Hawaii Lawmaker Elated With the Establishment of the Health and Human Services Committee

Representative John Mizuno (D-Kalihi, Kamehameha Heights), was confirmed today as the first Chairman of the newly combined committees of Health and Human Services through the passage of House Resolution 4 and 5. The resolutions amend the standing committees and committee assignments, and the Rules of the House of Representatives of the Twenty-Ninth Legislature of the State of Hawaii to Establish the Committee on Health and Human Services.

Rep. John Mizuno

“I am humbled by the passage of House Resolutions 4 and 5 and for the kind assignment and trust displayed by Speaker Scott K. Saiki, the leadership team and the caucus members to place me as the Chairman of the newly established Committee on Health and Human Services,” said Rep. Mizuno. “I am extremely thankful for the opportunity to Chair the combined committee and I anticipate a substantial workload for the upcoming 2018 session. With issues such as homelessness, possible cuts in Medicaid funding from the Federal government, compassionate care for our elderly and disabled, and a focus to be more efficient in the entire healthcare system in Hawaii, this will be an opportunistic 2018 session.”

“I will do my best to display careful, thorough thought in drafting sound policy and hearing good Legislation, which is congruent to Speaker Saiki, our leadership team, the majority caucus, as well as the GOP and the people of Hawaii. I look forward to a fruitful 2018 legislative session.”

11th Annual Peace Day Parade & Festival Schedule

On September 23, 2017, the 11th annual Peace Day Parade & Festival in Honoka‘a town joins millions of people across the planet, to honor the values of peace, compassion and global interdependence.

Photo by Evan Bordessa

This year’s theme, “Together for Peace,” echoes the United Nations’ theme for Peace Day, “Together for Peace: Respect, Safety and Dignity for All.” On September 23, 2017, the 11th annual Peace Day Parade & Festival in Honoka‘a town joins millions of people across the planet, to honor the values of peace, compassion and global interdependence.

Expressing serious messaging in creative, colorful, and ultimately positive ways, these events use music, dance, drumming, acrobatics and more to bring community together. The Peace Day Parade steps off down Mamane Street at 11 a.m., and the Peace Festival starts immediately afterward, with live entertainment, a large community Bon Dance, food booths and keiki activities.
The adoption of the UN’s theme—intended to focus on refugees around the world—gives Honoka‘a and Hawai‘i Island the opportunity to stand with other global communities supporting peace locally. In light of recent events that further divide a troubled world, it also takes on new relevance.

“In times of insecurity, communities that look different become convenient scapegoats,” said Secretary-General António Guterres in a statement. “We must resist cynical efforts to divide communities and portray neighbours as ‘the other.’ Discrimination diminishes us all. It prevents people, and societies, from achieving their full potential… Together, let us stand up against bigotry and for human rights. Together, let us build bridges. Together, let us transform fear into hope.”

Related Peace Day events take place throughout the month, September 14-30 (see schedule below). For more information and updates, please follow Peace Day Parade on Facebook, visit www.PeaceDayParade.org or email info@peacedayparade.org.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

STUDENT PEACE POSTER CONTEST

This year’s theme, “Together for Peace,” echoes the United Nations’ theme for Peace Day this year. Cash prizes will be awarded to the winners in various categories. Open to all ages, all grades, all school students and homeschoolers. Details and entry forms are available at www.peacedayparade.org. Or contact Alicia Glover at 808-724-3373, heavenonearthgirl@gmail.com. Free.

READ FOR PEACE

Thursday, September 14, 5-6 p.m., “Read for Peace” in the Honoka‘a Library, presented by Friends of the Libraries. All are invited for an engaging conversation about the book “The Tiger: A True Story of Vengeance and Survival” by John Vaillant, an international bestseller that has been translated into 15 languages. Film rights have been optioned by Plan B, Brad Pitt’s production company.

Publisher’s Weekly has said, “Over millennia of shared history, the indigenous inhabitants had worked out a tenuous peace with the Amur, a formidable hunter that can grow to over 500 pounds and up to nine feet long, but the arrival of European settlers, followed by decades of Soviet disregard for the wilds, disrupted that balance… {the book} leads readers into the lair of the tiger and into the heart of the Kremlin to explain how the Amur went from being worshipped to being poached.”

