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Big Island Chocolate Festival Salutes Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Centennial

With the theme, “Lavalicious – A Chocolate Salute to the 100th Birthday of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park,” the fifth annual Big Island Chocolate Festival is May 13-14 with events headquartered from the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel. Indulge in the alluring, rich taste of chocolate—in both its sweet and savory forms—while participating in a host of delicious, fun and informative chocolate-themed activities.

Chocolate fest 2013 a

The two-day chocolate extravaganza includes a cacao plantation tour at Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory, a college culinary competition and several public foodie and agriculture-themed seminars. Activities culminate 5:30-9 p.m. Saturday, May 14 with the indoor-outdoor festival gala—enjoy a host of sweet and savory culinary stations presented by top isle chefs, chocolatiers and confectioners.

General admission tickets to the gala are $75 and VIP tickets are $100 and include early event access at 5 p.m., table seating and specialty wines.

This year’s event celebrates the 100th birthday of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and culinary booths will be judged on how they best depict the event theme that could include Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes, Hawaiian culture and the park’s native plants and animals. Biology, geology and culture define the 333,086-acre national park, which was established August 1, 1916.

Chocolate Demo

Culinary stations will also be vying for awards in a variety of categories judged by a panel of celebrity chefs: “best” bonbon, savory, bean-to-bar, plated dessert and Hawaiian cacao. Attendees can get in on the friendly voting by casting a ballot for two People’s Choice Awards: Best Savory and Best Sweet.

Festivities will include fine wines and handcrafted ales, chocolate sculptures—including one of the largest volcanoes ever created using fine chocolate, chocolate body painting, live entertainment, dancing and a silent auction.

Presented by the Kona Cacao Association (KCA), event proceeds benefit the ACF Kona Kohala Chefs Assn./University of Hawai‘i endowment fund for the culinary program at Hawai‘i Community College-Palamanui and programs at Kona Pacific Public Charter School in Kealakekua.

Chocolate Festival Chefs

“We are happy to commemorate the centennial of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park at the Big Island Chocolate Festival,” says KCA President Farsheed Bonakdar. “We look forward to the new booth decorating contest and how our theme will inspire participants.”

Find ticket info at www.BigIslandChocolateFestival.com. Special room/ticket packages for two start at $396.20 at the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel and can be conveniently booked through the Festival website under “Tickets.” Special room rates can be reserved directly at the hotel at www.HapunaBeachPrinceHotel.com/events or calling 1-888-977-4622 and mentioning “Big Island Chocolate Festival Group Rate.”

The Big Island Chocolate Festival is presented by the Kona Cacao Association, Inc. The mission and goal of KCA is to promote the cacao industry on the Big Island of Hawai‘i by presenting BICF as an educational and outreach opportunity for local cacao farmers, the hospitality industry and cacao enthusiasts. For information, visit www.bigislandchocolatefestival.com.

Honolulu Selected for “Local Foods, Local Places” Federal Initiative

On behalf of the White House Rural Council, six federal agencies joined to announce 27 communities selected to participate in Local Foods, Local Places, a federal initiative that helps communities increase economic opportunities for local farmers and related businesses, create vibrant places, and promote childhood wellness by improving access to healthy local food.

Local Foods Local Places

“Local Foods, Local Places helps people access healthy local food and supports new businesses in neighborhoods that need investment,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. “The program is good for the environment, public health and the economy. By helping bring healthy local food to market and offering new walking and biking options, Local Foods, Local Places can help improve air quality, support local economies, and protect undeveloped green space.”

Honolulu was one of the cities selected in 2016 from EPA’s Pacific Southwest Region:

Honolulu, Hawaii – The Hawaii Community Development Authority will focus their Local Foods, Local Places efforts on plans to identify food-based projects that will spur greater investment and stewardship in the Kakaako Makai community; enhance local food production; integrate food security initiatives with community and transit-oriented development planning; and reduce stormwater runoff and vulnerability to sea level rise.

The selected communities were chosen from more than 300 applicants.

Each Local Foods, Local Places partner community works with a team of experts who help community members recognize local assets and opportunities, set goals for revitalizing downtowns and neighborhoods, develop an implementation plan, and identify targeted resources from the participating federal agencies to help implement those plans.

Local Foods, Local Places is a partnership among the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of Transportation, the Appalachian Regional Commission, and the Delta Regional Authority. The initiative was launched in 2014 and has already helped 26 communities make a difference in people’s lives.

Local Food, Local Places is one of the administration’s community-based initiatives in action across the country. In these places federal experts are working side by side with residents and local leaders to create customized solutions; bolstering coordination across agencies and improving how we interact with communities as a ‘one Government’ partner; and relying on valuable data to help inform solutions and evaluate what is working and what is not.

