island, where bombs fell during the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. Visitors to the Museum can see remnants from that day of infamy, including the 158-foot tall red and white iconic Ford Island Field Control Tower still under restoration, Hangars 37 and 79, and bullet holes and battle damage in hangar 79. Through its preservation and restoration of World War II fighter planes and accompanying artifacts in the Museum’s historic hangars, Pacific Aviation Museum Pearl Harbor shares the story of the vital role aviation played in America’s winning of World War II, and its continuing role in maintaining America’s freedom.

For more information, contact 808-441-1000, Marketing@PacificAviationMuseum.org, or visit www.PacificAviationMuseum.org, Facebook, Flickr, Instagram, YouTube, Pinterest, and Twitter.

“Lava Ocean Entry” 1 of 15 Photos Selected for National Geographic Contest

Kailua-Kona Photographer Mason Lake’s photo titled “Lava Ocean Entry” taken on the Big Island of Hawaii at the lava flow entrance Kamokuna, is one of fifteen photos that are in the running for the title of 2016 National Geographic “Nature Photographer of the Year”.

Lava Ocean Entry ... Lava ocean entry from the 2016 Kalapana lava flow on the Big Island of Hawaii. Watching new earth being formed is an amazing experience. Boiling ocean waves crashing into fresh lava & giving off clouds of steam along with scatter violent lava bursts from pressure release, creation of the earth is mesmerizing & powerful sight to see. Photo and Caption by Mason Lake/2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Lava Ocean Entry … Lava ocean entry from the 2016 Kalapana lava flow on the Big Island of Hawaii. Watching new earth being formed is an amazing experience. Boiling ocean waves crashing into fresh lava & giving off clouds of steam along with scatter violent lava bursts from pressure release, creation of the earth is mesmerizing & powerful sight to see. Photo and Caption by Mason Lake/2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

The Grand Prize of the contest provides the winner with a 10-day trip for two to the Galápagos with National Geographic Expeditions.

Roseanne Barr Comedy Shows at Blue Note Hawaii

Blue Note Hawaii, the state’s premier venue for the world’s most celebrated artists, announces two nights of comedy with television superstar and award-winning actress, Roseanne Barr. The original domestic goddess Roseanne Barr will amaze audiences November 4 and 5, with one show nightly at 8:00 p.m (Doors open at 6:30).roseanne-barr-at-blue-noteAfter 9 years, 224 episodes, 4 Emmy Awards, and countless other accolades, you couldn’t blame Roseanne if she wanted to quietly slip away, able to take solace in the fact she single-handedly re-landscaped the medium of situational comedy forever. Her creation and stark portrayal of “Roseanne Conner” and the Conner family on ABC’s Roseanne has been hailed as “the most ground breaking kitchen-sink sitcom since All in the Family,” (Entertainment Weekly) adding, “she’s the funniest disturber of peace that we have.”

She began her career as a stand-up comedian, turning her experiences as a wife and mother into a hilarious comedy act that audiences couldn’t resist. She subsequently produced and starred on her own hit sitcom, “Roseanne,” which ran for nine seasons and averaged a staggering 30 million viewers each week. The role earned Barr an Emmy Award, a Golden Globe, the prestigious Peabody Award, Kids Choice and multiple American Comedy Awards.

At Full Moon and High Tide Studio (FMHT), Barr’s family-run Production Company, she is currently spearheading numerous projects. The studio produced her first DVD for children, titled “Rockin’ with Roseanne: Calling All Kids!” which was inspired by Barr’s grandchildren. FMHT has produced original programming for VH1 and also produced her 4th HBO comedy special “Roseanne Barr: Blonde and Bitchin'” as well as numerous videos for Roseanne’s YouTube channel.

A titan in the world of stand-up comedy, Roseanne returned to her love for live performance, touring select cities around the country and abroad. In addition to making people laugh, Roseanne continues to be a “voice for the voiceless.” Whether it be fighting the BDS movement in Israel, thwarting GMO efforts on the Big Island in Hawaii, aiding the native American families of Pine Ridge, or advocating for the legalization of marijuana, Roseanne’s activism is unwavering. Fans can find Roseanne more information and frequently updated content on her website – roseanneworld.com, on Twitter – @TheRealRoseanne, and Instagram – @OfficialRoseanneBarr

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard on DOI Rule Announcement

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard released the statement below following announcement of the Department of Interior’s (DOI) Final Rule for Procedures for Reestablishing a Formal Government-to-Government Relationship with the Native Hawaiian Community.

Click to read

Click to read

The rule incorporates and takes into account more than 54,000 public comments submitted to the Department of Interior from the Native Hawaiian community and other key stakeholders:

“For decades, many in the Native Hawaiian community have fought for the same rights and treatment as indigenous groups across the United States, like Native American tribes and Alaska Natives. The Department of Interior announcement today simply places the decision-making authority solely within the hands of Native Hawaiians to determine what, if any, government-to-government relationship they choose to have with the U.S. federal government. I had the great honor of working as a legislative aide to Senator Akaka, who dedicated so much of his life to creating this opportunity for our Native Hawaiian community. I look forward to continuing to engage and work alongside our Native Hawaiian brothers and sisters as they determine their path forward.” 

