HVNP: What’s Open & Closed During Government Shutdown

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park announces that due to the lapse in federal appropriations and the ongoing eruption of Kīlauea Volcano both at the summit and from the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent, portions of the park are closed for visitor safety.

PC: NPS Janice Wei.

The open areas include Highway 11 through the park and Mauna Loa Road to Kīpukapuaulu (Kīpukapuaulu Trail, the day-use area and tree molds are open). Ka‘ū Desert Trail is open to the Footprints exhibit shelter. However, access may change without notice, and there are no NPS-provided services. Backcountry permits will not be issued and overnight camping will not be permitted.

Photo courtesy of Scott Cate .

The hazardous geologic processes and the immediate threats to visitor health and safety necessitate the restriction of access to areas that are volcanically active. These closed areas include the entire summit area of Kīlauea, Crater Rim Drive, Chain of Craters Road and the active lava flow within the park boundary.

Guests at Volcano House and Kīlauea Military Camp have 48 hours to depart by Monday morning, Jan. 22, 2018. Volcano Art Center Gallery is also closed.

The park reiterates that hazards associated with the active volcano pose a significant risk to the safety of visitors in the absence of National Park Service staff.

Reps. Gabbard & Hanabusa Will Not Accept Salary During Shutdown

Reps. Tulsi Gabbard and Colleen Hanabusa announced on Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018, that they will not accept their salary during the federal government shutdown.

Hawaii Reps. Tulsi Gabbard, left, and Colleen Hanabusa. Courtesy photos.

“Congress’ job is to serve the people, and it has failed,” said Rep. Gabbard. “Partisan posturing and grandstanding has taken precedence over human lives. Enough is enough. The failure to pass a year-long budget, and allowing the government to shutdown, while playing political football with issues of humanity is inexcusable. I will not accept any pay during this shutdown, and stand with our troops, law enforcement, first responders, and federal employees in Hawaii and nationwide who continue to serve and report for duty with no pay during this shutdown. Congress needs to put people before politics and reopen the government.”

“If we cannot work together through the regular order to keep the government funded and functioning then we should put our salaries to good use supporting causes that help people and nurture the communities who need it most,” said Rep. Hanabusa. “I intend to donate the salary I earn during the period that the government is shut down to charity.”

Background: Both members also did not take pay during the 2013 government shutdown. In 2013, Gabbard returned her salary to the U.S. Treasury and Hanabusa donated her salary to Meals on Wheels and the Moiliili Community Center.

$86 Million Sought for Puna CIP Projects

Rep. Joy San Buenventura

Hawai‘i Rep. Joy San Buenventura submitted House Bill 1617 relating to Capital Improvement Projects, seeking to appropriate more than $86 million in funds to help with the Puna District of Hawai‘i.

“Its about time that the children of Pāhoa Elementary School have their own cafeteria,” said Rep. Buenventura. “Kids should not need to cross the street and share a cafeteria with the teenagers of Pāhoa High & Intermediate. With a growing population, Pāhoa Elementary School should have its own cafeteria. Pāhoa Intermediate School needs a covered play court—separate from the older children of Pāhoa High School. The Highway 130 four-lane project has been in the books for awhile and is already in the 2019 budget. Having it in this bill is a reminder to have it funded.”

On Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2018, the bill was introduced and it passed the first reading.

The following projects were included on HB1617 that Rep. Buenventura is seeking appropriations for.

Pāhoa Elementary School:

Design and construction to renovate restrooms:

  • Design $10,000
  • Construction $50,000

Total $60,000

Design and construction for campus-wide repair and maintenance projects to reroof buildings and repaint building interiors and exteriors:

  • Design $105,000
  • Construction $440,000

Total $545,000

Also included in the elementary school appropriation, $9 million for construction for a new cafeteria and administration building.

Total funding sought for Pāhoa Elementary School: $9.605 million.

Pāhoa High and Intermediate Schools:

Plan, design, construction and equipment for a covering for the middle school play court:

  • Plans $100,000
  • Design $100,000
  • Construction $500,000
  • Equipment $300,000

Total $1 million

Plans, design, construction and equipment for a covered courtyard next to the gym:

  • Plans $10,000
  • Design $10,000
  • Construction $50,000
  • Equipment $30,000

Total $100,000

Plans, design, construction and equipment for a covered walkway from the cafeteria to the upper portables:

  • Plans $30,000
  • Design $30,000
  • Construction $150,000
  • Equipment $90,000

Total $300,000

Plans, design, construction and equipment to upgrade the track field:

  • Plans $1.5 million
  • Design $1.5 million
  • Construction $7.5 million
  • Equipment $4.5 million

Total $15 million

Total funding sought for Pāhoa High and Intermediate Schools: $16.4 million.

Highway 130 Map provided by Kea‘au-Pahoa Advisory Group (KPAG).

The bill also would appropriate $15 million for construction of a “Highway 130 Bypass Road” between Milo Street and Hawaiian Paradise Park as an alternate to Highway 130.

Also included in the initial version of the bill is $40 million for Highway 130 road improvements so  construction to expand the highway from two to four lanes or alternate alignments in that corridor between Kea‘au and Pāhoa can be completed.

Total funding sought for Highway 130 projects: $55 million.

Finally, the bill includes $5 million to plan, design, construct and for land acquisition for a wastewater treatment plant:

  • Plans $600,000
  • Design $750,000
  • Construction $1.75 million
  • Land acquisition $1.9 million

Total Funding: $5 million

Total funding requested for appropriation in HB1617: $86,005 million

Residents wishing to submit testimony, may do so online.

High Wind and High Surf Warning

The National Weather Service has issued a High Wind Warning and Advisory for Hawai‘i Island for Thursday, Jan. 18, through tomorrow night Friday, Jan. 19, 2018.

A High Wind Warning means maximum sustained winds of up to 40 mph with higher gusts and locally damaging winds. The highest winds are expected to occur in the district of Kohala. Hāmakua, Hilo, Puna, Ka‘ū and the summit areas may also experience high winds.

Due to the warning and advisory, the following are issued:

  • Owners of small boats and aircraft should take measures to secure their crafts.
  • Exercise extreme caution with all coastal and ocean activities as winds will generate rough and choppy conditions.
  • Residents and property owners should take action to secure loose outdoor objects before winds increase.
  • If you have outdoor plans today, be prepared for very windy conditions.
  • As in all high wind conditions, do expect possibility of power, phone, and internet interruptions
  • Motorists should be on the alert for debris on the roadways caused by the winds.

