• Follow on Facebook

  • what-to-do-media
  • RSS W2DM

  • puako-general-store
  • Cheneviere Couture
  • PKF Document Shredding
  • Arnotts Mauna Kea Tours
  • World Botanical Garden
  • Hilton Waikoloa Village
  • Hilton Luau
  • Dolphin Quest Waikoloa
  • Discount Hawaii Car Rental
  • 10% Off WikiFresh

  • Say When

    September 2017
    S M T W T F S
    « Aug    
     12
    3456789
    10111213141516
    17181920212223
    24252627282930
  • When

  • RSS Pulpconnection

  • Recent Comments

Man Achieves Goal to Visit ALL 59 National Parks

When Dave Parker entered Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Tuesday night, he accomplished his lifelong dream to visit the 59 iconic national parks in the U.S.

Chief Ranger John Broward shakes hands with Dave Parker of McLean, VA who completed his quest to visit all 59 National Parks on Wednesday. (All photos NPS Photos by Janice Wei)

“To see Kīlauea erupt is indescribable and it’s just spectacular to see,” Parker said. “It’s the reason we came here,” he said.

On Wednesday, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park surprised Parker with a “59ers” Certificate of Achievement, signed by National Park Service Acting Director, Mike Reynolds. The certificate was presented by Acting Superintendent and Chief Ranger John Broward, who congratulated Parker in front of visitors and staff at the Kīlauea Visitor Center.

Dave Parker poses for a photo in front of an interpretive display in the Kīlauea Visitor Center of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

“It’s uplifting that Mr. Parker made it a priority to see all 59 of the iconic national parks,” Broward said. “Park visitors help steward our public lands, and by appreciating them, they protect them. And Dave Parker, you couldn’t have a better last name,” he said.

Parker’s love for national parks blossomed at the tender age of 14, when his parents took him to his first parks, Yellowstone and Grand Teton. His family camped, rode horses, hiked the trails and watched Yellowstone’s famous geyser, Old Faithful, erupt. Now 77, Parker, his wife Carol, and friends Red and Sheri Cavaney, will spend a few nights at Volcano House and explore the eruptions of Kīlauea and Mauna Loa. They enjoyed a ranger talk about the volcanic origins of the Hawaiian Islands, and a guided tour with the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park (FHVNP).

Left to right: Elizabeth Fien, Executive Director of the Friends of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park; Dave Parker “59er”; , Margot Griffith, Executive Director of the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association; and Hawaii Volcanoes’ Acting Superintendent and Chief Ranger John Broward smile for a photo in the Kīlauea Visitor Center.

The park’s non-profit supporting partners, the FHVNP and the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, presented the Parkers and friends with commemorative items including ball caps, T shirts, pins, a gift certificate for The Rim restaurant, and other mementos and educational items to help them enjoy and discover the park.

“There are many ways to support your parks,” Parker said. “All parks have organizations that support them that you can donate to. You can volunteer and give back with your time. It’s an important investment to make for the survival of public lands and our future generations,” he said.
The auspicious visit was Parker’s fifth time to Hawai‘i, and his first to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. During his early career working for the Dept. of Commerce in Wash., D.C., he helped promote travel to the U.S., and had close ties to the Hawai‘i visitor industry. He and his wife live in McLean, VA.

Left to right: Sheri Cavaney, Dave Parker, Carol Parker and Red Cavaney, smile for photos in the Kīlauea Visitor Center on Wednesday. Dave is wearing an NPS Centennial T-shirt listing all 59 national parks.

The National Park Service has more than 20,000 National Park Service employees who care for America’s 417 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.

29th Annual Christmas with the Chefs

Sugarplums will dance in your head Saturday, Dec. 2 at the festive Christmas with the Chefs. The annual holiday gala returns to the seaside grounds of Courtyard King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel from 5:30-8 p.m.

Over 20 members of the American Culinary Federation (ACF) Kona Kohala Chefs Association will delight attendees with plates of expertly prepared savory cuisine and delectable holiday treats—all accompanied by handcrafted ales, choice wines and 100 percent Kona coffee.

The Bill Noble Trio jazzes up the evening for dancing under the stars fronting historic Kamakahonu Bay. A silent auction will tempt would-be Santas with an array of holiday gift ideas while supporting local businesses.

In its 29th year, the annual fundraiser benefits local culinary students attending Hawai‘i Community College—Palamanui and members of the Kona Kohala Chefs wanting to further their education.

Tickets are $90 presale, $95 at the door and available online at www.konakohalachefs.org. Tickets are available at Westside Wines, Kona Coffee & Tea, The Spoon Shop and Courtyard King Kamehameha’s Kona Beach Hotel. Tables of 10 are $1200—which includes reserved seating, table-side service and select bottles of wine—and can be purchased online.

The host hotel is offering a special event room rate starting at $159. Phone 808-331-6330 and ask for the “Christmas with the Chefs” room rate.

American Culinary Federation Kona Kohala Chefs Association: ACF is the largest, professional, non-profit organization for chefs and cooks in the nation. Founded in 1980, the Kona Kohala chapter is comprised of food service professionals, vendors, growers and culinary enthusiasts; www.konakohalachefs.org.

‘I‘iwi Receives Protection Under the Endangered Species Act

Once one of the most common forest birds in the Hawaiian Islands, the ‘i‘iwi, also known as the scarlet honeycreeper, will be protected as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service determined that listing was warranted based on a review of the best information available for the ‘i‘iwi, gained through exhaustive research, public comments and independent scientific peer reviews.

In the past, ‘i‘iwi could be found from the coastal lowlands where they foraged for food to the high mountain forests where they nested. Today, ninety percent of the ‘i‘iwi population is confined to a narrow band of forest on East Maui and the windward slopes of the island of Hawaii, between 4,265 and 6,234 feet (1,300 and 1,900 meters) in elevation. The birds are virtually gone from the islands of Lanai, Oahu, Molokai and west Maui, while the population on Kauai is in steep decline.

“In recent years, the ‘i‘iwi population has been in sharp decline, due to threats from habitat loss, invasive species and avian diseases, particularly avian malaria,” said Mary Abrams, project leader for the Service’s Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office. “These threats have affected all forest birds, not just the ‘i‘iwi. Conservation that benefits the ‘i‘iwi will undoubtedly benefit other Hawaiian forest birds.”

