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North Hawaii Community Hospital Adds New Pharmacy for Hospital Inpatients

After more than two years of planning, North Hawai’i Community Hospital pharmacy staff has moved into a new location within the hospital. Prior to the move in, employees joined together in a blessing by Kahu Billy Mitchell and NHCH Board of Trustees member. President Cindy Kamikawa and Pharmacy Director Anthony Fazio welcomed employees and Liana Honda, Native Hawaiian health manager presented a Hawaiian oli/chant.

Pharmacy Director Anthony Fazio (L) with NHCH President Cindy Kamikawa (R)

The new pharmacy is not open to the public but instead serves all of the pharmacy needs of patients staying overnight at the hospital. “The new pharmacy provides us with more space and upgraded technology, offering enhanced safety for both patients and staff,” said Pharmacy Director Anthony Fazio. “In addition, the new pharmacy will assure that we are ready for new regulations related to pharmaceuticals and medication in the future.”

“The completion of this project reflects the commitment of The Queen’s Health Systems to the provision of quality care to the people of North Hawai’i,” said Cindy Kamikawa, RN, and President of North Hawaii Community Hospital. The last significant renovation project at North Hawai’i Community Hospital was the MRI suite in 2001.

Hawai‘i Fest at Queens’ MarketPlace

The works of heart, hands, hula and Hawaiian music make Hawai‘i Fest a unique celebration, Saturday, September 9 at Queens’ MarketPlace, 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Admission to Hawai‘i Fest is free and the community is invited to enjoy aloha-filled Hawaiian music by some of the Island’s top entertainers, and explore an extensive art and craft fair with numerous artists and producers of handmade treasures. Top island entertainers Kainani Kahaunaele, Darlene Ahuna, Lito Arkangel, John Keawe and some of the Island’s favorite hula hālau will perform throughout the day, on two stages, at the Coronation Pavilion and by the “Town Clock.”

Hawaii Fest is a first time collaboration with Nā Mākua Designs and Queens’ MarketPlace.

“Nelson and Kainoa Makua of Nā Mākua, who also produce the annual Merrie Monarch Invitational Hawaiian Arts Fair, have done an amazing job of bringing together some of the most popular and skilled crafters that people want to see,” said Margo Mau Bunnell, Sales & Operations Manager. “Hawai‘i Fest will feature a unique selection of many different items— jewelry, fine art, made-in-Hawai‘i food products, hula implements, aloha wear by Simply Sisters, Living Hula, and more. And of course, everyone looks forward to the newest designs and casual Hawaiian wear from Nā Mākua Designs.”

Hawai‘i Fest is the shopping center’s celebration of ten years in the community, and the Queens’ MarketPlace family of shops and restaurants will also participate in the festivities with a variety of tasty food booths and vendor displays from Hawaiian ‘Ukulele and Guitar, Pacific Nature, and more.

“We wanted to do something that would let people continue to celebrate our beautiful Hawaiian culture throughout the day,” said Bunnell. “It is our way to round out the Hawai‘i Island Festival weekend. People can go to the Poke Contest in the morning, then come and check out all the craft vendors and talk to the artists, relax over lunch, then go back and enjoy all of the great talents at the Falsetto Contest. The idea is to offer a full, fun and immersive day at Waikoloa Beach Resort.”

Hawai‘i Fest is free and open to all, with free parking. For more information, visit www.QueensMarketPlace.net or call 808-886-8822.

Celebrating its tenth anniversary in the Waikoloa community, Queens’ MarketPlace in Waikoloa Beach Resort has earned a reputation among visitors and kama‘āina as “the gathering place of the Kohala Coast,” full of shopping opportunities, services and great food, along with entertainment and arts programs, movies under the stars and large-scale concerts in Waikoloa Bowl at Queens’ Gardens.

September Events at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture and After Dark in the Park (ADIP) programs with the public throughout 2017. In addition, the community is invited to lend a hand to save native rainforest through the park’s Stewardship at the Summit (SAS) volunteer program and enjoy a fee-free day on Sat. Sept. 30 (National Public Lands Day).