Additional books in the project are “The Book of Joy” by the Dalai Lama and “The Wise Heart” by Jack Kornfield. Kornfield was teacher of Mary Grace Orr, who will lead the September 30 Day of Mindfulness. Readers are welcome to bring their favorite books that further the discussion of attaining peace.

199,000 CRANES

The Peace Committee has reached its goal of gathering a “flock” of 199,000 origami cranes, one representing each victim of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. They are now working on a unique three-dimensional interactive exhibition of the cranes, to share with the public as part of the Peace Day events. Still in the planning stages with a community of artists and creatives, the ultimate goal is to take the exhibit to Hiroshima as a gift. Extra hands are welcome to string the cranes in groups of 50: at the Hawaiian Cultural Center of Hāmākua on First Friday, at Hāmākua Harvest, 10 a.m.-12 p.m., and September 22, 7-9 p.m. at Sea Dandelion Cafe ($10 dinner special).

CHALK THE WALK

Thursday, September 21, 3:30-5:30 p.m., at the Honoka‘a public library. Young artists are encouraged to come and express themselves on the sidewalks. A free activity for youth presented by the Friends of Honoka‘a Library; all materials provided. Free.

WINE AT 5

Friday, September 22, 5 p.m. at Cafe Il Mondo. The Blue Zones’ concept of “Wine at 5” suggests that people live longer when they take time out of their schedule to de-stress and enjoy socializing with friends in the community with good food and a relaxing drink. Cafe Il Mondo supports this concept with a special edition of their daily “Wine @ $5,” offering three select wines for $5 each, from 5-6 p.m., plus free samplings of wines from Blue Zones regions of the world, while they last. Entertainment will include the New Dharma Band as well as local favorites Sergio Ramirez and Robin Jensen.

PEACE DAY PARADE & FESTIVAL

Saturday, September 23, the 11th Annual Parade & Festival for the United Nations International Day of Peace steps off at 11 a.m. Mamane Street will be closed for this colorful and entertaining celebration, with Taiko drumming, hula, and all kinds of music. The Peace Day Festival follows immediately, with food booths, a variety of music, Bon Dance, Silent Auction and more.

CommUNITY Dance Party – Dancing Together for Peace

Saturday, September 23, 6:30-9:30 p.m. at Hawaiian Cultural Center of Hāmākua.  A commUNITY gathering to embrace music and dancing as the perfect way to reduce stress and increase energetic vibrations of positivity into our lives. DJ RajaSick will be sharing a huge selection of tracks, including dance classics and musical vibes from all over the world. (Requests can be sent in advance to DJRajaSick@gmail.com). Admission is $5 (cash only) and keiki are free. Fresh Hawaiian ‘awa & Big Island Booch will be available for sale at $4. This is a family friendly event produced by Sea Dandelion Cafe. Plant-based vegetarian potluck dishes are welcome.

A DAY OF MINDFULNESS

Saturday, September 30, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. (registration at 9:30 a.m.), located in the Social Hall, Honoka‘a Hongwanji Buddhist Temple. Participants will experience guided sitting and walking meditation with Mary Grace Orr, a Dharma discussion with Q&A and a mindful, silent meal. Please RSVP to honokaamindfulness@gmail.com, or call 808-775-1064.

The Day of Mindfulness is free, and donations, or Dana, as offerings of generosity and gratitude for the teachings, will be gratefully accepted. No prior meditation experience is necessary. Participants are asked to bring their own lunch and a cushion. Chairs and additional meditation cushions will be available. For more information and updates, please follow Peace Day Parade on Facebook, visit www.PeaceDayParade.org or email info@peacedayparade.org.

Hawai’i CC Nursing Instructor Receives National Recognition for Work in Psychiatric Nursing

Hawai’i Community College Nursing instructor Cheryl Puntil is the 2017 recipient of the Award for Distinguished Service from the American Psychiatric Nurses Association (APNA).

Cheryl Puntil

Puntil will be recognized for her commitment, initiative, loyalty, integrity and exceptional and meritorious service at the 31st Annual National APNA Conference in Phoenix, Arizona on October 18. With more than 10,000 members, APNA is the largest professional membership organization committed to the specialty practice of psychiatric mental health (PMH) nursing and wellness promotion, prevention of mental health problems, and the care and treatment of persons with psychiatric disorders.