In addition, the National Weather Service has issued a High Surf Advisory for the shorelines of Kohala, Hāmakua, Hilo, Puna and Ka‘ū.

A High Surf Advisory means there is a threat to life and property from the surf. Oceanfront residents, all ocean activities, and beachgoers are advised to be on the alert for possible strong currents and breaking waves.

You are urged to take precautions to prepare for these conditions.

Native Hawaiian Law Center Names New Director

D. Kapuaala Sproat. Courtesy UH Manoa.

The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa announces that Associate Professor D. Kapua‘ala Sproat has been named director of the Ka Huli Ao Center for Excellence in Native Hawaiian Law at the William S. Richardson School of Law at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Associate Faculty Specialist Susan K. Serrano will become associate director.

Sproat’s main areas of expertise focus on Native Hawaiian law, indigenous rights and natural resource protection and management. She is an authority on Hawai‘i water rights and has played a major role at the law school in the Environmental Law Program, as well as in Ka Huli Ao. In 2014 she received a Board of Regents’ Excellence in Teaching Award recognizing her exceptional teaching record and many contributions to UH and the community.

Sproat succeeds Ka Huli Ao founder Professor Melody MacKenzie, who will be working on an update to her 1,400-page treatise, Native Hawaiian Law: A Treatise, as well as several other projects along with teaching duties. The treatise, edited and written by MacKenzie in collaboration with Sproat and Serrano, took 15 years to complete and offers a comprehensive overview as well as historical background for Native Hawaiian law as it relates to U.S. and international law.

Susan K. Serrano. Courtesy UH Manoa

Sproat was born and raised on Kaua‘i’s North Shore in Kalihiwai, and is a member of the Akana and Sproat ʻohana on Kaua‘i and Kohala on Hawai‘i Island.

Serrano, in addition to teaching legal practice and Second Year Seminar, oversees several Ka Huli Ao projects, including its research and scholarship program; Post-JD Research Fellowship Program; and communications, including the center’s e-newsletter. Before joining the UH law school, Serrano was a special projects attorney at the Asian Law Caucus in San Francisco.

Brown Assumes Command of Naval Surface Forces

Vice Adm. Richard A. Brown relieved Vice Adm. Thomas S. Rowden as commander, Naval Surface Forces (SURFOR) and commander, Naval Surface Force U.S. Pacific Fleet, Jan. 18.

Vice Adm. Richard A. Brown relieves Vice Adm. Thomas S. Rowden as Commander, Naval Surface Forces (SURFOR) and Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet today. The turnover was conducted at the SURFOR headquarters on Naval Amphibious Base Coronado. With the mission of warfighting and winning at sea, SURFOR provides Fleet Commanders with lethal, ready, well-trained, and logistically-supported Surface Forces to assure, deter and win at sea. (U.S. Navy photo)

The turnover was conducted at SURFOR headquarters

“It has been an honor to serve with you,” Rowden told the SURFOR straff. “I am proud of all of you and all you do to keep our nation free.”

Brown assumed command of SURFOR after having served as commander of Navy Personnel Command (NPC) and deputy chief of naval personnel. A native of Lowell, Mass., Brown graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1985 with a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics. He holds a Master of Science in Operations Research from the Naval Post Graduate School and a Master of Arts in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College.

“I am honored to assume command of Naval Surface Forces and command of Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet,” said Brown. “I am humbled by the opportunity to lead the Surface Force and its brave Sailors.”

With the mission of warfighting and winning at sea, commander, SURFOR provides Combatant Commanders with lethal, ready, well-trained, and logistically-supported Surface Forces to assure, deter and win at sea.

Rep. Saiki 2018 Legislative Session Opening Day Remarks

The 2018 Hawai‘i Legislative Session started on Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018, with opening day remarks by House Speaker Scott Saiki:

These are tumultuous times.

This year, we must step up to the plate.

The State of Hawai‘i requires leadership now and the House of Representatives can and should provide that leadership.

Unfortunately, one need only look to the past weekend to see a glaring instance of the inability of government at various levels to manage major issues facing our state.

Saturday’s events reinforce the importance of the role of government. It also shines light on the role of the Legislature as the policymaker and as the check on the other branches of government. It is our duty to ensure that the three branches abide by their respective constitutional duties so that we all do our jobs well.

We rely on the executive branch to competently and efficiently implement our laws and to administer programs. This begins with basic functions. Some of these functions must be carried out without mistakes because, when mistakes happen, the public loses confidence in all of us.

We also rely on the Judiciary to fairly adjudicate and dispense justice. It is not the role of judges to make policy decisions from the bench. It is the Legislature’s duty to set policy, and we do this with the benefit of broader public input and context.

The legislative branch, and particularly we as the House of Representatives, begin this session with a renewed sense of purpose.

The House is in a unique position to provide leadership. Part of the reason is our composition. Our 51 members are diverse, experienced, and energetic. We represent some of the smallest units of government. Our members have a pulse on what real people actually think, what they do, and what they want.

This collective insight is very powerful and should not be taken lightly. We should use this insight to be bold and creative. We should always be thinking of how to make things better.

There are two painfully obvious challenges that confront our state – the lack of affordable housing and the increasing homeless population. They are full of complexity and competing interests that make them hard to solve. They will require commitment and courageous action, sustained over several years.

But the time to start is now.

HOUSING

There is a shortage of 65,000 housing units in Hawai‘i. The State has set a goal of building 22,500 affordable rental units by the year 2026, and encouraging the development of housing for all income levels.

There is a huge gap between what our working families are able to pay and the cost of building new housing in Hawai‘i. The state and counties must continue to partner with private and nonprofit developers to add to the affordable housing inventory and make these projects pencil out.

To address the financing gap, we should consider increases to programs such as the Rental Housing Revolving Fund, Dwelling Unit Revolving Fund and the Rental Assistance Revolving Fund.

These programs will subsidize rents, infrastructure and construction costs.

For the very low income, elderly and disabled, we should upgrade our public housing inventory. We should also invest in infrastructure in areas that are conducive to such housing, including areas near the proposed rail stations.

HOMELESSNESS

There are now over 7,000 homeless persons throughout the state, including 667 families.

The approach to homelessness is multifaceted and requires short and long-term action. But there is a model that we can adopt. That model is Kahauiki Village.

Kahauiki Village is an example of a successful public-private partnership that included the combined work of the state, the city, nonprofits, and the private sector, some of whom had not interfaced before.

It is a self-contained community that is comprised of 153 transitional homes, a preschool, a market, and a police meeting room. It also operates from a PV-generated battery system and is off the electric grid.

This model can be extended to homeless populations with substance abuse and mental health conditions.