Lend a Hand to Protect Volcanoes National Park on Public Lands Day this Saturday

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park celebrates 100 years protecting native ecosystems and invites everyone to lend a helping hand on National Public Lands Day (NPLD) this Saturday, Sept. 24. It’s a fee-free day, and while all park visitors can enjoy the park at no charge, NPLD volunteers will receive a free pass to use on another day of their choosing.

Keiki cut invasive Himalayan ginger from rainforest near Devastation Trail. NPS Photo/J.Ferracane

Keiki cut invasive Himalayan ginger from rainforest near Devastation Trail. NPS Photo/J.Ferracane

Join volunteers on Saturday for the Stewardship at the Summit program, from 8:45 a.m. to noon. Meet NPLD coordinator Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center, then head into the rainforest to remove invasive Himalayan ginger from the summit of Kīlauea. Wear sturdy, closed-toe shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, sunscreen, raingear, snacks, and water. Loppers/gloves provided.  No advance registration required.

While pretty and fragrant, Himalayan ginger (also called kāhili) is one of the most invasive plants in the park, and on earth. It is listed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature as one of the 100 World’s Worst Invasive Alien Species. The park strives to protect the rainforest habitat of native birds and plants, but Himalayan ginger takes over the native rainforest understory, and makes it impossible for the next generation of forest to grow. This inedible ginger species crowds out many native plants, including pa‘iniu (a Hawaiian lily), ‘ama‘u fern, and others.

Every year on NPLD, the largest single-day volunteer effort for public lands in the United States, all fee-charging national parks offer free entry. Many parks and public lands across the nation organize stewardship projects and special programs to raise awareness about why it is important to protect our public lands. To find out more, visit www.publiclandsday.org.

Hawaii Ecotourism Association Announces Winners of Sustainable Tourism Awards

Hawaii Ecotourism Association (HEA) announced the winners of sustainable tourism awards at a luncheon today in Waikiki. Twenty-three tour operators were certified as sustainable tour operators by HEA, a local nonprofit organization that protects Hawaii’s unique natural environment and host culture by promoting responsible travel.

Valley Isle Excursions, a company known providing luxury and eco-friendly tours to Hana and the road beyond, was awarded with the coveted the 2016 Sustainable Tour Operator Award. “This outstanding example of a sustainable tour operation far exceeds HEA’s mission and goal of protecting the unique natural and cultural resources of Hawaii nei,” said Aaron Lowe, President of HEA’s Board of Directors.

The 2016 Ecotour Guides of the Year were announced as follows: From Oahu – Manly Kanoa of Hokupaa and Andrew Puchalski of Kailua Beach Adventures; from Kauai – Abraham Frehm of Na Pali Experience, from Maui – Rowdy Lindsey of Hawaiian Paddle Sports and Curtis Geary of Maui Kayak Adventures; from Hawaii – Ben Catcho Jr. of KapohoKine Adventures and Richard Lindberg of Hawaiian Legacy Tours. Guides make each tour guest feel connected to Hawaii’s natural resources and Hawaiian culture. HEA is delighted to recognize the contribution of the award winners.

The Travel Writer of the Year was awarded to Shannon Wianecki. She is a prolific freelance writer who shares the natural and cultural history of the Hawaiian Islands with the readers of local and international travel magazines and books.

Pro Surfer Jamie O'Brien is sponsored by Body Glove.

Pro Surfer Jamie O’Brien is sponsored by Body Glove.

The twenty-three tour operators were awarded HEA’s Sustainable Tourism Certification for 2016-2018. They include: Under the Sea Hawaii, Hopkupaa, Dolphins and You, and Ocean Joy Cruises on Oahu; Kipu Ranch Adventures, Holo Holo Charters, and Na Pali Experience on Kauai; Aloha Kayaks Maui, Maui Nei Native Expeditions, Haleakala Bike Company, Temptation Tours, Maui Dreams Dive Company, Valley Isle Excursions, Maui Ocean Center, Maui Stand Up Paddle Boarding, Maui Surf Lessons, and Hawaii Mermaid Adventures on Maui; and Body Glove Cruises, Mauka Makai Adventures, Essential Hawaii Tours, Kona Honu Divers, Sea Quest Hawaii, and Kohala Ziplines on Hawaii.

“As a founding member of the organization, I am excited that the number of certified operators across the State more than doubled since the 2014-2016 certifications were awarded,” said Annette Kaohelaulii, HEA Board Treasurer.

IUCN recognized HEA’s Sustainable Tourism Certification Program in the tours organized especially for this event, which just ended. The Hawaii Tourism Authority also supports HEA efforts to educate commercial tour operators and community stakeholders on best management practices for the use of natural and cultural resources. HEA’s Certification Program is only one of two statewide programs in the U.S. providing a third party, comprehensive assessment of tour providers whose operations positively affect the State’s natural and cultural resources, contribute to conservation and help sustain local communities.