A complete list of communities participating in the Local Food, Local Places Initiative can be found at http://www.epa.gov/smartgrowth/local-foods-local-places-summary-reports

Building and Design Expo Feb. 12-14 – Live Cooking Demo and Book Signing with Sam Choy

The Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce presents the 11th annual Building & Design Expo February 12 – 14 at the Sheraton Kona Resort at Keauhou Bay‘s Kaleiopapa Convention Center.

Celebrity Chef Sam Choy, known for his Hawaiian cuisine, will feature his newest kitchen accessories line, Sam Choy’s Hawaiian Kitchen. He will also do a live cooking demo and book-signing.

Abbas Hassan of Tiki Shark Art, Sam Choy and Kirstin Kahaloa, Executive Director of the Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce

Abbas Hassan of Tiki Shark Art, Sam Choy and Kirstin Kahaloa, Executive Director of the Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce

Touted as “Hawai‘i Island’s largest home show,” more than 40 vendor booths will exhibit their goods and services in the three-day event. From general contracting and materials to home design and décor including fine art, the expo often features furnishings, blinds and shutters, window-tinting, kitchen countertops, cabinets and flooring, pest control PC solar and financing.

Event sponsors include Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union, Hawaii Gas, P.A. Harris Electric, Renewable Energy Services, Sam Choy & Tiki Shark Art and West Hawaii Today. Contact the Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce office at marketing@kona-kohala.com or 808.329.1758.

Breakdancing, Hip Hop, and Gender Roles in Opposing Forces

Kahilu Theatre presents AmyO’Neal’s Opposing Forces.

In Amy O’Neal’s Opposing Forces, five B-Boys from different generations and cultures come together in curiosity, strength, vulnerability, and grace in this dance performance that has one foot squarely in street style dance (hip hop) and one foot in contemporary dance story telling.

In Opposing Forces, choreographer Amy O’Neal examines the paradoxical nature of B-Boy culture as it relates to femininity and the value systems of dance battling, commercial dance, stage performance, and freestyle cyphers (jam circles). How do these different environments affect expression? Where are stereotypes changing and where do they remain the same? O’Neal pries open these topics and more via conversation, collaboration, and transfixing dance moves.

Breakdancing

Opposing Forces Performers and Movement Collaborators consist of:

  • Alfredo “Free” Vergara Jr.
  • Brysen “Just Be” Angeles
  • Fever One
  • Michael O’Neal Jr.
  • Mozeslateef

Amy O’Neal is a dancer, performer, choreographer, and dance educator based in Seattle. For fifteen years, she has taught and performed throughout the US, Japan, Italy, and Mexico, and she has choreographed for stage, commercials, rock shows, galleries, dance films and music videos. Her work is an amalgam of her diverse movement and life experiences presenting social commentary with dark humor and heavy beats.

She teaches Contemporary Dance and Urban Styles at Velocity Dance Center and House dance at The Beacon: Massive Monkees studio in Seattle. She teaches dance composition and improvisation for Seattle Theater Group’s “Dance This” program. She spent seven years developing and teaching for Young Choreographer’s Lab and Seattle Youth Dance Collective. She hasworked extensively with musician/comedian Reggie Watts since 2002 both on stage and screen.

Amy O’Neal will also give a Master Class on Friday, February 12 at 4pm. Their master class will provide lessons in stylistic and cultural differences between Hip Hop (which is Breaking, Popping, Locking, and Party Dances), House, Vogue, Whacking, Commercial Hip Hop, Street Jazz, and Amy’s signature amalgam of all these things. The cost is $10, and reservations are available online.

This presentation of Opposing Forces by Amy O’Neal was made possible by the New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Dance Project, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, with additional support from the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as sponsorship by the Western Arts Federation.

Kahilu Theatre doors open at 6pm for evening shows, with food and beverages available for sale.

Tickets are $68 / $58 / $47 / $20 and available for purchase online at www.kahilutheatre.org, by calling (808) 885-6868, or at the Kahilu Theatre Box Office, at 67-1186 Lindsey Road, Kamuela, HI 96743, Monday-Friday, from 9am to 1pm.

Coming Up – Award Winning Magicians at the Honoka’a Peoples Theatre

Award-winning magicians Bruce and Jennifer Meyers will bring their amazing feats of original magic to Honoka’a Peoples Theatre on Sunday, February 28 at 4 p.m., presented in collaboration with the Peace Committee of Honoka’a Hongwanji Buddhist Temple.

Magician Bruce Meyers

Magician Bruce Meyers

Designed with keiki in mind, the creative show involves the audience in surprising ways—as Bruce might levitate children in the audience, cut a local politician in half, make dozens of roses, or chickens, appear and disappear. As a prelude to The Magic of Bruce Meyers, aerial artist Luna Sophia will “fly” above the audience in a gracefully athletic performance on the aerial silks.