Avian malaria, carried by invasive mosquitos, is the primary driver in the decline in of the ‘i‘iwi population, and has already caused the decimation of dozens of other Hawaiian forest birds. The disease kills approximately ninety-five percent of infected ‘i‘iwi. Mosquitos, which are not native to the Hawaiian Islands, breed and thrive at lower and warmer elevations where they infect birds like the ‘i’iwi with avian malaria and pox.

“‘I‘iwi have virtually disappeared from any habitat where mosquitoes are found,” said Abrams. “This has caused their range to shrink dramatically – they are almost entirely limited to higher elevation ‘ohi‘a forests for their habitat, dietary, and nesting needs.

Higher and cooler elevation ‘ohi‘a forests, where mosquitoes do not thrive, remain the only habitat for the ‘i‘iwi, but even those areas are under threat. As temperatures rise, mosquitoes, and the avian diseases they carry, are able to survive at higher elevations and spread upwards into the mountains, further constricting the ‘i‘iwi’s range.

‘I‘iwi are dependent for their survival on forests of native ‘ohi‘a. On the island of Hawaii, home to 90 percent of the remaining ‘i‘iwi population, those ‘ohi‘a forests have been under attack from rapid ‘ohi‘a death, an invasive tree pathogen.

“Working with the state, our conservation partners and the public will be crucial as we work to recover the ‘i‘iwi, said Abrams. “The Service is committed to building on our record of collaborative conservation to protect Hawaii’s native species.”

The Service’s final listing rule will be published in the Federal Register on Sept 20, 2017, and will become effective on Sept 20, 2017. Next steps include development of a recovery plan, which will be bolstered by input from other federal and state agencies, other conservation partners and the public.

More information, including the final listing, can be found at http://www.fws.gov/pacificislands/.

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park’s October 2017 Events

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park (ADIP) programs with the public throughout 2017. In addition, the community is invited to lend a hand to save native rainforest through the park’s Stewardship at the Summit volunteer program.
ADIP and Hawaiian cultural programs are free, but entrance fees apply.

Programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Stewardship at the Summit. Volunteers are needed to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. No advance registration is required, and there is no cost to participate, but park entrance fees apply. Visit the park website for additional planning details: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm.
When: October 7, 13, 21, and 27 at 9 a.m.
Where: Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. on any of the above dates.

Lomi. Lomi is the traditional massage practice of the Hawaiian people.

Lomi massage demonstrated in the park. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson

There are many different styles of lomi used throughout Hawai‘i, and most are used as a way to heal body and mind. Lomi practitioner Annie Erbe will demonstrate this popular healing art. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Oct. 11 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Footprints in the Ash. Hawaiians once traversed Kīlauea on foot to travel between Puna and Ka‘ū, and during the 18th century, explosions from the volcano rained volcanic ash down on the people, preserving their footprints in the sands of “Keonehelelei.”

Footprints fossilized in volcanic ash in the Ka‘ū Desert will be the subject of October’s After Dark in the Park. NPS Photo.

Park Ranger Jay Robinson discusses new interpretive displays in the Ka‘ū Desert and explains what we know today about the impact of these explosive eruptions on native society. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ After Dark in the Park series. Free.
When: Tues., Oct. 17 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium

Mark Yamanaka in Concert. Join local recording artist Mark Yamanaka for a free concert.

Mark has been awarded multiple Nā Hōkū Hanohano awards since the debut of his first album, Lei Puakenikeni. His next album, Lei Maile, has also received critical acclaim. Mark’s crisp, clear falsetto and rich baritone voice will mesmerize you. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free.
When: Wed., Oct. 18 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Kahuku ‘Ohana Day. Families are invited for a day of fun, culture and discovery at the Kahuku Unit! Learn about the hidden powers that plants have to keep us healthy through the teachings of Aunty Ka‘ohu Monfort, a practitioner of lā‘au lapa‘au (Hawaiian herbal medicine).

Aunty Ka‘ohu Monfort demonstrates lā‘au lapa‘au at the 2017 Cultural Festival. NPS Photo/Jay Robinson

Collect seeds from native plants and help park rangers bring new life to Kahuku. Kids 17 and under and their families must sign up by October 13 to participate by calling 808-985-6019. Bring water, lunch and snacks, sunscreen, hat, long pants, shoes and reusable water bottle. Kahuku is located between the 70 and 71 mile markers on Highway 11.
When: Sat., Oct. 21, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (Registration required by Oct. 13).
Where: Kahuku Unit

Lau Hala. Join park staff and learn one of the great traditional arts of Hawaii, ulana lau hala. Hawaiians have used the hala (pandanus) tree to create many useful and beautiful items for centuries. Learn to weave lau hala and take home your own piece of lau hala art. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Oct. 25 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Waianuhea Bed and Breakfast Auction and Property Sale

Aloha to all our wonderful guests and friends over the years!

I am writing you today to tell you that Waianuhea is auctioning off all of its furnishings. The property itself is still up for sale, although the Manager’s Quarters (the small house at the bottom of the drive) was portioned off with 1.5 acres and sold last year. It is time for me to move on from Hawaii and all I have here, so I am taking the next step in this process and am clearing out the house of all furnishings.

My ohana stayed here in 2010.

I have engaged the services of Oahu Auctions, a highly reputable auction company that is conducting the auction online. Thus, if you are interested in bidding on an item from Waianuhea, even if you are far away, you can! For those of you on-island, you can see all the auction items in person during the preview period, which will be September 29th and 30th (10am to 5pm). The auction is scheduled to close Saturday, September 30th, starting at 6pm. Here is a link to the website for Oahu Auctions:

http://bid.oahuauctions.com/UPSCALE-BED-BREAKFAST-HAWAII-ISLAND-BIG-ISLAND_as48908

There you will see the catalog of all the items up for auction from Waianuhea. At this point, the catalog is still being “built”, so you may notice missing photos and descriptions which will be filled in soon. There are over 300 lots! You can browse through all these items, and if you decide to bid, click on “Get Approved to Bid” towards the top right corner of the page. There is no fee to bid.

There are items large and small up for sale! Maybe you will find your own perfect memento of Waianuhea.

