Hōkūleʻa to Set Sail for Kauaʻi

Hōkūleʻa is scheduled to depart the Haleiwa Boat Harbor for Hanalei Bay, Kauaʻi as part of the Mahalo Hawaiʻi, Sail. Crewmembers are preparing to set sail tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 p.m. and arrive to Kauaʻi the following morning that will include a public arrival ceremony at 10 a.m..

During the 3-day Kauaʻi engagement, crewmembers will participate with the community in events and activities that will highlight the recent Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage as well as the work being done within Kauaʻi communities to care for Island Earth.

Events during the stop will include outreach opportunities, local school visits, cultural exchanges, and crew presentations. The following events have been scheduled to date. The public is encouraged to check hokulea.com and Facebook for daily updates:

Kauaʻi Engagement Schedule – (*All dates and times subject to change)

Saturday, September 23
• 2:30 p.m. Hōkūleʻa departure from Haleʻiwa Boat Harbor, Oʻahu – public welcome

Sunday, September 24
• 10 a.m. Hōkūleʻa arrival ceremony and community paʻina at Hanalei Bay Pier – public welcome

Monday, September 25
• A.M. Scheduled school tours and visits – by appointment only
• 2:30-5:30pm Dockside outreach at Hanalei Bay Pier – public welcome
• P.M. ʻOahi O Makana, a Hawaiian protocol event – public viewing from Hanalei Bay to Haʻena areas

Tuesday, September 25
• A.M. Scheduled dockside school tours and visits – by appointment only
• P.M. Hōkūleʻa tentative departure for Oahu – public welcome

Saturday, September 30 (post departure)
• 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mālama Hulēʻia workday at the fishpond at Nuimalu Park

Public Hearings Scheduled on Proposal to Increase Commercial Marine License Fees

The Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) has scheduled statewide public hearings on proposed administrative rule amendments that would increase the annual commercial marine license fees from the current $50/year to $100/year initially, then to $150/year on January 1, 2018. This date may be delayed until later in the year, depending on when the rules are approved. The proposed rules also would establish a reporting deadline for dealers who buy marine life directly from commercial fishers.

Click to view proposed amendments

Bruce Anderson, DAR administrator said, “Commercial license fees haven’t increased in nearly 20 years.  We’re updating the fee schedule to reflect current and future needs.  Increased revenues from these fees will offset losses in revenues from non-resident fees for on-going operational expenses and to add new on-line reporting and licensing options to our website to better serve the fishing public.”

The hearings will be held at the following times and locations:

Thursday, September 28, 2017
MOLOKA‘I – Mitchell Pau‘ole Center Conference Room, 90 Ainoa Street, Kaunakakai, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Friday, September 29, 2017
O‘AHU – Stevenson Middle School Cafeteria, 1202 Prospect Street, Honolulu, 6 to 9 p.m..
LANA‘I – Lana‘i High/Elementary School Cafeteria, 555 Fraser Avenue, Lana‘i City, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Tuesday, October 3, 2017
HILO – Hawai‘i County Aupuni Center Conference Room, 101 Pauahi Street, Suite 101, Hilo, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
KONA – Honokohau Harbor Big Game Fishing Clubhouse, Kailua-Kona, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Wednesday, October 4, 2017
MAUI – Maui Waena School Cafeteria, 795 Onehe‘e Street, Kahului, 6 to 8:30 p.m.

Thursday, October 5, 2017
KAUA‘I – Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School Cafeteria, Lihue, 4431 Nuhou Street, 6 to 9 p.m.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017
KAUA‘I – Kapa‘a Elementary School, 4886 Kawaihau Road, Kapa‘a, 6 to 9 p.m.

All interested persons are urged to attend the public hearing to present relevant information and individual opinion for the DLNR to consider. Persons unable to attend or wishing to present additional comments, may mail written testimony by Friday, October 13, 2017 to the Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR), 1151 Punchbowl Street, Room 330, Honolulu, HI 96813.

Anyone with a hearing impairment who desires to attend the public hearing may request assistance of a sign language interpreter. The request may be made in writing (to the DAR address in the preceding paragraph), or by calling 587-0100 (voice or TDD) in Honolulu. The request will need to be received at least seven days before the hearing is scheduled to start. Additional information or a copy of the proposed rules will be mailed at no charge upon receipt of verbal or written request to the DAR address.

To view the draft rule, go to the Division of Aquatic Resources website at https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/dar/files/2017/08/HAR_13-74dr.pdf

Update On North Kona Emergency Water Restriction – Another Failure

The Emergency Water Restriction for North Kona remains in effect. ALL residents and customers in North Kona must continue to restrict water use to health and safety needs (drinking, cooking, and hygiene purposes).