ADIP, SAS and Hawaiian cultural programs are free, but entrance fees apply. Programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark the calendar for these upcoming events:

Stewardship at the Summit. Volunteers are needed to help remove invasive, non-native plants that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. No advance registration is required for groups under six, and there is no cost to participate, but park entrance fees apply. Visit the park website for details.
When: Sept. 2, 9, 15, 22 and 30.
Where: Meet project leaders at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. on any of the above dates.

Ke Kāpili Manu Kahiko: Traditional Hawaiian Bird Catching. How did ancestral Hawaiians interact with our native birds? Much has been forgotten about traditional Hawaiian relationships with the ‘āina. Park Ranger Noah Gomes has researched traditional Hawaiian bird catching from a variety of sources. He will share some of what he has learned through years of research in pursuit of his M.A. degree in Hawaiian language and literature from the University of Hawai‘i-Hilo. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, but park entrance fees apply.
When: Tues., Sept. 12 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Lei. Create your own beautiful lei with skilled lei maker No‘eau Kalima. Traditional lei are crafted with a variety of natural materials, including leaves and flowers. The beautiful and versatile Hawaiian lei is used for adornments, blessings, rituals, gifts, and as an expression of love and celebration. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Sept. 13, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Hālau Ke ‘Olu Makani O Maunaloa. Listen to the sweet sounds and watch the graceful dancing of Hālau Ke ‘olu Makani o Maunaloa. Led by Kumu Hula Meleana Manuel, they strive to perpetuate the native Hawaiian culture through mele (song) and hula. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing Nā Leo Manu “Heavenly Voices” presentations. Free, but park entrance fees apply.
When: Wed., Sept. 20 from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

HI-SEAS Mission V: What It’s Like to Live on Mars. HI-SEAS (Hawai‘i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation) is a habitat for a crew of six on an isolated Mars-like site high on the slopes of Mauna Loa volcano.

NPS Photo

The NASA-funded project aims to help determine the individual and team requirements for long-duration space exploration missions, including interplanetary travel to Mars. Jon Mission V crew member Brian Ramos as he describes what it’s like living and working in the habitat for eight months. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ongoing After Dark in the Park series. Free, but park entrance fees apply.
When: Tues., Sept. 26 at 7 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium

Ku‘i Kalo Make poi, the staple food of the Hawaiian diet. The root of the kalo plant is cooked and pounded (ku‘i) to create this classic Hawaiian dish. Park rangers will share their knowledge of kalo at this authentic cultural experience. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau “Experience the Skillful Work” workshops. Free.
When: Wed., Sept. 27, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Where: Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai

Fee-Free Day: National Public Lands Day (NPLD). NPLD is the nation’s largest, single-day volunteer effort for public lands. Join us at Hawai‘i Volcanoes, and help ensure the future of the Hawaiian rainforest. Volunteers will help remove invasive, non-native plants that prevent native plants from growing. Meet at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools are provided. No advance registration is required. Park entrance is free, and NPLD volunteers will receive a pass to return and enjoy the park fee-free on another day of their choosing.
When: Sat., Sept. 30, 2017 at 8:45 a.m. to noon. Meet at Kīlauea Visitor Center.
Where: Participating public lands nationwide. Visit https://www.neefusa.org/ for details.

New State Food Safety Rules for Food Establishments Enhance Public Health Protection

New state food safety rules designed to improve public health protection will go into effect on Sept. 2. The Hawaii Department of Health (DOH) has amended Chapter 50, Food Safety Code, after completing public hearings on Hawaii Island, Kauai, Maui and Oahu in December 2016 and March 2017. The amended rules will affect all food establishments statewide with new requirements for the industry.

One of the major rule changes is a new mandate for Food Handlers Education certification for persons-in-charge at all food establishments. This will ensure a minimum baseline of food safety knowledge for all facility owners and managers. Studies have shown that food establishments with properly trained persons-in-charge have a lower occurrence of critical food safety violations that are directly linked to food illnesses.