Many thanks for your patronage over our lifetime,

Carol Salisbury, Owner – Waianuhea

PS-Here is the link to Waianuhea’s property listing, including a wonderful video tour which you may wish to take to remind yourself of the beauty of Waianuhea:

Waianuhea Real Estate Listing

If you know someone who is interested in the property itself, my brokers are now with MacArthur Sotheby’s:

Brodie Callender: brodie@macarthurhawaii.com ; 808-885-5538 office; 808-987-4218 mobile

Alethea Lai: alethea@macarthurhawaii.com ; 808-885-8885 office; 808-989-7861 mobile

Kona Historical Society’s Farm Festival to Feature Celebrity Chef Sam Choy

Kona Historical Society’s Kona Coffee Living History Farm will be hosting the annual Farm Fest Open House at their historical coffee farm in Captain Cook on Saturday, September 30 from 10am to 2pm. The public is invited to attend this free community event that shares Kona’s rich farming history. Shuttles, generously sponsored by Hawaii Forest and Trail and Roberts Hawaii, will be running between the parking area of Kealakekua Ranch Center and the Kona Coffee Living History Farm from 9:30a.m. to 3p.m. since parking will not be available at the Farm.

At this year’s celebration, the theme is “From Farm to Table” in honor of Kona’s cultural heritage, and promises a day filled with fun-for-the-family activities that revolve around all the amazing sustainable foods that are made here in Kona. Celebrity Chef Sam Choy will be exploring the vegetable gardens and fruit trees on the farm, and using what he finds, he’ll prepare a delicious dish and beverage. Sandy’s Drive In will be returning to the farm for this annual celebration to cook up a traditional plantation era dish: Chicken Hekka.

The Kona Coffee Living History Farm, homesteaded by Japanese immigrants, reveals the story of Kona’s coffee pioneers in the 1925-1945 era. The coffee mill and farmhouse will be open to tours where guests can experience the domestic life of Kona’s coffee farmers. Visitors enter the kitchen where rice simmers on a traditional open-hearth stove before they remove their shoes to walk on tatami mats throughout the house. Outside, they learn to pick coffee and see how it was processed in the kuriba (mill) and dried on the hoshidana (drying platform), and explore the gardens where traditional vegetables are grown, or visit with the chickens, or Kona Nightengale Donkeys, who were an important part of the economy of Kona coffee farms.

Throughout the grounds of the Farm, historical interpreters, cultural practitioners and volunteers will be hosting “Hands on History” activities where guests can practice the art of lauhala weaving, Japanese calligraphy, medicinal gardening and pan roasting coffee, among others. The Songbird of Milolii, Diana Aki, will also return to the farm to perform local music on the lawn. Kona Historical Society will be displaying a new pop up exhibit featuring Kona’s history of growing and gathering food sustainably and sharing meals with our diverse, multicultural community.

This event is generously sponsored by Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union, Hawaii Tourism Authority, Candy Sargent, and Farm & Garden.

Kona Historical Society is a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Smithsonian Museum affiliate that has spent the past four decades collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii. The Kona Coffee Living History Farm is the only living history coffee farm in the nation. This award-winning, historic farm that tells the story of Kona’s coffee pioneers during the early 20th century.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Governor Ige Welcomes Japan Airlines’ Inaugural Flight From Narita to Kona

Gov. David Ige and the Hawai‘i Department of Transportation welcomed Japan Airlines’ inaugural flight from Narita International Airport to the Kona International Airport at Keāhole on Hawai‘i Island. The new daily, non-stop service marks JAL’s return to Kona.

The new service is expected to generate $9.8 million in tax revenue and create 900 new jobs, according to the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority.

“We warmly welcome Japan Airlines back to Kona and are extremely excited about the new daily service to Kona, which is on its way to becoming Hawai‘i’s second major international port of entry,” said Gov. Ige. JAL has offered excellent service to the Aloha State for more than 60 years, and has played a significant role in expanding and supporting our tourism industry and economy. We are also thankful for the opportunity for cultural exchange with Japan.”

“Our thanks go to Japan Airlines and Chairman Masaru Onishi for being such a great and loyal friend to Hawaii’s tourism industry. This new non-stop flight connecting Tokyo and Kona reinforces Japan Airlines’ commitment to support travel to the Hawaiian Islands, while offering its customers an enticing new vacation experience to discover the allure and natural beauty found on the island of Hawai‘i,” said George Szigeti, president and chief executive officer Hawai‘i Tourism Authority.

In addition to JAL’s Narita to Kona service, the airline currently has six non-stop flights between Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya and Honolulu.

Hōkūleʻa to Visit O’ahu’s North Shore – Mahalo, Hawaiʻi Sail

Hōkūleʻa is scheduled to depart the Marine Education Training Center (METC) at Sand Island on Thursday, September 14, and will sail to the next stop on the Mahalo, Hawaiʻi Sail: Haleʻiwa, Oʻahu. During the 10-day Haleʻiwa engagement, crew members will participate with the community in events and activities that will highlight the recent Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage as well as the work being done on Oʻahu’s North Shore to care for Island Earth.

Events during the stop in Haleʻiwa will include outreach events, local school visits, service projects, crew presentations, and canoe tours. The following events have been scheduled to date. The public is encouraged to check hokulea.com for daily updates:

Haleʻiwa Engagement Schedule (*All dates and times subject to change)
(Local contact email: hokuinhaleiwa@gmail.com. Updates on Wanana Paoa Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/wanana.paoa.7)

Friday, September 15

7:00 p.m.
Hōkūleʻa Crew Talk Story, Surfer, the Bar at Turtle Bay ResortPolynesian Voyaging Society president and navigator Nainoa Thompson along with crewmembers from the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage will share stories from the epic three-year journey around the globe. Free and open to the public.Participants (tentative): Nainoa Thompson, Kamaki Worthington, Kaimana Bacarse, Eric Co, Sam Kapoi, Kalepa Baybayan, http://www.turtlebayresort.com/Oahu-Restaurants/Surfer-The-Bar

Saturday, September 16

10:00 a.m.
Arrival ceremony at Haleʻiwa Harbor
Join the Hale’iwa community to ho’okipa Hōkūle’a to Hale’iwa.