One important takeaway is that Kahauiki Village represents what is possible if people and agencies at different levels work towards a common goal.

And even as we develop more transitional housing, we must also increase law enforcement to avoid encroachment into public spaces. This encroachment affects the quality of life for all, and we must find ways to divert it.

PRESIDENT OBAMA

These are the kinds of issues that our residents are counting on us to solve. But leadership is more than solving issues.

A year ago, President Obama said something in his Farewell Address to the Nation that reminds me of Hawai‘i’s situation today.

He spoke of the youth, diversity, and drive of Americans, and the potential that these traits offered to our country.

But the President also offered this warning:

“[T]hat potential will be realized,” he said, “only if our democracy works. Only if our politics reflects the decency of our people. Only if all of us, regardless of our party affiliation or particular interest, help restore the sense of common purpose that we so badly need right now.”

The people of Hawai‘i are looking to us for more than problem solving.

They are also looking to us to articulate and demonstrate a sense of shared purpose that calls others, calls on everyone, to join in.

The House will play a critical role in calling people together in common purpose, but to do it, I believe that each of us must embrace three things.

First, let’s be open to reform and to challenge the status quo. We can still honor the past, but build upon the foundation that was left for us. It is okay to do things differently.

Second, let’s view challenges through the lens of those who are impacted by them. Some of the most contentious issues in Hawai‘i arise when people believe that government does not consider their perspective or history. We need to do better at reconciling these differences – by drawing on the knowledge of all our people – including those impacted by the policies we create – to shape the path forward.

Third, let’s take a global approach to decision-making. Sometimes government is too focused on jurisdiction and turf. We need to move beyond that.

CONCLUSION

Members, we are at a moment in history where we cannot just be stewards. This legislative session is a call to broader involvement and decisive action. We must be courageous activists because the issues facing our state are too urgent to wait. I know that we are up to the challenge.

This year, we will rebuild a foundation that will help many residents throughout our state. And by doing so, we will advance Hawai‘i’s tradition of pioneering justice, fairness, and opportunity for all.

Thank you and best wishes for a productive session.

Hawai‘i State Senate Convenes

On Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018, the Hawai‘i State Senate convened the second year of the 29th Legislative Biennium Session with a renewed commitment to protect and sustain the people of Hawai‘i and its natural resources and to strengthen communities through effective legislation.

The opening session commenced with an invocation by Pastor Matt Higa from New Hope Kaua‘i. The National Anthem and Hawai‘i Pono‘i was performed by Ms. Nalani Brun.

Photo courtesy Hawai‘i Senate Majority

Among the honored guests in the Senate Chamber were members of the Fukuoka Prefectural Assembly, Governor David Ige, mayors and council members from the neighbor islands.

Senate President Ronald D. Kouchi opened the session with remarks on issues where he hopes the Senate will continue to provide leadership and pass meaningful legislation.

Senate President Kouchi encouraged Senators to continue to find ways to address the challenges of homelessness and follow through on the commitment to build affordable housing. With the state facing possible cuts of $12 million in federal aid, he asked Senators to remember to protect our kūpuna and to ensure they are providing adequate health services for each and every resident of the state. He also encouraged Senators to continue to grow the economy to maintain funding for much needed services.

Photo courtesy Hawai‘i Senate Majority

“Creating opportunities for each and every child in this state to close the income gap and to be able to reach for the stars and realize their dreams,” is the reason Senate President Kouchi emphasized education as a priority for the Senate, starting with providing funding to allow better training for teachers to give students the best education available.

President Kouchi called for support to expand the Promise Program, which provides tuition assistance for community college “so that financial need is not an obstacle to higher education and make college a reality for each and every student in Hawai‘i.”

He also wants to see an expansion of the Early College program, which brings university instructors to local high schools. Students are able to earn college credits while in high school, giving them the confidence to pursue higher learning and helping defray the cost of college, which is “a critical stepping stone to allow our children to find that pathway to success,” said Senate President Kouchi.

Photo courtesy Hawai‘i Senate Majority.

With the success of the Farm-to-School program that started in Kohala and is expanding to other schools, President Kouchi was encouraged to see a possible partnership between the Department of Agriculture and the Department of Education to grow the program that sources local fruits and vegetables, and most recently, locally grown beef. The Department of Education serves more than 100,000 meals a day making it essentially the largest restaurant in the state. “If we have a commitment from the largest restaurant in the State of Hawai‘i to purchase locally grown food, this is the way I see a path forward to put active production on agricultural land the state has purchased and we will be able to bring back farming and address the issue of food security.”

Reflecting on the events of Saturday’s false ballistic missile threat, President Kouchi told Senators “we found out how connected we are.” Just as in the moments when there was fear and the foremost thought was expressing love and appreciation for those closest to us, he encouraged Senators “to express love and hope and always be conscious of what you say.” He also vowed to work with the administration to determine the best practices and what is needed to ensure it does not happen again and how, as legislators, they can carry out their responsibilities to guarantee that each citizen and guest of the state will be safe.

Kouchi also assured the Governor that all 25 State Senators are committed to working on legislation that provide the best results for the people of Hawai‘i.

Photo courtesy Hawai‘i Senate Majority.

The Senate has committed to continue to fortify the state’s position as a leader in sustainability and climate change mitigation by working to implement the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals at the state level. The 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals is a voluntary international call for action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals of the 2018 Senate Legislative Program are posted on the Hawai‘i Senate Majority website.

“Hawai‘i was the first state in the nation to enact legislation that support the commitments and goals of the Paris climate accord,” said Senate Majority Leader J. Kalani English. “The Sustainable Development Goals will continue the efforts of the Senate to build a more resilient state and improve the quality of life for future generations.”

28th Annual Na Po‘e Pa‘ahana Awards

Big Island residents won first and second place awards in five categories as Hawai‘i’s hospitality industry honored the best-of-the-best of its employees at the 28th Annual Na Po‘e Pa‘ahana (the hard-working people) Awards. Nearly a thousand employees, family members, and industry representatives from throughout the state gathered for the luncheon ceremony, which was sponsored by the Hawai‘i Lodging & Tourism Association (HLTA) and held at the Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort on Thursday, Jan.11, 2018.

Hawaii Island finalists take 1st and 2nd place in five categories at hospitality industry awards.

“We’re very proud to recognize the people who are the heart and soul of our visitor industry,” said HLTA president and CEO Mufi Hannemann. “They number in the tens of thousands across the state, and this year we have been able to recognize 60 of the finest individuals across small, medium, and large hotels throughout the state. All of the Na Po‘e Pa‘ahana honorees embody the aloha spirit at work and in the community, and we cannot be more thankful for their contributions to the success of our industry.”