Mark Alan Vocal Works Brings A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias to Hilo

Local singing students from Mark Alan Vocal Works, Mark Sheffield’s voice studio, together with singers from his UH Hilo voice studio, will present a recital of (mostly) classical songs and arias.  Together with legendary pianist Quack Moore and the new vocal ensemble VOICES, they bring their unique interpretations of classics and modern favorites to Hilo. Showtime is Friday, September 30, at 7:30 p.m. at Hilo’s Church of the Holy Cross. Admission is free.  For more information, call 238-6040.

classical-recital

A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias presents singers in various stages of vocal development – from young beginners to experienced performers – in a recital designed to showcase and celebrate their particular strengths.  Singers include RyAnne Raffipiy, Landon Ballesteros, Samantha Saiki, Rachel Edwards, Amy Horst, and Bridge Hartman, along with Mark Sheffield, who teaches the other singers. Students from Mark’s private Vocal Works studio join singers from his UH Hilo voice studio to bring to life songs of love, heartbreak, joy, and beauty.

VOICES, a new vocal ensemble also led by Mark Sheffield, joins the concert with a return to their roots. They will perform their signature motet, “The Silver Swan” by Orlando Gibbons.  The solo singers follow, celebrating classics including old Italian songs “O cessate di piagarmi” and “Caro mio ben;” while bringing to life arias such as “Si, mi chiamano Mimi” from La Boheme and Rachmaninoff’s haunting “Vocalise.” The recital earns its (mostly) classical label with the performance of pop tunes by Adele and Billy Joel, and sizzling Broadway hits including Sondheim’s great song “Being Alive.”

Mark Sheffield maintains a busy private voice studio in Hilo, where he has taught both privately and at UH Hilo for ten years. 2016 saw the inauguration of Mark’s Vocal Works program, designed to provide both individual training and theory-based practical education in the vocal arts. This year also saw the inception of VOICES, a vocal ensemble comprised of Mark’s advanced students from both his Vocal Works and UH Hilo studios. Mark is joined at the helm of this recital by Quack Moore, the Grammy-winning pianist of Hilo Palace Theater and Saturday Night Live fame, who now devotes much of her time to supporting and promoting young musicians.

When asked how he came to create A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias, Mark said, “For a decade now, my students have performed in joint studio recitals given by my wife, piano teacher Katie Sheffield, and I. Beyond this, my students have performed to acclaim in shows locally and around the country, as they pursue studies, work, and dreams of Broadway success. Now we invite our friends and our community to a recital of our very own.  Thank you, Hilo, for supporting vocal music. We look forward to singing for you.”

A (Mostly) Classical Recital: Songs and Arias comes to Hilo September 30, 2016, at 7:30 p.m. at Hilo’s Church of the Holy Cross for one show only.  Admission is free.  Call 238-6040 for more information.

PBS Hawaii Opens Doors to New Home

Hawai‘i’s statewide public television station today opened its new home to the public, after a blessing ceremony and donor thank-you event this morning.

pbs-hawaii-new-building

PBS Hawai‘i’s new home, The Clarence T.C. Ching Campus at 315 Sand Island Access Road fronting Nimitz Highway, is a $30 million facility, the result of a successful capital campaign. Construction was completed on time and on budget. The building features three multimedia studios; the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Learning Zone, which includes the home base of the station’s statewide student news network, HIKI NŌ; and open work spaces with cheerful colors and natural light.

Event attendees included three multi-million dollar funders of the building – the State government, The Clarence T.C. Ching Foundation, and the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation. PBS Hawai‘i is offering tours of the building to all donors, large and small, totaling more than 2,000 people and organizations.

“We felt deeply the trust and aloha that people have in PBS Hawai‘i as an important part of this community,” said Board Chair Robbie Alm. “They reached out and supported the diversity of perspectives that we present and the fairness they find here.”

President and CEO Leslie Wilcox said, “We can’t thank the people of Hawai‘i enough. This new home reflects the values of people throughout the state and a vision for a closer relationship with our communities. The building design supports collaboration, creativity, culture and context.”

The mission of the educational media organization is to advance learning and discovery through storytelling that profoundly touches lives.

The two-story, 32,000 square-foot building was designed by architect Sheryl Seaman of Group 70 International. The general contractor was Allied Builders System, and Cumming served as owner’s representative.

Science Gets Silly with Garry Krinsky’s Toying with Science

Saturday, October 1 at 4pm, Garry Krinsky brings his fast-paced, fun loving, varied and dynamic program Toying with Science to Kahilu Theatre.

Garry Krinsky

Garry Krinsky

The acclaimed Toying with Science program combines circus skills, mime, original music, and audience involvement in the exploration of the scientific principles of gravity, leverage, fulcrums, and simple machines.

Garry Krinsky and his audience investigate basic scientific information and delve into the imaginations of scientists who have played important roles in the exploration and discovery of concepts that define our world. Science-based toys are brought to life with motion, music, humor, and insight. Garry impresses upon his audiences the idea that by mastering simple scientific concepts, one can produce terrific results!