1 – 5 p.m.
Public Canoe Tours, Haleʻiwa Harbor
Visit Hōkūle’a and take a tour of the wa’a

Sunday, September 17

1 – 5 p.m.
Public Canoe Tours, Haleʻiwa Harbor
Visit Hōkūle’a and take a tour of the wa’a

7:00 p.m.
Hōkūleʻa Crew Talk Story, Surfer, the Bar at Turtle Bay Resort
Polynesian Voyaging Society navigators will share how they apply ancestral wisdom and ʻike through storms, doldrums, and more in their experiences around the world. Free and open to the public. Participants (tentative) – Kamaki Worthington moderator, Austin Kino, Noelani Kamalu, Jason Patterson, Bryson Hoe, Kaleo Wong

Monday, September 18 & Tuesday, September 19

All Day Scheduled school tours and visits. (By appointment only)

Wednesday, September 20

All Day Scheduled school tours and visits. (By appointment only)

5 – 9 p.m.
Hōkūleʻa Crew and North Shore Community Talk Story at Waimea Valley
Special guests from Hōkūleʻa crew and local organizations will share inspirational stories about the Worldwide Voyage and discuss how it has catalyzed action in our North Shore, Oʻahu community. Celebrate progress and learn how you and your ʻohana can be involved. https://www.waimeavalley.net/

Thursday, September 21

All Day Scheduled school tours and visits. (By appointment only)

Friday, September 22

Morning Scheduled school tours and visits. (By appointment only)

6:30 – 9 p.m.
Hōkūleʻa Crew Talk Story at Patagonia Haleʻiwa
John Bilderback will present a photographerʻs view tracking brilliant moments and events throughout the epic three-year Mālama Honua journey around the globe alongside Worldwide Voyage crewmembers who sailed Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia. Free and open to the public.
http://www.patagonia.com/patagonia-north-shore-66-250-kamehameha-highway-haleiwa-hawaii-96712/store_924602999.html

Saturday, September 23

2 p.m. Hōkūleʻa departs for Hanalei

About the Mahalo, Hawaiʻi Sail
The Mahalo, Hawaiʻi Sail will give PVS an opportunity to thank Hawaiʻi’s people, bring Hōkūleʻa and Hikianalia home to all of Hawaiʻi, share lessons learned from the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage and deepen the organization’s connection and understanding of the important work being done here in the islands to care for the earth. During the port visits, PVS will engage with schools and organizations through outreach events, service projects, crew presentations and canoe tours.

September Port Dates (tentative and subject to change):
• September 15 – 22, 2017: Haleʻiwa
• September 24 – 26, 2017: Hanalei

October through May port dates will be posted as they become available.

Student Debate Competition to Highlight Opening Day of Global Tourism Summit

Perpetuating sustainable tourism and encouraging young people to become more involved in determining the travel industry’s future, both in Hawaii and internationally, is a key objective of the Global Tourism Summit, September 19-21, at the Hawaii Convention Center.

The 2017 Global Tourism Summit Student Debate is a highlight event fulfilling that need. Featuring 18 debate teams, 10 teams from outside Hawaii and eight within the State, the round-robin tournament is taking place on the Summit’s opening day, September 19. The central topic for the debate program is “Resolved: Tourism Helps to Preserve Culture.”

Presented by the Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA), the Global Tourism Summit offers a diversity of sessions covering topics and trends vital to Hawaii’s future, including Hawaiian culture, eco-tourism, innovation and technology. According to George D. Szigeti, HTA president and CEO, the Student Debate is an essential program because of how it brings teens into the discussion on tourism’s future.

“We need to provide our young people with the incentive and opportunity to express their views on how to make tourism better for all of society” said Szigeti. “The future is theirs and they need to help chart its course for all of us. The Student Debate tournament is intended to seed their interest in tourism and inspire them to be future leaders.”

The 10 teams from outside Hawaii consist of two teams from both Japan and Hong Kong, and one team each from China, Taiwan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Canada and the U.S. mainland. Some teams won local competitions to earn the right to participate in the Global Tourism Summit Student Debate.

The eight Hawaii teams in the Student Debate tournament include three teams from Parker School, two teams each from Kamehameha Schools and the Home School League, and one team from Hilo High School.

Among the international debate teams is The Forensics Society from the Taipei American School representing Taiwan. In May, The Forensics Society won the International Division of the U.S. National Tournament of Champions in Public Forum Debate at the University of Kentucky. The team’s coach, Dr. Nick Coburn-Palo, said the students are thrilled to be in Honolulu for the debate tournament.

“We are tremendously excited to embrace this incredibly generous opportunity to match wits with debate teams from some of the top schools in the world, as well as experience the hospitality for which Hawaii is internationally famous,” said Dr. Coburn-Palo. “Furthermore, our debaters are excited to dip their toes into professional waters by learning more about the rapidly evolving international travel industry at the conference.”

On the morning of September 19, the 18 teams will be paired off in rounds of timed competition with a multi-tiered format that challenges the debate members to present and defend their case through the following process.

  • Presentation of the team’s case.
  • Crossfire with opposing speakers asking and answering questions of each other.
  • Rebuttal to refute the opposing team’s arguments.
  • Summary highlighting the main points of the debate.
  • Final focus with each team explaining why they won the round.

All of the teams participate in three rounds of debates, with the scores tabulated for each one. The two teams that emerge with the top scores will compete in the 2017 Global Tourism Summit Student Debate Finale from 2:00-2:45 p.m. in the Liliu Theater.

PATA Hawaii Student Forum: Planning for a Career in the Global Tourism Environment

Following the debate finals is the PATA Hawaii Student Forum on the topic of Planning for a Career in the Global Tourism Environment. Presented by the Hawaii Chapter of the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA) the forum features prominent tourism industry leaders providing students majoring in hospitality, tourism or transportation management with valuable career advice. The PATA Hawaii Student Forum takes place from 3:00-4:55 p.m. in the Liliu Theater.

Registering for the Global Tourism Summit, September 19-21
Interested attendees can participate in the Global Tourism Summit by registering online at www.GlobalTourismSummitHawaii.com. Registration also includes lunch on the days registered for and participation in the Aloha Reception, featuring entrées from 20 restaurants, on September 20.

Several options are available for registration:

  • Individuals: Full Summit, September 19-21: $395
  • Groups of Eight or More: Full Summit, September 19-21: $365 per person (Groups can mix and match different attendees during the summit)
  • Student and Faculty Members: Full Summit, September 19-21: $150
  • Individuals, Partial Summit, September 19-20: $275
  • Individuals, Partial Summit, September 20-21: $265

Previously known as the Hawaii Tourism Conference, HTA changed the name of the annual event this year to the Global Tourism Summit to more accurately reflect Hawaii’s emergence as a leader in international travel and tourism.

Coming Soon – First Annual Tiki Festival On The Island of Hawaii

Mark your calendars Tiki Tribe.  Renowned local celebrity, magician and businessman “Kozy” (Paul Kozak) along with Tiki Shark Art Inc. will be hosting the First Annual Tiki Festival on the Island of Hawaii.  This Star Studded three day FREE Art event will start at the Royal Kona Resort on Thursday November 16th and end at Kozy’s Tiki Palace at The Shops at Mauna Lani on Saturday November 18th.