This restriction also prohibits the draining and refilling of swimming pools, hot tubs, water fountains, etc. Customers should take appropriate measures to reduce the loss of existing water in swimming pools and hot tubs, such as checking the pool for leaks and consulting a pool supplier for appropriate pool covers. In addition, customer should ensure proper operation and maintenance of pool pump equipment.

Recent well failures at Kohala Ranch Water Company (private water system) has left their community without an operating potable water source. As such, it was essential for the Department’s pump contractor to relocate equipment and respond to their critical situation. This will push back the completion of the Department’s Hualālai and Palani well repairs by approximately a week and a half.

Updates on well repairs can be found at www.hawaiidws.org.

Due to a significant level of overall compliance, water levels in the tanks have remained stable. The Department appreciates the community’s efforts to restrict water use during this time. Therefore, limited hand watering of precious plants, on occasion, is still acceptable using the following best practices:

  • Water at night to reduce evaporation.
  • Use of County’s free mulch to preserve moisture around plants. Visit the County’s website at: http://www.hawaiizerowaste.org/recycle/gr eenwaste/ for more information.
  • Use of rainwater from downspouts for plants.
  • Do not over-water plants.
  • Use of sprinklers (manual or automatic) for lawns and grass areas is still prohibited.

For other unique situations, please contact the Department to discuss possible options. Without everyone’s continued cooperation, there will be areas that will experience periodic loss of water service or lower water pressures.

We also recommend that residents store a sufficient amount of water for basic household needs, such as drinking, cooking, and hygiene purposes, in the event of service disruptions.

For your use, potable water can be obtained from a water “buffalo” located on Hina Lani Street below Anini Street as well as water spigots along Ane Keohokalole Highway, between Kealakehe High School and Palani Road. Please bring your own drinking water containers to fill.

For more information visit our website at www.hawaiidws.org. To report any observed wasteful use of water, call 961-8060 during normal business hours or email dws@hawaiidws.org. For after hour emergencies call us at 961-8790.

2017 Jurist of the Year and Judiciary Employees Honored

First Circuit Court Judge Virginia Lea Crandall was presented with the 2017 Jurist of the Year award by Chief Justice Mark E. Recktenwald, at the Hawaii State Judiciary’s 2017 Statewide Incentive Awards Ceremony on September 22.

Supreme Court Chief Justice Mark E. Recktenwald (left) congratulates the Hawaii State Judiciary’s highest awardees of 2017: First Circuit Court Judge Virginia Lea Crandall, the Jurist of the Year, and Distinguished Service Award recipients Iris Murayama, Hawaii State Judiciary Deputy Administrative Director of the Courts; and Colin Rodrigues, Deputy Chief Court Administrator, Second Circuit (Maui, Molokai, Lanai).

The Jurist of the Year is selected annually by the Chief Justice from nominations submitted by Hawaii attorneys and Judiciary personnel. The Jurist of the Year recognizes a full-time trial judge who exhibits exceptional judicial competence, evidenced by decisional quality; significant extra-judicial contributions to the administration of justice; and active participation in public service to the community at large.

“Judge Crandall is an exceptional jurist, and a strong leader who works tirelessly to find ways to improve the Judiciary’s ability to serve the public,” said Chief Justice Recktenwald. “Her vast experience in handling both civil and criminal trials has enabled her to serve as a mentor and role model to countless judges.”

Judge Crandall joined the Judiciary as a Circuit Court Judge of the First Circuit Ninth Division on April 1, 1991. She served as the Administrative Judge of the Civil Division, First Circuit Court, from June 1995 to January 1999. Judge Crandall then presided over a criminal trial calendar until 2010, when she was assigned to the civil trial calendar where she currently serves. She also currently serves as Chair of the Judicial Education Committee.

In addition to the honoring of the Jurist of the Year, the Hawaii State Judiciary presented individual and group awards to employees who have distinguished themselves through exceptional service and accomplishments.

The awards presented at this year’s ceremony and the recipients of those awards are:

Distinguished Service Award (the Judiciary’s highest merit award): Iris Murayama, Hawaii State Judiciary Deputy Administrative Director of the Courts; and Colin Rodrigues, Deputy Chief Court Administrator, Second Circuit (Maui, Molokai, Lanai).

Meritorious Service Award: Dee Wakabayashi, Director of Human Resources, Hawaii State Judiciary; and Marilyn Hasegawa, Program Specialist, Juvenile Client and Family Services Branch, Fifth Circuit (Kauai).