“Our goal is to provide positive, affordable activities for kids and youth,” said Peace Committee Chair Miles Okumura, “We have this in common—we value the next generation, and depend on them to carry on the traditions, values and messages we share today. And that’s the magic.”

To help further that goal, the team has reached out to the Hamakua Youth Center (HYC), who will be assisting with ticket sales from their Mamane Street location. They are also recruiting business and individual sponsors to help send children and youth to the performance. A $100 donation can provide a classroom of students, a sports team or school club with tickets to attend.

Bruce Meyers Magician

In addition to performing, Bruce and Jennifer run four-day Magic Camps for keiki age 6 and up, where they learn multiple tricks and illusions, and build their own magic kit to take home and practice for a lifetime. (For information on Magic Camp, please call 982-9294.)

“For children, as with music, magic can be an inspiring and fun way to share wonder and learn about achieving goals, to build self-esteem, poise, confidence and teamwork. The mystery of magic inspires children to want to know more and to learn and to do. It inspires that thirst for knowledge. They learn that to give and share wonder is an act of kindness,” says Bruce.

Bruce continues, “We are constantly and diligently involved in providing pathways and direction for the young to carry the torch as the wonder workers and peacemakers of tomorrow. It is they who will spread happiness and joy and remind the audiences of the future that, despite all of its faults, it’s still a breathtakingly beautiful and mysterious world.”

On Bruce’s website is the Hawaiian phrase, “Aka‘aka Loko I Ka Ike A Ke Aloha,” which translates to; “The secrets within me are seen through Aloha.”

Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 at the door, available online at www.BruceMeyers.com or at Hamakua Youth Center, 775-0976. For information on sponsoring a classroom, club or team contact Miles Okumura, misterokumura@yahoo.com .

Celebrity Chef Sam Choy and “Tiki Shark” Parker Host VIP Party at the Trump Hotel in Waikiki

Celebrity Chef Sam Choy along with renowned local Big Island artist Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker held a VIP by invitation only party at The Trump International Hotel – Waikiki Beach Walk last week. This event was an extension to the 2 day public celebration held in Kailua Kona last November where Chef Choy and Artist Parker introduced their collaboration and the new Sam Choy in The Kitchen line.

Sam Choy along with Brad Parker and Agent Abbas with KHON2 Executives

Sam Choy along with Brad Parker and Agent Abbas with KHON2 Executives

The A Lister’s party was attended by close friends and buyers of several large retail chains. In addition Tiki Shark’s financial backers, State of Hawaii representative Nicole Lowen, President & CEO of Hawaii Chamber of Commerce Sherry Menor McNamara, owners of Surf Giant Body Glove International and high ranking executives from KHON Channel 2 also dropped in to wish the Chef and Artist well.

“We are excited with teaming up with Chef Choy for the exclusive distribution of his new Hawaiian Kitchen line for the Islands, Guam and Saipan” quoted Tina Kagoshima – President of “HIC” Hawaii Intercontinental Corp.  “Looking forward to getting these beautiful towels into every kitchen” she added.

Sam with HIC President Tina

Sam with HIC President Tina Kagoshima

“What a great group of local folks, I feel my brand is in very good hands and will get the exposure it deserves in Hawaii with Tiki Shark Art Inc and HIC Corp behind it” said Chef Sam Choy. “Plus I love Brad’s art” he quoted.

Sam Choy Cooking Line Beach

For more information and availability about Sam Choy Hawaiian Kitchen Line please contact:

Nick Corish – Sales Manager HIC Corp, 808 216 9324 ncorish@hi-corp.com chefsamchoy.com

 

Hawaiian Aha Convention Does Not Represent the Public

Despite a Supreme Court injunction that halted the race-based election sponsored by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and the Native Hawaiian Roll Commission, government contractor Na’i Aupuni unilaterally transformed the election into an “everybody wins” scenario, seating everyone who had been on the ballot.  The resulting convention–the stated intent of which is to formulate a government for Native Hawaiians–begins today amid continued controversy over the actions of Na’i Apuni and OHA and whether any tribal entity developed from the meeting will be able to pass legal muster.

Hawaiian Activist Walter Ritte escorted out of a meeting.

Hawaiian Activist Walter Ritte escorted out of a meeting.  Click to view video

The lawsuit against the election is still ongoing and currently before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. In addition, Native Hawaiian activists continue to protest the political aims of Na’i Apuni and OHA, questioning OHA’s management of funds intended for the betterment of Native Hawaiians.