Hawaii’s own celebrity artist Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker along with mainland Tiki greats, Doug Horne, Ken Ruzic and Tom “Big Toe” Laura will be showing and selling their latest work, Grammy nominated Henry Kapono and local favorite LT Smooth will be jamming their tunes with celebrity Chef Sam Choy giving out samples of his famous Poke.

From left to right are:
Tom “Big Toe” Laura, Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker, Doug Horne and Ken Ruzic

This is the first of its kind three day, free event where folks will have a chance to meet and talk story with world class artists, chef’s and entertainers.  Everyone is encouraged to participate, have fun and buy some Tiki Art at great prices.

“I am honored to be able to put together this annual event for the community. It’s the first time in Hawaii history that these Tiki artists will gotten together for a group show”  said Kozy – sponsor and owner of Kozy’s Tiki Palace.

According to Abbas Hassan – Brad “Tiki Shark” Parker and Chef Sam Choy’s agent: “This will be a yearly event on the Island of Hawaii held in an authentic Tiki environment and is going to raise the bar of all Tiki Festivals that are currently held on the mainland”.  “Tiki enthusiasts from all around the world will flock to it” he added confidently.

Celebrity Chef Sam Choy will be serving up some of his famous poke.

More details of the event will be provided on social media as time comes closer.

For more information on the event please contact:

Reaffirm Your Marriage While Promoting World Peace

In conjunction with the September celebration of the annual United Nations International Day of Peace, a World Peace Marriage Rededication Ceremony is set for 6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 22 at Hawaiian Queen Coffee Garden in Kailua-Kona.

“The ceremony is an affirmation of marriage as transformative and sacred, as the wellspring of love for children and grandchildren, as the source of a healthy society and a building block for world peace,” explains the ceremony officiator, Rev. Chuck Frumin.

Open to married couples wishing to renew their marriage while promoting world peace, the event welcomes guests and children of participating couples. The marriage reaffirmation is sponsored by the Kona Family Church, a branch of the Family Federation for World Peace.

Festivities will be indoors and include a marriage renewal ceremony and barbecue chicken buffet dinner. Flowers will be provided to participants.
Event participation is free, donations are appreciated. For reservations, phone 808-987-4219.

UH Hilo Student Participates in International Human Rights Summit

A University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo senior from Timor-Leste (formerly East Timor) represented her country as a youth delegate at the 14th Annual International Human Rights Summit, held recently at United Nations (UN) Headquarters in New York City.

Josefina Pereira (right) seated with fellow delegates at the UN Trusteeship Council Chamber Room.

Josefina Pereira, who is majoring in administration of justice and political science, was one of 52 delegates selected for the summit, which teaches youth about human rights, specifically the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and inspires them to become advocates for tolerance and peace.

“It was an honor to represent Timor- Leste and UH Hilo as a delegate, and to learn more about important human rights issues from true human rights champions and activists from around the world,” Pereira said.

Pereira is a recipient of a United States Timor-Leste Scholarship funded by the U.S. Department of State Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs administered by the East-West Center. Her attendance at the summit was sponsored through a merit-based scholarship from Youth for Human Rights International (YHRI) and with financial assistance from the UH Hilo Office of International Student Services program.

“We were thrilled to have Josefina represent her country and UH Hilo at this important event,” said Jim Mellon, director of International Student Services at UH Hilo. “It is a testament to her dedication to human rights and to UH Hilo’s engagement with the global community.”

The summit brought together officials and advocates who work for equality and justice through human rights education, including ambassadors and other representatives of permanent missions to the UN. During the session, keynote speakers, youth delegates and ambassadors and observers from more than 45 countries were invited to share their thoughts and feelings on human rights issues in their home countries. Pereira addressed children’s rights in her homeland, with a focus on mitigating and eventually ending child abuse.

“This is an issue of great concern to me,” Pereira said. “I appreciate the opportunity the summit provided me to share my thoughts on this topic with an international audience.”

Participants also attended panel presentations on key human rights issues, including human trafficking, that featured leaders of the international effort to prevent human trafficking and a survivor who shared her own personal story. They later heard from noted human rights activists, including author and social entrepreneur Bryant McGill, Reach the World Director of Partnerships Christopher Ahearn, and radio and TV host Kerri Kassem. Pereira said she was deeply inspired by her experience and hopes to return.

“I feel I gained a lot from my experience, but have more to learn. So I would like to return next year as a youth ambassador,” Pereira said. “2018 will also be a very special year as the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights celebrates its 70th anniversary and YHRI marks its 15th anniversary. ”

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard Statement On Trump Administration Decision To End DACA

Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard (HI -02) today released the following statement in response to the Trump administration’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard stated:

“President Trump’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program is wrong. It will break up families and punish young people who were brought to this country as minors through no choice or fault of their own. These are people who have grown up in the United States, and who know no other country to be their home. DACA transformed the lives and futures of hundreds of thousands of young people, in Hawaii and across the country. Because of DACA they’ve been able to go to college, find a job, support their family, serve their country, and live free from the constant fear of deportation.

“In my home state of Hawaii, DACA has allowed more than 600 young people to remain legally in our country and contribute to our economy and society, including a member of my staff who came to the United States as a minor from Zimbabwe. Last week on Maui, I had the opportunity to hear from some of Hawaii’s DREAMers and hear their heart-wrenching stories about living in fear and in the shadows until DACA was put into effect. They cried as they shared their stories of the opportunity and freedom they have experienced because of DACA, and the fear of uncertainty in what lies ahead with the prospects of being forced to leave the only home they’ve ever known. Congress must act now to enact a permanent solution for these DREAMers and pass the bipartisan DREAM Act now.”

Democratic Party of Hawai‘i Statement on Trump Rescinding DACA

In response to the Trump’s administration decision to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), created by President Obama in 2012 to protect immigrants who came to this country as children, Democratic Party of Hawai‘i (DPH) Chair, Tim Vandeveer, released the following statement:

“Today, the Trump administration turned its back on hard-working immigrant families and students. Donald Trump’s actions force thousands of immigrants back into the shadows, tears families and communities apart, and is a devastating blow to the nearly 800,000 young immigrants who only know this country as their home. Trump and his Republicans are choosing to further divide our country, create fear in our communities and hurt our economy. Donald Trump’s cruel actions today bend to the wishes of extremists in his own party. “

“In Hawai‘i, we know better because we are defined by our diversity and guided by Aloha. Democrats proudly stand by the estimated 558 DACA beneficiaries in Hawai‘i and will fight to protect our abiding values of liberty, social justice, economic justice, protection of the environment, and compassion and respect for the dignity and worth of the individual. We will continue to work to fix our broken immigration system and support the DREAMers who are contributing to our economy and society.”

