Kona Historical Society’s Farm Festival to Feature Celebrity Chef Sam Choy

Kona Historical Society’s Kona Coffee Living History Farm will be hosting the annual Farm Fest Open House at their historical coffee farm in Captain Cook on Saturday, September 30 from 10am to 2pm. The public is invited to attend this free community event that shares Kona’s rich farming history. Shuttles, generously sponsored by Hawaii Forest and Trail and Roberts Hawaii, will be running between the parking area of Kealakekua Ranch Center and the Kona Coffee Living History Farm from 9:30a.m. to 3p.m. since parking will not be available at the Farm.

At this year’s celebration, the theme is “From Farm to Table” in honor of Kona’s cultural heritage, and promises a day filled with fun-for-the-family activities that revolve around all the amazing sustainable foods that are made here in Kona. Celebrity Chef Sam Choy will be exploring the vegetable gardens and fruit trees on the farm, and using what he finds, he’ll prepare a delicious dish and beverage. Sandy’s Drive In will be returning to the farm for this annual celebration to cook up a traditional plantation era dish: Chicken Hekka.

The Kona Coffee Living History Farm, homesteaded by Japanese immigrants, reveals the story of Kona’s coffee pioneers in the 1925-1945 era. The coffee mill and farmhouse will be open to tours where guests can experience the domestic life of Kona’s coffee farmers. Visitors enter the kitchen where rice simmers on a traditional open-hearth stove before they remove their shoes to walk on tatami mats throughout the house. Outside, they learn to pick coffee and see how it was processed in the kuriba (mill) and dried on the hoshidana (drying platform), and explore the gardens where traditional vegetables are grown, or visit with the chickens, or Kona Nightengale Donkeys, who were an important part of the economy of Kona coffee farms.

Throughout the grounds of the Farm, historical interpreters, cultural practitioners and volunteers will be hosting “Hands on History” activities where guests can practice the art of lauhala weaving, Japanese calligraphy, medicinal gardening and pan roasting coffee, among others. The Songbird of Milolii, Diana Aki, will also return to the farm to perform local music on the lawn. Kona Historical Society will be displaying a new pop up exhibit featuring Kona’s history of growing and gathering food sustainably and sharing meals with our diverse, multicultural community.

This event is generously sponsored by Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union, Hawaii Tourism Authority, Candy Sargent, and Farm & Garden.

Kona Historical Society is a community-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and Smithsonian Museum affiliate that has spent the past four decades collecting, preserving and sharing the history of the Kona districts and their rich cultural heritage within Hawaii. The Kona Coffee Living History Farm is the only living history coffee farm in the nation. This award-winning, historic farm that tells the story of Kona’s coffee pioneers during the early 20th century.

For more information, call Kona Historical Society at 808-323-3222 or visit www.konahistorical.org. To get the latest updates regarding Kona Historical Society programs, historic sites and special events, “LIKE” Kona Historical Society on Facebook.

Former Kauai Police Officer Indicted for Cyberstalking Offenses

Attorney General Doug Chin announced that a Kauai grand jury this week indicted Lihue resident Damian Loo (sp?) for harassment by stalking and use of a computer in the commission of a separate crime.

While employed at the Kauai police department, Loo allegedly used the computer surveillance system to watch a civilian female co-worker as she came and went to work for approximately three weeks earlier this year.

Attorney General Chin stated: “Harassment by stalking victimizes individuals and hurts them. Don’t do it.”

Harassment by stalking is a misdemeanor with a maximum sentence of one year in jail and a $2,000.00 fine. Use of a computer in the commission of separate crime is a class C felony and carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison and a $10,000.00 fine.

Loo is 49 years old and has no prior convictions. He posted bail in the amount of $1,000.00. He is presumed innocent unless and until he is found guilty of the charges beyond a reasonable doubt.

Governor Ige Welcomes Japan Airlines’ Inaugural Flight From Narita to Kona

Gov. David Ige and the Hawai‘i Department of Transportation welcomed Japan Airlines’ inaugural flight from Narita International Airport to the Kona International Airport at Keāhole on Hawai‘i Island. The new daily, non-stop service marks JAL’s return to Kona.

The new service is expected to generate $9.8 million in tax revenue and create 900 new jobs, according to the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority.

“We warmly welcome Japan Airlines back to Kona and are extremely excited about the new daily service to Kona, which is on its way to becoming Hawai‘i’s second major international port of entry,” said Gov. Ige. JAL has offered excellent service to the Aloha State for more than 60 years, and has played a significant role in expanding and supporting our tourism industry and economy. We are also thankful for the opportunity for cultural exchange with Japan.”

“Our thanks go to Japan Airlines and Chairman Masaru Onishi for being such a great and loyal friend to Hawaii’s tourism industry. This new non-stop flight connecting Tokyo and Kona reinforces Japan Airlines’ commitment to support travel to the Hawaiian Islands, while offering its customers an enticing new vacation experience to discover the allure and natural beauty found on the island of Hawai‘i,” said George Szigeti, president and chief executive officer Hawai‘i Tourism Authority.

In addition to JAL’s Narita to Kona service, the airline currently has six non-stop flights between Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya and Honolulu.

USS Cheyenne Holds Change of Command Ceremony

The Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Cheyenne (SSN 773) held a change of command ceremony at the submarine piers on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Sept. 14.

In 2011 I was invited aboard the USS Cheyenne for a tour.

Cmdr. John T. Gonser relieved Cmdr. John W. Stafford as the commanding officer of Cheyenne and its crew.

Rear Adm. Richard A. Correll, commander, Submarine Group Seven, was the guest speaker for the ceremony and praised Stafford for his achievements and dynamic leadership during his three-year tenure.

“Cmdr. Stafford achieved success because he gets out of the way and lets the officers, chief petty officers and crew do their jobs,” said Correll. “Our very best commanding officers, such as John here, know that their job is to really know their Sailors, and to help every member of their crew be successful by putting them in situations where their strengths are magnified.”

Under Stafford’s leaderships, the crew of the Cheyenne earned the 2015 Squadron Seven Engineering “E” award, 2016 Battle Efficiency “E” award and the 2016 Marjorie Sterrett Battleship Award for superior performance in battle efficiency competition.

Stafford thanked the members of the Cheyenne crew, his family, the support on the waterfront and her namesake city.

“Thank you to the great city of Cheyenne, Wyoming,” said Stafford. “One of my biggest regrets was not making it to Cheyenne Frontier Days, but all the crew members, who did attend, remarked at the love the city has for its submarine. Thank you to the patriots of middle America.”

During the ceremony, Stafford received a Legion of Merit for his exceptionally meritorious service.

As Gonser assumed command, he praised his new crew for the incredible opportunity to continue carrying out his duty to uphold the reputation and demands of the Cheyenne.

“This ship and crew have an impressive history and reputation,” said Gonser. “While we should take pride in being part of this legacy, here is my challenge to you, and my promise to you. Together we will serve our country whenever and wherever our nation’s security demands and live to make those who came before you proud of us.”

Following his relief, Stafford will report to commander, Submarine Group Seven in Yokosuka, Japan.

Homeported in Pearl Harbor, USS Cheyenne is named after the city of Cheyenne, Wyoming, and was the last of the 62 Los Angeles-class submarines to enter service in the U.S. Navy. Commissioned Sept. 13, 1996. Cheyenne measures more than 360-feet long and weigh more than 6,000 tons when submerged.

Curb Ramp Repairs on Keawe Street Intersections

The Department of Public Works and its contractor T&T Electric, Inc. will be repairing the curb ramps at the Keawe St./Haili St. intersection and the Keawe St./Kalākaua St. intersection beginning on Wednesday, September 20, 2017 and should be completed by Friday, September 22, 2017, weather and construction conditions permitting. The Contractor’s working hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

The intersections will remain open while repair work is being done. Motorists are advised to expect delays and are encouraged to use alternate routes.

The County of Hawai‘i Department of Public Works apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause and thanks the community for their patience and understanding.