First commissioned by the Museum of Science in Boston, Toying with Science has toured across the U.S. and Canada to rave reviews, including performances at Kennedy Center of Washington DC, Lincoln Center Out of Doors, and on NBC’s Today Show.

krins

Garry Krinsky’s theatre experience is extensive, and it has been said that he resembles a living cartoon with his animated movement and non-stop energy. Garry co-founded the Patchwork Players, and was an original member of both the Boston Buffoons and the Wright Bros., a New England vaudeville troupe. Since 1978, he has brought his high energy and experience to thousands of schools, theaters, and festivals.

The Kahilu Theatre doors open at 3pm for the performance and there will be beverages and snacks available for sale at the Kahilu Theatre bar. The Kapa Kahilu Exhibit is currently on display in the Kohala Gallery, featuring some of todays most respected kapa artists.

Tickets are $33 / $28 / $23 / $18 and available for purchase online at www.kahilutheatre.org, by calling (808) 885-6868, or at the Kahilu Theatre Box Office at 67-1186 Lindsey Road, Kamuela, HI 96743, Monday – Friday, from 9am to 1pm.

Garry Krinsky – Toying With Science Promo video from Baylin Artists Management on Vimeo.

Garry will also give two Youth Shows at the Theatre on Friday, September 30 at 9am and 10:30am. For more information about Youth Shows offered at the Theatre please contact Education Coordinator Lisa Shattuck at youth@kahilutheatre.org.

These performances are made possible by generous sponsorship from Tom & Marsha Kerley, Other Friends of Kahilu, and Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel.

Iconic Hawaiian Bird Proposed for Endangered Species Act Protection

In response to a 2010 petition from the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today proposed protection for the ‘i‘iwi as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. This bird, a bright-scarlet, nectar-feeding Hawaiian honeycreeper, was once widespread across all of the main Hawaiian Islands, but is now primarily found at higher elevations on East Maui and the island of Hawaii. The number one threat facing the species is climate change, which is driving the spread of highly lethal mosquito-borne diseases.

The ‘i‘iwi. (Photo by Brett Hartl, Center for Biological Diversity.)

The ‘i‘iwi. (Photo by Brett Hartl, Center for Biological Diversity.)

“The ‘i‘iwi is a spectacular, iconic Hawaiian bird that desperately needs Endangered Species Act protection to survive,” said the Center’s Loyal Mehrhoff. “But the good news is that if we protect it, it has a good shot at dodging extinction. A recent study by the Center found that the majority of U.S. birds with endangered species protection are improving.”

The ‘i‘iwi (Drepanis coccinea, also known asVestiaria coccinea) is a medium-sized honeycreeper that lives in native forests of ohia and koa. It is one of more than 50 species of honeycreepers that evolved, in a spectacular example of adaptive radiation, from a single finch-like bird that colonized Hawaii 2.5 million to 4 million years ago. Two out of three Hawaiian honeycreepers are now extinct, and most of the remaining honeycreepers are either already listed as threatened or endangered, or are declining. The ‘i‘iwi has seen a 92 percent decline on Kauai in the past 25 years and a 34 percent decline on Maui. As temperatures increase with global warming, so does the spread of introduced mosquito-borne diseases like avian malaria — which is almost 100 percent fatal to the bird.

“Protected areas that we once thought could save the ‘i‘iwi are now expected to be uninhabitable in the future because of the expanding range of mosquitoes and malaria,” said Mehrhoff. “So it’s crucial for the ‘i‘iwi to get the help it needs to avoid extinction and recover. This will require removing or greatly reducing the threat from introduced mosquito-borne diseases, as well as restoring and protecting native Hawaiian forests.”

New “Fun Pass” Being Introduced at Hawaii County Fair

E.K Fernandez shows will be introducing their fun pass card system in this year’s 66th Annual Hawaii county Fair which runs from Sept. 22nd to the 25th.

fun-pass-cardsPlease understand cards are none refundable once purchased and only good for the following:

All E.K Fernandez carnival rides, all games and novelty wagons and all EK food wagons Pizza, cotton candy, funnel cake, hamburger, and corn dog wagons.

fun-pass-standThese cards will be pre-sold starting Sept 21-22 ,2016 from 10:00am until 5 pm each day! Location will be in the fairs grounds next to our information Booth area behind the Afook-Chinnen Civic auditorium

ALL ENTRY GATES WILL STILL BE CASH ONLY and ALL OTHER FOOD BOOTHS AND SODA BOOTH VENDORS ARE CONSIDERED CASH ONLY ZONES, which means please have CASH available to purchase in these areas, placing all your money on fun pass cards may limit you to selected participating areas of EK Fernandez Shows and food wagons.

parking-for-fair

Walk a Mile in Her Shoes 2016

YWCA Hawaii Island hosts the sixth annual “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” fundraiser Saturday, October 22. The one-mile march begins at 7:30 a.m. at the YWCA Ululani Street campus.
walk-a-mile-2016Hawaii County Prosecuting Attorney Mitch Roth and radio personality Darrin “DC” Carlson will lead the march.