Puntil and several APNA colleagues worked on the APNA Essential Suicide Competencies for nurse assessment and management of individuals at risk for suicide.

“Through [Cheryl’s] vision, determination, and perseverance, the APNA Suicide Competencies initiative became a reality and an exemplar, continues to expand, and addresses both a major national public health problem and gap in nursing education,” Puntil’s colleagues stated.

“It is an incredible honor to receive the American Psychiatric Nurses Association Award for Distinguished Service,” said Puntil. “I followed my passion and was lucky to find awesome mentors who paved the way for me to assist in establishing competencies that will change nursing practice and improve care for those at risk for suicide. I was very surprised and grateful for the acknowledgment from my esteemed colleagues who nominated me, and to the APNA board for voting on my behalf to receive the award.”

Puntil received her Bachelor’s of Science in Nursing from the College of Saint Teresa and her Master’s of Science in Nursing from the University of California, Los Angeles. She is certified as an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) and a Psychiatric Mental Health Clinical Nurse Specialist (PMHCNS-BC).

Puntil joined Hawai’i CC Division of Nursing and Allied Health in 2014. Hawai’i CC offers Associate of Science Degree in Nursing and a Certificate of Achievement in Practical Nursing.

Suicide Prevention at Hawai’i CC

With suicide the second leading cause of death for persons 15-34, Hawai’i Community College has taken an active approach to suicide prevention. The college has established a Mental Wellness and Personal Development Service that offers services to students and leads trainings for faculty, staff and students in Safe Talk and QPR. Puntil has also brought Safe Talk training to Hawai’i CC Nursing students.

Puntil and Hawai’i CC Mental Health Therapist Kate De Soto were invited by UH Hilo Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Farrah-Marie Gomes to serve on the UH Suicide Prevention Committee.

The college will participate in National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month in September with tabling events, sign making and sign waving on September 12 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The goal is to bring awareness to the issue of suicidality and and enhance prevention efforts, said De Soto.

“We want to reduce the stigma of depression and suicidal thoughts so people have fewer barries to seeking help,” De Soto said. “The more we show support as a community, the more people are likely to speak up and the more people are likely to know what to do if someone does speak up.”

Students seeking services from the Mental Wellness and Personal Development office can contact De Soto at 934-2706 and kdesoto@hawaii.edu.

Governor Nominates Representative Marcus Oshiro to the Hawaii Labor Relations Board 

Gov. David Ige today announced that he has nominated State Rep. Marcus Oshiro (D-House District 46) to the Hawaii Labor Relations Board as Chairperson and Representative of the Public. Oshiro will be completing the term left vacant by the resignation of Kerry Komatsubara, which ends June 30, 2018, and he is also being appointed for a six-year term which ends June 30, 2024.

State Rep. Marcus Oshiro

“Marcus is a respected leader who knows and understands the issues, and he has the background and experience to step right in to fill this very important role,” said Gov. Ige. “This will be a new opportunity for him to use his talent and skills on behalf of the public, and I have every confidence in him.”

“I am humbled by Gov. Ige’s nomination to serve as the chairperson of the Hawaii Labor Relations Board. With the Senate’s approval, I look forward to ensuring our labor laws are applied fairly and consistently with the principles of collective bargaining in promoting the harmonious and cooperative relations between the parties.”

Oshiro has served in the State House of Representatives since being elected in 1994. He is a former vice speaker, majority leader, and is past-chair of the committees on finance and labor. He is an active member of the community,

Oshiro earned his Juris Doctorate at Willamette University College of Law after completing his undergraduate work at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. He is a graduate of Leilehua High School.

Both nominations to fill Komatsubara’s term and to the additional six-year term are subject to Senate confirmation.

Hawaii Judge Betty Vitousek Leaves Lasting Legacy at 98

Retired Senior Family Court Judge Betty Vitousek, who was instrumental in creating a model for family courts across the country, passed away Monday morning. She was 98.

“Judge Vitousek was a person of great integrity, compassion and wisdom who shaped our Family Court into the strong institution it is today,” said Hawaii Chief Justice Mark E. Recktenwald. “From encouraging mediation to developing programs to help families cope with the impacts of divorce, she was an innovator who cared deeply about Hawaii’s children and families. Her many other contributions to our community included laying the groundwork for what became the Legal Aid Society of Hawaiʻi. She also served as a mentor to countless lawyers and judges. We are deeply grateful for her legacy, and send our heartfelt sympathy and aloha to her family.”