The DPH will be hosting a phone bank to members of Congress and sign-making from 2pm – 4pm today at the DPH Headquarters located at 627 South St. #105 in Honolulu.

Following the phone bank, members will participate in a sign-waving in support of DACA recipients and DREAMers at the Federal Building located at 300 Ala Moana (Ewa corner where Ala Moana Blvd meets Halekauwila St) from 4:30pm – 5:30pm.

UH Hilo Offering American Sign Language Classes

The College of Continuing Education and Community Service (CCECS) at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo offers non-credit American Sign Language (ASL) classes open to anyone age 15 and older.American Sign Language Level 1A will introduce the basics of ASL, including grammar and vocabulary for simple social conversation. Participants will also learn about deaf culture and rules of social interaction. Instructor Vicki Linter has been an ASL interpreter for 25 years and has taught ASL in California and Hawaiʻi. Classes will be held in UH Hilo’s Kanaka`ole Hall Room 106 on Wednesdays from 5 – 6:30 p.m., September 20 – November 22. The cost is $150.

American Sign Language Level 1B is for anyone who has some experience with ASL. Participants will focus on advancing expressive and receptive conversational skills. The course will be taught by Pam Bond, a deaf instructor and native in ASL with 12 years of teaching experience at Brigham Young University and at the high school level in Utah. Classes will be held in UH Hilo’s Kanaka`ole Hall Room 106 on Thursdays from 5 – 6:30 p.m., September 14 – November 16. The cost is $150.

Both classes require the Signing Naturally Student Workbook, Level 1, Units 1-6.

For more information and to register, call CCECS at 932-7830 or visit http://hilo.hawaii.edu/ccecs/.

Celebration of Life and Silent Auction Planned for Ernest Jackson

Ernest James Jackson was killed tragically in a motorcycle accident August 24, 2017 in Pahoa HI. He leaves behind his wife Jenn and his 3 children: Jamar, Tristan, and Amora.

His Celebration of Life will be Saturday September 2, 2017, 1pm until 4pm, at the E-Max building, Kalani Honua Resort, 12-6860 Kalapana-Kapoho road, Pahoa.

There will be a silent auction in conjunction with the Celebration of Life, with the proceeds going to Ernest’s children. We are accepting all manner of donations for the auction; massages, watsu, art, meals, vacation packages, jewelry, personal services, etc.

If you would like to donate something for the auction, please contact the organizers Kevin Horton and Misti Johnson.

Contact:
Kevin Horton/Misti Johnson
Kalapana100@yahoo.com
PH: 808-965-1084
FaceBook: Kevin Horton

11th Annual Peace Day Parade & Festival Schedule

On September 23, 2017, the 11th annual Peace Day Parade & Festival in Honoka‘a town joins millions of people across the planet, to honor the values of peace, compassion and global interdependence.

Photo by Evan Bordessa

This year’s theme, “Together for Peace,” echoes the United Nations’ theme for Peace Day, “Together for Peace: Respect, Safety and Dignity for All.” On September 23, 2017, the 11th annual Peace Day Parade & Festival in Honoka‘a town joins millions of people across the planet, to honor the values of peace, compassion and global interdependence.

Expressing serious messaging in creative, colorful, and ultimately positive ways, these events use music, dance, drumming, acrobatics and more to bring community together. The Peace Day Parade steps off down Mamane Street at 11 a.m., and the Peace Festival starts immediately afterward, with live entertainment, a large community Bon Dance, food booths and keiki activities.
The adoption of the UN’s theme—intended to focus on refugees around the world—gives Honoka‘a and Hawai‘i Island the opportunity to stand with other global communities supporting peace locally. In light of recent events that further divide a troubled world, it also takes on new relevance.

“In times of insecurity, communities that look different become convenient scapegoats,” said Secretary-General António Guterres in a statement. “We must resist cynical efforts to divide communities and portray neighbours as ‘the other.’ Discrimination diminishes us all. It prevents people, and societies, from achieving their full potential… Together, let us stand up against bigotry and for human rights. Together, let us build bridges. Together, let us transform fear into hope.”

Related Peace Day events take place throughout the month, September 14-30 (see schedule below). For more information and updates, please follow Peace Day Parade on Facebook, visit www.PeaceDayParade.org or email info@peacedayparade.org.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

STUDENT PEACE POSTER CONTEST

This year’s theme, “Together for Peace,” echoes the United Nations’ theme for Peace Day this year. Cash prizes will be awarded to the winners in various categories. Open to all ages, all grades, all school students and homeschoolers. Details and entry forms are available at www.peacedayparade.org. Or contact Alicia Glover at 808-724-3373, heavenonearthgirl@gmail.com. Free.

READ FOR PEACE

Thursday, September 14, 5-6 p.m., “Read for Peace” in the Honoka‘a Library, presented by Friends of the Libraries. All are invited for an engaging conversation about the book “The Tiger: A True Story of Vengeance and Survival” by John Vaillant, an international bestseller that has been translated into 15 languages. Film rights have been optioned by Plan B, Brad Pitt’s production company.

Publisher’s Weekly has said, “Over millennia of shared history, the indigenous inhabitants had worked out a tenuous peace with the Amur, a formidable hunter that can grow to over 500 pounds and up to nine feet long, but the arrival of European settlers, followed by decades of Soviet disregard for the wilds, disrupted that balance… {the book} leads readers into the lair of the tiger and into the heart of the Kremlin to explain how the Amur went from being worshipped to being poached.”

Additional books in the project are “The Book of Joy” by the Dalai Lama and “The Wise Heart” by Jack Kornfield. Kornfield was teacher of Mary Grace Orr, who will lead the September 30 Day of Mindfulness. Readers are welcome to bring their favorite books that further the discussion of attaining peace.