“The Aha convention clearly does not represent the voices of Hawaii’s citizens in general nor of Native Hawaiians in particular,” stated Keli’i Akina, Ph.D., President of the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii and a plaintiff in the case against the election. “Whatever document or governing organization the delegates come up with will have no more force of law or moral authority than a wish list put together by any group of 150 or so individuals.  The participants in this convention have been misled by organizers if they believe that they are able to start a viable race based government. Their efforts are also at risk as the status of the Na!I Aupuni  process is still an open case before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals”

Dr. Akina continued, “The more than 6.5 million dollars of public funds that have been wasted on the Native Hawaiian roll and Aha convention have robbed Hawaiians of money that should have been spent on housing, education, jobs, and health services.”

A list of documents and filing associated with the case of Akina v. Hawaii can be viewed at:  http://new.grassrootinstitute.org/2015/10/akina-v-hawaii-the-documents/

Click here to watch a video of Walter Ritte protesting the process.

Hokulea Departs Fernando de Noronha for Natal

After a four-day stop at Fernando de Noronha, an archipelago off the Brazilian coast, Hokulea departed the UNESCO Marine World Heritage site yesterday at 11:00 a.m. Brazil time (3:00 a.m. HST) and is now headed to Natal, Rio Grande do Norte. Note: Fernando de Noronha is eight hours ahead of Hawaii Time. During their stay, crewmembers were able to learn about efforts to protect the marine life and other natural resources of the pristine island.

Hokulea21a

The Hokulea crew is now sailing approximately 241 miles to reach Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, located in northeastern Brazil. The arrival to the coastal city will mark Hokulea’s first visit to the South America continent. The leg will take approximately two days.

Hokulea21c

After stopping in Brazil, Hokulea will continue the Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage and stop in several ports in the Caribbean before sailing north and visiting cities along the East Coast of the United States. She is scheduled to arrive in New York City by June 8, 2016 to celebrate World Oceans Day.

Hokulea21b

Since departing Hawaiian waters in May 2014, Hokulea has sailed more than 20,000 nautical miles and made stops in 11 countries and 46 ports, weaving a “Lei of Hope” around the world. Along the way, more than 160 volunteer crewmembers have helped to sail Hokulea accompanied by escort vessel Gershon II to spread the message of malama honua (or taking care of Island Earth) by promoting sustainability and environmental consciousness, as well as exchanging ideas with the countries she has visited.

Hokulea21d

So far, crew members have connected with over 45,000 people in communities across the South Pacific, Tasman Sea and Indian Ocean including Samoa, Aotearoa (New Zealand), Australia, Indonesia, Mauritius and South Africa. For a midway recap of the Worldwide Voyage, please view http://www.hokulea.com/2015-worldwide-voyage-recap/

Hokulea first set out on the Pacific Ocean in 1975. Since then, she has traveled to multiple countries across the globe, reawakening a Hawaiian cultural renaissance in the process through reviving the traditional art of wayfinding – navigating the sea through means of using natural resources like ocean swells, stars, and wind.

Open Application Period Begins Today for Preschool Open Doors Program 2017 Assistance

The Department of Human Services encourages families to apply for its Preschool Open Doors (POD) program between Monday, February 1 and March 31, 2016.  Applications received during this period will be considered for preschool participation between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017.

Patch HawaiiThis program, which is currently serving more than 1,100 children statewide, provides child care subsidies to eligible low- and moderate-income families to pay preschool tuition. POD aims to provide children whose families might otherwise not be able to afford preschool the opportunity to gain essential skills to be successful in school and in life.

To qualify for the program, children must be eligible to enter kindergarten in the 2017-2018 school year (born between August 1, 2011 and July 31, 2012). Families are reminded that a child must be 5 years old on or before July 31 to enter kindergarten. Families may choose any one of the 438 state-licensed preschools. Underserved or at-risk children receive priority consideration for the POD program, and funds are limited.

Interested families may request an application beginning February 1, 2016 from the Department’s POD contractor, PATCH, by visiting www.patchhawaii.org or calling 791-2130 or toll free 1-800-746-5620.  PATCH can also help families locate a preschool convenient for them.

Applications must be received by March 31, 2016 to be considered for the July 1, 2016-June 30, 2017 program period. Applications should be dropped off, mailed or faxed to the following:

PATCH – POD
560 N. Nimitz Hwy, Suite 218
Honolulu, HI 96817
Fax: (808) 694-3066

Eligibility and priorities for POD program selection are detailed online in HAR §17-799, which is available online at humanservices.hawaii.gov/admin-rules-2/admin-rules-for-programs.  For more information about other DHS programs and services, visit humanservices.hawaii.gov

Democratic Party of Hawaii Seeking Candidates to Replace Late Senator Gilbert Kahele

Democratic Party of Hawaii

The Hawaii County Democratic Party is seeking candidates who are interested in an appointment to serve as the Senator of Senate District 1. I’m sure you are all aware of the recent passing of Senator Gil Kahele who served so honorably in this seat. Our party will hold a process to determine 3 names that we will forward to the Governor for his appointment to the seat.