In 1970, Gov. John A. Burns appointed Judge Vitousek to the newly created Family Court of the First Circuit. At that time, she was the only active female judge in the state, although there had been previously.

In 1977, she was named Senior Administrative Judge of the Family Court, where she oversaw its wide-ranging judicial services and programs. Judge Vitousek was instrumental in formulating its policies and procedures to address legal issues regarding families and children.

Judge Vitousek had a reputation for being hardworking, compassionate and fair, but firm and for treating everyone with dignity. She was also known for working collaboratively with her fellow judges and Judiciary staff while developing new programs, and making ongoing improvements within the Family Court.

“We are deeply saddened by the passing of Judge Vitousek, one of the greatest jurists in the history of the State of Hawaii’s Judiciary,” said Judge R. Mark Browning, Chief Judge of the First Circuit and previously the Senior Family Court Judge. “As a jurist and as a person, she personified grace and wisdom. I and many others will miss her. We are comforted by the fact that the values that she passed to us continue to be taught to a new generation of judges and lawyers. Her commitment to the children and the families of our state and to the community as a whole is a legacy that continues today.

“I had the privilege of knowing her personally. She touched my life in a profound way, for which I am eternally grateful. Judge Vitousek will live forever in our hearts and souls,” he added.

Judge Vitousek was an early advocate of mediation, working in partnership with the Neighborhood Justice Center for mediation, particularly for child custody cases. She also started “Divorce Experience,” to help divorcing couples to understand the process, both legally as well as emotionally. The program included how best to consider the needs of the children. Today the program is called “Kids First” and is mandatory for couples with children.

Judge Vitousek’s influence extended beyond Hawaii. She served as national president of the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts, was named a delegate to the White House Conference on Children, and served on the board of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court judges.

During her time on the bench, she was recognized by the Legal Aid Society, Protection and Advocacy Agency, and Hawaii Women Lawyers. She was also given the 1987 Association of Family and Conciliation Courts Distinguished Service Award.

Judge Vitousek retired from Family Court in 1988.

After retiring, she continued serving the community by volunteering on numerous boards and for the Supreme Court’s Appellate Mediation Program and Chief Justice’s Judicial Performance Review Panel.

Betty Belle Morrison was born in Wenatchee, WA. in 1919. After graduating from Lewis and Clark High School, she attended the University of Washington, earning a bachelor’s degree in sociology in 1940.

That year she traveled by ship to Japan as a delegate of the American Student Conference. While on board, she met and became friends with Roy Vitousek of Honolulu. After the war, they reconnected and were married in December 1945.

They attended law school at Stanford University and graduated together in 1948.

After graduating from Stanford, Judge Vitousek practiced adoption law for a number of years. She conducted the research which led to the formation of the Legal Aid Society of Hawaiʻi, and volunteered for numerous community organizations. She became the first executive director of the Hawaii State Bar Association and worked with Judges Gerald Corbett and Samuel King to pass legislation establishing Family Courts in Hawaii, only the second state to do so.

Judge Vitousek is survived by her sons Peter (Pamela Matson) Vitousek and Randy (Sharon) Vitousek, and daughter Kelly (Frederic Manke) Vitousek, six beloved grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. Roy Vitousek passed away in 1994.

Services are pending.

Mayor Harry Kim Opposed to Permanent Cap on Counties’ Transient Accommodation Tax


Testimony by Harry Kim, Mayor, County of Hawai’i before Senate Ways & Means Re: SB 4:

The County of Hawai’i opposes the permanent cap on the counties’ share of the Transient Accommodation Tax (TAT). This cap is unnecessary to achieve all other aspects of the bill to finance Honolulu’s rail. The bill proposes to finance rail by extending the General Excise Tax (GET) surcharge period to 12/31/2030, increasing the share of the surcharge that goes to rail by decreasing the administrative charge retained by the State, and increasing the TAT rate by 1% and dedicating all of that increase to rail. There is no reason related to rail financing to cap the share of the TAT to the counties.