199,000 CRANES

The Peace Committee has reached its goal of gathering a “flock” of 199,000 origami cranes, one representing each victim of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. They are now working on a unique three-dimensional interactive exhibition of the cranes, to share with the public as part of the Peace Day events. Still in the planning stages with a community of artists and creatives, the ultimate goal is to take the exhibit to Hiroshima as a gift. Extra hands are welcome to string the cranes in groups of 50: at the Hawaiian Cultural Center of Hāmākua on First Friday, at Hāmākua Harvest, 10 a.m.-12 p.m., and September 22, 7-9 p.m. at Sea Dandelion Cafe ($10 dinner special).

CHALK THE WALK

Thursday, September 21, 3:30-5:30 p.m., at the Honoka‘a public library. Young artists are encouraged to come and express themselves on the sidewalks. A free activity for youth presented by the Friends of Honoka‘a Library; all materials provided. Free.

WINE AT 5

Friday, September 22, 5 p.m. at Cafe Il Mondo. The Blue Zones’ concept of “Wine at 5” suggests that people live longer when they take time out of their schedule to de-stress and enjoy socializing with friends in the community with good food and a relaxing drink. Cafe Il Mondo supports this concept with a special edition of their daily “Wine @ $5,” offering three select wines for $5 each, from 5-6 p.m., plus free samplings of wines from Blue Zones regions of the world, while they last. Entertainment will include the New Dharma Band as well as local favorites Sergio Ramirez and Robin Jensen.

PEACE DAY PARADE & FESTIVAL

Saturday, September 23, the 11th Annual Parade & Festival for the United Nations International Day of Peace steps off at 11 a.m. Mamane Street will be closed for this colorful and entertaining celebration, with Taiko drumming, hula, and all kinds of music. The Peace Day Festival follows immediately, with food booths, a variety of music, Bon Dance, Silent Auction and more.

CommUNITY Dance Party – Dancing Together for Peace

Saturday, September 23, 6:30-9:30 p.m. at Hawaiian Cultural Center of Hāmākua.  A commUNITY gathering to embrace music and dancing as the perfect way to reduce stress and increase energetic vibrations of positivity into our lives. DJ RajaSick will be sharing a huge selection of tracks, including dance classics and musical vibes from all over the world. (Requests can be sent in advance to DJRajaSick@gmail.com). Admission is $5 (cash only) and keiki are free. Fresh Hawaiian ‘awa & Big Island Booch will be available for sale at $4. This is a family friendly event produced by Sea Dandelion Cafe. Plant-based vegetarian potluck dishes are welcome.

A DAY OF MINDFULNESS

Saturday, September 30, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. (registration at 9:30 a.m.), located in the Social Hall, Honoka‘a Hongwanji Buddhist Temple. Participants will experience guided sitting and walking meditation with Mary Grace Orr, a Dharma discussion with Q&A and a mindful, silent meal. Please RSVP to honokaamindfulness@gmail.com, or call 808-775-1064.

The Day of Mindfulness is free, and donations, or Dana, as offerings of generosity and gratitude for the teachings, will be gratefully accepted. No prior meditation experience is necessary. Participants are asked to bring their own lunch and a cushion. Chairs and additional meditation cushions will be available. For more information and updates, please follow Peace Day Parade on Facebook, visit www.PeaceDayParade.org or email info@peacedayparade.org.

Hawaii Judge Betty Vitousek Leaves Lasting Legacy at 98

Retired Senior Family Court Judge Betty Vitousek, who was instrumental in creating a model for family courts across the country, passed away Monday morning. She was 98.

“Judge Vitousek was a person of great integrity, compassion and wisdom who shaped our Family Court into the strong institution it is today,” said Hawaii Chief Justice Mark E. Recktenwald. “From encouraging mediation to developing programs to help families cope with the impacts of divorce, she was an innovator who cared deeply about Hawaii’s children and families. Her many other contributions to our community included laying the groundwork for what became the Legal Aid Society of Hawaiʻi. She also served as a mentor to countless lawyers and judges. We are deeply grateful for her legacy, and send our heartfelt sympathy and aloha to her family.”

In 1970, Gov. John A. Burns appointed Judge Vitousek to the newly created Family Court of the First Circuit. At that time, she was the only active female judge in the state, although there had been previously.

In 1977, she was named Senior Administrative Judge of the Family Court, where she oversaw its wide-ranging judicial services and programs. Judge Vitousek was instrumental in formulating its policies and procedures to address legal issues regarding families and children.

Judge Vitousek had a reputation for being hardworking, compassionate and fair, but firm and for treating everyone with dignity. She was also known for working collaboratively with her fellow judges and Judiciary staff while developing new programs, and making ongoing improvements within the Family Court.

“We are deeply saddened by the passing of Judge Vitousek, one of the greatest jurists in the history of the State of Hawaii’s Judiciary,” said Judge R. Mark Browning, Chief Judge of the First Circuit and previously the Senior Family Court Judge. “As a jurist and as a person, she personified grace and wisdom. I and many others will miss her. We are comforted by the fact that the values that she passed to us continue to be taught to a new generation of judges and lawyers. Her commitment to the children and the families of our state and to the community as a whole is a legacy that continues today.

“I had the privilege of knowing her personally. She touched my life in a profound way, for which I am eternally grateful. Judge Vitousek will live forever in our hearts and souls,” he added.

Judge Vitousek was an early advocate of mediation, working in partnership with the Neighborhood Justice Center for mediation, particularly for child custody cases. She also started “Divorce Experience,” to help divorcing couples to understand the process, both legally as well as emotionally. The program included how best to consider the needs of the children. Today the program is called “Kids First” and is mandatory for couples with children.

Judge Vitousek’s influence extended beyond Hawaii. She served as national president of the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts, was named a delegate to the White House Conference on Children, and served on the board of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court judges.

During her time on the bench, she was recognized by the Legal Aid Society, Protection and Advocacy Agency, and Hawaii Women Lawyers. She was also given the 1987 Association of Family and Conciliation Courts Distinguished Service Award.

Judge Vitousek retired from Family Court in 1988.

After retiring, she continued serving the community by volunteering on numerous boards and for the Supreme Court’s Appellate Mediation Program and Chief Justice’s Judicial Performance Review Panel.

Betty Belle Morrison was born in Wenatchee, WA. in 1919. After graduating from Lewis and Clark High School, she attended the University of Washington, earning a bachelor’s degree in sociology in 1940.

That year she traveled by ship to Japan as a delegate of the American Student Conference. While on board, she met and became friends with Roy Vitousek of Honolulu. After the war, they reconnected and were married in December 1945.