You can send me an email at micahalameda@gmail.com and I will forward you a copy of our county’s process for filling mid term vacancies. To be eligible an individual must be a member in good standing of the Democratic Party for a minimum of 6 months. The candidate can not currently be under reprimand pursuant to Article 1 of the Constitution of the Democratic Party of Hawaii. There will be a mandatory meeting of all candidates seeking the seat at the Keaukaha Elementary School Cafeteria on Saturday, February 13, 2016 at 10:00 a.m.

At the meeting candidates will present a 3 minute introduction and then will be interviewed by officers of the nine precincts who comprise Senate District 1. At the completion of the interview process the precinct and district officers will vote to determine the top three candidates to forward to the governor. The process will be under my leadership as the Democratic Party Chair of House District 2 which is located entirely within Senate District 1.

Prospective candidates are to provide to the County Chair, Phil Barnes, for dissemination to the appropriate selection body a written application including the following:

1. Credentials and reasons for consideration for the position
2. Evidence of party participation
3. Verified signatures of at least five (5) party members within Senate District 1.

Items 1 and 2 above should be sent to Chair Barnes by email, preferably as PDF files, for electronic distribution to selectors. His email address is greenhi3@yahoo.com. Your signatures to complete #3 need to be on a form from the Hawaii County Democratic Party which you can easily get by emailing Chair Barnes and need to be delivered by mail to Chair Barnes at 64 Amauulu Road Hilo, HI 96720.

The Deadline for applications to be in Chair Barnes possession is 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday February 10, 2016.

For further inquiries please contact micahalameda@gmail.com or at (808) 319-3371.

Aloha nui,
Micah Alameda, Chair
District 2

Senator Gilbert Kahele Big Island Celebration of Life – Process to Nominate Replacement at Legislature

On January 26th, Hawaii Senator Gilbert Kahele passed away.  A celebration of life for Senator Kahele will be held on Monday, February 8, 2016 at 5 p.m. at the Hilo Civic Auditorium.  A private burial at sea will be held at Kapua Bay.

Kahele Motorcade
The process to nominate a replacement for him at the State Legislature was explained by Big Island Senator Lorraine Inouye as following:

The process will be that the Hawaii County Party Chair, Phil Barnes, will be notifying the precinct presidents of senate District 1.

A meeting must be held to have precinct members cast votes for their person, instructions to be determined.

It goes to several rounds, a vote cast for candidates by precincts, until such time a final three, who survived, their names will be sent to the State Party Chair, who then forwards those 3 names to the governor.

The meeting will be somewhere in Hilo, at a date picked by the Party chair and his officers.  I understand it will be sometime this month.
Please continue to search on the Hawaii County website as, I am sure information will be posted, or contact your precinct president.

I am sure there will be a deadline and must be a Democrat.

Candidates must be a democrat in the Senate District 1 only. Candidates may not only be elected official.  The election area will be cordoned off to keep candidates and precinct members who will participate in the voting process in a secured section of the place to be determined, but cannot close such meeting from other democrats who would like to observe in another section of the event.

That is the democratic process.

I see nothing in the current statute in the HRS of Hawaii to deny observers.  But they cannot participate in this election process.

All instructions must be clear at the day of the voting and conducted by the County Party Chair and the State Party President.

Lorraine R Inouye
Senator – District 4

Big Island Artist Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker Art Hangs in Hawaii’s State Capital

Renowned Big Island based artist Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker’s limited edition Giclee on Canvas “Scaredy Cat Meets The Ghost Of Exotica” now hangs in State Representative Nicole Lowen’s office.

Artist Brad Parker with Hawaii House Rep. Nicholle Lowen

Artist Brad Parker with Hawaii House Rep. Nicole Lowen

“Its a great honor to get the seal of approval of my art from Representative Lowen” quoted the artist. “I am happy that our local Representative appreciates my unique style of art and asked me to be part of the State Capital’s Art collection”.

“I am always thrilled to display art from Kona in my Honolulu office and I absolutely love this piece!” quoted Representative Lowen. “Now I have one of the most interesting pieces of art in the State Capital. Thank you Brad and Abbas” she added.

Final Tribute for Hilo Senator Gilbert Kahele – Motorcade to Pass State Capitol

State lawmakers will pay a final tribute to the late Senator Gilbert Kahele as a motorcade passes the State Capitol on Beretania Street on Tuesday, February 2, 2016 at 9 a.m.  The motorcade will continue on to Hickam Air Force Base where the late Senator will be flown to his hometown of Hilo for memorial services.

Photo via Senator Gilbert Keith-Agaran

Photo via Senator Gilbert Keith-Agaran

A celebration of life for Senator Kahele will be held on Monday, February 8, 2016 at 5 p.m. at the Hilo Civic Auditorium.  A private burial at sea will be held at Kapua Bay.