The goal is to raise $25,000 for the YWCA Hawaii Island Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS) program, the only 24-hour, 7-days a week rape crisis center for the island. SASS services are free and include crisis counseling, therapy for assault survivors and their families, forensic evidence collection and violence prevention education for schools and the community.

“October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, so ‘Walk a Mile’ is a chance for men to literally walk in women’s shoes. It’s also an opportunity to call for an end to sex assault, rape and gender violence in our community,” said Kathleen McGilvray, CEO of YWCA Hawaii Island. “Sadly, nearly 50 percent of our SASS clients are 18 and under. Every dollar raised will be used to help survivors address and move through the trauma of sex assault.”

In 2015, SASS responded to more than 2,441 crisis and support calls from survivors and their families, opened 329 cases, provided 1,929 hours of therapy and performed 50 sexual assault forensic medical exams.

March participants are asked to report to the kick-off site (145 Ululani Street in Hilo) by 7:30 a.m. to register, select shoes and warm up for the walk. Walkers can wear decorated shoes for the judges’ choice contest. All participants must complete an entry form and submit a $25 registration fee.

Those interested in participating in the walk – individually or as a team – or being an event sponsor should contact Events@YWCAHawaiiIsland.org or call the YWCA office at 935-7141 ext 111.

“Sea to Sky” – Rebuilding Hōkūalaka’i

A free youth event called “Sea to Sky” will be held this weekend.  This event is designed to bring different aspects of our island together with the common purpose of rebuilding the voyaging canoe, Hōkūalaka’i.  The Hōkūalaka’i will be used for teaching purposes on Hawaiʻi Island and beyond. Hōkūalakaʻi’s home is in the same location (Palekai) that the historic Hōkūleʻa departed from on its world wide voyage.

hokulakaiThis will be the first of many “Sea to Sky” events at Palekai in Hilo.  It will be an all day event with something for everyone to enjoy.  We have invited many members of the scientific field to have fun educational learning stations available for kids and all participants will be hosted with great food and activities. The focus of the monthly events are structured to:

  • Unite community in helping to restore the voyaging canoe, Hōkūalaka’i.
  • Promote indigenous knowledge in science programs
  • Increase cultural relevance
  • Create opportunities to pursue careers in science and culture education fields

The schedule for the September 24th will be:

  • 8:00-8:30am Informal meet, setup and discuss days activities and work planned for the canoe.
  • 8:45-9:30am ‘awa ceremony and welcome
  • 9:30-11:30am Work on Hōkūalakaʻi, Visit Learning Stations, and Site Beautification Project
  • 11:30-12:30pm Lunch
  • 1:00-4:30 Paddling, Sailing, Swimming (Ocean Activities)
  • 4:30-5:00 Closing talk and cleanup

We will have “Learning Stations” and a variety of organizations joining us each week. Come down to Palekai and join in the community effort to restore Hōkūalakaʻi and help our youth learn about the science and culture that is happening on the Big Island.

If you would like to setup a booth to help educate kids, please contact us!  This will be an on-going event to share Hawaii’s Science and Culture with our youth and each other.  We will be publishing more details and our upcoming events on our website: http://alohapueo.org/pueo-events

Matson Pays Tribute to Master Navigator “Papa Mau”

Matson, a leading U.S. carrier in the Pacific, continued its 20th anniversary celebration in Guam and Micronesia with a special vessel naming ceremony honoring one of Micronesia’s most renowned navigators — Pius “Mau” Piailug, fondly known in the Pacific navigation community as “Papa Mau.”

Mau Piailug, who died July 12 at 78 on the western Pacific island of Satawal.

Mau Piailug, passed away on July 12, 2010 at the age of 78 on the western Pacific island of Satawal.

Members of the Piailug family arrived from islands throughout Micronesia to attend the ceremony at the Port Authority of Guam, and members of the Yapese community on Guam honored Piailug’s memory with traditional performances as the vessel was officially blessed and named “Papa Mau.”

“Matson is proud to christen the newest vessel in its Guam / Micronesia service Papa Mau in honor of ‘Mau’ Piailug’s singular influence in the perpetuation of traditional wayfinding and celestial navigation,” said Bernadette Valencia, Matson general manager for Guam and Micronesia. “As the Papa Mau navigates the islands in the Pacific for many years to come, we will be reminded of ‘Mau’s’ far reaching legacy.”

Piailug, who passed away in 2010, was from the island of Satawal and widely known for sharing his knowledge with navigators throughout the Pacific. In 1976, he guided the crew of the Hawaii voyaging canoe Hokule´a on its historic 34-day voyage from Hawaii to Tahiti using nothing but traditional navigation methods.

Nainoa Thompson, Hokule’a navigator, president of Polynesian Voyaging Society and one of five Hawaii navigators upon whom Piailug bestowed the traditional master navigator title of pwo in 2007, said of the ship naming, “It honors his name, his legacy and what he has done for all Pacific people.”