Recipients of HLTA’s accolades are selected based on nominations submitted by their supervisors and co-workers, and are judged on the basis of outstanding and exceptional service to lodging guests, coworkers, and the community.

A total of 67 awards were presented at the event, emceed by KHON2 co-anchors Howard Dashefsky and Marisa Yamane.

Clarence Yee. Courtesy Photo

Clarence Yee, Journeyman Tradesman at the Mauna Lani Bay Hotel & Bungalows, was named the Outstanding Lodging Employee of the Year. “Yee has served 38 years in the industry, and is the most senior person at his resort,” said Hanneman. “His selfless generosity, humility, and excellent teamwork shines not only with his fellow associates, but with everyone he meets.”

This year’s Na Po‘e Pa‘ahana award winners and runners-up are as follows. Hawai‘i Island finalists are highlighted:

Outstanding Lodging Employee of the Year: 

  • 1st Place – Clarence Yee, Mauna Lani Bay Hotel & Bungalows
  • 2nd Place – Branden Gaspar, Waikiki Resort Hotel
  • 3rd Place – Juanito Tomas, Marriott’s Ko ‘Olina Beach Club

Manager of the Year:

  • 1st Place – Carol Lopes, Embassy Suites by Hilton Waikiki Beach Walk
  • 2nd Place – Brandon Maeda, The Westin Ka’anapali Ocean Resort Villas
  • 3rd Place – Anderson Almario, Sheraton Waikiki Bell

Valet Person of the Year Large Property (Over 450 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Patricio (Peter) Santiago, The Westin Maui Resort & Spa
  • 2nd Place – George Sumida, Prince Waikiki
  • 3rd Place – Benjamin Sarian, Sheraton Maui Resort & Spa

Medium Property (200-450 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Oren Yamagata, Waikoloa Beach Marriott
  • 2nd Place – Craig Shimizu, The Kahala Hotel & Resort
  • 3rd Place – Nathan Brovelli, Aston at The Whaler on Ka’anapali Beach

Small Property (Under 200 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Rexie Butihi, Maui Beach Hotel
  • 2nd Place – Tiki Uikirifi, The Surfjack Hotel & Swim Club
  • 3rd Place – James Winston, Luana Waikiki Hotel & Suites

Engineering/Maintenance Person of the Year Large Property (Over 450 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – David Rickard, The Westin Maui Resort & Spa
  • 2nd Place – Trudenio Ramirez, Sheraton Waikiki
  • 3rd Place – Nelson Tomas, Sheraton Maui Resort & Spa

Medium Property (200-450 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Terence Yamasaki, Mauna Lani Bay Hotel
  • 2nd Place – Wayne Ohta, Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel
  • 3rd Place – Rodney Young, Marriott’s Waiohai Beach Club

Small Property (Under 200 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Xing Lin, Hokulani Waikiki by Hilton Grand Vacations Club 2
  • nd Place – Ferdinand Lagundino, Lawai Beach Resort
  • 3rd Place – Ben Simao, Marriott’s Kauai Lagoons – Kalanipu’u

Food & Beverage Person of the Year Large Property (Over 450 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Roger Arrieta, The Westin Maui Resort & Spa
  • 2nd Place – Willie Aniban, The Westin Ka’anapali Ocean Resort Villas
  • 3rd Place – Thomas Rodrigues, Sheraton Waikiki

Medium Property (200-450 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Sharon Pacheco-Escobar, Waikoloa Beach Marriott
  • 2nd Place – Nancy Dearborn, The Westin Princeville Ocean Resort Villas
  • 3rd Place – Debra Agdinaoay, Andaz Maui at Wailea

Small Property (Under 200 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Robert Bidigare, The Surfjack Hotel & Swim Club

Front Office Person of the Year Large Property (Over 450 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Melani Akuna, The Royal Hawaiian, a Luxury Collection Resort
  • 2nd Place – Kelly Stutzman, Grand Wailea, A Waldorf Astoria Resort
  • 3rd Place – Byron “Keola” Makaiau, Moana Surfrider, A Westin Resort & Spa

Medium Property (200-450 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Rebecca “Becs” Kaneapua-Alexander, Aston at The Whaler on Ka’anapali Beach
  • 2nd Place – Denise “Dee Dee” Mikasa, The Kahala Hotel & Resort
  • 3rd Place – Craig Pohl, The Ritz-Carlton, Kapalua

Small Property (Under 200 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Tracy Pinnow, Ewa Hotel Waikiki
  • 2nd Place – Janine Pagador, Lawai Beach Resort
  • 3rd Place – Darwin Van Antwerp, Wyndham Vacation Resorts Royal Garden at Waikiki

Housekeeper of the Year:

  • 1st Place – Wilfredo Galicha, Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort
  • 2nd Place – Arnel Tuazon, Hale Koa Hotel
  • 3rd Place – Brittany Bilbrey, Aulani, a Disney Resort & Spa

Medium Property (200-450 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Delia Bernal, The Kahala Hotel & Resort
  • 2nd Place – Ador Recaido, Aston Waikiki Sunset
  • 3rd Place – Leah Cacay, Waikiki Resort Hotel

Small Property (Under 200 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Remedios Castillo, The Pagoda Hotel
  • 2nd Place – Andrea Clemente, Aqua Oasis Hotel
  • 3rd Place – Jocelyn Bato, The Surfjack Hotel & Swim Club

Security Officer of the Year Large Property (Over 450 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Marvin Rabara, The Westin Ka’anapali Ocean Resort Villas
  • 2nd Place – Steven Sotelo, Hilton Hawaiian Village Waikiki Beach Resort
  • 3rd Place – Jameson DeMello, Hale Koa Hotel

Medium Property (200-450 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Shawn Maxwell, The Westin Princeville Ocean Resort Villas
  • 2nd Place – Avlyn Moniz, Mauna Kea Beach Hotel
  • 3rd Place – Nathan Chun, ‘OHANA Waikiki East by Outrigger

Small Property (Under 200 Rooms):

  • 1st Place – Mark Pasion, Lawai Beach Resort
  • 2nd Place – Shawn Uyeda, Marriott’s Kauai Lagoons – Kalanipu‘u

Allied Member of the Year:

Alaska Airlines was named the Allied Member of the Year. The company was recognized as a valuable member of the HLTA for its support of Hawai‘i’s visitor industry and the community.

Leader in Sustainability Award:

The Kahala Hotel & Resort, for their exemplary sustainable practices which have been implemented in its daily operations for over 50 years.