The Senate chamber will be open tomorrow, Thurs. January 28, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. for members of the public to pay their respects to the late Senator Kahele.

A condolence book is available to sign that will be shared with the family.

  • WHO:  Hawaii State Senators
  • WHAT:  Motorcade pass for final tribute to Senator Gil Kahele
  • WHEN:  Tuesday, February 2, 2016,  9:00 a.m.
  • WHERE:  Beretania Street, State Capitol

 

Body Glove to Celebrate Tatiana-Weston’s Rookie of the Year Honor with Private Dinner Prepared by Celebrity Chef Sam Choy

Body Glove to kick off their annual trip to the North Shore by hosting a celebratory dinner for WSL Rookie of the year, Tatiana Weston-Webb, prepared by World Famous Celebrity Chef Sam Choy.

Sam Choy

The event will be filmed and aired on KHON Channel 2 in a episode of “Sam Choy’s IN THE KITCHEN” later this year. Sam will raid the Body Glove refrigerator for leftovers and use his culinary magic with whatever ingredients he can find and create a gourmet meal for all. Body Glove Athlete’s Tatiana Weston-Webb, Jamie O’Brien, Mo Freitas and Garret MacNamara and Sam’s co-host John Venri will be the Chef’s will be Sam’s official assistant’s and taste testers.

Jamie O'Brien gets ready to go on a Body Glove cruise.

Jamie O’Brien gets ready to go on a Body Glove cruise.

In the days following Tati’s celebration, Body Glove will begin hosting key retailers, sales reps and athletes throughout the waiting period of Volcom Pipe Pro, January 28th – February 7th. “We look forward to the opportunity to give back to the retailers, sales reps and athletes that support the brand”, say’s Body Glove Marketing Director, Nick Meistrell. “The trip also offers a platform for us to gather feedback on new product lines, create content for future advertising campaigns, and of course enjoy some surfing with the crew. Not to mention, all this with a world class surfing competition viewable from the house!”

Hunter Ports Women's Classic - Tatiana Weston-Webb © ASP / Robertson

Hunter Ports Women’s Classic – Tatiana Weston-Webb © ASP / Robertson

Retailers in attendance and will be joined by select athletes from the Body Glove Team including aforementioned Tatiana Weston-Webb, Jamie O’Brien, Mo Freitas and Garret MacNamaras well as Anthony Walsh, Alex Gray, and Nolan Rapoza.   In true All Things Water fashion, Wake Surf Champions, Keenan and Noah Flegal will also be on hand to attempt the challenging crossover from the wake to the waves of the North Shore.

Keenan was also featured in Body Gloves award winning film “Liquid Gold” – filmed entirely on location in Dubai.

About Body Glove International

Founded in Redondo Beach, California in 1953 by twin brothers Bill and Bob Meistrell, Body Glove is the original wetsuit company. Today, the privately-owned, family-operated company is a leading global watersports brand that specializes in wetsuits, swimwear, clothing, footwear, accessories and technology products. While Body Glove has supported surfers and the surfing industry since 1953, today Body Glove sponsors one of the most respected surf and wakeboard teams in the industry. Pro surfers Tatiana Weston-Webb, Jamie O’Brien, Anthony Walsh, Alex Gray, Guinness World Record Holder Garrett McNamara, as well as wakeboarders Harley Clifford and Bob Soven are all part of the Body Glove Team. Through Reef Check, SIMA’s environmental fund, and the Surfrider Foundation, Body Glove also works hard to preserve and protect the oceans and waterways it loves. The company’s headquarters are still based in Redondo Beach, but its products are sold all over the U.S. by a network of independent retailers, at its own Dive N’ Surf retail shop and in approximately 50 countries worldwide.

Hawaii Sanctuary to Remain Focused on Humpback Whales – State Reacts to NOAA Decision

NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) has informed the State of Hawaii of its decision to continue the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary as it was first designated by Congress – as a sanctuary to protect humpback whales and their habitat.

Humpback whales off Maui

Humpback whales off Maui

Each winter, Hawaiian waters are home to the largest breeding population of humpback whales in the world. Humpbacks are a flagship species in an ecosystem full of marine mammals, fish, coral, and other valuable marine and cultural resources. The State and NOAA, along with other partners and communities, are working hard to preserve Hawaii’s marine ecosystem for the sustainable use and enjoyment of present and future generations.

“The Hawaii Dept. of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) consistently works to implement an integrated, ecosystem-based approach to management.  We believe strongly that this can only be achieved through partnerships in which each entity builds upon and leverages its unique strengths.  The Sanctuary has done this extraordinarily well with humpback whales for over 20 years and we had hoped that this expertise could be extended to other marine mammals,” said DLNR Chair Suzanne Case.  “Although ultimately the Sanctuary will not have an expanded purpose, we look forward to building upon its accomplishments, as well as highlighting its successes, particularly the Sanctuary’s world-renowned entanglement response program, at the World Conservation Congress coming to Hawaii in September,” continued Case.