The new rule requires that at least one employee present at every food establishment during normal work hours (including during food preparation) must have a formal food handlers training level certification. DOH will accept certification recognized by the American National Standards Institute. Training is available online from various vendors with fees averaging $10-$15 for certification. Proof of certification will be required during health inspections after Sept. 2, 2018. DOH will allow the industry one year to comply with this new provision.

Other changes to the state’s Food Safety Rules include:

  • Health inspectors may post placards during all types of inspection, including those for general complaints, and may post a “CLOSED” red placard at food establishments operating without a valid permit.
  • DOH may refuse permit renewals for food establishments with unpaid fines or stipulated agreements more than 30 days overdue.
  • DOH approval will be required prior to the sale of all “Wild Harvested Mushrooms.”
  • Permit exemptions will be allowed for residential child and adult day care providers, and bed and breakfast operators when certain conditions are adhered to. While exempt from permit requirements, these establishments may be subject to state health inspections.
  • Exemptions will also be allowed for the sale of “Homemade Foods” foods that are not potentially hazardous (e.g. certain pre-packaged foods). While exempt from permit requirements, these establishments may also be subject to state health inspections.
  • Special Event Temporary Food Establishment permits will be restricted to 31 days at a time. Consecutive permits may be allowed. Permit fees will remain at $100 for a 20-day permit with an additional $5 fee for each day over 20 days.
  • The section of the rules for Mobile Food Establishments has been removed and these regulations will be incorporated into the general regulations for all food establishments. All Mobile Food Establishments are required to access a state approved facility to support their food operations safely.
  • Full adoption of the 2013 FDA Model Food Code to include regulations governing reduced oxygen packaging. This will provide Hawaii with the most current nationally recognized food safety practices based on the most recent scientific studies conducted on food safety.

The DOH Sanitation Branch protects and promotes the health of Hawaii residents and visitors through education of food industry workers and regulation of food establishments statewide. The branch conducts health inspections of food establishments where food products are prepared, manufactured, distributed, or sold. The branch also investigates the sources of food borne illnesses, and works to control and prevent foodborne outbreaks. Health inspectors work with business owners, food service workers, and the food industry to ensure safe food preparation and conditions.

For more information on the department’s food safety program go to http://health.hawaii.gov/san/.

Governor Appoints Hawai‘i Island Executive to UH Board of Regents

Gov. David Ige has nominated corporate executive and consultant Douglas Shinsato to the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, representing Hawai‘i County (East).

Douglas Shinsato

Shinsato is co-founder of Anthill Ventures, a cross-border incubator and advisor to technology start-ups in India, Southeast Asia, Europe and the United States. Anthill focuses on tele-education, tele-health, sustainable food production, and cyber-security. Shinsato and his global partners focus on innovative digital technologies that aim to improve people’s lives.

Shinsato is also a member of the Board of Directors of Creative Intelligence Associates, one of Japan’s top branding strategy firms. The consulting firm advises clients on how to leverage or transform their branding and messaging strategies to increase customer satisfaction, revenues and profits.

Previously, Shinsato served as president for leading technology companies such as PTC Japan and as vice president-Asia Pacific for Autodesk. He was also senior partner at Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu.

“I am honored to be appointed to the Board of Regents. I look forward to working with my fellow Regents on behalf of the UH and its extended community,” said Shinsato.

Shinsato has a B.A. and MBA from the University of Southern California and a Juris Doctor degree from the Stanford Law School.

He is married to Jennifer Lindsay-Shinsato. They have two adult children and one grandchild.

If confirmed by the state Senate, Shinsato will complete the term of the late Barry Mizuno. The term expires on June 30, 2018.

Hilo Man Steals City Bus AGAIN

Hawaiʻi Island police have arrested a 21-year-old Hilo man in connection with a stolen county bus.

Kawelo Nakamura

At 1:36 a.m., Monday morning (August 28), county employees reported that the lock on the gate to the County of Hawaiʻi Mass Transit base yard was cut and the gates were found opened. Reports received indicated that a 42-passenger bus was taken from the base yard and that may have been seen heading in the Hāmākua direction over the Wailuku Bridge on Highway 19 and later on Queen Ka’ahumanu Highway near Mauna Lani.