Hospitality Educator of the Year:

Charlene Navarro, Kauai High School, for her active engagement in Kauai High School’s Academy of Hospitality & Tourism and enduring support of Hawai‘i’s future hospitality leaders.

Na Po‘e Pa‘ahana Legacy Award:

The Brothers Cazimero, for playing an instrumental role in Hawaii’s visitor industry through the field of culture, arts, and entertainment.

Woman of the Year Award:

Teri Orton, Hawaii Convention Center/AEG Facilities, for her leadership within the hospitality industry, community and HLTA’s Women in Lodging & Tourism committee.

Chef/Restaurateur of the Year:

Colin Hazama, The Royal Hawaiian, a Luxury Collection Resort, for his significant contributions to Hawai‘i’s culinary industry and the community.

The Hawai‘i Lodging & Tourism Association (HLTA) is a statewide organization representing hotels, condominiums, timeshares, other lodging entities, suppliers, and related firms and individuals. HLTA is dedicated to supporting Hawai‘i’s visitor industry through education, political action, and membership benefits, and raising awareness about its contributions to communities throughout the state.

Legal Cannabis Businesses Must Be Allowed Access to Banks, Hawai‘i Urges

Hawai‘i Attorney General Doug Chin and Alaska Attorney General Jahna Lindemuth, joined by 17 other attorneys general, urged Congress on Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018, to advance legislation allowing states with legalized medical or recreational marijuana to bring that commerce into the banking system.

AG Chin and AG Lindemuth co-chair the bipartisan National Association of Attorneys General Marijuana Working Group, comprised of states that have legalized either medical cannabis dispensaries, like Hawai‘i, or recreational cannabis.

“Banks and other depository institutions are currently hindered by federal law from providing financial services to cannabis businesses,” said Attorney General Chin, “This encourages a cash-only, grey market that hurts law enforcement and tax collections.”

The multi-state letter requests legislation that would provide a legal “safe harbor” for depository institutions that provide a financial product or service to a covered business in a state that regulates its marijuana industry. Attorney General Chin and the 18 attorneys general emphasized that the requested legislation would not only protect public safety by bringing grey-market financial activities into the banking sector and thus subject to law enforcement monitoring, but would also result in billions of dollars infused into the banking industry.

“Twenty-nine states [including Hawai‘i] and several US territories have legalized the medical use of marijuana. Among those, eight states and the District of Columbia also allow recreational use by adults over 21 years of age. However, because federal government classifies marijuana as an illegal substance, banks providing services to state-licensed cannabis businesses could find themselves subject to criminal and civil liability under the Controlled Substances Act and certain federal banking statutes,” the letter states.

The attorneys general also note a recent decision by the United States Department of Justice to rescind guidance on how financial institutions could provide services to state-licensed marijuana businesses consistent with federal law. That rescission, the attorneys general argue, has made even more urgent the need for congressional action to get the cash generated by this industry into a regulated banking sector.

The multi-state letter was sponsored by Hawai‘i, Alaska, District of Columbia and North Dakota. It was also signed by California, Colorado, Connecticut, Guam, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont, and Washington.

Today in Hawai‘i, eight licensees have received permission to operate dispensaries for licensed medical cannabis patients.

Dear Congressional Leaders:

We are a bipartisan group of state attorneys general who recognize that the states and federal government share a strong interest in protecting public safety and bringing grey market activities into the regulated banking sector. To address these goals, we urge Congress to advance legislation that would allow states that have legalized medical or recreational use of marijuana to bring that commerce into the banking system.

Twenty-nine states and several US territories have legalized the medical use of marijuana. Among those, eight states and the District of Columbia, also allow recreational use by adults over 21 years of age. However, because the federal government classifies marijuana as an illegal substance, banks providing services to state-licensed cannabis businesses could find themselves subject to criminal and civil liability under the Controlled Substances Act and certain federal banking statutes. This risk has significantly inhibited the willingness of financial institutions to provide services to these businesses.

Despite the contradictions between federal and state law, the marijuana industry continues to grow rapidly. Industry analysts report that sales grew by 30% to $6.7 billion in 2016 and expect those totals to exceed $20 billion by 2021. Yet those revenues often exist outside of the regulated banking space. Businesses are forced to operate on a cash basis. The grey market makes it more difficult to track revenues for taxation purposes, contributes to a public safety threat as cash intensive businesses are often targets for criminal activity, and prevents proper tracking of large swaths of finances across the nation.

To address these challenges, we are requesting legislation that would provide a safe harbor for depository institutions that provide a financial product or service to a covered business in a state that has implemented laws and regulations that ensure accountability in the marijuana industry such as the SAFE Banking Act (S. 1152 and H.R. 2215) or similar legislation. This would bring billions of dollars into the banking sector, and give law enforcement the ability to monitor these transactions. Moreover, compliance with tax requirements would be simpler and easier to enforce with a better-defined tracking of funds. This would, in turn, result in higher tax revenue.

Prior Department of Justice guidance outlined how financial institutions could provide services to state-licensed marijuana businesses consistent with their obligations under federal law and created some space for the banking industry to work with those businesses, though challenges remained in many areas. The recent rescission of that guidance has made the need for Congressional action to get the cash generated by this industry into a regulated banking sector even more urgent.

Our banking system must be flexible enough to address the needs of businesses in the various states, with state input, while protecting the interests of the federal government. This includes a banking system for marijuana-related businesses that is both responsive and effective in meeting the demands of our economy. We look forward to working with you as you move forward in this process and lending our voice and expertise as you develop legislation.

HPD Searching for Puna Man Missing Since August

The Hawaiʻi Island Police Department is searching for a 29-year-old Puna man reported as missing.

Garret Jenks

Garret Jenks was last seen in early August. He is described as 5-feet-8-inches, 140 pounds, thin build, light complexion, with hazel eyes and short blonde hair.

Police ask anyone with information on his whereabouts to call Officer Branden Watanabe at the Puna Police Station (808) 965-2716 or the Police Department’s non-emergency line at (808) 935-3311.

USS Fitzgerald: Courts-Martial Proceedings/Article 32

YOKOSUKA, Japan (June 17, 2017) The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) returns to Fleet Activities (FLEACT) Yokosuka following a collision with a merchant vessel while operating southwest of Yokosuka, Japan. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Peter Burghart/Released)

Below is a statement released January 16 by U.S. Navy Chief of Information (Acting), Capt. Greg Hicks on Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) charges preferred against individual service members in relation to the USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) and USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) collisions:

“On 30 October 2017, Admiral William Moran, Vice Chief of Naval Operations, designated Admiral Frank Caldwell as the Consolidated Disposition Authority to review the accountability actions taken to date in relation to USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) and USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) collisions and to take additional administrative or disciplinary actions as appropriate.