“We will continue working with the appropriate divisions within NOAA, as well as communities and ocean users, to build upon the successes of the Sanctuary and better manage all of our protected species. This includes addressing the threat of harassment to spinner dolphins and of toxoplasmosis to Hawaiian monk seals and other marine mammals,” said DLNR Division of Aquatic Resources Administrator Bruce Anderson.

The State of Hawai‘i recognizes the tremendous dedication and commitment of the Sanctuary Advisory Council (SAC), which has worked tirelessly throughout the Sanctuary’s Management Plan Review process to guide and advise sanctuary management.  DLNR is eager to continue to partner with and draw on the tremendous depth of expertise of the SAC as the Sanctuary enters this new chapter.

The Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whales National Marine Sanctuary was established by Congress in 1992. It is located from the shoreline to 600 ft. depth off of Maui Nui, including Penguin Bank, and off the north shore of Kauai, the north and south shores of Oahu, and the north Kona coast of Hawai‘i Island. The sanctuary is co-managed by NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the State of Hawai‘i through the Department of Land and Natural Resources.

Hawaii State Senate to Hold Public Memorial for the Late Senator Gilbert Kahele

The Hawai‘i State Senate will open its doors to members of the public who wish to express their sympathies to the family of the late Senator Gilbert Kahele.

Senator Kahele Empty Desk

A condolence book will be made available to sign within the Senate Chambers and will be shared with the family. 

  • WHO:  Hawai‘i State Senate
  • WHAT:  Public memorial to be available in Senate Chambers
  • WHEN:  Wednesday, January 27, 2016, After session (around 12:30 p.m.) to 5:00 p.m. and Thursday, January 28, 2016 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
  • WHERE:  Senate Chambers – Hawaii State Capitol

Lyman Museum Lecture – Why Early Hawaiians Moved to Mainland

Even before Kamehameha I founded his kingdom, Native Hawaiians were traveling to distant ports and visiting far-off lands. Kanaka labor is credited with helping to settle the northwest coast of North America, from fur trading to gold mining, and Hawaiians also participated in the U.S. Civil War. But what would be sufficiently attractive to draw them away from paradise … and why would some choose to make their new homes permanent?

Hawaii in CaliforniaOn Monday, February 8, from 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Lyman Museum, Hawai‘i Island historian Boyd D. Bond shares this little-known aspect of Hawaiian history.

The nationally accredited and Smithsonian-affiliated Lyman Museum showcases the natural and cultural history of Hawai`i. Located in historic downtown Hilo at 276 Haili Street, the Museum is open Monday through Saturday, 10:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Admission to this program is free to Museum members, $3 for nonmembers. First come, first seated. For additional information, call (808) 935-5021 or visit www.lymanmuseum.org.

Public Invited to February 5 Groundbreaking for Hōnaunau Rodeo Arena Reconstruction

Please join Hawai‘i County Mayor Billy Kenoi, County Councilwoman Maile David and other dignitaries for a public groundbreaking ceremony that will be held at 3 p.m. Friday, February 5, to commemorate the start of reconstructing the Hōnaunau Rodeo Arena.

Honaunau rodeo

The ceremony will be held at the rodeo arena located at 84-5134 Hōnaunau Road, which is approximately halfway between the Hōnaunau Post Office and the Pu‘uhonua O Hōnaunau National Historic Park. Refreshments and light pupu will be served.

With the strong support of Councilwoman David, Mayor Kenoi and the Department of Parks and Recreation are investing $5.1 million to rebuild the entire rodeo arena and allow for expanded public use. Plans call for constructing a new comfort station, judges’ stand, covered spectator stands, and paved parking stalls. New panels, pens, and infill material also will be installed. A new 2,000-square-foot pavilion with concession area will support rodeo events while doubling as a much-needed venue for South Kona residents to hold public meetings, private parties, and other functions. Finally, the entire facility will be made ADA-compliant, while a completely rebuilt water system will include new water spigots that will be made available for public use.

Isemoto Contracting Co. Ltd. is expected to finish the arena reconstruction by October 2016.

For more information, please contact the Department at 961-8311.

Special Presentation by Big Island Film Festival at Aloha Theatre

In a special presentation of award-winning films, the Big Island Film Festival will screen two dynamic, award-winning films at the Aloha Theatre in Kainaliu. The short film, “Our Father,” and feature “Honeyglue” will screen at 7 p.m. on Saturday, January 30, 2016.

Acclaimed for strong acting and impactful story, “Our Father” chronicles an aging father, estranged from his family and suffering from late stage dementia. In a fleeting moment, he reveals to his son secrets that begin to heal a broken family.