At 6:24 a.m., police briefly pursued the bus after it was observed traveling into Hilo on Bayfront Highway, but the pursuit was discontinued in the interest of public safety. At 6:45 a.m., the bus was located behind the Walter Victor Stadium where the suspect, Kawelo Nakamura was taken into custody and transported to the Hilo cellblock while detectives with the Criminal Investigation Section continue the investigation.

Anyone who may have witnessed the incident or have any other information about it is asked to call the Police Department’s non-emergency line at (808) 935-3311 or Detective Todd Pataray of the Area I Criminal Investigation Section at (808) 961-2382 or Todd.Pataray@hawaiicounty.gov.

Editors note… this isn’t the first time he’s tried to steal a bus:  http://damontucker.com/2017/08/07/man-charged-in-connection-with-theft-of-county-mass-transit-bus/

EPA Penalizes Kapolei Company for Failing to Close Illegal Cesspool

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced a settlement with Fileminders of Hawaii, LLC, requiring the company to close a large-capacity cesspool at its Kapolei facility on Oahu.  Cesspools can contaminate groundwater, and large-capacity cesspools have been banned since 2005.

In May 2016, EPA inspected the Fileminders facility, a records storage company in the Campbell Industrial Park, and found one large-capacity cesspool (LCC) in use. EPA regulations under the Safe Drinking Water Act required closure of all existing LCCs by April 5, 2005.

Fileminders, the operator of the cesspool, and Hawaii MMGD, the company’s owner, will pay a civil penalty of $122,000 for violating the Safe Drinking Water Act. In June, the cesspool was closed and the company installed an individual wastewater system.

“Closing large cesspools is essential to protecting Hawaii’s drinking water and coastal resources,” said Alexis Strauss, EPA’s Acting Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “EPA’s large-capacity cesspool inspection and enforcement efforts will continue until illegal cesspools are a distant memory.”

An LCC is a cesspool that serves multiple residential dwellings or a commercial facility with the capacity to serve 20 or more people per day. Cesspools collect and discharge waterborne pollutants like untreated raw sewage into the ground, where disease-causing pathogens can contaminate groundwater, streams and the ocean.

Cesspools are used more widely in Hawaii than in any other state, despite the fact that 95 percent of all drinking water in Hawaii comes from groundwater sources. over 3,400 large-capacity cesspools have been closed statewide, many through voluntary compliance.

For more information and to submit comments on this specific agreement, visit

https://www.epa.gov/uic/hawaii-cesspools-administrative-orders#oahu

For more information on the large-capacity cesspool ban and definition of a large-capacity cesspool, visit http://www.epa.gov/uic/cesspools-hawaii

Hawaii Supreme Court Refuses to Order State to Repair Waikiki Gold Coast Seawalls

The Hawaii Supreme Court on Friday rejected a request by Waikiki apartment and condominium owners to order the State of Hawaii to pay for repairs to a damaged seawall, or for the owners’ attorney fees after 10 years of litigation, Attorney General Doug Chin announced.

The case, Gold Coast Neighborhood Association v. State of Hawaii, was initiated in 2007 by private individuals owning property situated on what is known as the “Gold Coast” on Oahu. Friday’s decision by the Hawaii Supreme Court ends the case.

The owners sued the State to repair seawalls built by private parties to protect private property from erosion and wave damage. The Supreme Court refused to issue such an order. The Court ruled the State holds an easement over the seawalls and is not liable for attorneys’ fees.

Attorney General Chin said, “We are pleased the Court affirmed our position that the courts are not the proper place to decide how taxpayer money is spent. The State will repair the seawalls if and only if money to do so is appropriated by the state legislature and allocated by the governor.”

The State of Hawaii was represented internally at all stages of the litigation. Supervising Deputy Attorney General Bill Wynhoff tried the case in circuit court and argued the State’s case in both the Intermediate Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court. The private owners were represented by the firm McCorriston Miller Mukai McKinnon LLP.

A copy of the Supreme Court’s opinion and the dissenting opinion are attached.