Hokulea Spreading the Malama Honua Message at the 2016 Our Ocean Conference

To Malama Honua is to take care and protect all that makes up our planet. From the lands to the seas to perpetuating indigenous cultures across the globe, Hokulea’s historic Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage connects communities and countries through stories of hope and wisdom-utilizing these different perspectives as a guiding force to solve some of the world’s greatest challenges.

Nainoa Thompson, president of the Polynesian Voyaging Society and master navigator of Hokulea shared his vision of Malama Honua at this year’s 2016 Our Ocean Conference, hosted by Secretary of State John Kerry on Thursday, September 15, 2016.

our-ocean-nainoaWith a special connection to the sea, Thompson was chosen to speak among prominent influencers and leaders to help explore and understand the importance of conserving the ocean. The Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage has been inspiring collective actions from different organizations around the world-many of which are starting in Hawaiʻi, as Governor David Ige announced Hawaiʻi’s commitment to manage 30 percent of Hawaiʻi’s nearshore waters by 2030 during the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) World Conservation Congress.

our-ocean-panel

“It was an honor to provide a voice for Hawaii and the Pacific at this important conference focused on ocean protection,” said Nainoa Thompson, president, Polynesian Voyaging Society. “Being in the room and hearing the actions being taken by these great ‘navigators’ makes me hopeful that the world will get back on the right course with a sail plan for a sustainable ocean and future for our children.”

The ocean is a vital resource to sustain all life on Earth. The Our Ocean Conference brings together many of the world’s environmental activists, and higher-level government leaders to catalyze actions in order to protect our ocean from pollution, climate-related impacts, and unsustainable and illegal fishing.

our-ocean-obamaSeveral speakers of the 2016 Our Ocean Conference included President of the United States, Barack Obama; Actor and Environmental Activists, Leonardo DiCaprio; and U.S. Senator Brian Schatz of Hawaii-all who hope to empower and create a movement for generations to follow.

The 2016 Our Ocean Conference was held in Washington D.C.from September 15 to September 16, 2016.

THINK Fund Classroom Grants Available for 2016-17 School Year

THINK Fund at HCF has funding available for STEM classroom grants through DonorsChoose.org for the 2016-17 school year.

The classroom grants support projects that boost Hawai‘i Island public and public charter school 3rd – 12th grade students in STEM learning; can include materials, supplies and on-island field trips; and can be up to but not over $2,500.

The Hawai‘i Island New Knowledge (THINK) Fund was created by the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) to benefit Hawai‘i Island students pursuing STEM endeavors with an annual contribution of $1 million. TMT selected two Hawai‘i foundations, Hawai‘i Community Foundation and Pauahi Foundation to administer THINK Fund distributions in scholarship and grant making platforms. TMT has so far funded $2.5 million to the THINK initiative on Hawai‘i Island.

The Hawai‘i Island New Knowledge (THINK) Fund was created by the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) to benefit Hawai‘i Island students pursuing STEM endeavors with an annual contribution of $1 million. TMT selected two Hawai‘i foundations, Hawai‘i Community Foundation and Pauahi Foundation to administer THINK Fund distributions in scholarship and grant making platforms. TMT has so far funded $2.5 million to the THINK initiative on Hawai‘i Island.

“Many types of projects are part of the STEM learning pathway for our local students, so we support engineering projects such as robotics, engineering design, and aerodynamic design,” says Lydia Clements, Director of Neighbor Islands for the Hawai‘i Community Foundation. “We also encourage projects that expose students to STEM career opportunities like computer programming, environmental science and healthcare.”

Projects can be posted at any time at DonorsChoose.org and requests are reviewed weekly by the THINK Fund at HCF. If a project is selected for funding it usually takes less than three weeks for the students to receive materials in their classroom.

Mrs. Richards’ science class at Keaau High School received a STEM classroom grant in the 2015-2016 school year. Instead of having her students read about decomposition, the students got their hands dirty and created interactive presentations that told the story. “These kids didn’t present dry, written lab reports,” Mrs. Richards said. “They created art to tell their scientific stories. We’re empowering young scientists, thanks to the grant.”

With the classroom grant from THINK Fund at Hawai‘i Community Foundation (HCF), the students used EcoSTEM Earth Kits to create mini biodome environments to study real-time worm culture, decomposition, soil quality, and planting. But they didn’t stop there. With the Epson 3LCD projector, they told their stories of theory and discovery using interactive technology.

THINK Fund at HCF gets classroom materials into the hands of teachers and students quickly, capturing their enthusiasm while it’s still fresh and getting them out in the field with their projects. The fund’s purpose is to support projects that promote science and math disciplines.

To apply, teachers write up their grant need on DonorsChoose.org, applications are reviewed, projects are selected and funded.

In its first eighteen months, THINK Fund at HCF has committed $150,000 and funded 82 classroom projects for over 8,000 students across Hawai‘i Island. These students have nurtured hydroponics gardens, studied water quality through new lab equipment, and built their own Mars Rover with the help of 3D printers.