After careful deliberation, today Admiral Frank Caldwell announced that Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) charges are being preferred against individual service members in relation to the collisions.

USS Fitzgerald: Courts-martial proceedings/Article 32 hearings are being convened to review evidence supporting possible criminal charges against Fitzgerald members. The members’ ranks include one Commander (the Commanding Officer), two Lieutenants, and one Lieutenant Junior Grade. The charges include dereliction of duty, hazarding a vessel, and negligent homicide.

USS John S. McCain: Additionally, for John S. McCain, one court- martial proceeding/Article 32 hearing is being convened to review evidence supporting possible criminal charges against one Commander (the Commanding Officer). The charges include dereliction of duty, hazarding a vessel, and negligent homicide. Also, one charge of dereliction of duty was preferred and is pending referral to a forum for a Chief Petty Officer.

The announcement of an Article 32 hearing and referral to a court-martial is not intended to and does not reflect a determination of guilt or innocence related to any offenses. All individuals alleged to have committed misconduct are entitled to a presumption of innocence.

Additional administrative actions are being conducted for members of both crews including non-judicial punishment for four Fitzgerald and four John S. McCain crewmembers.

Information regarding further actions, if warranted, will be discussed at the appropriate time.”

Student Meals Feature Another Local Food Source

The Hawai‘i State Department of Education (HIDOE) continues to try and use local agriculture in student meals through its ‘Aina Pono Harvest of the Month program, which kicked off last year with locally grown beef. This month, HIDOE and the Lieutenant Governor’s Office have partnered up with the Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture (HDOA) and various local farms across the state to serve fresh bananas at all public schools.

Fresh bananas will be served in a Banana Pie or a Banana Crumble (pictured above) at every public school cafeteria in January.
Photo Credit: Department of Education

“We’re highlighting locally grown bananas by serving either a fresh Banana Pie or Banana Crumble one day in January at every school cafeteria,” said administrator for School Food Services Branch Albert Scales. “By introducing a produce that is locally grown in Hawai‘i to our students each month, we hope to expand their palates and allow them to try new foods that they might not have been exposed to at home.”

Scales said serving the bananas in a dessert would make it more appealing for students. “Instead of serving raw bananas that students can peel and eat, we wanted to be creative,” he said. “Part of introducing new foods to children is making it fun for them. If the new food looks interesting, they’re more inclined to try it.”

While HIDOE is changing the way food is purchased, prepared and delivered, the ‘Aina Pono Harvest of the Month program is also a great opportunity for Hawaii’s agriculture community.

“This new program that was developed under the Farm to School Initiative continues to cultivate the partnership with our schools, farmers and ranchers,” said Scott Enright, chairperson of the Hawai‘i Board of Agriculture. “It also connects students with the farming community, allowing them to experience the taste and freshness of what Hawai‘i has to offer.”

Approximately 34,000 lbs. of bananas are being provided by several local farms, including Sugarland Growers Inc. and ‘Ohana Banana Farms, to name a few.

“We’re excited to be working with the Department of Education on incorporating more fresh, local produce for Hawaii’s public school students,” said owner of Sugarland Growers Larry Jefts.

Jefts said purchasing local foods from our food safety certified farms on each island also helps to support and strengthen Hawai‘i’s economy.

“Buying local creates important economic opportunities and supports our community’s growth and sustainability,” said Jefts. “The money that is spent on locally grown foods is reinvested with other local businesses and services across the state. There are numerous benefits as a result of this coming full circle.”

The Farm to School Initiative started in 2015, and was led by Lt. Gov. Shan Tsutsui. The program was created to increase locally grown food in student meals through a partnership with Lt. Gov. Tsutsui, HIDOE, the Department of Agriculture and The Kohala Center. Today, the Farm to School Initiative is included under ‘Aina Pono, which also incorporates school gardens, nutrition, health and food education, test kitchens, meal programs and menu planning at Hawai‘i’s public schools.

Gov. Ige: False Alert ‘Will Never Happen Again’

Hawai‘i Gov. David Ige issued a message to residents and visitors of Hawai‘i on Sunday, Jan. 14, at 1:07 p.m., the day after an erroneous message was sent by the state’s emergency management agency, warning of an incoming ballistic missile.

“On Saturday, Hawai‘i’s residents and visitors experienced an unfortunate situation that has never happened before and will never happen again—a false alert issued by the Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency that a ballistic missile was on its way to the Hawaiian Islands.

“On behalf of the State of Hawai‘i, I deeply apologize for this false alert that created stress, anxiety and fear of a crisis in our residents and guests.

“I can personally assure each and every resident and visitor that steps have already been taken by the Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency to ensure that a situation of this type never happens again.

“The Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency is committed to protecting the people of Hawai‘i, and over the past year it has been taking responsible measures to prepare for the highly unlikely event of a missile attack. As a state government, we must learn from this unfortunate error and continue to prepare for any safety threat to Hawai‘i’s residents and visitors—whether it is a man-made threat or a natural disaster such as a hurricane or tsunami.

“In the next few days, I will continue meeting with our emergency preparedness team and personally talking with families, individuals and leaders from around our state to ensure we reach every household. We must also do what we can to demand peace and a de-escalation of tensions with North Korea.

“Again, on behalf of the State of Hawai‘i, I apologize for yesterday’s events and any hardship and inconvenience this created for you, your family and loved ones.”

During a press conference on Saturday afternoon, Jan. 13, 2018, Hawaiʻi Gov. David Ige said he is “angry and disappointed” following a false alarm notification issued by the Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency (HI-EMA), warning the public of an incoming ballistic missile.

HI-EMA confirmed that there was no ballistic missile and that there were no computer hacks to its system. The message was sent out due to human error, according to authorities.

HI-EMA Administrator Vern Miyagi said he “deeply apologizes” for the incident, adding that he accepts responsibility because it was “his team” that was involved.

HI-EMA officials said they have already taken measures to ensure that an incident such as the one that occurred this morning does not happen again. HI-EMA has also started a review of cancellation procedures to inform the public immediately if a cancellation is warranted.

“We understand that false alarms such as this can erode public confidence in our emergency notification systems,” HI-EMA officials said. “We understand the serious nature of the warning alert systems and the need to get this right 100% of the time.”