A cap on the counties’ TAT share is contrary to the Legislature’s own working group report and the original intent of the TAT tax summarized as follows:

  • Working Group Recommendation. The working group recommended the Tourism Special Fund receive $82 million in FY 2016 and increase in subsequent years in line with the Consumer Price Index for Honolulu, $31 million constant for the Convention Center-Turtle Bay-Special Land Develop Fund, and the remainder split between the State and counties at 55% for the State and 45% for the counties. Based on total TAT revenues in 2016 of $444 million, the $103,000,000 cap represents 31% of the remainder of the TAT after allocations to the Tourism Special Fund ($82 million) and the Convention Center-Turtle Bay-Special Land Development Fund ($33 million). As a result of the cap, the counties’ share will only get worse as tourism grows.
  • Nexus to Tourism Services. The incidence of the TAT is primarily on visitors, so the TAT tax revenues should fund public services which benefit visitors. The UH Economic Research Organization (UHERO) estimated that the counties pay for 53% of the services for which visitors directly benefit (UHERO Working Paper No. 2016-4). These services include police and fire protection, rescue, parks, beaches, water, roads, and sewer systems.
  • Act 185 (1990). Recognizing that “many of the burdens imposed by tourism falls on the counties,” the legislature created the TAT as a “more equitable method of sharing state revenues with the counties” (Conference Committee Report 207 on HB No. 1148). The legislature deemed at that time that the fair allocation was 95% of the total TAT revenues to the counties.

The State has multiple sources of revenues. The counties only have property tax, motor vehicle weight tax, and public utility franchise tax. Our out-of-control homeless problems are a symptom of the soaring cost to rent or own a home in Hawai’i. And you want to offer us the power to increase the GET tax, the most regressive form of taxation that impacts the lower income the greatest. We already had to increase our property tax to make ends meet. With the collective bargaining decisions dominated by the State, we again will face possible increases. We ask only for our fair share as recommended by the Working Group, to maintain quality services that uphold the tourism industry and affordability for our people.

Hawaii House of Representatives Adopt Resolution Formalizing New Committee Assignments

The Hawaii House of Representatives today adopted a resolution formalizing new committee assignments.

The new committee assignments are part of a broader House reorganization and administrative housekeeping that naturally follows from the change in Speaker at the end of the 2017 regular session.

There were more than 50 of changes made to committee assignments based on:

  • Member requests;
  • Changes to caucus;
  • GOP caucus asking for changes; and
  • Committees reorganized.

Committee assignments are as follows:

Agriculture

Chair Richard P. Creagan
Vice Chair Lynn DeCoite

Cedric Asuega Gates
Kaniela Ing
Matthew S. LoPresti
Calvin K.Y. Say
Gregg Takayama
Cynthia Thielen

Consumer Protection & Commerce

Chair Roy M. Takumi
Vice Chair Linda Ichiyama

Henry J.C. Aquino
Ken Ito
Aaron Ling Johanson
John M. Mizuno
Calvin K.Y. Say
Chris Todd
James Kunane Tokioka
Ryan I. Yamane
Bob McDermott

Economic Development & Business

Chair Mark M. Nakashima
Vice Chair Jarrett Keohokalole

Sharon E. Har
Daniel Holt
Linda Ichiyama
Aaron Ling Johanson
Kyle T. Yamashita
Lauren Kealohilani Matsumoto

Education

Chair Justin H. Woodson
Vice Chair Sharon E. Har

Richard P. Creagan
Mark J. Hashem
Kaniela Ing
Sam Satoru Kong
Angus L.K. McKelvey
Takashi Ohno
Rickard H.K. Onishi
Sean Quinlan
Lauren Kealohilani Matsumoto

Energy & Environmental Protection

Chair Chris Lee
Vice Chair Nicole E. Lowen

Ty J.K. Cullen
Sam Satoru Kong
Angus L.K. McKelvey
Ryan I Yamane
Bob McDermott

Finance

Chair Sylvia Luke
Vice Chair Ty J.K. Cullen

Romy M. Cachola
Lynn DeCoite
Beth Fukumoto
Cedric Asuega Gates
Daniel Holt
Jarrett Keohokalole
Bertrand Kobayashi
Matthew S. LoPresti
Nicole E. Lowen
Nadine K. Nakamura
Kyle T. Yamashita
Andria P.L. Tupola
Gene Ward