The following 29 schools on Hawai‘i Island have received STEM Classroom Project Grants from the THINK Fund at HCF: Connections New Century Public Charter, Hilo Intermediate, Hilo Union Elementary, Ho‘okena Elementary, Innovations Public Charter, Ka ‘Umeke Ka‘eo Public Charter, Kano o ka‘aina New Century Public Charter, K‘au High and Pahala Elementary, Kea‘au High, Kea‘au Middle, Kealekehe Elementary, Kealakehe High, Kealakehe Intermediate, Keonepoko Elementary, Kohala Elementary, Kona Pacific Public Charter, Konawaena Elementary, Konawaena High, Konawaena Middle, Kua o ka La Public Charter, Laupahoehoe Community Public Charter, Paauilo Elementary & Intermediate, Prince Kalaniana‘ole Elementary and Intermediate, Volcano School of Arts & Science Public Charter, Waiakea High, Waiakea Intermediate, Waikoloa Elementary & Middle, Waimea Elementary and Waters of Life Public Charter School.

Kozy’s Tiki Palace – Comedy Magic Club By Night and Tiki Art Gallery By Day

The Shops at Mauna Lani announces its newest addition, Kozy’s Tiki Palace, a comedy club venue and gallery. By day, discover colorful, hard-to-find Hawaiiana and decorative Tiki Art, while night brings Kozy’s mystifying mix of comedy and magic to life.

kozys-tiki-palaceProclaimed by comedian Dennis Miller as “the single greatest magician I have ever seen,” Kozak the Magician, better known as Kozy, has been amazing audiences for over 39 years, from his start on the streets of Pittsburgh, to Las Vegas and beyond, including a performance for Prince Charles and Princess Diana.

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“Kozy”

He has appeared in global stand-up comedy markets, nightclubs, theaters and casino resorts as well as HBO, Showtime, MTV, “The Tonight Show” and Comedy Central.

Artist Brad "Tiki Shark" Parker delivering some art.

Artist Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker delivering some art.

His Tiki Gallery brings together art inspired by 1950’s Tiki Bars, including what artist Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker calls his “Lowbrow Pop Surrealism” paintings, Tiki inspired art from Trey Surtees, Jin An Wong and Jacob Medina, original pieces from world famous tattoo ink artist Rockwood and one of a kind Cigar Box Guitars hand crafted by Michael Zack. The Gallery is open daily, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.

Kozy’s Tiki Palace is located on the shopping center’s ground level, Suite 106, next to Reyn’s and Tommy Bahama Store. His “World Class Magic Comedy” is presented nightly at 8 p.m. for adults 18 and over. Appetizers and drinks by Tommy Bahama Restaurant & Bar are available for purchase. For tickets and information, visit www.konakozy.com, or call (808) 430-1957.

Hokulea and Aha Punana Leo Converge on Kahnawake – Heading Towards Great Lakes

As Hokulea continues forth on her Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage, the crew and founding board members of Aha Punana Leo-a Native Hawaiian nonprofit dedicated to revitalizing the Hawaiian language for future generations in Hawaiʻi-honored a relationship that spans nearly 5,000 miles and 40 years of revolutionaries working together to revitalize and perpetuate the core of indigenous knowledge.

hokulea-mohawke

Passing through the 34th lock to get to the upper Montreal area of the St. Lawrence river, Hokulea docked at her first Marina within a Native Reserve-the Mohawk Territory of Kahnawake.

This gathering was yet another opportunity along this Worldwide Voyage to honor the collaborative work being done in native communities to keep indigenous knowledge alive and relevant to the world around us. Additionally, the crew of Hokulea, the founding members of Aha Punana Leo, and the Mohawk community hope to inspire and perpetuate native knowledge and language for generations to come.

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Kauanoe Kamana, founding board member and current president of Aha Punana Leo, addressed both groups in Hawaiian. “The connection between our work in language revitalization and the pursuits of our waʻa Hokulea, have to do with the fact that we set out with our work, prepared and with a strong resolve to succeed as best as we can,” said Kamana as translated in English. “But, we donʻt know what the result will be until we actually arrive.”

“Your work in the past had huge impact in Hawaiʻi, and the fact that you would allow us to bring our leaders up here, our pioneers, our courageous individuals, Pila Wilson, his wife Kauanoe, Nāmaka,” said Nainoa Thompson, Pwo navigator. “These are the ones that are changing the world and bringing back the language with your help,” Thompson added.

The Mohawk community is home to the immersion program whose leaders helped pave the way for Hawaiʻi’s immersion program in the early ʻ80’s. Dorothy Lazore was instrumental in establishing the Mohawk language immersion program in Kahnawake and spoke before Hawaiʻi’s Board of Education on the day that Hawaiʻi DOE’s immersion program was approved-a program that has become a model nationally and internationally.

mohawks“As you were telling us just how we helped you and how we were an inspiration for your people, and how our teachers went out to help you to revitalize what could have been lost in one generation or in two,” said Kanentokon Hemlock, Bear Clan Chief of the Kanonsonnionwe Long House. “It’s interesting because you inspire us.We look to you. We follow your inspiration too in all the work you have been doing in your land,” Hemlock shared.