Our Father

The film stars Michael Gross, who played “Burt” in the “Tremors” movies, and is still recognized worldwide as Michael J. Fox’s father from “Family Ties.” “Our Father” is a short film, under 30 minutes, and would be considered R-rated.

Feature film “Honeyglue” won Audience Choice Feature at last year’s Big Island Film Festival at the Fairmont Orchid, Hawai’i.

Honeyglue

Honeyglue

Winner of numerous film festival awards, including Cannes World Cinema Initiative Best Feature, “Honeyglue” is a story of love that steps out of all boundaries. In the only three months they have, Morgan, a protected young woman with terminal cancer, and Jordan, a gender-defying adventurer, make every second worth more than the last. This film would be rated PG13.

Tickets are $10 adults, $5 children, available at the door.

The Big Island Film Festival at the Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i is a celebration of narrative filmmaking, with free family films under the stars, international features and shorts, stellar social events, celebrity receptions, screenwriting workshops, film awards and much more in an outstanding island setting.

Anchor sponsors include: The Fairmont Orchid, Hawai‘i, The Shops at Mauna Lani, Hawai‘i Tourism Authority/Hawai‘i County Department of Research and Development CPEP, and many other generous sponsors and supporters. For detailed information, visit www.BigIslandFilmFestival.com or call 808-883-0394.

Combined Cancer Statistics Mask the Truth for Native Hawaiians

Papa Ola Lōkahi, the Native Hawaiian Health Board, is joining with other Hawaiian health organizations and health care providers to emphasize the importance of research and data that accurately describes the health and wellness status for Kānaka Maoli, Hawai‘i’s indigenous community.  We are gravely concerned to see cancer data for Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPI) reported in combination with Asian Americans (AA) in the just-released ACS Cancer Facts & Figures 2016, which includes a Special Section:  Cancer in Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders.

Cancer in Hawaiians

Hawaiian health advocates have fought for nearly 30 years to raise awareness about the pronounced cancer health disparities among Native Hawaiians, some of which are the highest in the nation and certainly the highest in our state. The Hawaiian congressional delegation and health community contributed to the revision of the Office of Budget & Management Directive of 1997(OMB 15), which charges federal agencies, institutes and offices with disaggregating AA and NHPI data.  Furthermore, the Affordable Care Act requires that all federal data be collected and reported in accordance with the accepted population identifiers.

“Reporting aggregated data sabotages the gains we’ve made over the past 3 decades.  It changes the mo‘olelo, or story, for us Kānaka Maoli,” asserts Dr. Noa Emmett Aluli, Molokai family physician and Vice-President of the ‘Ahahui o nā Kauka, Association of Native Hawaiian Physicians.  “Unfortunately, it can lead to inappropriate education, treatment strategies, and misallocation of resources and efforts.”

Examples of community harm that is perpetuated by aggregating NH and AA cancer data:

The Special Section on AANHPI, 2016 reports that “Cancer is the leading cause of death among AANHPIs…”  In fact, while Native Hawaiians carry the highest cancer mortality burden in Hawai‘i, heart disease is the leading cause of death among Native Hawaiians (Aluli et al, 2010).

The Special Section also reports “Breast cancer incidence and death rates are reported to be 30 to 50%lower for AANHPI.”  Breast cancer incidence among Hawaiian women is 24% higher than for whites, 60% higher than for Chinese, and 12.4% higher than for Japanese.  Breast cancer mortality rates in Hawai‘i are 31% higher than for whites, 127% higher than for Chinese, and 85% higher than for Japanese.  The rates are even more disparate among Pacific Islanders, such as women from the Marshall Islands (Hawaii Cancer Facts and Figures 2010).

“We understand researchers’ concern for stable data sets to produce reliable data, but Hawai‘i has participated in the Nation Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program since SEER’s inception.  As such, significant incidence and mortality data on Native Hawaiians in Hawai‘i are available,” clarifies Dr. Kathryn Braun, co-Principal Investigator of ‘Imi Hale Native Hawaiian Cancer Network (‘Imi Hale).

Hardy Spoehr, former Executive Director of Papa Ola Lōkahi, has been a long standing champion of this issue. “It’s disappointing that aggregation of NH data with that of AA is still prevalent in federal data reporting.  American Cancer Society is an internationally respected organization and needs to be a leader in this realm of data presentation, not a perpetuator of harmful reporting practices that have made it so difficult for the Hawaiian community to raise awareness about its cancer burden.”

Misrepresented data promotes harmful perceptions about the health status and health needs of the Hawaiian community. All minority and small groups who are not equitably represented in national data collection and reporting are victims of this harmful practice.

Papa Ola Lōkahi will remain diligent about raising awareness about this and we ask our local and national partners and colleagues to do the same.