“I know first-hand how today’s false alarm affected all of us here in Hawaiʻi, and I am sorry for the pain and confusion it caused,” said Gov. Ige. “I, too, am extremely upset about this and am doing everything I can do to immediately improve our emergency management systems, procedures and staffing,”

On the recommendations of Miyagi, the governor has suspended all future drills until HI-EMA has completed a full analysis of the event.

HI-EMA has already instituted a two-person activation/verification rule for tests as well as actual missile launch notifications.

An automatic cancellation command that that can be triggered within seconds of an error has been put in place.

This is the process that HI-EMA is currently reviewing:

Expanding notification processes for Hawaiʻi’s Congressional delegations, county mayors and key staff.

A formal preliminary report of findings and corrective actions will be issued next week.

According to HI-EMA officials, in the case of an actual event, it would take 20 minutes from launch to impact for a missile from North Korea to reach Hawaiʻi.

Authorities would spend the first five minutes characterizing the launch to determine the missile’s path. Once it is determined that is incoming to Hawaiʻi, the warning point person has the authority to press the button to initiate public notification.

If an actual threat exists and the public notification has been issued, residents and visitors of Hawai‘i would have an estimated 11 to 13 minutes to get inside, stay inside and stay informed.

The federal government’s Ready.org website offers guidelines on what to do before, during and after a nuclear blast.

RELATED LINKS

NO INCOMING BALLISTIC MISSILE: FALSE ALARM
Gov. Ige Statement on False Alarm
Hawai‘i Reacts to Ballistic Missile False Alarm
Hawai‘i Tourism Authority on Ballistic Missile False Alarm
Hawai‘i Emergency Management Attributes False Alarm to Human Error

Former President Clinton Visits Big Island

Former President Bill Clinton is currently enjoying time on the Big Island of Hawai‘i.

Sen.Kai Kahele, President Bill Clinton and Sen. Brickwood Galuteria. PC: Sen. Kahele.

Clinton was the 42nd president to serve our country, serving from 1993 to 2001. 

Hawai‘i State Sens. Kai Kahele and Brickwood Galuteira got to meet with him on Friday, Jan. 12, 2018, for about 45 minutes.

“We talked about Hawai‘i and how much it has to offer the world and how America could use a little bit of aloha right now,” said Sen. Kahele.

Besides talking with the former president, the Senators gave him a portrait of the famed Polynesian voyaging canoe Hōkūle‘a.

The former president will be on the Big Island until Monday, Jan. 15.

Gov. Ige Statement on Today’s False Alarm

Hawai‘i Gov. Ige released the following statement after meetings and debriefings with leaders at the Department of Defense and Hawai‘i Emergency Management after today’s false alarm to an incoming ballistic missile:

Today is a day most of us will never forget. A terrifying day when our worst nightmares appeared to become a reality. A day where we frantically grabbed what we could, tried to figure out how and where to shelter and protect ourselves and our ‘ohana, said our “I love yous,” and prayed for peace.

I know firsthand how today’s false notification affected all of us here in Hawai‘i, and I am sorry for the pain and confusion it caused. I, too, am extremely upset about this and am doing everything I can to immediately improve our emergency management systems, procedures and staffing.

I have spent the morning with Gen. Logan, Hi-EMA Administrator Vern Miayagi and their teams and have directed that they make immediate changes. We are doing everything we possibly can to prevent this from happening again.

I encourage all of us to take stock, determine what we all can do better to be prepared in the future – as a state, county and in our own households. We must also do what we can to demand peace and a de-escalation with North Korea, so that warnings and sirens can become a thing of the past.

Governor David Ige

NO INCOMING BALLISTIC MISSILE: FALSE ALARM

VIDEO: Damon Tucker interviews Mayor Harry Kim.

UPDATE: Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, 11:13 a.m.

Maui County Emergency Management Agency Officer Herman Andaya told Big Island Now just before 11 a.m. today that the incident occurred during a shift change at the State of Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency in Honolulu.

It is the State of Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency that sounds these alerts, Andaya said.

There are three shift changes throughout day at HEMA, operating 24/7, he said.

“They have procedures in place,” Andaya said. “They go through a drill of what to do at every shift change.”

“It is our understanding that at the 8 a.m. shift change, someone ‘hit the wrong button’—erroneously sounding the alert,” he said.

“The false alarm is still under investigation by the State of Hawaii,” Andaya said. “Although it was a false alarm, we should take this opportunity to prepare ourselves for such emergencies. Our residents should remember that if this was an actual ballistic missile attack, the public is advised to get inside, stay inside and stay informed.”

The public should also be reminded that prior to an emergency, make a plan, create an emergency kit and stay informed (see “EMERGENCY KIT RECOMMENDATIONS” below).

A guidance summary of what to do in the event of an actual attack can be found online.

UPDATE: 10:43 a.m.

The following is a statement by Sen. J. Kalani English, Senate Majority Leader, on today’s false ballistic threat alarm:

“The events surrounding this morning’s false alarm regarding a “ballistic missile threat to Hawaiʻi” is both unfortunate and very unacceptable. The Hawaiʻi Emergency Management Agency (Civil Defense) and the United States Pacific Command Center have confirmed that there is no threat to our islands.

“I am outraged that a mistake of this magnitude occurred. The initial alert was sent out via Civil Defense at 8:15am HST and it took the Hawaiʻi Emergency Management Agency over 38 minutes to clarify that the “alarm” was inadvertent and indeed a mistake. The panic and pandemonium that many in Hawaiʻi experienced was unwarranted and completely unnecessary.

“I will be working with my colleagues in the Legislature to investigate into this matter and to provide the proper oversight to ensure that our state emergency alert system is properly functioning. We need to ensure that this never happens again and I am committed to doing so.”

UPDATE: 9:28 a.m.

Gov. David Ige is meeting this morning with top officials of the State Department of Defense and the Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency to determine what caused this morning’s false alarm and to prevent it from happening again.

“While I am thankful this morning’s alert was a false alarm, the public must have confidence in our emergency alert system. I am working to get to the bottom of this so we can prevent an error of this type in the future,” said Gov. Ige.

House of Representatives Speaker Scott K. Saiki released the following statement after the false missile alarm:

“This system we have been told to rely upon failed and failed miserably today. I am deeply troubled by this misstep that could have had dire consequences. Measures must be taken to avoid further incidents that caused wholesale alarm and chaos today.

“Clearly, government agencies are not prepared and lack the capacity to deal with emergency situations. Apparently, the wrong button was pushed and it took over 30 minutes for a correction to be announced. Parents and children panicked during those 30 minutes.

“The Hawai‘i House of Representatives will immediately investigate what happened and there be consequences. This cannot happen again.”