During this monumental visit, crew members of Hokulea and Mohawk natives gathered at the Kanonsonnionwe Long House as they welcomed each other by exchanging gifts and songs in their native languages. Kālepa Baybayan, captain of Hokulea’s leg 23 of the Worldwide Voyage, presented Kanentokon Hemlock, Bear Clan Chief of the Kanonsonnionwe Long House, with a traditional Hawaiian feather or kahili.

“Working together like this-that is the key to our collective success! It is that kind of mindset, thinking not just about the individual, but thinking about all of us-us as an ʻohana,” said in Hawaiian by Kamanā.

Leg 23 Sail Plan

Leg 23 Sail Plan

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard Calls For Answers, Review of Care For Recently Deceased Hilo Veteran

Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard released the following statement today calling for immediate review of the care that 68-year old Vietnam combat veteran Roy Hall received from the Hilo VA clinic before his death on Saturday:

(Image: Hawaii News Now)

(Image: Hawaii News Now)

“Roy Hall served in our country’s military in Vietnam, and like all veterans, he was promised quality medical care from exceptional health professionals. I had the privilege of speaking with Mr. Hall just a couple days before his death, and he shared the service-related illnesses, PTSD, and nightmares he has struggled with for decades. His wish was that his fellow veterans not endure the hardship and struggle he experienced, especially in the last few months of his life.

“My heart goes out to Roy’s ʻohana, especially his wife Edy. She shared with me deeply disturbing issues regarding the care her husband received—particularly during the last several months of his life and up to the hours before he passed away.  Roy’s last wish was to share his story with me and so many others in the hopes that it could lead to improved health care for all veterans. He told me to never give up and to continue fighting for our fellow veterans. I will honor Mr. Hall by never giving up and aggressively investigating the issues he and his wife have raised—for them, and for all of our veterans who deserve the highest standard of care.”

In response to investigations revealing egregious wait times across the country for veterans seeking an appointment with a primary care physician, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard introduced the Access to Care and Treatment (ACT) Now for Veterans Act. The premise of the ACT Now for Veterans Act, to allow veterans to get the immediate care they need from non-VA medical providers, was ultimately included in the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act signed in to law in 2014.

She has continued to push for accountability and systemic changes at the VA to ensure veterans get the critical quality care they need, including introducing the Veterans Administration Bonus Elimination Act to prevent bonuses for senior VA executives who fail to meet VA requirements for veterans health care, working to reform veteran mental health care, and more.

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Tips for Safe and Easy Lava Lake Viewing in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Visitors and local residents gather nightly at the Jaggar Museum observation deck in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park to watch the lava lake spatter and glow within the summit crater of Kīlauea volcano, vying for the best parking spot and vantage point.

Daytime viewing of the lava lake activity has been exceptional. Photo taken from Jaggar Museum observation deck on Friday, 9/9/16. NPS Photo/J.Ferracane

Daytime viewing of the lava lake activity has been exceptional. Photo taken from Jaggar Museum observation deck on Friday, 9/9/16. NPS Photo/J.Ferracane

The lava within Halema‘uma‘u Crater recently became visible for the first time since May 2015, and rangers have been busy directing vehicles at Jaggar Museum from 5 p.m. until well after dark, often sending people to park at Kīlauea Overlook, about 1/3 of a mile away.

Park rangers share the following tips for an optimal viewing experience:

  • Avoid the busy times, and visit the lava lake during the day. Or come after 9 p.m. The park is open 24 hours a day.
  • Be mindful of air quality. Hazardous volcanic gas and particulates can drift over the summit area in light or southerly winds. These gases are a danger to all, especially people with heart or respiratory problems,      young children and pregnant women. Kīlauea Visitor Center offers updates on air quality 24 hours a day, and visitors can monitor the Hawai‘i SO2 network website.
  • Be prepared to hike a 1/3 of a mile each way between Kīlauea Overlook and Jaggar Museum on Crater Rim Trail. Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes, bring rain gear, water, binoculars, a flashlight, and extra batteries.
  • Carpool if possible to reduce the number of vehicles in the parking areas.
  • Monitor the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) webcams. The KI camera provides a panoramic view of Halema‘uma‘u Crater from HVO, near Jaggar Museum.

In addition, air quality is poor at the coast where another eruption from Kīlauea enters the ocean at the Kamokuna site. Park rangers have roped off sections downwind of the ocean entry and have placed signs warning about toxic fume clouds which contain sulfur dioxide, volcanic particulates, and hydrochloric acid near the coast.

To stay upwind of the fumes, it is currently best to hike in from the County of Hawai‘i lava viewing area on the Kalapana side to access the ocean entry in the park. The Kalapana access is open daily from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. It’s about a 4.2-mile hike from the Kalapana boundary to the ocean entry viewing point, one way, along the gravel emergency access road.