Health & Human Services

Chair John M. Mizuno
Vice Chair Bertrand Kobayashi

Della Au Belatti
Marcus R. Oshiro
Chris Todd
Andria P.L. Tupola

Higher Education

Chair Angus L.K. McKelvey
Vice Chair Mark J. Hashem

Richard P. Creagan
Sharon E. Har
Kaniela Ing
Sam Satoru Kong
Takashi Ohno
Richard H.K. Onishi
Sean Quinlan
Justin H. Woodson
Lauren Kealohilani Matsumoto

Housing

Chair Tom Brower
Vice Chair Nadine K. Nakamura

Henry J.C. Aquino
Mark J. Hashem
Sean Quinlan
Joy A. San Buenaventura
Bob McDermott

Intrastate Commerce

Chair Takashi Ohno
Vice Chair Isaac W. Choy

Romy M. Cachola
Beth Fukumoto
Ken Ito
Richard H.K. Onishi
James Kunane Tokioka
Justin H. Woodson
Gene Ward

Judiciary

Chair Scott Y. Nishimoto
Vice Chair Joy A. San Buenaventura

Tom Brower
Chris Lee
Dee Morikawa
Mark M. Nakashima
Marcus R. Oshiro
Gregg Takayama
Bob McDermott
Cynthia Thielen

Labor & Public Employment

Chair Aaron Ling Johanson
Vice Chair Daniel Holt

Sharon E. Har
Linda Ichiyama
Jarrett Keohokalole
Mark M. Nakashima
Kyle Yamashita
Lauren Kealohilani Matsumoto

Legislative Management

Chair Bertrand Kobayashi
Vice Chair Della Au Belatti

Isaac W. Choy
Cindy Evans
Dee Morikawa
Andria P. L. Tupola

Ocean, Marine Resources & Hawaiian Affairs

Chair Kaniela Ing
Vice Chair Cedric Asuega Gates

Richard P. Creagan
Lynn DeCoite
Matthew S. LoPresti
Calvin K.Y. Say
Gregg Takayama
Cynthia Thielen

Public Safety

Chair Gregg Takayama
Matthew S. LoPresti

Richard P. Creagan
Lynn DeCoite
Cedric Asuega Gates
Kaniela Ing
Calvin K.Y. Say
Cynthia Thielen

Tourism

Chair Richard H.K. Onishi
Vice Chair Beth Fukumoto

Romy M. Cachola
Isaac W. Choy
Ken Ito
Takashi Ohno
Justin H. Woodson
Gene Ward

Transportation

Chair Henry J.C. Aquino
Vice Chair Sean Quinlan

Tom Brower
Mark J. Hashem
Nadine K. Nakamura
Joy A. San Buenaventura
Bob McDermott

Veterans, Military & International Affairs & Culture and the Arts

Chair Ken Ito
Vice Chair James Kunane Tokioka

Romy Cachola
Isaac W. Choy
Beth Fukumoto
Takashi Ohno
Richard H.K. Onishi
Justin H. Woodson
Gene Ward

Water & Land

Chair Ryan I. Yamane
Vice Chair Sam Satoru Kong

Ty J.K. Cullen
Chris Lee
Nicole E. Lowen
Angus L.K. McKelvey
Cynthia Thielen

Big Island Workshops on the Legislature – Make Your Voice Heard

You can add your voice at the State Capitol! Tell legislators what you want them to focus on when Regular Session begins in January and be ready to offer your testimony when things get rolling. To help, the Legislature’s Public Access Room (PAR) is offering “Your Voice,” a free 1- hour workshop at numerous locations on the Big Island.

Topics include understanding the legislative process, deadlines, and power dynamics, as well as tips on effective lobbying, testifying, and communicating with Senators and Representatives. “How-To” guides, informational handouts, and other resources will be available.

“Your Voice” – Free One-hour Workshops:

  • Mon Sept 11 6:00 p.m. Kailua-Kona – West Hawai’i Civic Center Community Hale; 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Highway
  • Tue Sept 12 6:00 p.m. Waimea- Thelma Parker Memorial Library; 67-1209 Mamalahoa Highway
  • Wed Sept 13 5:30 p.m. Hilo Public Library; 300 Waianuenue Ave.
  • Thu Sept 14 5:30 p.m. Pahoa Community Center; Kauhale Street

For additional information, or to ask about additional workshops during this visit, contact PAR ─ 808/587-0478 or par@capitol.hawaii.gov.