Group Meritorious Service Award: Third Circuit (Hawaii Island) Drug Court Staff: Hilo Office – Pagan Devela, Gabrielle Chow, Marlyce Correira, Keri Kimura, and Dustin Cueva; Kona Office – Yvonne Keanaaina, Wendy Terada, Rodney Branco, and Daralyn Kimiye Villesca.

Spirit of the Judiciary Award: Sudarat Pindavanija, IT Specialist, Judiciary Information Management System (JIMS); and David Lam, Chief Court Administrator, Fifth Circuit (Kauai).

Certificate of Commendation: Nicole Morrison, Supervisor, Administrative Driver’s License Revocation Office; and Star Haleamau, Judicial Clerk, Traffic Violations Bureau, Third Circuit (Hawaii Island) Kona Office.

Group Certificate of Commendation: Administrative Fiscal Office: Tracy Chan, Accountant; Myrna Fong, Account Clerk; and Noreen Miyasato, Account Clerk; and Third Circuit Judicial Clerks, Client Services Division, Juvenile Services Branch, Clerical Section, Hilo Office – JoAnn Hirako, Supervisor; Katherine-Anne Schubert, Tammi Mansinon, Tiana Akiu; and Kona Office – Leah Anu Morimoto.

Hawaii Receives First Sentinel-Class Coast Guard Cutter

The Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry (WPC 1124) arrived in Honolulu Friday becoming the first of three 154-foot fast response cutters stationed in Hawaii.

The crew of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry (WPC 1124) arrives to their new Homeport in Honolulu, Sept. 22, 2017. The Oliver Berry is the first of three 154-foot fast response cutters to be stationed in Hawaii. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Levasseur/Released)

The cutters are designed to patrol coastal regions and feature advanced command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance equipment, including the ability to launch and recover standardized small boats from the stern. The Oliver Berry is the first of three Honolulu-based FRCs that will primarily serve the main Hawaiian Islands.

The cutter is named after Chief Petty Officer Oliver Fuller Berry, a South Carolina native and graduate of the Citadel. He was a highly skilled helicopter mechanic working on early Coast Guard aircraft. Berry was also one of the world’s first experts on the maintenance of helicopters and served as lead instructor at the first military helicopter training unit, the Rotary Wing Development Unit which was established at Coast Guard Air Station Elizabeth City, North Carolina, in 1946. He also helped develop the helicopter rescue hoist.

Lt. j.g. Peter Driscoll, executive officer of the Coast Guard Cutter Oliver Berry (WPC 1124) waves as the cutter arrives for the first time at Coast Guard Base Honolulu, Sept. 22, 2017. There will be three fast response cutters stationed at Base Honolulu by the spring of 2019. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Tara Molle/Released)

Berry had an extensive career spanning much of the globe. He was involved in a helicopter rescue out of Newfoundland that earned him a commendation and the Silver Medal of the Order of Leopold II. In this case, Berry was able to quickly disassemble a helicopter in Brooklyn, New York, which was then flown to Gander, Newfoundland, in a cargo plane where he then reassembled it in time to find and rescue 18 survivors of a crash aboard a Belgian Sabena DC-4 commercial airliner.

The Coast Guard is acquiring 58 FRCs to replace the 110-foot Island-class patrol boats. The FRCs are designed for missions including search and rescue; fisheries enforcement; drug and migrant interdiction; ports, waterways and coastal security; and national defense. The Coast Guard took delivery of Oliver Berry June 27 in Key West. The crew then transited more than 8,400 miles (7,300 nautical miles) to Hawaii.

There will be three fast response cutters stationed here at Base Honolulu by the spring of 2019. These cutters with their improved effectiveness in search and rescue will make the waters around the main Hawaiian Islands a much safer place for recreational boaters and users of the waterway. They greatly improve our on water presence with each providing over 7,500 operational hours, a 40 percent increase over the 110-foot patrol boats.

A commissioning, scheduled to be held Oct. 31, will be presided by Vice Adm. Fred M. Midgette, Coast Guard Pacific Area commander. Also in attendance will be the cutter’s sponsor Susan Hansen, distant cousin of Oliver Berry.

Hawaii Residents Can Spot the International Space Station Tonight

Hawaii residents can spot the International Space Station tonight (depending on clouds).


It will be visible beginning tonight, Friday, September 22, at 7:25 PM. It will be visible for approximately 5 minutes at a maximum height of 54 degrees. It will appear 11 degrees above the Southwest part of the sky and disappear 24 degrees above the North Northeast part of the sky.

You can view a livestream from the space station here: https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive