Coast Guard, Navy Coordinate Medevac for Man on Cruise Ship Off Maui

A 72-year-old man arrived safely to Maui Wednesday, after being medevaced 170 miles offshore.

A Navy MH-60 Seahawk helicopter aircrew from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 37 at Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, arrived on scene at 3:55, safely hoisted the man aboard and delivered him to awaiting emergency medical services at Kahului Medical Center in Maui.

“This case illustrates the importance of our partnership with the Navy”, said Lt. Duane Zitta, command duty officer, Coast Guard Joint Response Coordination Center Honolulu. “In the remote Pacific, long-range capable search and rescue assets are vital to getting people to a higher level of medical care as quickly and safely as possible.”

JRCC personnel in Honolulu received notification at 5:18 p.m. Tuesday from the master of the cruise ship Radiance of the Seas, of a passenger aboard suffering from symptoms of abdominal distress.

Watchstanders at JRCC contacted the duty flight surgeon who recommended the man be seen by a general surgeon within 24 hours. Watchstanders at JRCC then coordinated with HSM-37 to conduct the rescue.

UH Shines in 2018 U.S. News and World Report Rankings

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, UH West Oʻahu and UH Hilo once again made the U.S. News and World Report’s Best Colleges Rankings, along with UH Mānoa Shidler College of Business. The 2018 U.S. News and World Report rankings were released on September 12.

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa moved up 10 spots to 159 on the 2018 U.S. News and World Report’s Best Colleges Rankings. UH Manoa is also ranked 6 in Best Ethnic Diversity (National Universities), 83 in Top Public Schools, and 177 in High School Counselor Rankings.

“We continue to be gratified by the upward movement in recent academic and research rankings, both on national and international levels,” said Michael Bruno, UH Mānoa interim vice chancellor for academic affairs and vice chancellor for research. “They show that our faculty and staff are working hard, and working together, to give students the best and most accessible higher education experience.”

The announcement of UH Mānoa’s upward mobility on the U.S. News and World Report ranking follows the 2018 Times Higher Education World University Rankings that rated UH Mānoa 63 in the U.S., up from 69 last year—representing its best showing ever in the Times ranking.

UH West Oʻahu ranked 25 among Best Regional Colleges (West), placing it in the top 38 percent of schools in their respective category.

“The faculty, staff and students are thrilled to be recognized as it is an affirmation of the great work we do to prepare 21st Century leaders—career creators who are making a positive difference in our communities!” said UH West Oʻahu Maenette K. P. Ah Nee-Benham.

UH Hilo ranked 66 among Best Regional Universities West, placing it in the top 47 percent in their respective categorory.

“We are very pleased to see UH Hilo recognized for its excellence in providing a quality educational experience,” said UH Hilo Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai. “This ranking is a testament to the work of our faculty and staff, who are deeply committed to providing our students with the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed when they graduate and enter their chosen professions.”

The U.S. News and World Report rankings surveyed 1,600 colleges among more than 3,000 four-year institutions throughout the U.S. Its methodology considers, among various factors, endowment size, rate of alumni giving and student-to-faculty ratio, which tend to favor private institutions.

U.S. News and World Report profiles:
UH Mānoa
UH West Oʻahu
UH Hilo

Seniors 55+ Invited to Akamai Living Fairs in Hilo and Kona

The Hawai‘i County Department of Parks and Recreation is pleased to invite seniors 55 years and older to attend this year’s Akamai Living Fairs, to be held in Hilo and Kona.

These free events will feature health screenings, seminars, vendors, entertainment and door prizes.  The Akamai Living Fairs are co-sponsored by the County of Hawai‘i Department of Parks and Recreation’s Elderly Activities Division and HMSA.

  • Hilo: Edith Kanakaʻole Multipurpose Stadium on Friday, October 20, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
  • Kailua-Kona: West Hawaiʻi Civic Center on Friday, November 3, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

For more information, please call Margaret Yafuso at 966-5801.

Honolulu New Park Rules Crack Down on Sale or Distribution of Expressive Materials

I wish Hawaii County would adopt similar rules to get the kook James Borden out of Lincoln Park once and for all:

James Borden Facebook picture

Honolulu – New rules are now in effect concerning the sale or distribution of expressive materials in Honolulu city parks.  The new rules became effective September 8, 2017.

The prior “Rules and Regulations Governing the Sale of Message-bearing Merchandise by Nonprofit Organizations in City Parks and Facilities” has been repealed, and new rules under Honolulu Administrative Rules Title 19, Chapter 18 entitled “Sale or Distribution of Expressive Materials” have been adopted.

Under the new rules, expressive materials are permitted for sale and distribution. Expressive materials are defined as any written or printed material containing political, religious, philosophical or ideological messages. This includes, but is not limited to: books, pamphlets, handbills, cards, circulars, pictures, magazines, and leaflets.

Additionally, there are numerous items defined as merchandise whose sale is prohibited under the new rules. The items include, but are not limited to: food, drink, coffee mugs, beverage containers, sunglasses, flags, records, patches, maps, jewelry, handicraft, decals, audio or video tapes, shirts, hats, ties, shorts, footwear or any other clothing article.

Sales permits approved under the old rules for the month of September 2017, prior to the implementation of the new rules, will be honored.

Other rules for permitted sales within parks, such as those outlined by temporary concession permits and designated concessionaire agreements, are not affected by these new rules as they do not apply to the sale and distribution of expressive materials in conjunction with a First Amendment activity.

Under the new rules, a permit is necessary for use of a portable table, within a designated area, for the purposes of selling or distributing expressive materials. The designated areas are located where there will be minimal impact to other park functions and facilities. The portable tables and all materials must be removed from the site each day and nothing can be stored at the park location. Permit applications for these activities will not be accepted more than a year before the proposed request date and cannot be used for a period lasting longer than 14 days.

The Department of Parks and Recreation reserves the right to seize and dispose of any merchandise being sold or distributed on park land in violation of these rules.

A public hearing was held on these proposed changes on February 22, 2017 at the Mission Memorial Building, with public notice given beginning on January 20, 2017.

The new rules are available online at parks.honolulu.gov in the “Rules & Regulations” section.

House Passes Bipartisan Amendment to Appropriations Bill Cosponsored by Rep. Tulsi Gabbard to Protect Against Property Seizures

The U.S. House of Representatives yesterday passed a bipartisan amendment to the appropriations package cosponsored by Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02) preventing police forces from seizing private property for profit without due process.

Known as adoptive forfeiture, the practice allows the federal government to accept money and property that has been seized by state law enforcement agencies from people, in some cases, before individuals are formally charged or proven guilty of a crime. This practice creates a loophole for states that have adopted stringent, constitutionally sound asset forfeiture laws and allows them to continue practices that are otherwise deemed illegal at the state level.

Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard said: 

“Attorney General Sessions’ recent announcement to expand civil asset forfeiture allows local law enforcement to bypass state laws and seize property from people with the lowest possible burden of evidence without concern for whether the person is eventually charged or convicted. 

“While some will tell you this is necessary to go after big drug cartels, the reality is the median value of the adoptive forfeiture seizures is around $9,000. Not only is this median value not a sign of major drug trafficking operations, but seizures tend to be focused on poorer neighborhoods. Between 2012 and 2017, the median value of assets seized by Cook County police was just over $1,000; in Philadelphia in 2015, the median value was just $192.   

“This policy does not discriminate between the innocent and the guilty. Rather, this policy places the responsibility on private citizens to prove their innocence rather than put the appropriate burden on law enforcement to prove guilt. All too often, innocent people without legal representation never see their money or property again, and even those who are proven innocent have no promise their property will be returned. 

“The Fifth Amendment of the Constitution exists to protect the citizens of this country from being deprived of life, liberty or property without due process of law. In practice and in principle, adoptive forfeiture is a violation of that Fifth Amendment.”

Background: The practice of adoptive forfeiture was significantly drawn back during the Obama Administration and limited to exceptions related to public safety. However, Attorney General Sessions recently issued a policy directive reauthorizing adoptive forfeiture practices.  This decision marks a return to previous practices that run contrary to safeguarding civil liberties.

State Land Board to Consider Judge’s Recommendation in TMT Contested Case

The Hawai‘i State Board of Land and Natural Resources (BLNR) will hear oral arguments in the Contested Case Hearing for the Conservation District Use Application (CDUA) for the Thirty Meter Telescope at the Mauna Kea Science Reserve, on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017 beginning at 9:00 a.m. in the Crown Room of the Grand Naniloa Hotel in Hilo. This is not a public hearing and members of the public will not be allowed to testify, argue, or otherwise present to the BLNR.

Minute Order No. 107, posted on Sept. 7, 2017 provides that each party to the contested case will have fifteen (15) minutes to present oral arguments.  Up to five minutes of the fifteen minutes may be reserved by parties for responding/rebuttal argument. Those rebuttal arguments will take place after all parties have completed their initial arguments. There are twenty-three (23) parties to the contested case.

The DLNR is providing as much seating as possible for public observation, once space has been made for the parties. Seating will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Na Leo TV will provide live streaming of the oral arguments, but there will not be viewing available at the Grand Naniloa. Doors to the Crown Room will open at 8:30 a.m. for public entrance.  There will be no reserving of seats and any seat that’s empty for more than ten minutes may be given to the next person in line waiting outside.  Signs, posters, and other displays will not be allowed inside the Crown Room or on the hotel’s property. Food will not be allowed in the Crown Room.

DLNR continues to utilize expanded media coverage rules used during the TMT Contested Case Hearing and only designated pool media; Na Leo (broadcast) and the Hawai‘i Tribune-Herald (print) will be allowed to videotape or photograph the proceedings. All other audio and photographic documentation of oral arguments is not allowed.