They attended law school at Stanford University and graduated together in 1948.

After graduating from Stanford, Judge Vitousek practiced adoption law for a number of years. She conducted the research which led to the formation of the Legal Aid Society of Hawaiʻi, and volunteered for numerous community organizations. She became the first executive director of the Hawaii State Bar Association and worked with Judges Gerald Corbett and Samuel King to pass legislation establishing Family Courts in Hawaii, only the second state to do so.

Judge Vitousek is survived by her sons Peter (Pamela Matson) Vitousek and Randy (Sharon) Vitousek, and daughter Kelly (Frederic Manke) Vitousek, six beloved grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. Roy Vitousek passed away in 1994.

Services are pending.

Hawai‘i Fest at Queens’ MarketPlace

The works of heart, hands, hula and Hawaiian music make Hawai‘i Fest a unique celebration, Saturday, September 9 at Queens’ MarketPlace, 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Admission to Hawai‘i Fest is free and the community is invited to enjoy aloha-filled Hawaiian music by some of the Island’s top entertainers, and explore an extensive art and craft fair with numerous artists and producers of handmade treasures. Top island entertainers Kainani Kahaunaele, Darlene Ahuna, Lito Arkangel, John Keawe and some of the Island’s favorite hula hālau will perform throughout the day, on two stages, at the Coronation Pavilion and by the “Town Clock.”

Hawaii Fest is a first time collaboration with Nā Mākua Designs and Queens’ MarketPlace.

“Nelson and Kainoa Makua of Nā Mākua, who also produce the annual Merrie Monarch Invitational Hawaiian Arts Fair, have done an amazing job of bringing together some of the most popular and skilled crafters that people want to see,” said Margo Mau Bunnell, Sales & Operations Manager. “Hawai‘i Fest will feature a unique selection of many different items— jewelry, fine art, made-in-Hawai‘i food products, hula implements, aloha wear by Simply Sisters, Living Hula, and more. And of course, everyone looks forward to the newest designs and casual Hawaiian wear from Nā Mākua Designs.”

Hawai‘i Fest is the shopping center’s celebration of ten years in the community, and the Queens’ MarketPlace family of shops and restaurants will also participate in the festivities with a variety of tasty food booths and vendor displays from Hawaiian ‘Ukulele and Guitar, Pacific Nature, and more.

“We wanted to do something that would let people continue to celebrate our beautiful Hawaiian culture throughout the day,” said Bunnell. “It is our way to round out the Hawai‘i Island Festival weekend. People can go to the Poke Contest in the morning, then come and check out all the craft vendors and talk to the artists, relax over lunch, then go back and enjoy all of the great talents at the Falsetto Contest. The idea is to offer a full, fun and immersive day at Waikoloa Beach Resort.”

Hawai‘i Fest is free and open to all, with free parking. For more information, visit www.QueensMarketPlace.net or call 808-886-8822.

Celebrating its tenth anniversary in the Waikoloa community, Queens’ MarketPlace in Waikoloa Beach Resort has earned a reputation among visitors and kama‘āina as “the gathering place of the Kohala Coast,” full of shopping opportunities, services and great food, along with entertainment and arts programs, movies under the stars and large-scale concerts in Waikoloa Bowl at Queens’ Gardens.

September Events at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park (ADIP) programs with the public throughout 2017. In addition, the community is invited to lend a hand to save native rainforest through the park’s Stewardship at the Summit (SAS) volunteer program and enjoy a fee-free day on Sat. Sept. 30 (National Public Lands Day).

ADIP, SAS and Hawaiian cultural programs are free, but entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Stewardship at the Summit. Volunteers are needed to help remove invasive, non-native plants that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. No advance registration is required for groups under six, and there is no cost to participate, but park entrance fees apply. Visit the park website for details.
When: Sept. 2, 9, 15, 22 and 30.
Where: Meet project leaders at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. on any of the above dates.

Ke Kāpili Manu Kahiko: Traditional Hawaiian Bird Catching. How did ancestral Hawaiians interact with our native birds? Much has been forgotten about traditional Hawaiian relationships with the ‘āina. Park Ranger Noah Gomes has researched traditional Hawaiian bird catching from a variety of sources. He will share some of what he has learned through years of research in pursuit of his M.A. degree in Hawaiian language and literature from the University of Hawai‘i-Hilo. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, but park entrance fees apply.
When: Tues., Sept. 12 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Lei. Create your own beautiful lei with skilled lei maker No‘eau Kalima. Traditional lei are crafted with a variety of natural materials, including leaves and flowers. The beautiful and versatile Hawaiian lei is used for adornments, blessings, rituals, gifts, and as an expression of love and celebration. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Sept. 13, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Hālau Ke ‘Olu Makani O Maunaloa. Listen to the sweet sounds and watch the graceful dancing of Hālau Ke ‘olu Makani o Maunaloa. Led by Kumu Hula Meleana Manuel, they strive to perpetuate the native Hawaiian culture through mele (song) and hula. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free, but park entrance fees apply.
When: Wed., Sept. 20 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

HI-SEAS Mission V: What It’s Like to Live on Mars. HI-SEAS (Hawai‘i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation) is a habitat for a crew of six on an isolated Mars-like site high on the slopes of Mauna Loa volcano.

NPS Photo

The NASA-funded project aims to help determine the individual and team requirements for long-duration space exploration missions, including interplanetary travel to Mars. Jon Mission V crew member Brian Ramos as he describes what it’s like living and working in the habitat for eight months. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, but park entrance fees apply.
When: Tues., Sept. 26 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Ku‘i Kalo Make poi, the staple food of the Hawaiian diet. The root of the kalo plant is cooked and pounded (ku‘i) to create this classic Hawaiian dish. Park rangers will share their knowledge of kalo at this authentic cultural experience. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Sept. 27, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Fee-Free Day: National Public Lands Day (NPLD). NPLD is the nation’s largest, single-day volunteer effort for public lands. Join us at Hawai‘i Volcanoes, and help ensure the future of the Hawaiian rainforest. Volunteers will help remove invasive, non-native plants that prevent native plants from growing. Meet at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. No advance registration is required. Park entrance is free, and NPLD volunteers will receive a pass to return and enjoy the park fee-free on another day of their choosing.
When: Sat., Sept. 30, 2017 at 8:45 a.m. to noon. Meet at Kīlauea Visitor Center.
Where: Participating public lands nationwide. Visit https://www.neefusa.org/ for details.