News sources have simply reported that “the wrong button was pushed.”

ORIGINAL POST: Saturday, Jan. 13, 8:10 a.m.

The alert sent out at 8:07 a.m. is an official false alarm, according to Hawai‘i County Civil Defense.

According to a police officer interviewed by Big Island Now Reporter Damon Tucker in front of Hawai‘i County Civil Defense headquarters, the alarm was sent in error. It was supposed to be a scheduled test.

At 8:36 a.m., the COUNTY OF HAWAI‘I Civil Defense issued this information: “Please disregard message of nuclear attack. There is NO THREAT of Missile Launch at this time.”

The alert said, “Ballistic missile threat inbound to Hawai‘i. Seek immediate shelter. This is not a drill.”

A disaster alert was sent out at 8:07 a.m. About 30 minutes later, officials released information about the false alarm.

In the meantime, there was no additional information available on radio or TV, and none was provided to the media by official outlets.

No warning sirens were sounded throughout the state.

It has been reported that an incoming missile from North Korea could reach Hawai‘i in 15 to 20 minutes. The state has no nuclear shelters.
As tensions between the US and North Korea continue to escalate, Hawai‘i has resumed the monthly tests at 11:45 a.m. on the first business day of every month to inform its residents of an impending nuclear attack.
The Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency said that the monthly tests are intended to update the population on what the agency is doing to “prepare our state for a nuclear threat.”

However, authorities say the possibility of a North Korean nuclear strike is unlikely.

In response to BigIslandNow.com’s disaster alert post, Facebook post and video post, Big Islanders expressed their concerns along with gratitude for the information—especially the false alarm notice:
The frightening part… we believed it, because our leadership has been so incredibly poor.
The concern here is that citizens will now be conditioned to respond ineffectively in the event of a true emergency. Major fail.
Sounds like some emergency official types need to be sent packing.
If Trump pushes the big red button on this mishap, there’s no turning back. We want PEACE.
No the statement they MEANT to issue was, “We cannot apologize enough for the costly mistake of issuing a false nuclear missile alarm to the citizens of Hawaii. We are looking into this matter and will ensure it will not repeat in the future.” You don’t just tell people to DISREGARD after all that mayhem. An apology is due IMMEDIATELY!
I called my sis right away crying scared. I still cannot breathe have a knot on my entire body. This is totally unacceptable. They need to take this seriously.
I hope they will track ER visits for cardiac events this week. Spoken from a 9/11 mental health provider, cortisol levels for the entire state just sky-rocketed. There will certainly be medical fallout that should be documented.
I am extremely surprised how sporadic coverage was on the local radio and tv during the alert! In such circumstances, black out all programmed shows and set alert message(s) on repeat or switch to local news reporter!
Sounds like a scare tactic. Someone’s head should roll.
Wow that’s a big mistake!
Appreciate you reporting the news as I couldn’t find it anywhere and no other messages came over our phone.
Radio stations need a live body to make intercede recorded programming.
 It shows how many people are not prepared.
Someone needs to be fired!
FALSE ALARM=HEART ATTACK
Prayers.
Thank God!

If this was an actual warning, not a false alarm, Hawai‘i residents and visitors should immediately seek shelter. Again, the state has no nuclear fallout shelters.

EMERGENCY KIT RECOMMENDATIONS

  • 14 days of food, water and medications:
  • One gallon of water per person per day for drinking and sanitation.
  • Nonperishable food.
  • Manual can opener.
  • Battery-powered or solar-powered radio with extra batteries.
  • Important documents in a sealed plastic bag:
  • Identification.
  • Debit and credit card information.
  • Banking information.
  • All insurance information.
  • Healthcare directives.
  • Copy of property title/deeds.
  • Copy of prescriptions and dosages.
  • Phone list of family and important numbers.
  • Flashlight and extra batteries.
  • Plastic bag and ties for personal sanitation.
  • Matches, blankets and tarps.
  • First-aid kit.
  • Whistle to signal for help.
  • Personal hygiene items:
  • Toothbrush and toothpaste.
  • Soap and shampoo.
  • Antibacterial hand wipes.
  • Toilet paper.
  • Deodorant.
  • Eyecare (if needed).
  • Moisturizing lotion.
  • Extra cash in small bills.

Contact your emergency management/county civil defense agency to report siren operation issues:

Hawai‘i County: (808) 935-0031
Maui County: (808) 270-7285
City and County of Honolulu: (808) 723-8960
Kaua‘i County: (808) 241-1800

RELATED LINK
Hawai‘i Completes First Attack Warning Test Since Cold War

Man Identified in Hawaiian Beaches Suicide

The Hawai‘i Island Police Department reports that an autopsy was held today on the man who shot himself, ending the standoff with police in Hawaiian Beaches earlier this week.

The standoff the Hawaiʻi Island Police Department had been investigating involving a lone, barricaded man in the Hawaiian Beaches subdivision in lower Puna came to an end with the subject taking his own life just before 1 p.m., today, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. PC: Anna Pelayo

Hawai‘i Island police have identified the man as 51-year-old Keith K. Cummings of Pāhoa. The pathologist was able to confirm that he died from a single, self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. The manner of death has been determined to be suicide.

Tuesday morning, Jan. 9, 2018 at about 12:20 a.m., patrol officers responded to a report of gunshots fired at a residence on Kamanu Street in Hawaiian Beaches. Upon their arrival, officers were confronted by a male with a firearm seated within a vehicle parked in the driveway of a residence. Several more shots were fired upon the officers’ arrival, though it is unclear if any shots were directed at the officers. The occupant of the residence was able to leave home safely and is physically unharmed.

The department’s Special Response Team responded to the scene and crisis negotiators established communication with the suspect who remained in his vehicle.

Flags to Fly at Half-Staff in Honor of Former State Rep. Kawakami

Gov. David Ige has ordered that the flags of the United States and State of Hawai‘i shall be flown at half-staff at all state offices and agencies, as well as the Hawai‘i National Guard, as a mark of respect for the late former Hawai‘i State Rep. Bertha Kawakami, on Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018.

“Rep. Kawakami positively influenced the lives of many of Hawai‘i’s youth while serving at the Hawai‘i State Department of Education for more than 30 years,” said Gov. David Ige. “I first knew her as an educator on O‘ahu. Throughout her lifetime, she was committed to working for Hawai‘i, and making our state a better place to live. To Bertha’s family, may you find peace in knowing that her memory will live on in the hearts of those whose lives she touched.”

Flags will be flown at half-staff from sunrise to sunset on Saturday, Jan. 13, the day of Kawakami’s memorial service.