If there are any questions or concerns, please call Barett Otani, Information and Education Specialist, at 961-8787.

Call for Nominations for the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents

The Candidate Advisory Council (CAC) of the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents has initiated the recruitment process for four (4) seats on the Board of Regents.

Nominations are now being accepted for one (1) At Large seat; one (1) Hawaiʻi County seat; and one (1) Maui County seat for five-year terms.  Nominations are also being accepted for one (1) Student seat for a two-year term.  All terms begin July 1, 2018.

Candidates for the Hawaiʻi County and Maui County seats must reside in the geographic area that they represent.  Candidates for the Student seat must be a University of Hawaiʻi student.

Application materials, procedures and descriptions of regent responsibilities are available online at www.hawaii.edu/rcac.  This information may also be requested by calling (808) 692-1218 or by email at borapp@hawaii.edu.

Completed applications must be received by CAC or postmarked by 11:59pm on Friday, October 13, 2017.

Members of the UH Board of Regents as well as the Candidate Advisory Council, who represent various constituent groups, serve voluntarily and are not paid.

Informational Meetings on Rat Lungworm Disease Revised Scheduled Around Oahu

A series of three informational meetings on rat lungworm disease (RLWD) has been scheduled on Oahu this month. The meetings are being coordinated by the Hawaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA), Hawaii Department of Health (DOH) and the University of Hawaii College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR).

The meetings have been scheduled for:

  • Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017 @ Waimanalo Elementary/Intermediate School Cafeteria, 41-1330 Kalanianaole Hwy., 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
  • *REVISED LOCATION: Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017 @ Hawaii Agriculture Research Center (HARC), 94-340 Kunia Rd., 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
  • *REVISED LOCATION: Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017 @ Kahuku High School Cafeteria, 56-490 Kamehameha Hwy., 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Farmers, home gardeners and interested individuals are encouraged to attend.  Agricultural and health officials will make brief presentations and provide information on how to reduce the risk of RLWD and other foodborne illnesses, especially on farms and in gardens.

Those with a Hawaii State Department of Agriculture Pesticide License will be able to obtain 2.0 HDOA Agricultural Pesticide Applicator CEUs for attending the entire presentation.

RLWD is a disease that affects the brain and spinal cord. It is caused by a parasitic nematode called Angiostrongylus cantonensis, which may be carried by rodents, snails, slugs and other animals including freshwater shrimp, land crabs and frogs. Humans can acquire the infection by eating raw or undercooked snails, slugs or other animals infected with the parasite.

The DOH reports that in 2017, there have been 16 laboratory-confirmed cases of RLWD statewide:

  • Hawaii Island: nine cases
  • Maui: six cases
  • Oahu: one case
  • Kauai: no cases

The average number of cases per year statewide typically range from two to 11.

More information on RLWD may be found at:

EPA Awards $332,000 to Hawaii Department of Agriculture for Pesticide Programs

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded $332,000 to the Hawaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA) to support its pesticide regulatory program.

“The Hawaii Department of Agriculture has been our long-time partner in environmental protection,” said EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt. “We are pleased to support the pesticide program in ensuring that pesticides are used properly, agricultural workers are protected, and Hawaii’s unique ecosystems can thrive.”

HDOA has authority over pesticide use in Hawaii and conducts inspections, enforcement, training and monitoring for pesticide use throughout the state. Specifically, HDOA:

  • Investigates and enforces incidents of possible pesticide misuse;
  • Provides outreach to agricultural employers to ensure they protect workers from pesticide exposures;
  • Assures the competency of applicators of restricted-use pesticides through its certification and licensing program;
  • Conducts inspections of pesticide products at retail outlets for proper EPA registration, labeling and establishment information;
  • Evaluates pesticides licensed in the State of Hawaii for their potential to contaminate groundwater resources.

The EPA’s Pacific Southwest Region (Region 9) administers and enforces federal environmental laws in Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, the Pacific Islands and 148 tribal nations — home to 50 million people.

For more information on pesticides please visit: https://www.epa.gov/pesticides.